• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Main
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Theodore Thinker's Tales
Title: The holiday book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001901/00001
 Material Information
Title: The holiday book with illustrations
Series Title: Theodore Thinker's Tales
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C ( Francis Channing ), 1812-1859
Clark & Maynard ( Publisher )
Publisher: Clark & Maynard
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1851
 Subjects
Subject: Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Puzzles -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Riddles, Juvenile   ( lcsh )
Puzzles -- 1851   ( rbgenr )
Riddles -- 1851   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Puzzles   ( rbgenr )
Riddles   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Francis C. Woodworth.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001901
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002240008
oclc - 16799439
notis - ALJ0547
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page i
        Front page ii
        Front page iii
    Frontispiece
        Front page iv
    Title Page
        Front page v
    Copyright
        Front page vi
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Back Cover
        Page 98
    Spine
        Page 99
Full Text
"'
Ebt ~~l.~~pr





































The Baldwin Library
Univeuity
om
R m Farida














'4\
;ol ,
-r ~ rC, ,, II- e A
iii I~"',a


av






THEODORE THINKER'S TALES.

THE


i HOID .AY BOOK.J
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS.


BY FRANCIS C. WOODWORTH.


NEW YORK:
CLARK & MAYNARD,
5 BARCOLY ST.






















Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1851,
BY CLARK, AUSTIN & CO.,
ia the Clerks Office of the District Court of the United States for tba
Southern District of New York.




V t f


FRANK AND SUSAN.
Frank and Susan, a brother
and sister, went to school in the
city of New York. Their pa-
rents lived in the city, and the
children did not often go into
the country. But a few years
ago-I believe it was the sai





6 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
year in which the cholera visited
the city-they were told that
if they would learn their lessons
well, they might go into the
country as soon as the vacation
began, and that they might stay
all the rest of the summer.
So, the very first day after
their school was out for the sum-
mer, Frank and Susan went to
Greenville, a beautiful place in
the country, and there they





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 7

stayed until the frost began to
nip the leaves of the trees, in
the fall.
I cannot tell you half of what
they saw and heard, that de-
lighted them; and if I should
tell the whole, some of you,
who are more acquainted with
the country than you are with
the city, would say, "Why, Mr.
Thinker, I've seen all that many
a time." So, instead of giving





8 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
you half a dozen chapters, all
filled with what these two chil-
dren saw and heard in and
about the pretty village of
Greenville, I will write you a
book made up of pictures of
holiday life; that is, I will give
you just such stories as I think
you will all like to read when
there is no school, and during
your holidays. This book I
will call "The Holiday Book."





THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

SNow I shall expect that you
will love to read this book quite
as well as you love to play;
and, indeed, I shall put some
riddles, and puzzles, and cha-
rades, and such things in it, so
that, while you are reading
them, and trying to find them
out, it will be almost the same
thing as play.







FRANK AND SUSAN. AT GREENVILLE.

Would you like to know how
Frank and Susan spent their
time in the country? They
did so many things, that it
would be difficult to mention
them all. But you may be
sure of one thing-they did
not spend all their time in
playing. I suppose they liked





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 11
play as well as any children;
but they found other ways of
amusing themselves, once in a
while, besides playing. I have
seen some boys and girls, who
seemed to think that they could
not do any thing but play, when
there was a vacation in their
school, even if the vacation last-
ed all summer. Frank and
Susan, however, did not have
any such thoughts.





12 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
It was a very common thing
for them, when their grand-
father and grandmother, with
whom they were staying, were
willing, to go out into the woods,
and hunt for flowers, and make
the acquaintance of the birds
and the squirrels.
They were both very fond
of botany; and many a time,
.while they were at Greenville,
they strayed into those beautiful





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 18

places where the flowers were
very abundant, and, after col-
lecting a great many different
kinds, they sat down under the
shade of some large tree, where
they found out the names of
the different flowers, by the
help of a book written on pur-
pose for boys and girls of their
age.
In the picture of Frank and
Susan, which I have given you.




