• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
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Title: Aesop in rhyme, or, Old friends in a new dress
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002018/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aesop in rhyme, or, Old friends in a new dress
Uniform Title: Aesop's fables
Alternate Title: Old friends in a new dress
Physical Description: 288, 16 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Park, Marmaduke
Aesop
Sinclair, Thomas S., ca. 1805-1881 ( Lithographer )
C.G. Henderson & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: C.G. Henderson & Co.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: 1852
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcshac )
Fables -- 1852   ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1852   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: poetry   ( marcgt )
Juvenile poetry   ( lcshac )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Marmaduke Park.
General Note: Added title page engraved.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note: Frontispiece and added title page printed in colors by T. Sinclair, Philadelphia.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002018
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002464188
oclc - 07903054
notis - AMG9576

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page 1
    Frontispiece
        Front page 2
        Front page 3
        Front page 4
    Half Title
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Copyright
        Page 4
    Main
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        Page 6
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    Advertising
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    Back Cover
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    Spine
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ESOv,


IN RHYME;
OR,


OLD FRIENDS IN


A NEW DRESS.


PHILADELPHIA :
C. G. HENDERSON, & CO.,
N. W. CORNER ARCH AND FIIFH STREETS.
1852.


-~it_ C-~---.

~c~Jr
























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1852,
BY C. G. HENDERSON & CO.,

S in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States,
in and for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
_______ L__________________t___























..THE DOG AND THE WOLF.
A WOLF there was, whose scanty fare
Had made his person lean and spare;
A dog there was, so amply fed,
His sides were plumpand sleek; 'tis said
The wolf once met this prosperous cur,
And thus began: "Your servant, sir;
(5)




4


U THE DOG AND THE WOLF.

I'm pleased to see you look so well,
Though how it is I cannot tell;
I have not broke my fast to-day;
Nor have I, I'm concerned to say,
One bone in store or expectation,
And that I call a great vexation.

"Indeed it is," the dog replied:
"I know no ill so great beside;
But if you do not like to be
So poorly fed, come live with me."
"Agreed," rejoined the wolf, "I'll go:
But pray, what work am I to do?"
" Oh, guard the house, and do not fail
To bark at thieves, and wag your tail."
So off they jogg'd, and soon arrived
At where the friendly mastiff lived.
"Well," said the wolf, "I can't deny
You have a better house than I."
"Not so," the other then replied,
"If you with me will hence abide."
" Oh," said the wolf, "how kind you are I
But what d'ye call that, hanging there?


A





THE DOG AND THE WOLF


Is it an iron chain, or what ?"
"Friend," said the dog, "I quite forgot
To mention that; sometimes, you see,
They hook that little chain to me;
But it is only meant to keep
Us dogs from walking in our sleep,
And should you wear it, you would find,
It's nothing that you need to mind."
"I'll take your word," the wolf replied.
It's truth by me shall ne'er be tried;
I'll have my liberty again,
And you your collar and yjr chaiL."

MORAL.
Our neighbors sometimes seem to be
A vast deal better off than we;
Yet seldom 'tis they really are,
Since they have troubles too to bear,
Which, if the truth were really known,
Are quite as grievous as our own.


7




















THE HERDSMAN.

A HERDSMAN, who lived at a time and a
place
Which, should you not know, is but little'
disgrace,
Discovered one morning, on counting his
stock,
That a sheep had been stolen that night
from the flock.
(8)





THE HERDSMAN.


" Oh, I wish I had caught ye, whoeverye be,
I'd have soon let you know, I'd have soon
let ye see,
What he had to expect," said the herds-
man, "I trow;
But I've thought of a scheme that will
trouble you now."
So what did he do, sir, but put up a board,
Describing the thief, and proposed a re-
ward
Of a lamb, to the man who would give
information
Concerning the thief, and his true desig-
nation.

The project succeeded; for soon there
applied
A certain near neghbor, with others
beside.
"But tell me the thief," said the herds-
man, "at least;"
'3p e hither," said they, "and we'll
show you the beastI'


a


9




10 THE HERDSMAN.
"The beast I' said the rustic, who thought
he should die on
The spot, when he found that the thief
was a lion I
"Ill luck to my hurry, what now shall
I do?
I promised a lamb to detect you 'tis true;
But now I'd consent all my substance to
pay,
If I could but with safety get out of your
way.
MORAL.
Silly people ask things that would ruin,
if sent;
They demand them in haste, and at lei-
sure repent.






















THE BOYS AND THE FROGS.
SOME boys, beside a pond or lake,
Were playing once at duck and drake?
When, doubtless to their heart's content,
Volleys of stones were quickly sent.
But there were some (there will be such)
Who did not seem amused so much;
(11)




THE BOYS AND THE FROGS.


These were the frogs, to whom the game,
In point of sport was not the same.
For scarce a stone arrived, 'tis said,
But gave some frog a broken head;
And scores in less than half an hour,
Perished beneath the dreadful shower
At last, said one, "You silly folks, I say,
Do fling your stones another way;
Though sport to you, to throw them thus,
Remember, pray, 'tis death to us 1"
MORAL.
From hence this moral may be learned:
Let play be play to all concerned.


12





















THE COCK AND THE JEWEL.
A COCK there was: a sage was he
(If Esop we may trust,)
Who wish'd to make a meal, you see,
As other sages must.
With this intent, as heretofore,
When on the hunt for grain;
Our hero scratched the litter o'er
With all his might and main.
2 (13)




14 THE COCK AND THE JEWEL.
But scarce a minute had he scratched,
When, to his great surprise,
A gem, with golden chain attached,
He saw with both his eyes.
" Alack !" quoth he, what have we here ?
A diamond, I protest I
Which lords and ladies buy so dear,
And hold in such request.
"But one good barley-corn to me
Has more intrinsic worth
Than all the pearls now in the sea,
Or gold now in the earth."
MORAL.
The moral here, in Esop's mind,
Was this, there's not a doubt:
Things have most value, which we find
We cannot do without.




