• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Main
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Cousin Cicely's Silver Lake stories ; 2
Title: The old portfolio
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001954/00001
 Material Information
Title: The old portfolio a collection of pieces in prose and rhyme, for the Silver Lake stories
Series Title: Cousin Cicely's Silver Lake stories
Physical Description: 170 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bradford, Sarah H ( Sarah Hopkins ), b. 1818
Smith, Thomas B., 19th cent ( Stereotyper )
Howlands (Firm) ( Engraver )
Austin, R ( Engraver )
Roberts, William, b. ca. 1829 ( Engraver )
Alden, Beardsley & Co ( Publisher )
Wanzer, Beardsley & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Alden, Beardsley & Co.
Wanzer, Beardsley & Co.
Place of Publication: Auburn <N.Y.>
Rochester <N.Y.>
Publication Date: 1852
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1852   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1852   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- Auburn
United States -- New York -- Rochester
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Cousin Cicely, author of "The jumble," etc.
General Note: "Stereotyped by Thomas B. Smith, 216 William St., N.Y."--verso of title page.
General Note: Added title page, engraved.
General Note: Wood-engravings variously signed: Howland; R. Austin; & W. Roberts.
General Note: "Cousin Cicely's Silver Lake stories."--illustrated series title, p. 3. Series list, p. 8.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001954
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222573
oclc - 35259362
notis - ALG2819
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Copyright
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Table of Contents
        Page 9
    List of Illustrations
        Page 10
    Main
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
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    Back Cover
        Page 172
    Spine
        Page 174
Full Text


















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SILVER LAKE STORIES.


I,


AUBURN:
ALDEN, BEARDSLEY & CO.





















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9







THE OLD PORTFOLIO;


A COLLECTION OF PIECES


IN PROSE AND RHYME,

FOR THE





WPfttb llustatfons



BY COUSIN CICELY.
AUTHOR OF "THE JUMBLEE" ETO.




AUBURN:
9 ALDEN, BEARDSLEY 4 0.
ROCHEST ER:
WANZER, BEARDSLEY & CO.
1862.

























Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1852, by
ALDEN BEARDSLEY & CO.,

In the Clerk's Office of the Northern District of New York.


















STEREOTYPED BY
THOMAS B. SMITH,
216 William St., N. Y.











I WAS turning over an old trunk of papers the other
day, which had been stowed away in the garret for years;
when to my surprise I found in the bottom of one of
them an old Portfolio. How natural it looked to me,
though old and defaced; and as I sat on the garret-floor,
and looked at it on one side, and then on the other, how
well I remember the day when my dear brother brought
it to me all bright and new, and said, Here, Cicely, is
my birthday present for you." How beautiful it did
look to me! Yes, it was on my birthday! how many
years ago it was, I hardly dare acknowledge to myself,
and I certainly shall not to my readers. But the old
Portfolio seemed to be well filled, and my surprise on
seeing it was increased, when I opened it and found it
filled with my early scribblings. And there I sat on the
garret floor all the morning reading them, and when I
rose I thought to myself, Well, it is possible that some
of these pieces may be interesting to my numerous young
friends," and so I determined to give them a part of the
contents of the Old Portfolio."













THE SILVER LAKE STORIES,

COMPRISING THE FOLLOWING VOLUMES.

I.-THE JUMBLE.

II.-THE OLD PORTFOLIO.
III.-THE GREEN SATCHEL.
IV.-THE CORNUCOPIA.
V.-AUNT PATTY'S MIRROR.

VI.-THE BUDGET.




















Page
TOMMY'S VISIT TO AUNT DEBBY, 11
THE FOX AND THE ROOSTER, 81
BENJAMIN WEST TO HIS LITTLE SISTER 86
EMILY S BIRTHDAY PARTY, 88
TIE UNLUCKY SPORTSMAN, 62
THE YOUTHFUL MURDERER, 64
THE LILY, 98
LITTLE SUE'S LETTER, 101
TIE TRUANT, 111
THE ORPHANS, 114
THE INMATE OF A LUNATIC ASYLUM, 184
THE CRANBERRY PARTY, 161


(ntuntts.




















Jist of Sllnstrntinns.

Page

THE BARKERSVILLE BOY, .. Frontispiece.
CHANTICLEER, 32
THE BABY'S PICTURE, . 37
THE SPORTSMAN, . 63
MR. MANTON IN THE GARDEN, . C5
ROBERT AND ALFRED, . 82
THE END OF POOR ROBERT, . 97
THE LILY, . 99
THE TOY-SHOP, . 106
THE TRUANT, . 111
THE ORPHANS, .. 115
THE PICNIC, . 162
PREPARING TO START FOR HOME, . 169












Iohvig's si fo Lqqf febb.


HO do you think is coming to
make us a visit ?" said Mr.
Edwards to his wife, as he
looked up from a letter he was reading
at the breakfast table.
I am sure I cannot guess," she an-
swered.
Aunt Debby Wheelock !" said Mr.
Edwards. She says she will be here
to-morrow."





12 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.
"Well!" said Mrs. Edwards with a
sigh, she shall be made welcome, and
as comfortable as possible."
"Oh dear !" exclaimed little Mary,
"I am so sorry she is coming; she is
so cross! Are old maids always so
cross, Papa ?"
"Oh no," her father answered, "by
no means ; I have known a great many
' old maids,' as you call them, who were
kind, and pleasant, and cheerful, and
the most agreeable companions you
would wish to be with."
"And then Aunt Debby is so dread-
ful neat, and particular," said Tommy,
"and it is always don't touch this I'





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


and let that alone !' and she seems to
think she has just as much right to di-
rect and scold us all when she is here,
as mother has. I just wish she'd stay
at home !"
And then," said Ellen, she keeps
us running all the time to get spools, and
scissors, and spectacles; she seems to
think we were made for nothing but
to wait upon her. I wonder what she
wants to come here for ?"
But in spite of the children's decided
opposition, Aunt Debby's yellow gig,
driven by herself, was seen the next
morning coming up the lane, laden with
bag and baggage, band-box and basket.