14 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
they are reading a book, as
you will see.
"Ah! that is the botany,"
you say, "that they have taken
out with them, so they might
study out the names of the
flowers they found."
No, this time they have got
another book. I can tell you
what the name of it is, if you
would like t6 know. It is
Woodworth's Youth's Cabinet,





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 15

a magazine made on purpose
for children. The day before
that on which Frank and Susan
made the visit to the old chest-
nut-tree, in the sheep pasture,
where they are represented in
the picture, their father came
up from New York, and brought
them one of these magazines,
telling them that he was going
to have a new one sent to them
every month.





16 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
They found a great many
things in this magazine which
pleased them very much. The
stories, the little pieces of poetry,
the scraps of history, and the
descriptions of wonderful things,
delighted them so, that they
could hardly take their eyes off
from the book until they had
read it through.
There was another part of
the book that they liked. I




THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 17
am not sure but they liked it
better, indeed, than they did
any thing else in it. That was
the part which was devoted to
enigmas, and riddles, and such
things. How they did puzzle
over some of those knotty (not
naughty) riddles! How hard
they tried to untie those knots !
Susan did rather better with
the riddles than her brother. I
am not sure but girls generally





18 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
show more wisdom than boys
in guessing riddles and puzzles.
I think I hear some of my
little readers say, "I should like
to see some of those puzzling
things that Frank and Susan
found in the Cabinet."
I will print some of them for
you; or, rather, I will print
-some as good as those were. I
do not make them myself. My
wit, if I have any, does not run





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 19

in that channel exactly. But
I have some good friends who
are quite at home in tying such
knots; and when I told them
I was about making a Holi-
day Book" for children, and
that I wanted to put some ex-
cellent riddles and enigmas into
it, they sent me a few, which
they gave me liberty to present
to you.
Shall I tell you the names of





20 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
these good friends of children?
I have a great mind to do so.
One of them lives in the State
of Michigan, and her name-
but really I am afraid, after all,
that she would not like it, if I
should tell you. It begins with
L, though. I will tell you as
much as that. Another lives
in Brooklyn, just over the East
River, opposite my own city.
This is Mrs. S. N. Another is





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 21
Mrs. H. L. W. Still another
lady, who has sent me some
very pretty puzzles for my
young friends, was for many
years a missionary among the
Choctaw Indians, but is now liv-
ing in one of the New England
States--Miss L. S. H.
But I will bring on the puz-
zles, and say no more about
the persons that made them.













Enigma No. 1.
I comprise but nine letters, yet am
able to spell more than three times the
number of words that there are letters
in my name.
Would you like to hear me ?
My 6, 5, 4, is a name of Deity.
My 5, 6, is a city destroyed by the Is-
raelites.
My 4, 5, 6, 3, is a means of sending
intelligence.
My 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, is a well-known
author.









rP9









H1I
tA




I





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 25

My 3, 2, 4, 5, is an object of worship:
also an animal.
My 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, is a branch of me-
chanical trade.
My 7, 8, is an abverb.
My 4, 5, 6, 9, is a name of the ocean
or continent.
My 7, 8, 9, is a descendant.
My 4, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, is a word used
formerly instead of curse.
My 9, 8, is a negative.
My 1, 5, 6, 4, is to disable a limb.
My 8, 9, is a preposition.
My 5, 3, 4, 2, is part of a Popish reci-
tation.
My 4, 2, 1, 5, is a familiar name for a
parent.






26 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

My 8, 6, 3, is an article in common
use, in pursuit of which life, health, and "
all else is risked-privation, peril, and
anxiety encountered.
My 2, 6, 4, is what all must do to
excel.
My 7, 8, 6, 3, is found in every land
on the globe.
My 3, 6, 1, 5, is the capital of a re-
public.
My 4, 2, 9, is an animal of the biped
species.
My 3, 8, 5, 9, is what few like to ask,
and fewer still to grant.
My "3, 6, 8, 9, is a wild beast.
My 3, 8, 2, 4, is essential to the thrift
of house plants.






THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 27

My 7, 6, 2, 4, is the name of a popu-
lous kingdom.
My 5, 6, 3, is a name for pain.
My 7, 3, 6, 1, is applied to any thing
having length without thickness.
My 7, 6, 8, 9, is the New Testament
name of the ancient church.
My 4, 8, 5, 9, is an expression of dis-
tress.
My 3, 8, 6, 9, is a choice part of
animal food.
My whole was once the favorite resi-
dence of an emperor.