-w


THE MAN AND THE LION.

A MAN and a lion once had a dispute,
Which was reckon'd the greatest, the
man or the brute;
The lion discoursed on his side at some
length,
And greatly enlarged on his courage and
strength.
(15)





16 THE MAN AND THE LION.
The man, one would think, had enough
to reply
On his side the question, which none
could deny;
But like many others who make a pre-
tence,
He talked perfect nonsense, and thought
it good sense.

"So," says he, "don't be prating,-look
yonder, I pray,
At that sculpture of marble, now what
will you say ?"
The lion is vanquished; but as for the man
He is striding upon him; deny it who can."
"But pray," said the lion, who sculp-
tured that stone ?"
"One of us," said the man, "I must can-
didly own."
"But when we are sculptors," the other
replied,
You will then on the man see the lion
astride."-






THE MAN AND THE LION.


MORAL.

The man might have added, if he had
been wise,
"But a beast cannot sculpture a stone, if
he tries."
That sufficiently shows where the differ-
ence lies.


2*


17



















THE FOX AND THE CRANE.
" I CERTAINLY think," said a fox to a crane,
"That face, ma'am of yours is remark-
ably plain;
That beak that you wear is so frightful
a feature,
It makes you appear a most singular
creature."
The crane, much offended at what she
had heard,
March'd off at full speed, without saying
a word:
(18)






JHE FOX AND TB CRANE. 19

' Oh dear I" said the fox, "Mrs. Crane, I
protest
You misunderstand me, 'twas only ajest."
"Come, don't be affronted--stay with
me and dine;
You know very well 'tis this temper of
mine
To say such odd things to my intimate
friends;
But you know that poor Reynard no mik
chief intends."
So the crane thought it best not to break
with him quite,
But to view his remarks in a good-na-
tured light.
So she put on as pleasant a face as she
could
When he ask'd her to dine, and replied
that she would.
But alas I she perceived that his jokes
were not over,
When Reynard removed from the victuals
its cover





THE FOX AND THE CRANE.


'Twas neither game, butcher's meat,
chicken, not fish;
But plain gravy-soup, in a broad shallow
dish.
Now this the fox lapp'd with his tongue
S very quick,
While the crane could scarce dip in the
point of her beak;
"You make a poor dinner," said he to
his guest;
Oh, dear 1 by no means," said the bird,
"I protest."
But the crane ask'd the fox on a subse-
quent day,
When nothing, it seems, for their dinner
had they
But some minced meat served up in a
narrow-neck'd jar;
Too long, and narrow, for Reynard by far.
"You make a poor dinner, I fear," said
the bird;
"Why, I think," said the fox, wouldud
be very absurd


20






THE FOX AND THE CRANE. 21

To deny what you say, yet I cannot com-
plain,
But confess, though a fox, that I'm
matched by a crane."
MORAL.
Cunning folks who play tricks which
good manners condemn,
Often find their own tricks played again
upon them.


















THE TRAVELLER AND THE SATYR.

A LUCKLESS wight, in winter slow,
Travelling once a forest through
Cold and hungry, tired and wet,
Began in words like these to fret:
"Oh, what a sharp inclement day I
And what a dismal, dreary way I
No friendly cot, no cheering fields,
No food this howling forest yields;
(22)




THE TRAVELLER AND THE SATYR.


I've nought in store or expectation 1
There's nought before me but starvation."
"Not quite so bad," a voice replied;
Quickly the traveller turned aside,
And saw the satyr of the wood,
Who close beside his dwelling stood.
"Here is my cave hard by," said he,
"Walk in, you're welcome, pray be free."
The traveller did not hesitate,
Hoping for something good to eat,
But followed to his heart's content,
Blowing his finger as he went.
"Pray," said the satyr, "may I know
For what you blow your fingers so?"
"What need you," said the man, "be
told ?-
To warm my fingers, 'numb'd with cold."
Indeed I" was all his host replied,
Intent some pottage to provide,
Which heated well, with spice infused,
Was to his shivering guest produced:


23






24 THE TRAVELLER AND THE SATYR.
So hot it was, as Esop sung,
It made our traveller scald his tongue;
And wishing not again to do it,
Our hero could not wait, but blew it.
"What ?" said his host, in accent rough,
"Is not your pottage hot enough?"
" Yes," said the man, "full well I know it,
'Tis far too hot, that's why I blow it."
"You artful villain I do you so?"
His host replied, with angry brow;
"My cave shall not a moment hold
A man that blows both hot and cold I
By none but rogues can that be done,
You double-dealing wretch, begone !"
MORAL.
The traveller scarce deserved such wratb,
For warming fingers-cooling broth.
No statutes old or new forbid it,
Although with the same mouth he did it:
Yet this beware of old and young,
What Esop meant-a double tongue;
Which flatters now with civil clack,
And slanders soon behind one's back.





















THE TRAVELLERS AND THE PURSE.
Two friends once were walking in sociable
chat,
When a purse one espied on the ground;
"Oh, see!" said he, (thank my fortune
for that,)
What a large sum of money I've
found 1"
3 (25)


~CaL~ha~





26 THE TRAVELLERS AND THE PURSE.

"Nay, do not say I" said his friend, for
you know
'Tis but friendship to share it with me;"
"I share it with you," said the other.
"How so?
He who found it the owner should be."
"Be it so," said his friend, "but what
sound do I hear ?
'Stop thiefI' one-is calling to you;
He comes with a constable close in the
rear 1
Said the other, Oh, what shall we do?"
"Nay, do not say we," said his friend,
"for you know
You claimed the sole right to the prize I
And since all the money was taken by you,
With you the dishonesty lies."
MORAL.
When people are selfish, dishonest, and
mean,
Their nature, in dealing, will quickly be
seen.





