13






14 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

Aunt Debby was in fact just what
the children had described her, and her
visit did not give a great deal of satis-
faction to those at Willow-bank, as Mr.
Edwards's place was called.
When Aunt Debby's visit was fin-
ished, she astonished them all by re-
questing that Tommy might be allowed
to accompany her home and make her
a short visit; and they were still more
astonished to find that Tommy was
quite willing to go. Tommy was no
more fond of Aunt Debby than his sis-
ters and brothers were, but all children
are fond of change, and Tommy had
not been away from home in a long






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


time, and had never been at Barkers-
ville, where Aunt Debby lived.
So Tommy was highly delighted
when the yellow gig drove up to the
door, and his little trunk was put in,
and he himself was safely deposited by
Aunt Debby's side. But before the
journey was half over, both Aunt
Debby and Tommy himself, wished
that he was safe back at home.
Tommy was a lively, active boy, and
was very fond of asking questions. So
long as they were sensible questions,
showing that he really wished for in-
formation, his parents were always
ready to listen to them patiently, and





16 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

give him an answer; but Aunt Debby
had no patience ever with children,
and was particularly cross that day,
on account of the badness of the
roads.
"Who lives here, Aunt Debby?"
Tommy asked, as they passed a white
house on the road.
"I don't know, child; how should
I know ? do you suppose I know every-
body on the road from your place to
Barkersville ?"
"What are those men going to do,
Aunt Debby ?"
"I'm sure I don't know, and what's
more I don't care; if you want to know






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


what they're going to do you had bet-
ter ask them."
"I wonder where those children are
going ?"
Well, do keep your wonder to your-
self! do you never stop talking, child ?"
Thus silenced whenever he attempted
to make any conversation, and having
nothing better to do, Tommy fell asleep,
and was awakened by the stopping of
the gig at Aunt Debby's door.
Aunt Debby lived in one of a row of
little white cottages, which were situ-
ated on each side of the one long
straight street, which formed the vil-
lage of Barkersville. Everything about
2


17





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


it looked very neat, and very quiet, and
very dull, and Tommy had no sooner
entered the house, than again he wished
himself at home.
The day after they arrived, it began
to rain, and it rained steadily all day.
Poor little Tommy, who was accustomed
to his play-things, and books, and the
company of his little brothers and sis-
ters, now felt lonely enough; for there
was nothing to play with, and nothing
to look at in Aunt Debby's cottage.
Tommy was an active boy, who must
have employment, or he must be in
mischief; in short, he must be doing
something. Aunt Debby, like many


18





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


other persons, did not think of this; if
she had, by taking a little trouble,
she might have saved herself a great
deal.
Aunt Debby sat at her sewing, and
poor little Tommy sat in the window,
looking out at the rain as it came
down into the great mud-puddles, and
thinking how pleasant it was in the
nursery at home; he fancied he could
see Mary on one end of the rocking-
horse, and Ellen on the other, and his
brother Jimmy on top; and all the
pretty toys and books which were col-
lected there for the amusement of the
children.


19





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Presently he walked quietly up to
Aunt Debby and said,
"Aunt Debby, will you please to let me
have a scissors, and some paper to cut ?"
Paper to cut all over the floor ? no,
child! I am not going to pick up pa-
pers after you all day; what do you
want to cut out of paper ?"
Oh I can cut little men, and women,
and horses, and dogs, and a great many
nice things."
"Well! I've no paper to spare for
cutting up, and I am not going to have
snips of paper cut all over the floor."
- "Mother always makes us pick up
the scraps we cut over the floor."


20





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Well, I'm not your mother !"
"And I'm very glad you are not,"
thought Tommy.
What on earth is the child doing
now ?" exclaimed Aunt Debby; "there !
-there goes the writing sand all over
the floor Get me the little broom and
the shovel quick! I declare you'll do
the furniture more harm in a week, than
I should in seven years !"
"I did not know there was sand in
the box," said Tommy very much fright- 4
ened. I only wanted to look at the
bottom of the box, and as soon as I
turned it up all the sand ran out." "
Well, just learn to leave things


21





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


alone, and you'll save yourself and me
a world of trouble."
Aunt Debby," said Tommy after a
while, may I go out and play ?"
Out and play, in all this mud and
rain ? is the child crazy ? No, indeed!
I'm not going to have all the mud of
the streets tracked up my nice stairs
hum! pretty work that would be !"
"Isn't there any little boy who
might come and play with me, Aunt
Debby ?"
"There's boys enough, but they don't
come here, I can tell you !"
"I shouldn't think they would," said
Tommy to himself.


22





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Tommy was pretty quiet for a few
minutes, but spying a pipe on a shelf,
he called out, 0
Oh Aunt Debby, may I take this
pipe and blow bubbles ?"
"Bubbles !" screamed Aunt Debby,
"and the next thing would be the soap-
suds streaming all over my nice carpet,
and taking all the color out. Bubbles,
indeed! Why don't you do something
useful, child ?"
I would like to do something very
much, Aunt Debby, but I don't see any-
thing to do. Have you got any chil-
dren's books ?"
Children's books ? no, of course I





S THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.
haven't. What would I do with chil-
dren's books ?"
"Aui4 Debby, was you ever a child?"
"There's another of your absurd
questions; what do you mean by that
now ?"
I was thinking if you was, it must
have been a great while ago !"
"And why do you think so, Mr. Im-
pudence ?"
Because I think you must have for-
gotten how children feel. What did
you do when you was a child, Aunt
Debby ?"
"Do? why, if I remember right, I
kept to my sampler, and such useful