28 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.


Enigma No. 2.
My first is an object that city folks see,
Which goes on two legs, but ne'er upon
three;
'Tis very much prized by the lazy and
lame ;
Although very useful, it has a short name.
My second is found
In Long Island Sound,
Yet ne'er in the water appears;
'Tis seen in the hair
Of the bat and the bear,
SBut never resides in their ears.
My third is a tool which fishermen use,
And one of all others they like not tb
lose;






THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 29

Yet if you'll invert it, 'twill bring to your
view
The age of a child, perhaps older than
you.
My whole is the name of a gem, that in
truth,
Should be in the hands of every youth.
Now can you not my name surmise 1
I'm something that you dearly prize.


Enigma No. 3.
I am composed of twenty-one letters.
My 3, 9, 1, 12, 11, is the name of an
ancient city.
My 18, 20, 7, 21, is any thing and
every thing.






30 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

My 8, 15, 19, 16, 13, is what Cupid is
often called.
My 4, 5, 2, 6, is real estate.
My 10, 17, 14, is what people always
are when it rains hard, and there is no-
thing between them and the sky but a
thin umbrella.
My whole is of great importance to
many, and is made a theme of endless
speculation and discussion by a few-if
not more.

Enigma No. 4.
I am composed of twenty-one letters.
My 2, 19, 8, 9, is a northern constella-
tion.
My 6, 21, 17, is a vindictive goddess.





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 31

My 2, 11, 1, 9, 14, was a Roman poet,
( elated to Seneca.)
My 1, 4, 14, 18, 15, is a river in
Africa.
My 10, 11, 6, 19, is a dangerous place
for intoxicated men who cannot swim.
My 5, 15, 20, 13, is a distinguished
title.
My 16, 12, 3, 7, have been called
"timid, busy, large, small, pretty, wicked,
daring, clumsy," etc.
My whole is a woman celebrated in
history, with her title.





82 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.


Charade No. 1
My first is great, and bright, and high,
Else were my whole not needed;
My second wandering from his eye,
Is by'my first unheeded;
And I, upon a sultry day,
Am often seen along Broadway.

Charade No. 2.
My first is an adjective, sad to behold-
More terribly fearful to bear;
My third more brilliant may be than gold,
Though viewless and free as the air;
My fourth without wings will swiftly fly,
Yet never it goes ahead,
Nor touches it either the earth or the sky,
But follows wherever 'tis led;






THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 38

My second is found in the other three;
My whole is an island that lies in the sea.

Charade No. 3.
My first is a very useful article in
making books for children.
My second belongs to the first order
of creation.
My third abounds on the eastern coast
of the United States.
My whole is a desirable accomplish-
ment.
Charade No. 4.
My first contains a family;
My second will outweigh
A thousand pounds of precious gold,
Try it whene'er you may.
3






34 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

My whole is worn by rich and poor,
Each sex and every station;
And, save some dark, uncultured tribes
In every land and nation.

Your thoughts it silently conveys,
If thus you please to use it;
And, sent with tidings to a friend,
He seldom will refuse it.

Sometimes it bears the gallant ship
Across the ocean wide;
And sometimes holds it firmly moored
In spite of wind and tide.









































































































I



















0 04
0

e







0
p.
4r
*W

0 0


mE.'!.






THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

Riddle No. 1.
In my silvery sheen,
With visage so bright,
In garments so clean,
And of fabric so light,
I'm a fairy queen.
In my swift gliding car,
With my banner unfurled,
I have journeyed afar;
I have seen all the world,
And each glimmering star.
I'm a queen, and my throne
Is exalted so high,
To look down I am prone,
To look up I scarce try;
Yet I honor my crown.


37






88 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

Some call me quite green,
But no one can teach me;
My faults are all seen;
But none can impeach me-
Oh, no! I'm a queen.


Riddle No. 2.
I'm restless and uneasy,
Yet fastened in a socket;
And when I'm very weary,
I shut my door and lock it.