THE MOUTH AND THE LIMBS.
IN days of yore, they say, 'twas then
When all things spoke their mind;
The arms and legs of certain men,
To treason felt inclined.
These arms and legs together met,
As sungly as they could,
With knees and elbows, hands and feet,
In discontented mood.
(27)




THE MOUTH AND THE LIMBS.


Said they, "'Tis neither right nor fair,
Nor is there any need,
To labor with such toil and care,
The greedy mouth to feed."
"This we're resolved no more to do,
Though we so long have done it;"
Ah !" said the knees and elbows too,
And we are bent upon it."
"I," said the tongue, "may surely speak,
Since I his inmate am;
And for his vices while you seek,
His virtues I'll proclaim.
"You say the mouth embezzles all,
The fruit of your exertion;
But I on this assembly call
To prove the base assertion.
The food which you with labor gain,
He too with labor chews;
Nor does he long the food retain,
But gives it for your use.


28




THE MOUTH AND THE LIMBS.


"But he his office has resigned
To whom you may prefer;
He begs you therefore now to find
Some other treasurer."
"Well, be it so," they all replied;
"His wish shall be obeyed;
We think the hands may now be tried
As treasurers in his stead."
The hands with joy to this agreed,
And all to them was paid;
But they the treasure kept indeed,
And no disbursements made.
Once more the clam'rous members met,
A lean and hungry throng;
When all allowed, from head to feet,
That what they'd done was wrong.

To take his office once again,
The mouth they all implored;
Who soon accepted it, and then
Health was again restored.


3*


29




30 THE MOUTH AND THE LIMBS.
MORAL.
This tale for state affairs is meant,
Which we need not discuss;
At present we will be content,
To find a moral thus:
The mouth has claims of large amount,
From arms, legs, feet, and hands;
But let them not, on that account,
Pay more than it demands.


















THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.
SAID a hare to a tortoise, Good sir, what
a while
You have been only crossing the way;
Why I really believe that to go half a
mile,
You must travel two nights and a day."
SI am very contented," the creature re-
plied,
"Though I walk but a tortoise's pace,
(31)




THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.


But if you think proper the point to de-
cide,
We will run half a mile in a race."
"Very good," said the hare; said the
tortoise, "Proceed,
And the fox shall decide who has won,"
Then the hare started off with incredible
speed;
But the tortoise walked leisurely on.
"Come tortoise, friend tortoise, walk on,"
said the hare,
Well, I shall stay here for my dinner;
Why, 'twill take you a month, at that
rate, to get there,
Then how can you hope to be winner?"
But the tortoise could hear not a word
that she said
For he was far distant behind;
So the hare felt secured while at leisure
she fed,
And took a sound nap when she dined.


32





THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.


So at last this slow walker came up with
the hare,
And there fast asleep did he spy her;
And he cunningly crept with such cau-
tion and care,
That she woke not, although he pass'd
by her.
"Well now," thought the hare, when
she opened her eyes,
"For the race,--and I soon shall have
done it;"
But who can describe her chagrin and
surprise,
When she found that the tortoise had
won it 1
MORAL.
Thus plain plodding people, we often
shall find,
Will leave hasty confident people behind.


33




















THE MILKMAID.
A MILKMAID, who poized a full pail on her
head,
Thus mused on her prospects in life, it
is said:
"Let's see-I should think that this milk
will procure
One hundred good eggs, or fourscore to
be sure.
(34)





THE MILKMAID. 35
Well then-stop a bit,-it must not be
forgotten,
Some of these may be broken, and some
may be rotten;
But if twenty for accidents should be de-
tach'd,
It will leave me just sixty sound eggs to
hatch'd

"Well, sixty sound eggs- no; sound
chickens, I mean;
Of these some may die-we'll suppose
seventeen-
Seventeen !-not so many-say ten at
the most,
Which will leave fifty chickens to boil or
to roast.

"But then there's their barley; how
much will they need ?
Why they take but one grain at a time
when they feed,





THE MILKMAID.


So that's a mere trifle; now then let us see,
At a fair market price, how much money
there'll be?"
"Six shillings a pair-five -four-three-
and-six,
To prevent all mistakes, that low price I
will fix;
Now what will that make? fifty chickens,
I said,
Fifty times three-and-sixpence-I'll ask
brother Ned.
"Oh! but stop-three-and-sixpence a
pair I must sell 'em;
Well, a pair is a couple-now then let
us tell 'em;
A couple in fifty will go-(my poor brain!)
Why just a score times, and five pair will
remain.
"Twenty-five pair of fowls-now how
shameful it is,
That I can't reckon up as much money
as this!


36





THE MILKMAID 37
Well, there's no use in trying; so let's
give a guess;
I will say twenty pounds, and it can't be
no less.
"Twenty pounds, I am certain, will buy
me a cow,
Thirty geese, and two turkeys-eight
pigs and a sow;
Now if these turn out well, at the end of
the year,
I shall fill both my pockets with guineas
'tis clear.
"Then I'll bid that old tumble-down
hovel good-bye;
My mother she'll scold, and my sisters
they'll cry:
But I won't care a crow's egg for all they
can say;
I sha'n't go to stop with such beggars as
they I"
But forgetting her burden, when this she
had said,
The maid superciliously toss'd up her head
4





38 THE MILKMAID.

When alas I for her prospects-the milk
pail descended
And so all her schemes for the future
were ended.
MORAL.
This moral, I think, may be safely
attached:
Reckon not on your chickens before they
are hatched.


















THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES.
A LARK who had her nest concealed,
Says Esop, in a barley field;
Began, as harvest time drew near,
The reaping of the corn to fear;
Afraid they would her nest descry,
Before her tender brood could fly.
She charged them therefore every day,
Before for food she flew away,
To watch the farmer in her stead,
And listen well to all he said.
(39)


W -^^





40 THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES.
It chanced one day, she scarce was gone,
Ere the farmer came and his son.
The farmer well his field surveyed,
And sundry observations made;
At last, "I'll tell you what,'! said he,
"This corn is fit to cut, I see;
But we our neighbor's help must borrow,
So tell them we begin to-morrow."
Just after this the lark returned,
When from her brood this news she
learned.
Ah dearest mother," then, said they,
"Pray, let us all begone to-day."
"My dears," said she, "you need not fret,
I shall not be uneasy yet;
For if he waits for neighbor's aid,
The business long will be delay'd."
At dawn she left her nest once more,
And charged her young ones as before.
At five the farmer came again,
And waited for his friends in vain,





THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES. 41
" Well," said the man, "I fancy, son,
These friends we can't depend upon;
To-morrow early, mind you go,
And let our own relations know."
Again the lark approached her nest,
When round her all her young ones
pressed,
And told their mother, word for word,
The fresh intelligence they heard.
" Ah, children, be at ease," said she
"We're safe another day, I see;
For these relations, you will find,
Just like his friends, will stay behind."
At dawn again the lark withdrew,
And did again her charge renew.
Orce more the farmer early came,
And found the case was just the same.
The day advanced, the sun was high;
But not a single help drew nigh.
Then said the farmer, "Hark ye, son-
I see this job will not be done,
4*





42 THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES.
While thus we wait for friends and
neighbors;
So you and I'll commence our labors:
To-morrow early, we'll begin
Ourselves, and get our harvest in."
"Now," said the lark, when this she heard,
"Our movement must not be deferred;
For if the farmer and his son
Themselves begin, 'twill soon be done.'
The morrow proved the lark was right;
For all was cut and housed by night.
6 MORAL.
Hence, while we wait for other's aid,
Our business needs must be delay'd;
Which might be done with half the labor
'Twould take to go and call a neighbor.

















THE PHILOSOPHER AND THE
ACORN.
A PHILOSOPHER, proud of his wit and his
reason,
Sat him under an oak in a hot summer
season.
On the oak grew an acorn or two, it is said:
On the ground grew a pumpkin as big
as his head.
Thought the sage, "What's the reason
this oak is so strong
A few acorns to bear that are scarce an
inch long;
(43)






44 THE PHILOSOPHER AND THE ACORN.

While this poor feeble plant has a weight
to sustain,
Which had much better hang on the tree,
it is plain ?"
But just at the time the philosopher spoke
An acorn dropped down on his head from
the oak;
Then, said he, who just now thought his
plan was so clever,
"I am glad that this was not a pumpkin,
however."
MORAL.
The sage would no doubt have looked
grievously dull,
Had a pumpkin descended with force on
his scull.
Of his folly then let us in future beware,
And believe that such matters are best as
they are:
Leave the manners and customs of oak
trees alone,
Of acorns, and pumpkins--and look to
our own.


















THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.
A WOLF, once forgetting the size of his
swallow,
Tried to pass a large marrow-bone
through it.
"Oh dear," said the beast, thinking death
was to follow,
"How careless and stupid to do it !"
His mouth was propp'd open by means
of the bone,
And his breathing was greatly impeded,
(45)






46 THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.
But a crane coming up, he contrived to
make known
What kind of assistance he needed.
"How d'y'e do ?" said thb bird; said the
beast, "Very ill,
For a bone has gone down the wrong
way;
But if you can extract it by means of
your bill,
The service I'll amply repay."
Thought the crane, "I'm no surgeon: yet
all must agree,
That my bill will make excellent for-
ceps;
And as for the money, I do not now see
Why I need refuse taking his worship's.
Said the bird, "It's agreed;" said his
patient, "Proceed,
And take the bone hence, I beseech;"
Which, after awhile, and with infinite
toil,
The crane at last managed to reach.






THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.


"Thank my stars I" said the beast, from
his terrors released,
"Thank you too, sir," said he to the
bird;
"Alas said the crane, "is this all I'm
to gain,
I was waiting the promised reward."
Said the wolf, "You forget, I've con-
tracted no debt,
Since the service was rendered by me;
Your head I released from the jaws of a
beast,
And now you're demanding a fee I"
MORAL.
Give your help to a wolf, should he beg
for your aid,
But you must not expect when you've
done to be paid.


47




















THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.
A DO growing thinner, for want of a
dinner,
Once purloined him a joint from a tray,
" How happy I am, with this shoulder of
lamb "
Thought the cur as he trotted away.
But the way that he took, lay just over
a brook,
Which he found it was needful to cross;
(48)






THE DOG AND THE SHADOW. 49

So without more ado, he plunged in to
go through,
Not dreaming of danger or loss.
But what should appear, in this rivAlet
clear,
As he thought upon coolest reflection,
But a cur like himself, who with ill-gotten
pelf,
Had run off in that very direction.
Thought the dog, a propose I but that in-
stant let go
(As he snatched at this same water-
spaniel)
The piece he possess'd:-so with hunger
distress'd
He slowly walked home to his kennel.
MORAL.
Hence, when we are needy, don't let us
be greedy,
(Excuse me this line of digression,)
Lest in snatching at all, like the dog, we
let fall
The good that we have in possession.
(6) 5


















THE TRAVELLERS AND THE BEAR.
Two trav'llers one morning set out from
their home,
It might be from Sparta, from Athens,
or Rome;
It matters not which, but agreed, it is
said,
Should danger arise, to lend each other aid.
But scarce was this done, when forth
rushing amain,
Sprung a bear from a wood tow'rds these
travellers twain;
(50)






THE TRAVELLERS AND THE BEAR.