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


things. I never remember snipping
papers round the floor, or blowing bub-
bles, or any such nonsense as that."
Another pause, broken by a shrill
scream from Aunt Debby, who ex-
claimed in loud tones,
"Well! I never in all the days of
my life, did see the equal of this child
for mischief! Here goes the ink on
the table-cover; stop! stop! don't
take that handkerchief to wipe it up
with! now here's a nice job for me I
Is this the way you go on at home,
child ?"
"Indeed, Aunt Debby, I did not
mean to do it! everything I touch





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


seems to turn over. No, ma'am, they
never complain of my being mischiev-
ous at home. Oh! Aunt Debby, I'll
tell you what I can do. I brought my
paint-box with me: may I paint a lit-
tle while ?"
"Paint ? worse and worse! every-
thing would be daubed up ; what would
you paint ?"
I've got a pencil, Aunt Debby, and I
can draw pictures and then paint them."
Well, you won't do that here, I can
tell you I don't know what your
mother is made of, to let you go on as
she does; she is very different from
me, any way."






THE SILVER LAKE SERIES.


You never said a truer word than
that, Aunt Debby," said Tommy in a
low tone.
"I should like to know what your
mother does with you, and three or four
more like you all day," said Aunt
Debby.
"Well, I'll tell you," said Tommy.
"She lets us cut papers, if we pick up
every scrap ourselves; and she lets us
paint in the nursery, if we carefully put
away our things; and she lets us blow
bubbles in the basement room, that
has an oil-cloth on it: and then we
have pretty picture-books, and so many
playthings. Oh," said Tommy with a .



27





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


deep sigh, it is always so pleasant at
home !"
Only one single day was Tommy al-
lowed to go into the street, and then
having found an old hoop on a barrel,
he went out to roll it, but having
knocked down a fence which one of
the Barkersville boys was building, the
boy flew at him in a passion, and soon
sent him in crying to Aunt Debby with
a bloody nose.
With this exception, the days passed
on with little variety, only that some
days Tommy did more mischief than
others. Eagerly did he count the
hours, and gladly did he hail the day,


28






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


when his father came to take him
home.
"Well, Tommy, and what did you do
at Aunt Debby's ?" asked his sisters.
Oh! I spilt the sand, and spilt the
ink, and broke a window and two sau-
cers, and spilt the ashes on the floor,
and burned a hole in the carpet, and-"
Oh Tommy! Tommy! nothing but
mischief ?" said his mother.
I did not mean to do mischief, dear
mother, but Aunt Debby would not
give me anything else to do; I must
do something, you know, and somehow
everything I did was wrong."
"Well, there is a good deal of truth


29





30 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

in what Tommy says," said his mother.
"Little folks must be busy, and if we
do not find employment for them, they
will find it for themselves, and make
us a great deal more trouble in the
end."














ae Fox 4sQ3ie 00oos0er.

(AN OLD FABLE IN RHYME.)

A LARGE splendid Rooster-his name Chanticleer,
Having just perched himself on a corn-rick
quite high,
Crew so loud as to startle a fox who was near-
This fox like all others was cunning and sly.

He had long lain in a thicket of green,
And had watched fora victim and waited in vain,
For the hens kept so close that not one had he
seen,
And he feared as he came, he must go back
again.









4 4


14I


'I'
Aaii 4)


0

0






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 33

Just'then came the crowing of which I have
spoken,
Looking up to the corn-rick he saw the cock
there,
Said the fox, Should I climb it my neck would
be broken,
I must find means to make him come down I
declare."

Then he crept from the hedge, near the corn-rick
he drew,
Putting on his best looks and his pleasantest
smile,
Said he, My dear Cousin, pray how do you do,
Since I've seen your bright form seems a very
long while.

" My humble respects I am anxious to pay,
But the great height on which you have chosen
your seat
3




34 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

Makes it quite inconvenient, so dear sir, I pray,
You'll come down that my cousin and friend 1
may greet."


You may eat, 'tis more likely," replied Chanti-
cleer,
"Should I come down I soon would be in a bad
box,
I know that your love is both tender and dear,
But I'm not one to be taken in by a fox."


"Why, Cousin," said Reynard, "you surely have
heard,
That the animals all have made peace with
each other,
That from this time henceforth, every beast, every
bird,
Must in harmony live, and not prey on his
brother."





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 35

c But cousin, dear cousin, at what do you gaze ?
"I think," said the rooster, "the hounds I
descry !"
" Oh ho! my dear sir, if you think that's the case,
I'll speedily vanish and bid you good-bye !"

" Stop, stop, Cousin Reynard, pray why should
you run,
The hounds will not hurt you-there's peace in
the nation."
"Don't stay me one moment, for 'tis ten to one,
That the hounds have not yet heard the peace
proclamation !"













BeQ01riq Mie.sl io }iis Ti)te iffer,
WHOSE PORTRAIT HE DREW WHEN HE WAS SEVEN
YEARS OLD.
LI still, little sister, now don't move or wink,
I've mixed all my colors with chalk and with ink,
In the juice of red berries my brushes I dip,
To copy your beautiful bright cheek and lip.
My brushes I've stole from the old pussy's side,
And the hairs in a crow-quill I tightly have tied.
Poor mother laments o'er the pussy's lost fur,
And thinks some sad sickness has come upon her.
Keep still, little sister, how mother will stare,
When she looks on the paper and sees you are
there.






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


37


THE BABY'S PICTURE.


Just one minute more now, that smile pray recall,
I've got it now, darling, the dimple and all!
I've painted the baby! tell mother the news I
Now wake, little sister, as soon as you choose I














MILY'S birth-day had come, and, ac-
j cording to a promise long since
made her, she had a little party
of girls and boys. After the usual
games had been gone through with, of
"Blind-man's buff," "Puss in the cor-
ner," "Magical music," "What is my
thought like ?" "The stage-coach," and
many others, the question came up,
"What shall we play next?"