I've a gallery of pictures
As large as life, and true;
But, through my various humors,
They're not exposed to view.





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 89

The readers of this riddle
To me are much indebted;
A fact which I have cause to think
They never have regretted.

I'm a busy little body,
And useful quite as small;
Oft lingering in the study,
Oft in the lordly hall.

My home is in the palace,
And in the hermit's cell;
Sometimes my brimming chalice
A tale of woe will tell.





tO THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

Riddle No. 3.
The day we most dislike of all:
A sound we love to hear;
The cause of our first parents' fall;
Yet nothing far or near.
A liquor drank, that turns the brain;
A tool mechanics use;
A cause of death, in fear and pain;
Yet something to amuse.
Utensils daily, in our use,
A covering many wear;
A fair thing, hiding earth from view;
Yet sailing through the air.
My whole's a name-few hear it not,
And heard, it scarce will be forgot.






THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 4.

Riddle No. 4.
Come, guess my name-I'm very small;
One syllable will tell it all;
In every house I find a spot;
He's poor indeed, who owns me not.

Take but one letter from my name,
'Twill quickly bring to view,
What animals of all kinds claim-
Yes, even I and you.
And sad indeed would that dog be,
Who should be dispossessed of me.

Now take one letter more away,
And it will leave behind,
What has been proven, to this day,
A blessing to mankind.





42 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

Quite out of breath would that man be,
Who should be dispossessed of me.

Prepared aright, with viewless speed,
'Twill send a missile flying.
Tell what it is. "I can't." But try-
There's naught, you know, like trying



Riddle No. 5.
There is what seems, as I may say
A wonder to the mind;
For we may take it all away,
A dozen times, or more, a day,
Yet leave it all behind.





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 43
Do you think you can find
out the answers to all these
puzzling things, little friend?
Try them, and see. Some of
them are rather hard; but in-
dustry and patience conquer
almost every thing. When
you get through untying these
knots, I have a story to tell you
about a boy who came very
near being drowned, because
he did not mind his father.





44 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

The story was told me by the
Brooklyn lady whom I have
mentioned before. I was so
well pleased with the story,
and thought it would teach
such a good lesson to my young
friends, that I asked her to
write it down. She did so,
and here it is.







d














E4
**_









LITTLE GEORGE.


There was once a little boy
whose name was George. He
lived by the side of a pretty
river. His papa had a beau-
tiful boat, called the "Swan;"
-nd very often when George
had been a good boy, his father
w-uld take him out in the boat.





48 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
George had been told that he
must not get into the boat
alone, because there was danger
that some accident would hap-
pen to him.
One day, George wanted to
go down into the meadow, and
get some of the pretty wild-
flowers that grew on the banks
of the river. His mother told
him he might go; and he took
his little basket with him, and





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 49
off he started for the meadow.
He spent some time gathering
pretty flowers; and then he
went down and stood on the
banks of the river, and threw
stones into the water, for his
dog Snap to fetch out. He
soon got tired of that fun, and
said to himself, "I think I will
go and sit a little while in the
boat. It will not do any harm,
I guess, and I won't stay.long.k '




60 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
Don't you think it was very
naughty in him to do what his
kind papa had told him not to
do? But you shall hear what
happened to him, because he
did not mind his papa.
While he was in the boat,
the rope that had made it fast
to the post got loose, and the
boat began to float away down
the stream. George called
loudly for help; but there.was





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 51
no one near to hear him, and
the boat kept going further and
further from the shore.
Poor George! how sorry he
was now that he had not mind-
ed his dear papa! He began
to cry; but the boat kept
going on, and was fast carrying
him out to the wide sea. He
thought he should never see
his dear home any more. By
and by he saw something black,





52 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

a long way off, coming into the
river, from the sea. He was
very much frightened, think-
ing that perhaps it might be a
whale.
He kept looking at it, as it
came nearer and nearer, when
what was his joy to find that it
was a boat coming toward him,
with some fishermen in it! He
shouted, and waved his pocket-
handkerchief; for it was get-





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 58
ting dark, and he was afraid
they would not see him. But
they saw. him, and came up to
him. He told them who he
was, and what had happened
to him. The fishermen were
very kind to him, and .took
him into their boat. They
wrapped him up warm, with
some of their clothing; for he
had got very cold. Then they
tied his boat fast to theirs, and




54 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
soon rowed poor little George
back to his father's house.
Oh! how glad he was to get
home! He thanked the good
fishermen, begged his dear pa-
pa's pardon, and promised never
to be so disobedient again; It
was a very good lesson for
George, and he never forgot it.






