Then one of our heroes, with courage im-
mense,
Climb'd into a tree, and there found his
defence.
The other fell flat to the earth with dread,
When the bear came and smelt him, and
thought he was dead;
So not liking the carcase, away trotted he,
When straight our brave hero descended
the tree.
Then, said he, "I can't think what the
bear could propose,
When so close to your ear, he present
his nose."
"Why this," said the other, "he told me'
to do,
To beware for the future of cowards like
you."
MORAL.
Those people who run from their friends
in distress,
Will be left when themselves are in trouble,
I guess.


51





















STHE FROGS AND THE BULL.
A BULL once treading near a bog,
Displaced the entrails of a frog,
Who near his foot did trust them;
In fact, so great was the contusion,
And made of his inwards such confusion,
No art could re-adjust them.
In chanced that some who saw his fate,
Did to a friend the deed relate,
(52)






THE FROGS AND THE BULL.


With croakings, groans, and hisses;
"The beast," said they, "in size excelled
All other beasts," their neighbors swell'd,
And ask'd, "as large as this is I"
"Oh, larger far than that," said they,
"Do not attempt it, madam, pray;"
But still the frog distended,
And said, I'll burst, but I'll exceed,"
She tried, and burst herself indeed I
And so the matter ended.
MORAL.
Should you with pride inflate and swell,
As did the frog: then who can tell!
Your sides may crack, as has been shown,
And we with laughing crack our own.


53




















THE COUNCIL OF MICE.


SOME mice who saw fit, once a quarter to
meet,
To arrange the concerns of their city;
Thought it needful to choose, as is com-
mon with us,
First a chairman, and then a committee.
When the chairman was seated, the ob-
ject he stated
For which at that meeting they sat:
(54)






THE COUNCIL OF MICE.


Which was, it should seem, the concert-
ing a scheme
To defeat the designs of the cat.

Dr. Nibblecheese rose, and said, "I would
propose,
To this cat we fasten a bell;
He who likes what I've said, now will
hold up his head;
He who does not, may hold up his tail."

So out of respect, they their noses erect,
Except one who the order reversed;
Ayes, all then but one, but yet nought
could be done,
Until he had his reasons rehearsed.

"I shall not," said this mouse, "waste
the time of the house,
In long arguments; since, as I view it,
The scheme would succeed without doubt,
if indeed
We could find any mouse who would
do it."


55






TIE COUNCIL OF MICE.


"Hear! hear was the cry, and "no
bells we will try,
Unless you will fasten them on;"
So quite broken-hearted the members de-
parted,
For the bill was rejected nem. con.
MORAL.

Then be not too hasty in giving advice,
Lest your schemes should remind of the
council of mice;
You had better delay your opinion a year,
Than put forth a ridiculous one, it is clear.


56






















THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.
A WOLF and lamb once chanced to meet,
Beside a stream, whose waters sweet
Brought various kinds of beasts together,
When dry and sultry was the weather;
Now though the wolf came there to drink,
Of eating, he began to think,
As soon as near the lamb he came,
And straight resolved to kill the same;
(57)


r





THE WOLF AND TIE LAMB.


Yet thought it better to begin,
With threatening words and angry mien.
"And so," said he, to him below,
"How dare you stir the water so?
Making the cool refreshing flood,
As brown as beer, and thick as mud."
"Sir," said the lamb, "that cannot be,
The water flows from you to me;
So, 'tis impossible, I think,
That what I do can spoil your drink."
"I say it does, you saucy puss:
How dare you contradict me thus;
But more than this, you idle clack,
You rail'd at me behind my back
Two years ago, I have been told;"
" How so? I'm not a twelvemonth old,"
The lamb replied; "So I suspect
Your honor is not quite correct."
"If not, your mother it must be,
And that comes all the same to me,"
Rejoined the wolf-who waited not
But killed and ate him on the spot.


58






THE WOLF AND THE LAMB. 59
MORAL.
Some, like the wolf, adopt the plan,
To make a quarrel if they can;
But none with you can hold dispute,
If you're determined to be mute;
For sure this proverb must be true,
That ev'ry quarrel must have two.





















THE BEASTS IN PARTNERSHIP.

THIS firm once existed, I'd have you to
know,
Messrs. Lion, Wolf, Tiger, Fox, Leopard,
and Co.;
These in business were joined, and of
course 'twas implied,
They their stocks should unite, and the
profits divide.
(60)





THE BEASTS IN PARTNERSHIP. 61

Now the fable relates, it so happened one
day,
That their efforts combined, made a bul-
lock their prey:
But agreed that the Lion should make
the division,
And patiently .waited the monarch's de-
cision.
"My friends," said the Lion, "I've parted,
you see,
The whole into six, which is right, you'll
agree;
One part I may claim, as my share in
the trade,
Oh, take it and welcome," they all of
them said.
"I claim too the second; since no one
denies
'Twas my courage and conduct that
gained you the prize:
And for the third; that you know is a fine
fo the Lord of the manor, and therefore
is mine.
6





62 THE BEASTS IN PARTNERSHIP.
"Hey day!" said the fox; "Stop a bit,"
said the lion,
' I have not quite done," said he, fixing
his eye on
The other three parts; "you are fully
aware,
That, as tribute, one other part comes to
my share."
"And I think wouldd be prudent, the
next to put by
Somewhere safe in my den for a future
supply,
And the other, you know, will but barely
suffice,
To pay those expenses which always
arise."
"If this be the case," said the fox, "I
discern
That the business to us is a losing concern;
If so to withdraw, I should think would
be best;"
"Oh, yes let us break up the firm,"
said the rest;




THE BEASTS IN PARTNERSHIP. 63
And so:-for you may not have heard
of it yet, -
It was quickly dissolved, though not in
Sthe azette.
MORAI.
Some folks in their dealings, like him in
the fable,
Will take others' shares, if they think
they are able;
But let them not wonder who act in this
way,
If they find none will join them in busi-
ness or play.
/ac





















THE LION AND THE MOUSE.