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"Oh, I had almost forgotten!" ex-
claimed Emily, my charade-book !"
"What is your charade-book, Emily ?"
asked the children.
"Here it is," said Emily, taking a
little red book out of a drawer; my
aunts and uncles amused themselves
one evening in making charades, and
I copied them all into this little red
book. Now if you will all sit down, I
will read them to you, and you shall
guess them, and whoever guesses
wrong, must pay a forfeit."
"Oh, that will be fine," exclaimed
the children, forming themselves into
a circle about Emily.


39





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"Won't you please to tell me what a
charade is, Emily ?" asked little Carry.
"Yes," said Emily. "A charade is
usually, I believe, (at least all these
are,) composed of a first, a second, and
a whole. The first means one thing, the
second means another thing, and the
whole means something different, that
is made up of the first and second. Do
you understand now ?"
"No, not exactly," said Carry.
S"Well, see here Carry, suppose I say
to you, 'My first supplies you with
milk,' what answer would you give to
that ?"
"That would be 'cow,'" said Carry.


40






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"Yes, and then if I were to say my
second is what you do on the ice, what
would you say to that?"
"Slip down?" asked Carry.
"Yes, slip,'" answered Emily;-
"then if I were to say my whole is a
pretty yellow flower, you could give
the answer at once."
"Oh, yes, it would be 'cow-slip'-
now I know what a charade is; please
to go on, Emily."
"Well," said Emily, "now you must
all listen and think; the first one is,

'My first when pursued springs along with a
bound,
And almost like lightning flies over the ground"''


41





42 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

"That must be a rabbit," said Char-
lotte Hall.
I guess it's a deer," said Arthur
Wilson.
"It may be either," said Emily, "let's
read the second part and see.
My second is found in every church steeple,
And its sound calls together a host of good
people.' "
"That is a bell, of course," cried sev-
eral voices-" rabbit-bell--deer-bell"-
neither of these would do-"read the
whole, Emily."
Emily read,
4" My whole is a sweet little ffiwer of blue,
If you can't guess its name, what a ninnytare you."






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"It's a pity if we are all to be set
down as ninnies, on the first charade,"
said William Gray; "let's see. 'My
first when pursued'-oh, I've got it
now; hare,-hare-bell, that's it." "Yes,
that must be it," agreed all the chil-
dren.
"You said rabbit,' Charlotte, and
you, Arthur, said 'deer;' hand out your
forfeits," said Emily.
Charlotte handed her pocket-hand-
kerchief and Arthur his knife, which
were safely put away till the end of
the game.
"Now read another, Emily !" said the
children.


43





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Emily read,

When a poor man the ague and fever has got,
He must do my first if he likes it or not."

"I guess that is to take medicine,"
said little George Masten.
"No, no," said Belle Stanley, "that
must be shake."
"I guess Belle is right," said Emily,
"now listen to the second part.

'My second is a deadly weapon in the soldier's
hand,
Its shining point has lowly laid, full many a gal-
lant band.' "

"Gun !" shouted Herbert Brown.


44






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"No, it can't be gun, Herbert," said
Emily-" its shining point."
"Well, then, it is a sword," said
Herbert.
Or a 'spear,' called out Charlotte.
"Yes, that must be it, for the whole
is this:
'My whole a famous writer was, in days of good
Queen Bess,
His plays are read and acted now, his name you'll
surely guess.' "
"Oh, yes, easy enough," said Char-
lotte, "it is Shake-spear."
"Your forfeits, young gentlemen;"
George Masten handed his glove, and
Herbert his pencil.


45





46


THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"Now for another, Emily."
"Here it is," said Emily.

"I rattle o'er an iron road, an iron horse to draw
me,
No living steed need ever try to pass or keep be-
fore me."

"That is easy enough to guess," said
Cornelia Watson, "it cannot be any-
thing but a rail-road-car. What is the
other part of it, Emily ?"
"The second part is,

'The youngest of the family, the darling too of all,
A great excitement seizes them if e'er I cry or
fall.' "

"Little Carry, you ought to guess






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


that," said Charlotte, "you are the
youngest of the party, and the young-
est of the family. What do they call
you at home, Carry ?"
"Oh, they call me Pet and Pussy,"
said Carry.
"Well, then, if Cornelia is right
about the car, it must be 'car-pet,'"
said Charlatte.
"So it is, to be sure," said Emily,
"for the whole is,

'Of all various colors and patterns I'm found,
And you walk over me, yet I am not the ground.'

"No forfeits this time," said Emily.
"Now for another charade:


47






48 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.
'What Miss Frances does well with her needle I
show,
I wish all little girls would try to do so.'"
"Come, Fan, what is it you do so
well with your needle ? I am sure you
ought to know."
"If it really meant me, I would not
be so vain as to answer," said Fanny,
"but as it does not, I will try and
guess; let's see, 'with the needle,'
stitch ?"
"I don't know yet," said Emily, "let
me read the second part of it.
'When I am used by night or day,
I keep all foes and thieves away.'"
"That's a dog," said Charlie Hunt






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"Dog / ridiculous /" said Fanny.
"What sense would stitch-dog make ?"
"Well, perhaps your stitch wasn't
right," said Charlie.
"I don't believe you are either of you
right," said Belle, "read the whole, will
you, Emily ?"
Emily read,

"I'm a tree of the forest, I'm everywhere found,
And unlike other trees, I'm green all the year
round."

"That's a pine, of course," said Her-
bert.
"No, no," said Belle, "I've got it
now I it's hem-lock. What Fraaces
4


49





50 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


does with her needle is to hem, and the
lock keeps out thieves, and the hemlock
is green all the year round."
"Locks don't always keep out
thieves," said Charlie, "for sometimes
they get in at the window."
Fanny and Charlie very promptly
handed out their forfeits, and Emily
went on to the next charade.
"I think this is first rate," said
Georgy, "only I haven't guessed one yet."
"Well, this is an easy one, Georgy:

SWhat does Pussy do, Maria,
When she sits before the fire "

"My name isn't Maria," said Georgy,





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"but I think I can answer that; she
sleeps, of course-' sleep,' or 'nap,' must
be the answer to that; read the second,
Emily."