THE TORBTUN3-TULNL r f


rl


C-!!3 CM [JU T I
3. -- I Ir!SL
ba OW ba Uma L








THE FORTUNE-TELLER

SOh, mother!" said Mary Ran-
dom, "I want to go over and
see Aunt Maggy, the fortune-
teller."
' "Why, my dear," her mo-
ther replied, what good will it
do you to go ?"
"Oh, I want to have my
fortune told."





58 THE HOLIDAY BOOK
"Do you mean that you
wish to know what is going to
happen to you for years to
come ?"
"Yes, ma'am. Please let me
go, won't you, dear mamma?
All the girls in school have
been, almost."
"Do you suppose that Aunt
Maggy, as you call her, can
tell what is going to happen
to you?"





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 59
"The girls all say she can.
A great while ago, she told-"
"My dear child, that woman
knows no more about those
things than I do."
"Well, she says she does."
"I know it; but she deceives
people. She is not what she
pretends to be."
"Why, mother, Miss Julia
Palmer, the school ma'am we
had last summer, went over to





60 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
see Aunt Maggy the other day.
What did she go for, if she did
not believe that she would have
her fortune told correctly ?"
"Did Miss Julia go? Are
you sure she went ?"
Yes, ma'am, I know she
went. She went with Mary
Morgan, and Fanny Gray, and
two or three other girls."
"And did Miss Julia have
her fortune told ?"





THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

"Yes, ma'am; so
Gray said. She told
about it."
"Well, what did s
you ?"


Fanny
me all

he tell


"When they got to the
house where Aunt Maggy lives,
away down in the lane, toward
the grist-mill, and when they
saw her ugly face at the win-
dow, they were almost afraid
to knock at the door. Fanny





62 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
said that Aunt Maggy was the
worst-looking woman she ever
saw in her life. But while they
were standing just inside of the
gate, and thinking whether
they had better go into the old
woman's house, or take to their
heels, and scamper off, Aunt
Maggy came out, and asked
them to walk in.
"They did not go in, though.
They stayed in the yard, under





THE HOLIDAY BOO 68
the great willow-tree. Fanny
said she could almost hear her
heart beat, at first, she was so
much afraid of the fortune-
teller. She was sorry she did
not stay at home. Aunt Maggy
does look like a bad woman,
doesn't she ? The other day,
I met her in the street, opposite
the shoemaker's shop, and I
started and ran, she Jo.oked at
me so strangely. She had on





64 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
a straw hat, as large as a bushel
basket, I should think; and
there was an old pipe twisted
into the band. I wonder if the
old creature smokes ?"
"I presume she does. Don't
you remember when you went
up to Captain Prall's with me,
to see little Emily, when she
had the scarlet fever ?"
"Oh, yes, I remember it well.
What a cold day it was! That




r~pr~rrgqlr7~1~ rl-~-
'1 r
























I~iilk

~~ k





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 67

was the time we saw a fox run-
ning across the road, and two
dogs chasing him, as fast as they
could run. I wonder if the dogs
ever caught the fox, mother?"
"I don't know how that was.
The dogs were a long way be-
hind the fox, when they crossed
the road. But you remember
we went into the store that
day, to buy some nice things
for Emily Prall ?"




68 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

"Oh, yes, ma'am, we bought
same raisins, and some loaf
sugar, and some lemons; and
how little Emily Prall did like
the lemonade you made for
her !"
"Yes. But do you recollect
that Aunt Maggy, (as you call
her-though I should not like
such a woman for my aunt;)
do you recollect that she was
in the store ?"