A UON, with the heat oppress'd,
One day composed himself to rest;
But whilst he dozed, as he intended,
A mouse his royal back ascended;
Nor thought of harm as Esop tells,
Mistaking him for something else,
And travelled over him, and round him,
And might have left him as he found him,
464)





THE LION AND THE MOUSE.


Had he not, tremble when you hear,
Tried to explore the monarch's earl
Who straightway woko with wrath im-
mense,
And shook his head to cast him thence.
" You rascal, what are you about,"
Said he, when he had turned him out.
"I'll teach you soon," the lion said,
"To make a mouse-hole in my head I"
So saying, he prepared his foot,
To crash the trembling tiny brute;
But he, the mouse, with tearful eye,
Implored the lion's clemency,
Who thought it best at least to give
His little prisoner a reprieve.
'Twas nearly twelve months after this,
The lion chanced his way to miss;
When pressing forward: heedless yet,
He got entangled in a net.
With dreadful rage he stamp'd and tore,
And straight commenced a lordly roar;
When the poor mouse who heard the noise,
Attended, for she knew his voice.
6*


65






66 THE LION AND THE MOUSE.

Then what the lion's utmost strength
Could not effect, she did at length:
With patient labor she applied
Her teeth, the net-work to divide;
And so at last forth issued he,
A lion, by a mouse set free
MORAL.
Few are so small or weak, I guess,
But may assist us in distress;
Nor shall we ever, if we're wise,
The meanest, or the least, despise.





















THE JEALOUS ASS.

"THERE lived," says friend Esop, some
ages ago.
An ass who had feelings acute, you must
know;
This ass to be jealous, felt strongly in-
clined,
And for reasons which follow, felt hurt
in his mind."
(67)




. A-1


68 THE JEALOUS ASS.

It seems that his master, as I understand,
Had a favorite dog which he fed from
his hand.
Nay, the dog was permitted to jump on
his knee:
An honor that vex'd our poor donkey to
see.

Now," thought he, "what's the reason,
I cannot see any,
That I have no favors, while he has so
many?
If all this is got by just wagging his tail,
Why Ihave got one, which I'll wag with-
out fail."

So the donkey resolved to try what he
could do
And, determined unusual attentions to
show,
When his master was dining, came into
the room.
"Good sir said his friends, "why your
donkey is come!"


___






THE JEALOUS ASS.


"Indeed I" said their host, great asto-
nishment showing,
When he saw the ass come, while his tail
was a-going;
But who can describe his dismay or fear,
When the donkey rear'd up, and bray'd
loud in his earl
You rascal get down,-John, Edward,
or Dick
Where are you? make haste, and come
here with a stick."
The man roared-the guests laugh'd-
the dog bark'd-the bell rung:
Coals, poker, and tongs, at the donkey
were flung,
Till the blows and the kicks, with com-
bined demonstration,
Convinced him that this was a bad specu-
lation;
So, mortified deeply, his footsteps retrod
he,
Hurt much in his mind, but still more in
his body.


69






70 THE JEALOUS ASS.
MORAL.

So some silly children, as stupid as may
be,
Will cry for indulgences fit for a baby.
Had they entered the room while the
donkey withdrew,
They'd have seen their own folly and
punishment too:
Let them think of this fable, and what
came to pass;
Nor forget, he who played this fine game
was an ass.


A M





















THE TOWN AND COUNTRY MICE.
A PLIN, but honest, country mouse,
Residing in a miller's house;
Once, on a time, invited down
An old acquaintance of the town:
And soon he brought his dainties out;
The best he had there's not a doubt.
A dish of oatmeal and green peas,
With half a candle. and some cheese;
(71)






THE TOWN AND COUNTRY MICE.


Some beans, and if I'm not mistaken,
A charming piece of Yorkshire bacon.
And then to show he was expert
In such affairs, a fine dessert
Was next produced, all which he press'd,
With rustic freedom, on his guest.
But he, the city epicure,
This homely fare could not endure
Indeed he scarcely broke his fast
By what he took, but said, at last,
" Old crony, now, I'll tell you what:
I don't admire this lonely spot;
This dreadful, dismal, dirty hole,
Seems more adapted for a mole
Than 'tis for you; Oh! could you see
My residence, how charm'd you'd be.
Instead of bringing up your brood
In wind, and wet, and solitude,
Come bring them all at once to town,
We'll make a courtier of a clown.
I think that, for your children's sake,
'Tis proper my advice to take."
0


72






THE TOWN AND COUNTRY MICE.


"Well," said his host, "I can but try,
And so poor quiet hole good bye I"
Then off they jogg'd for many a mile,
Talking of splendid things the while;
At last, in town, they all arrived-
Found where the city mouse had lived-
Entered at midnight through a crack,
And rested from their tedious track.
"Now," said the city mouse, "I'll show
What kind of fare I've brought you to:"
On which he led the rustic mice
Into a larder, snug and nice,
Where ev'ry thing a mouse could relish,
Did ev'ry shelf and nook embellish.
"Now is not this to be preferred
To your green peas?" Upon my word,
It is," the country mouse replied,
"All this must needs the point decide."
Scarce had they spoke these words,
when, lo!
A tribe of servants hasten'd through,
7


73




THE TOWN AND COUNTRY MICE.