"What the horses and hounds do when after the
deer,
Now tell, and my second will straightway ap-
pear."

"That may be 'run,'" said William
Gray, "or 'chase,' I guess. I guess it
is chase;' let's see; what does pussy
do?' now I am getting it, hurrah for
mej read the whole, Emily, quick."

"Whene'er you buy anything under the sun,
The name of my whole, then, by you will be
done."


51





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"Yes, I'm right !" said William, "the
word is pur-chase.' What does the cat
do ? 'pur,' and the horses and hounds
'chase,' and anything that you buy you
'purchase.' "
Emily read a great many more cha-
rades, some of which I will give you
here, and you may see if you will suc-
ceed in answering them as well as
Emily's little friends did; if you can-
not, you must ask some of your friends
to help you.
1.
He sits on his throne, with royalty crowned,
While his true humble subjects are kneeling
around.





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


53


2.
With hook and bait, in his boat he goes,
And oft his line in the water throws.

WHOLE.
My whole is a bird, through the air he flies fast,
And stoops to the waters to take his repast.


1.
I am not the well, yet what do you think ?
From my mouth often pours the pure water you
drink.
2.
I may be your sister, your cousin or brother,
Y r uncle or aunt, or your father or mother.

WHOLE.
m round and I'm yellow, and none can deny,
tat nothing can beat me for making a pie.







THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


1.

A contemptible creature, who walks through the
streets,
All whiskered, mustachoed, and perfumed with
sweets.
2.

He roams the forest king among the beasts,
And on his foes with exultation feasts.

WHOLE.

A pretty bright and yellow flower that in the
meadow grows,
There's not a child the country round, but well
its blossom knows.


1.

Often in a single night,
I clothe the trees and fields in white.






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES,


55


2.
Children love to play with me in all kinds of
weather,
In the winter I am made of snow, in summer of
yarn or leather.

WHOLE.
In the early spring you are sure to see me,
My blossoms of white are all over the tree.


1.
When summer showers do not
parched ground,
In trees, and shrubs, and plants,
first is always found.


fall to wet the

and flowers my


2.
The home of the beast of the forest,4m I,
His bright shining eyes in my depths you descry.







56 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

WHOLE.
If you would like to know my whole, take the list
of men
Who as poets have been famed, you will find it
then.

1.

I'm the most cunning fellow that lives in the wood,
One whose arts are not easily understood.
2.

Sometimes I'm worn for ornament, but oftener
for use,
I cling so tight when once drawn on, 'tis hard to
shake me loose.
WHOLE.
A pretty flower I know I am, and much admired
too,
But touch me not, for poison lurks within my
leaves of blue.






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 57

1. 4
I'm a stately gentleman, when you cross the main,
If you wish to see me you'll find me out in Spain.

2.
A very useful thing I am though often very small,
Turn me once round, I guard your house, your
closets, gold and all.

WHOLE.
No beauty I claim, I am naught but a drudge,
As on with my great load I patiently trudge.


1.
Children love to eat me with their milk at night
or morn,
Sometimes I'm hasty pudding called, sometimes
I'm called suppaan.






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


2.
Few are so poor they may not dwell within my
lowly bound,
If they've a roof to cover them, beneath that roof
'tis found.
WHOLE.
My whole springs in a single night,
And gets its growth before daylight.

1.
I'm up in the morning early singing loud and clear,
Few boys are up early enough my morning song
to hear.
2.
The laziest horse will rapidly flee,
If once on his side he is touched by me.

WHOLE.
My whole in the flower-garden you may often see,
On it rests the humming-bird, in it sucks the bee.






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Some of Emily's friends were not
more successful in guessing these cha-
rad.es, than they were with the first;
but among them all they generally
contrived to get the right answer.
Poor little Georgy had to empty his
pockets of everything, and then was
obliged to borrow articles to pay his
forfeits. When the charades were all
read, Cornelia was blindfolded, and
then came, What shall the owner of
these do ?" And when Emily's mother
and aunts came to call the children in
to supper, they stood at the door for
some time, laughing very heartily at
the scene before them.





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Arthur was spinning round on one
foot in the middle of the room, and
Herbert was standing on his head,
while Charlotte danced round him.
Georgy Masten was fiddling for them
with the shovel and poker. Belle Stan-
ley was curtseying twenty-seven times
to the bust of Franklin, and Charlie
Hunt was kissing most affectionately
on each cheek the plaster image of an
old lady in the corner of the room.
Little Carry was grinding at an im-
aginary organ; and Cornelia was mes-
merizing Emily, while Fanny was dan-
cing as a shaking quaker. But the good
things were waiting to be eaten, and


60





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 61

in the midst of the playing, and dan-
cing, and whirling, and curtseying, they
were interrupted by the cry, "Please
to walk in to supper I"
















HAVE you ever heard of the Irishman
Who went out one day with his gun,
And he banged so harmlessly right and left,
The birds thought he was onljr in fun.

And they watched the unlucky sportsman,
And they laughed as they sat on the tree,
For they said that just where he meant to shoot,
Was the safest place to be.

At last he aimed at a brilliant bird
Who sat on the topmost limb,
But it is scarcely worth while to say,
That he did no harm to him.






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


63


THE SPORTSMAN.
Yet the sportsman was sure he saw him fall,
And he walked up and down the road,
Till at length as he stooped at the root of the tree,
He spied a monstrous toad.

"I've got you at last, my beauty,
Sure I'm in luck to-day,
Ah! wasn't you a lovely bird,
Till I blew all your feathers away."













(FOUNDED ON FACT.)