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 69

"Yes, and she was buying
something."
"Well, I saw what she was
buying. It was tobacco. No
doubt she smokes'; and she
does a great many things worse
than that. I think she is quite
as bad as she looks. Really, I
should hardly think you would
tease me to go and see such a
woman as you describe; and I
am sure it seems strange that




T0 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
you should want to have her
tell your fortune."
"Oh, mother, I should not
go alone. Fanny didn't go
alone, you know."
"But you haven't told me
what the fortune-teller said. I
want to know something about
that, before I give my consent
for you to go over to her house.
Whose fortune did she tell
first ?"





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 71
"Miss Julia's. None of the
girls dared to let the old wo-
man take hold of their hand,
till they saw that the school
ma'am was not afraid."
"Well, how about Miss Ju-
lia's fortune ?"
"Aunt Maggy took hold of
her hand, and looked at it very
carefully, for a long time, with-
out saying any thing. Then
she looked in Miss Julia's face,




72 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

and told her that she saw ex-
actly what would happen to
her. 'You will be a great lady,
one of these days,' said she.
'You will not keep school any
more, then. You will have
lots of silver and gold, and you
will ride in a fine carriage. But
you will see trouble first. A
very dear friend, who lives a
great way off, will die. You
will be very sick. Some people
d





THE HOLIDAY BOOK 78
will think you are going to die.
But you will not die. You will
live till you get married to a
rich husband, and have all these
fine things. You will live a
good while after that, too.
When you are rich, you will
do good with your money; and
you will remember poor Mag-
gy, and give her a whole purse
full of gold.' And the fortune-
teller said a great many things




74 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
more. She told Miss Julia thai
her-"
"Well, never mind the rest.
We have had nonsense enough
for one day, I should think.
You cannot go to the fortune-
teller's. It will do you no good,
and may do you harm to go.
I wonder that Miss Julia could
have been so foolish as to go;
and I wonder still more that
she should have taken those





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 75
little girls with her, It is not the
place for girls and boys. You
will see this as plainly as I do,
when I tell you something about
this woman, and also something
about fortune-telling, which you
never knew before.
"I knew Maggy before you
was born. She used to work
for me, once. I kept her until
I found she was a bad woman,
and then I turned her away.





76 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
Before she went away, how-
ever, she stole a great many
things from the house. We
got a few of them back again.
But the silver spoons which she
stole, we never could get. She
stole from other people, too.
At last, she became so trouble-
some, that the neighbors began
to think it would be necessary
to have her taken up, and sent
to prison. But she begged very





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. ?7

hard when she was told what
the people thought of doing,
and promised to do better if
they would forgive her, and not
put her in prison. So the
neighbors thought they would
try her again. If she did not
steal any more, they told her,
they would not put her in
prison.
"Then the old woman took
up the trade of fortune-telling.




78 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
She gave out that she had
made a bargain with some
wicked spirits, and that they
had agreed to tell her a great
many secrets about the future
history of the people who lived
in the neighborhood. All the
neighbors had to do, according
to her story, if they wanted to
learn what was going to hap-
pen to them for years to come,
was just to come to her house,





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 79
and pay her a quarter of a
dollar, or half a dollar, I am
not sure which."
"It was only a quarter of a
dollar, mother-that was all
Miss Julia paid."
"Very well, a quarter of a
dollar. As soon as they gave
her that sum of money, she said
she would tell them all they
Wanted to know. A good many
foolish people, at different times,





80 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
have been to her house, to have
their fortunes told. She is a
cunning old creature. Some-
times, after a simple girl has
given her the quarter of a dollar,
she looks in the person's hand,
and then talks to herself awhile,
and finally says that the spirits
will not answer her then; that
she must come again. The
foolish girl does come again.
Then the old woman makes





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 81

her visitor pay another quarter
of a dollar. She has been
known to get as much as three
or four dollars from one poor
servant girl, before she got
through telling the whole of
the girl's fortune. And that is
not the worst of it. Many who
have been to her to have their
fortunes told, actually believe
every word she says; and the
silly things that Maggy puts
6




1
82 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
into their heads make them
proud, and dissatisfied with their
condition."
"But does Aunt Maggy steal
now, mamma?"
"Most of the neighbors think
that she does. A great many
things are missed, which it is
thought are taken by her. But
she is so sly, that no one sees
her stealing. She is not too
good to steal. You may be





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 83
sure of that. She gets drunk,
and tells lies, and uses very
bad language. Any one who
does such things cannot be too
good to steal. My dear daugh-
ter, would you like to go over
to Aunt Maggy's, and have
your fortune told ?"
"No, ma'am, I don't want
to go near her. What a fool
I was to want to have my for-
tune told !"