And also two gigantic cats,
Who spied our country mouse and brats.
Then, by a timely exit, she
Just saved herself and family.
" Oh, ask me not," said she in haste,
"Your tempting dainties more to taste;
I much prefer my homely peas,
To splendid dangers such as these."
MORAL.
Then let not those begin to grumble,
Whose lot is safe, though poor and
humble;
Nor envy him who better fares,
But for each good, has twenty cares.

















THE FOX AND THE CROW.
CRows feed upon worms: yet an author
affirms
Cheshire cheese they will get if they're
able;
"For," said he, "I well know. one un-
principled crow
Once purloined a large piece from my
table."
Then away darted she, to the shade of a
tree,
To deposit the booty within her;
(75)




THE FOX AND THE CROW.


But it never occurred to the mind of the
bird,
That a fox was to have it for dinner.
"How many a slip, twixtt the cup and
the lip I"
(Excuse me, I pray, the digression,)
Said a fox to himself, "I can share in
the pelf,
If I act with my usual discretion."
So said he, "Is it you? pray, ma'am,
how do you do,
I have long wish'd to pay you a visit;
For a twelvemonth has passed, since I
heard of you last
Which is not very neighborly, is it?
"But, dear madam," said he, "you are
dining, I see;
On that subject I'd ask your advice;
Pray, ma'am, now can you tell, where
provisions they sell,
That arc not an extravagant price?


76




THE FOX AND THE CROW. 77
'Bread and meat are so dear, and have
been for a year,
That poor people can scarcely en-
dure it,
And then cheese is so high, that such beg-
gars as I,
Till it falls, cannot hope to procure it."

But the ill-behaved bird did not utter a
word,
Still intent on retaining her plunder;
Thought the fox, "It should seem, this
is not a good scheme,
What else can I think of, I wonder?"

So said Reynard once more, "I ne'er
knew it before,
But your feathers are whiter than
snow is I
But thought he, when he'd said it, she'll
ne'er give it credit,
For what bird is so black as a crow
is."
7*




78 THE FOX AND THE CROW.
"But I'm told that your voice is a hor-
rible noise,
Which they say of all sounds is the
oddest;
But then this is absurd, for it never is
heard,
Since you are so excessively modest."
If that's all thought the crow, "I will
soon let you know
That all doubt on that score may be
ended ;"
Then most laughingly piped, the poor
silly biped,
When quickly her dinner descended
MORAL.
If this biped had not been so vain and
conceited,
She would not by the fox quite so soon
have been cheated;
But perhaps the term biped to some may
be new:
'Tis a two-legged creature-perchance it
is you.




















THE LION AND THE ECHO.

A LION, bravest of the wood,
Whose title undisputed stood,
As o'er the wide domains he prowl'd,
And in pursuit of booty growl'd,
An Echo from a distant cave
Regrowl'd, articulately grave:
His majesty, surprised, began
To think at first it was a man;
79


.0 M%-.WW4;7-




THE LION AND THE ECHO.


But on reflection sage, he found
It was too like a lion's sound.
"Whose voice is that which growls at
mine ?"
His highness ask'd. Says Echo, Mine I"
"Thine says the Lion: "Who art
thou?"
"Echo as stern cried, "Who art thou ?"
" Know I'm a lion, hear and tremble I"
Replied the king. Cried Echo, tremble I"
"Come forth," says Lion; show thyself."
Laconic Echo answered, "Elf."
" Elf, durst thou call me, vile pretender? "
Echo as loud replies, "Pretender I"
At this, as jealous of his reign,
He growl'd in rage; she growl'd again.
Incensed the more, he chafed and foam'd,
And round the spacious forest roam'd
To find the rival of his throne,
Who durst with him dispute the crown.

A fox, who listen'd all the while,
Address'd the monarch with a smile:


80




THE LION AND THE ECHO. 81
" My liege, most humbly I make bold,
Though truth may not be always told,
That this same phantom which you hear,
That so alarms your royal ear,
Is not a rival of your throne:
The voice and fears are all your own."
Imaginary terrors scare
A timorous soul with real fear;
Nay, even the wise and brave are cow'd
By apprehensions from the crowd:
A frog a lion may disharm,
And yet how causeless the alarm






















THE PAPER KITE.

ONCE on a time, a paper kite
Was mounted to a wondrous height;
Where, giddy with its elevation,
It thus expressed self-admiration:
" See how yon crowds of gazing people
Admire my flight above the steeple;
(82)




THE PAPER KITE.


How would they wonder, if they knew
All that a kite, like me, could do?
Were I but free, I'd take a flight,
And pierce the clouds beyond their sight.
But, ah! like a poor prisoner bound,
My string confines me near the ground.
I'd brave the eagle's towering wing,
Might I but fly without a string."
It tugg'd and pulled, while thus it
spoke,
To break the string-at last it broke!
Deprived at once of all its stay,
In vain it tried to soar away:
Unable its own weight to bear,
It flutter'd downward through the air;
Unable its own course to guide,
The winds soon plunged it in the tide.
Oh I foolish kite, thou hadst no wing,
How could'st thou fly without a string ?
My heart replied, "Oh, Lord, I see
How much the kite resembles me I
Forgetful that by thee I stand,
Impatient of thy ruling hand;


883





84 THE PAPER KITE.
How oft I've wish'd to break the lines
Thy wisdom for my lot assigns!
How oft indulged a vain desire
For something more or something higher!
And but for grace and love divine,
A fall thus dreadful had been mine."











40r









THE RATS AND THE CHEESE

IF bees a government maintain,
Why may not rats of stronger brain
And greater power, as well bethought
By Machiavelian axioms taught?
And so they are, for thus of late
It happened in the rats' free state.
Their prince (his subjects more to please)
Had got a mighty Cheshire cheese,
8 (85)





THE RATS AND THE CHEESE.


In which his ministers of state
Might live in plenty and grow great.
A powerful party straight combined,
And their united forces joiri'd,
To bring their measures into play,
For none so loyal were as they;
And none such patriots, to support
As well the country as the court.
No sooner were those Dons admitted
But (all those wondrous virtues quitted)
They all the speediest means devise
To raise themselves and families.
Another party well observing
These pampered were, while they were
starving,
Their ministry brought in disgrace,
Expelled them and supplied their place;
These on just principles were known
The true supporters of the throne,
And for the subjects liberty
They'd (marry would they) freely die;
But being well fix'd in their station,
Regardless of their prince and nation,


86




THE RATS AND THE CHEESE. 87
Just like the others, all their skill
Was how they might their paunches fill.
On this a rat, not quite so blind
In state intrigues as human kind,
But of more honor, thus replied:
"Confound ye all on either side;
All your contentions are but these,
Whose arts shall best secure the cheese."



















AURELIA AND THE SPIDER.

THE muslin torn, from tears of grief
In vain Aurelia sought relief;
In sighs and plaints she passed the day;
The tatter'd frock neglected lay:
While busied at the weavfig trade,
A spider heard the sighing maid
And kindly stopping in a trice,
Thus offered (gratis) her advice:
' Turn, little girl behold in me
A stimulus to industry
(88)




AURELIA AND THE SPIDER.


Compare your woes, my dear, with mine,
Then tell me who should most repine:
This morning, ere you left your room,
The chambermaid's remorseless broom
In one sad moment that destroyed,
To build which thousands were employed I
The shock was great; but as my life
I saved in the relentless strife,
I knew lamenting was in vain,
So patient went to work again.
By constant work, a day or more,
My little mansion did restore:
And if each tear which you have shed
Had been a needle-full of thread,
If every sigh of sad despair
Had been a stitch of proper care,
Closed would have been the luckless rent,
Nor thus the day have been mispent"
ikb %


89




















THE REDBREAST AND THE
SPARROW.

PERCH'D on a tree, hard by a rural cot,
A redbreast singing cheer'd the humble
spot;
A sparrow on the thatch in critic spleen
Thus took occasion to reprove the strain.
"Dost thou," cried he, "thou dull de-
jected thing,
Presume to emulate the birds of spring?
(90)


0-TV W N r




THE REDBREAST AND TIE SPARROW. 91

Can thy weak warbling dare approach
the thrush
Or blackbird's accents in the hawthorn
bush ?
Or with the lark dost thou poor mimic, vie,
Or nightingale's unequaled melody ?
These other birds possessing twice thy fire
Have been content in silence to admire."
"With candor judge," the minstrel bird
replied,
"Nor deemi my efforts arrogance or pride;
Think not ambition makes me act this
part,
I only sing because I love the art:
I envy not, indeed, but much revere
Those birds whose fame the test of skill
will bear;
I feel no hope arising to surpass,
Nor with their charming songs my own
to class;
Far other aims incite my humble strain.
Then surely I your pardon may obtain,
While I attempt the rural vale to move
By imitating of the lays I love."



















THE POET AND THE COBWEBS.

A BARD, whose pen had brought him
more
Of fame than of the precious ore,
In Grub Street garret oft reposed
With eyes contemplative half-closed.
Cobwebs around in antique glory,
Chief of his household inventory,
Suggested to his roving brains
Amazing multitude of scenes.
(92)





THE POET AND THE COBWEBS.


"This batch," said he, "of murder-
spinners
Who toil their brains out for their
dinners,
Though base, too long unsung has lain
By kindred brethren of Duck Lane,
Unknowing that its little plan
Holds all the cyclopede of man.
"This one, whose radiant thread
Is every where from centre spread,
Like orbs in planetary skies,
Enclosed with rounds of various size,
This curious frame I aptly call
A cobweb mathematical.
"In secret holes, that dirty line,
Where never sun presumes to shine,
With straws, and tilth, and time beset,
Where all is fish that comes to net,
That musty film, the Muse supposes
Figures the web of Virtuosos.
"You, where the gaudy insect sings,
Are cobwebs of the court of kings,


93





THJE POET AND THE COBWEBS.


Where gilded threads conceal the gin.
And broider'd knaves are caught therein.
" That holly, fix'd 'mid mildew'd panes,
Of cheerless Christmas the remains
(I only dream and sing its cheer,
My Muse keeps Lent throughout the year)
That holly, labor'd o'er and o'er,
Is cobwebs of the lawyer's lore,
Where frisky flies, on gambols borne,
Find out the snare, when lost, undone.
" These dangling webs, with dirt and age,
Display their tatter'd equipage,
So like the antiquarian crew,
That those in every thread I view.
"Here death disseminated lies,
In shrunk anatomies of flies;
And amputated limbs declare
What vermin lie in ambush there:
A baited lure with drugg'd perdition,
A cobweb, not misnamed physician.
Those plaited webs, long pendent there,
Of sable bards a subtle snare,


94





THE POET AND THE COBWEBS.


Of all-collective disposition,
Which holds like gout of inquisition,
May well denominated be,
The trap-webs of divinity."
But whilst our bard described the scene,
A bee stole through a broken pane;
Fraught with the sweets of every flower,
In taking his adventurous tour,
Is there entrapped. Exert thy sting,
Bold bee, and liberate thy wing I
The poet kindly dropped his pen,
And freed the captive from its den;
Then musing o'er his empty table,
Forgot the moral of his fable.


95



















THE EPICURE AND THE PHYSICIAN
Two hundred years ago, or more,
An heir possessed a miser's store;
Rejoiced to find his father dead,
Till then on thrifty viands fed;
Unnumber'd dishes crown'd his board,
With each unwholesome trifle stored.
He ate-and long'd to eat again,
But sigh'd for appetite in vain:
His food, though dress'd a thousand ways,
Had lost its late accustomed praise;
(96)




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