SLD Mr. Manton, who was visiting at
his brother's beautiful place in the
country, was seated one day in a
retired spot in the garden, when he
heard two of his nephews quarrelling.
The words of anger and contention rose
higher and higher, till at length, fear-
ing they would soon come to blows, the
old gentleman called out in a stern
tone, "Boys! boys! come here !"





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


MR. MANTON IN THE GARDEN.
The sounds of contention ceased, and
the boys, with their faces still flushed
with passion, appeared before their
uncle, who said, My dear boys, I have


65






66 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

been an unwilling listener to the sounds
of anger and strife which I have just
heard; I am often obliged to hear such
sounds among the rude, quarrelsome
boys in the city, but I confess I am sur-
prised to hear them in the still, beau-
tiful, quiet country, and among broth-
ers too."
"Well, but uncle, isn't Ned mean;
he has gone and taken my ball, and-"
"It is not his ball, uncle; he sold it
to me; it was a fair bargain."
Hush, hush, boys; I do not want to
hear anything about the cause of dis-
pute; but I cannot tell you how it
grieves me to hear brothers quarrel-





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


ling, or to see one brother cherishing
ill or unkind feelings towards another.
It always brings to my mind a dread-
ful scene, which occurred when I was
a school-boy, but which I shall never
forget till the last day I live. But I
see the lightning darting from yonder
cloud, and hear the thunder rolling; let
us go into the house before the rain
comes up, and I will tell you the story."
After they were comfortably seated
in the library, Mr. Manton began:
"When I was a lad, I attended a
boarding-school in the country, about
three miles from the town of W- .
It was a very pleasant school; the


67





68 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

boys, of whom there were about twenty,
were, generally speaking, a very good-
natured, pleasant set of fellows, and,
strange to say, they all liked the mas-
ter, and always spoke well of him. In-
deed, Mr. Cuthbert was a model of a
schoolmaster. lHe had the most won-
derfuil faculty of winning the love of his
scholars, and at the same time of com-
manding their respect; and he could
join with them in their plays, without
in the least descending from his dig-
nity. Mr. C Athbert was a gentleman
and a Christian, and this he proved by
every movement and every action.
"One summer day, we were all play-





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


ing in the extensive play-ground at-
tached to the school, when a carriage
drove up to the large front gate, from
which alighted a gentleman and two
boys. Of course our play was sus-
pended for a few moments, while we
watched the strangers as they ascended
the broad gravel-walk.
"'They will have to go back as they
came,' said Harry Lane,' for Mr. Cuth-
bert has his full number now; the
school is limited to twenty.'
"' What a handsome little fellow that
youngest one is, with his light curling hair
and blue eyes; he looks full of fun; I wish
he could stay,' said Arthur Williams.


69





TIE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"' But what a cross, surly, unsociable
looking character the big one is,' said
another boy; 'depend upon it he will
make trouble if he is admitted into the
school. I never saw such an ugly look-
ing subject. I wonder who they are in
mourning for ?'
"The gentleman and the boys had
now been admitted into the house.
We had a longer recess than common
that day; and before we were called
in by the school-bell, we saw two
trunks brought in from the carriage,
and we also saw the gentleman go
away without the boys.
"Mr. Cuthbert had indeed been in-





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


duced by some means or other, to break
through his rule, and to take the two
young strangers into the school, and
before long they were introduced into
the school-room.
Their names were Robert and Al-
fred Canfield; and, as has been inti-
mated by the conversation of the boys,
they were as different as light and
darkness. Robert was cross, and sul-
len, and unsocial, and met all our
attempts at an acquaintance with him
with the most chilling reserve. While
in less than half a day, little Alfred
was eagerly joining in all our plays,
and knew the name of every boy in the


71





TIE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


school. But it was not only to us who
were strangers to him, that Robert was
thus sullen and cross; we soon found
that he seemed to regard with an espe-
cial dislike, his little brother Alfred, to
whom he always spoke in the most
brutal and unfeeling tones; ordering
him to do whatever he wanted, and
sometimes flying into fits of fierce and
terrible passion, if Alfred, through
some mistake, did not do just as he
wished.
"Their history, by what means I do
not now remember, soon came out, and
was whispered about among the boys.
They were orphans; their father had


72





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


been dead for some years, but their
mother had died only a few months
before they came to our school; and
for her they were now in mourning.
Their father liad left them some prop-
erty, but a very handsome fortune had
been left them by an uncle, who had
bequeathed his own fine place to his
namesake, little Alfred, and then divi-
ded the rest of his property between
the two. Of course if either of them
died, the whole property would go to
the survivor.
"* We boys always thought that this
was one reason why Robert disliked his
little brother, as it was very evident lie


73





74 TIE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

did, and this dislike seemed to grow
atd strengthen every day that he lived.
I remember one day when we were
playing in the gymnasium, Alfred had
a fall from a ladder, which stunned him
for a few moments. As usual, Robert
was not with us in our sports, but as I
was running to call Mr. Cuthbert, I met
him looking as dark and cross as usual.
"'Robert,' said I, your little brother
has had a fall in the gymnasium.'
"Something like a gleam of pleasure
lighted up the boy's ugly countenance
as he said, 'Well, is he killed?' My
blood boiled with fury, and I could
scarcely keep my hands off from him.





TIE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


But I ran on to find Mr. Cuthbert, who
went in haste to the gymnasium, and,
taking Alfred in his arms, he carried
him to the house, where he was soon
completely restored, and by night was
playing with us again as lively as ever.
But that look that came over Robert's
face I could not forget, and I deter-
mined to watch him closely, as long as
we remained together at the school.
I whispered my suspicions to the other
boys too, and said to them,' He would
be glad any day to hear that Alfred
was dead.'
Some of the boys in our school were
allowed by their parents to have guns,





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


and it was a favorite amusement with
them to go out gunning on Saturday
afternoons. Mr. Cuthbert, who was
very timid, disliked the idea of their
being trusted with such dangerous
weapons, but when allowed by their
parents, he did not interfere to prevent
their using them. Robert and Alfred
had each a beautiful gun sent them as
a present from their guardian. One
Saturday afternoon, in the autumn, six
or eight of us went out gunning to-
gether; to our surprise, Robert joined
us, and was very much more agreeable
in his manners than usual. He even
spoke to Alfred, without his usual gruff,





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


coarse tones. We began to think Rob-
ert was improving.
"At length, after wandering about
in a piece of woods, and being for a
time scattered we found on collecting
again, that all were there but Robert
and Alfred. Just as we were talking
about them and wondering where they
were, we heard the sound of a gun.
'There they are shooting now, over in
that direction, by the sound,' said one
of the boys, and we started off to find
them. After walking for some time,
we stopped, and shouted their names,
but there was no answer. Then
we passed on till we came to the


77





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


verge of the wood, but saw no traces
of them.
"' We have come beyond the spot
where that gun went off. I know,' said
Harry Lane; 'I'll tell you what, boys,
we've done wrong in leaving Robert
and Alfred together, without some one
to watch that oldest one.'
"This was but the echo of what had
been passing in my own breast, but I
had not dared to acknowledge even to
myself, the dim forebodings which had
taken possession of my mind. We now
scattered, and began the search in ear-
nest, and .had not been looking many
minutes, before a cry of horror burst


78





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


from some boy not far from where I
was standing. We all hurried to the
spot, and there we found poor little Al-
fred lying on his face; his own gun
was lying not far from him, pointing
towards him, and had evidently been
lately discharged.
"We turned the little boy over, and
to our great joy found that he still
breathed; though his eyes were closed
and he was insensible. One of the
boys immediately ran to a brook which
was near, to bring some water in his
hat, while two more set off to bear the
tidings to Mr. Cuthbert, and to have




















bi P
LO



(DO,95Q






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


arrangements made for taking Alfred
back to the school.
"As soon as Mr. Cuthbert had re-
ceived the intelligence, he despatched
one of the scholars to the town of W-
for a physician, and then with a num-
ber ()f the boys to assist him, started
towards the woods with a litter, on
which was placed a bed. By the time
he arrived, Alf-ed had been roused to
consciousness, but was in very great
pain. The shot had entered his breast,
just above the heart, and though not
immediately fatal, Mr. Cuthbert very
much feared the consequences.
"The boys, grieved, and shocked, and





82 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

distressed, took turns in assisting Mr.
Cuthbert to carry the litter; and after
a long and wearisome walk, they at
length reached the school, and poor
little Alfred, much exhausted, and
in great pain, was laid on his own
bed.
"All this time no one had seen any-
thing of Robert; but soon after Alfred
was brought in, he came in at the side
door. He seemed rather excited, and
spoke in a brisk, lively tone, quite un-
usual with him.
"'Well, boys! so you've got home
before me,' he said.
"'Yes,' said Henry Hall gravely,





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


'and we have brought home your
brother Alfred.'
"'Brought home Alfred! and where
did you find him? at least I mean,
what did you bring him home for?
Is there anything the matter with
him ?'
"'Yes,' said I, 'there is matter
enough. Your little brother has been
shot.'
"' Been shot!' he exclaimed, 'he has
shot himself, you mean. Of course no
one shot him, because no one was near
him when it was done.'
"' How do you know no one was near
him, Robert ? how do you know that I,


83





84 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

or any of the other boys, were not near
him ?'
"'Oh! because you were scattered
off in different parts of the woods, and
Alfred and I were alone together; and
I got tired of shooting, and started off
to come home, and then I heard Alfred's
gun go off, and it must have been then
he did it.'
All this time Robert talked very fast,
and quite different from his usual manner,
and never looked one of us in the face.
"'Robert, would not you like to go
up and see your brother?' I said.
"'No, no, I never liked to look at
dead people,' he answered.





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"' Dead ?' I exclaimed, 'did you sup-
pose your brother was dead all this
time ?'
"'Of course I did! Isn't he dead?'
he asked, and his countenance resumed
its old cross, bitter look.
"'No, Robert, Alfred is not dead,'
said I,' and you, of all others, ought to
pray that his life may yet be spared.'
"I hope we did not judge Robert
wrongfully; I know there have been
cases where persons have been tried
and condemned for murder, and the
evidence has appeared to be very
strong against them, and it has after-
wards been discovered that they were


85





86 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


innocent. Whatever might have been
the facts, however, there was no doubt
on the mind of any one of the boys,
that Robert had intended to kill his
brother.
"I was sitting by little Alfred's bed-
side, the first time he woke, with his
mind perfectly clear and conscious,
after the doctor's visit. No one had as
yet asked him any questions, because
he had been in great pain and distress,
and had had frequent fainting turns.
But now he seemed calm and quiet,
and as he looked around the room, his
eye rested with a glance of recognition
on Mr. Cuthbert and myself. Our





TIE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


teacher came by the side of the bed,
and taking Alfred's hand in his, he
said gently, Alfred, if you can bear it,
I want to ask you a few questions?'
"Alfred seemed to know what was
coming, and he turned away his head,
and said with a look of pain,' Please
do not make me talk, Mr. Cuthbert; I
am too tired.'
"'You can surely tell me, Alfred,
how this happened ?'
"'No, sir, I cannot, for I do not
know.'
Was the gun in your own hand,
Alfred, when it went off?'
'No, sir.'


87





88 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.
"' What were you doing at the time ?'
"'I was crawling under some bushes
to get a pigeon which Robert had shot.'
"'Ah, Robert was with you, was he?
And did Robert tell you to crawl under
the bushes for the pigeon ?'
"Alfred hesitated a moment, and
then said, 'Yes, sir.'
"'And what did you do with your
gun, when you went to creep under the
bushes, Alfred?'
"' Oh! how can I tell all about it,
Mr. Cuthbert. I am so tired talking.'
'Alfred, answer me one more ques-
tion truly. Did you hand your gun to
your brother to hold for you ?'





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"Alfred made no answer; the ques-
tion was repeated, when he replied,
'Yes, sir, I did; but oh, Mr. Cuthbert,
I know it was an accident. The gun
must have fallen from his hand. Rob-
ert never would mean to hurt me, I
know; oh, do say it was an accident,
Mr. Cuthbert,' and with the exertion of
speaking so eagerly, poor little Alfred
fell back and fainted again.
"Mr. Cuthbert immediately wrote to
Mr. Courtenay, the guardian of the two
boys, who came without loss of time.
When he arrived, however, little Al-
fred's symptoms had already become
very alarming; fever and inflammation






90 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

had set in, and he was most of the time
delirious. It appeared to us that Rob-
ert was trying to act like a perfectly
innocent person, but as the guilty often
do in such cases, he quite over-shot the
mark. He knew that suspicion would
fasten upon him, if he left the school,
and he seemed determined to remain
and brave it out. But no persuasions
or entreaties would induce him to enter
the room in which his brother was ly-
ing, although little Alfred, in his lucid
intervals, begged to see Robert, and to
see him alone.
"When Mr. Courtenay came, he and
Mr. Cuthbert had a long conversation






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


with Robert alone, but Robert had his
story ready, and kept to it. And
though all were convinced of his guilt,
yet there were no witnesses of it, as
Alfred could not be persuaded to say
anything to criminate his brother.
"The last night of poor little Alfred's
life, I was permitted, with Mr. Cuthbert,
to watch by his bed-side. It was very
affecting to hear him call upon his
mother in his delirium, and to hear his
touching appeals to Robert, who he
supposed was near him.
"'Mother,' he would say, 'it is my
side, press your soft hand on my side;
it will make it feel easier. Sing to me,


91





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


mother, that beautiful hymn once more.
No, mother no, Robert never meant to
hurt me. Robert,' he would call, 'Rob-
ert, there are only us two left. Why
cannot you love me, Robert? Don't
you remember mother told you when
she was dying, to watch over your
little brother?' .Sometimes he would
call out, 'Oh, Robert, don't! don't do
it!'
"About midnight he ceased talking,
and fell into an uneasy slumber; then
his breathing became very difficult,
and he would open his beautiful eyes
very wide, and stare wildly around the
room, and yet seem to see nothing.


92





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Mr. Cuthbert held the candle before
his eyes, but he did not appear to see
the light, we called to him, but it was
evident that his hearing was gone.
Our teacher then sent me to awake Mr.
Courtenay, and tell him that he feared
Alfred was dying. Mr. Courtenay threw
on a dressing-gown, and before proceed-
ing to Alfred's room, he went to the
door of that in which Robert slept, and
called in a stern voice, Robert, get up
and come here!'
"Robert came out looking pale and
much frightened, and I perceived that
he trembled like a leaf. 'Your little
brother is dying, sir,' said Mr. Courte-


93






94 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

nay,' and you are to go with me, and
stand by his bedside.'
"Robert struggled fiercely to get
away, but Mr. Courtenay's strong hands
held him, and dragged him on to the
room of the dying boy. Alfred was
evidently very near death; he could no
longer swallow, and he was gasping for
breath; and with his little thin fingers
picking at the blanket. Robert was
fearfully agitated when he looked upon
him; he tried to struggle from Mr.
Courtenay's grasp, and rush from the
room, but his guardian held him fast.
'Robert,' I heard him whisper, 'though
I have no positive proof of it, yet I





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 95

firmly believe that this is your delibe-
rate work, and you shall look upon the
end of it.'
Then little Alfred's faint voice said,
'Mother, mother, kiss me! Robert!
where is Robert ? tell him I forgive
him all! My Saviour!' and that was
all. Our dear little playmate and
friend was no more.
"Robert left the next day with his
guardian, who took the remains of lit-
tle Alfred, to lay them beside those of
his parents. We heard nothing more
of him for years, but afterwards I
learned that his career, which began
so early in crime, continued downward,






96 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

and that he was then in the state
prison, for the crime of manslaughter.
"A few weeks since I took up a pa-
per, and read as follows:
"' A convict in the state prison,
having possessed himself by some
means of a sharp instrument, commit-
ted suicide last evening by stabbing
himself in the breast. His name was
Robert Canfield, and he has long been
known as a very desperate character.
He is not quite twenty-one, and in a
few months would have come into pos-
session of a handsome property, which
must now pass into the hands of dis-
tant relatives.'







THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 9T

"This was the end of poor Rob-
ert I"






















7



f.













Itie l-itg'

MY darling, be thou like the lily so fair,
Which raises its beautiful head to the sky,
Which gladly receives of the sunlight its share,
And drinks in the dew when the evening is nigh.

To the Father of All ever thankfully raise
Thine eye and thy heart, for the blessings he
sends,
Rejoice in his goodness, and give him the praise,
But remember these blessings he gives not-
but lends.

When the clouds gather black and the wild winds
sweep by,
The lily bows meekly its head to the blast,

















































TIHE LILY.





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


100


Folds up its sweet blossom and closes its eye,
But looks up once more when the tempest is past.

So, my love, when adversity sweeps o'er thy path,
Bow meekly thy head till the storm passes by,
For trouble is sent thee in love-not in wrath,
Then up to the heavens in faith lift thine eye.

When the lily has drooped in the cold autumn rain,
And it falls and the place where it stood is
forgot,
It only lies sleeping till spring comes again;
He who clothed all the lilies has watched o'er
the spot.

So whenever thy head is laid under the sod,
He will watch o'er thy dust till he bids it arise,
Oh! pure as the lily ascend to thy God,
And bloom mid the flowers that bloom in the
skies.




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