THE HAND-ORGAN.
A Dialogue between Theodore and his friend Henry.


Henry. Mr. Thinker, I saw
a man with a hand-organ to-
day, and it was the queerest
thing of the kind that I ever
came across.
Theodore. Ah! and what
was there about the organ that
was so queer ?



















tt


\it
/ &#




~P~ ~ --h-Th_-P~i-n-rTs~m-T-~-~P;rrT7-~C~~ --:~I) : I -~'~ .- -';Y





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 87
H. Why, when the man
turned the crank, it played
"Yankee Doodle," and "Home,
sweet Home," and "Hail, Co-
lumbia!" and ever so many
tunes.
T Well, what then? Al-
most any hand-organ will do as
much as that, when anybody
turns the crank.
H. Oh, I hadn't got half
through telling about it. While






88 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

it was playing a tune, some
little soldiers, made of wood,
marched around on the top of
the hand-organ, and they had
guns and swords in their hands,
and they kept tune with the
music. There were some little
girls and boys, too, standing in
another place on the organ,
and they danced while the man
was playing.
T. That was worth seeing,


--7w WWT PvjWPMP1MQ-





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 89

I should think. Did the man
have a monkey with him?
H. No, sir. But last Satur-
day, when I went down town,
I saw a man with a hand-organ,
and he had a monkey, which
he held with a chain.
T. I suppose the monkey did
some rather funny things, did
he not ?
H. Oh, yes, sir. He made
me laugh all the time I was




.-*"- ----------*-- II

90 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
looking at him. He had a
tin pan, which he passed round
to all the boys and girls, so
that they might throw some
pennies into it. Then he took
the pan, and put it on his head,
for a hat. I wonder how the
man could teach the monkey
so many tricks.
T. I have seen this man with
his organ a good many times;
and I know a chapter in his





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 91

history which contains a good
lesson. I will recite it to you.
Homer Baldwin (for that is
the name of the man you saw
with the hand-organ) was a
pretty good boy when he was
of your age. But, in some way
or another, he got into bad com-
pany. Before he was sixteen
years old, he had learned to
like rum, and brandy, and such
kinds of liquors; and more than





92 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.

once, before that time, though
his parents kept a close watch
over him, he got so drunk that
he could scarcely stand.
One night, after his father
and mother had gone to bed,
he stole out of the house softly,
so that nobody could hear him,
and went to a house on the
next block from the one where
his father lived. There were
two young men in this house,





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 93

who had a room together, and
whose habits were very bad.


BOMxR AND HIS OOlPaPAIOs.

Homer had been invited to
come to their room. They
were going to have a "high





94 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
time," they said. They did
have a high time, I should
think. They drank hot whis-
key, until they all became
drunk. Homer was not used
to hot whiskey, and he became
worse off than the other two.
That night, he tumbled down
stairs, he was so drunk, and
broke his arm. From that time
to this he has never had the
use of his left arm.





THE HOLIDAY BOOK. 95

H. Why, I did not see but
he had two arms.
T. You would not perceive
that he had lost the arm, unless
you noticed very carefully. He
has a sleeve on the left arm,
just such a sleeve as there is
on the other arm. But that
arm had to be cut off, near the
shoulder. It was hurt so badly,
that it mortified, and so he lost
it. That scar which you saw





96 THE HOLIDAY BOOK.
over the eye, was made by the
wound he received when he
fell.
I tell you what it is, my
boy, the best thing you can do,
when you are asked to drink
brandy, or rum, or gin, or wine,
no matter how much you are
urged-the best thing you can
do, is to let such stuff alone.





















































































0




xi

-wnc,7'































ir




__T' Mr


rs
















=rrv
























19




























......... -tr -.
-m .. .. .........
74


_Jaw




-zt




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs