• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The tardy girl
 The new tea-set
 The bee and the flowers
 The orphan children
 What is an allegory?
 Innocence, memory, and hope
 What is the matter?
 Chasing after pleasure
 The dialogue
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: The girl's story book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001900/00001
 Material Information
Title: The girl's story book
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C ( Francis Channing ), 1812-1859
Clark, Austin & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Clark, Austin & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1851
 Subjects
Subject: Girls -- Conduct of life -- Early works to 1900 -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Theodore Thinker.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001900
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002240004
oclc - 15616870
notis - ALJ0543
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    The tardy girl
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The new tea-set
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The bee and the flowers
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The orphan children
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    What is an allegory?
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Innocence, memory, and hope
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    What is the matter?
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Chasing after pleasure
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    The dialogue
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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THE TARDY GIRLt.
Do you see that girl, trudging
along, with a book itd: one :
hand, and her bag in the other? '
Well, where do you think:thrI .
is going ?
"To school, I guess."
You are right. She is goiag ,




S6 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
to school. But she will be late.
I'm sure she will be late.
"What makes you think so,
sir ?
Because she is always late.
No'matter how early she gets
up in the morning-no mat-
ter how early she eats break-
fast-she always manages to
get to the school-house a little
while after school begins. And
this is a bad habit of hem,




HIE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 7
There is no excuse for it. She
might be early at school, just
as well as late.
And she is not only tardy in
getting to the school-house, but
she is tardy everywhere. When
the bell rings for breakfast, she
is not quite ready; and so sh6
comes into the dining-room
after the rest of the family
have commenced eating, or
perhaps she opens the door




8 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.

just as her father is asking a
blessing.
You ought to see her when
she is getting ready to go any-
where with her father and mo-
ther. She spends so much
time in idleness or play, that
she has hardly time to put on
her things, when her parents
are ready to go.
She got severely punished
for this fault once, or, rather,
1




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 9
she punished herself for it. It
was one beautiful day in spring
-one of those days in which
it seems that the birds are
having a concert on a large
scale, they fill the air so full
of their music.
"Would you like to take a
ride with us this morning, Jean-
nette ?" asked her mother.
Jeannette was delighted with
the thought, and actually dan-




10 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
ced bfr joy, as she said, "Yes,
ma'am, I will go right away,
and get ready."
"Very well," said her mother,
"see that you get ready in sea-
son. I must go into the kitchen,
and see about the dinner, be-
fore I go. But you may tell
Susan to help you put on. your
red merino frock and clean
apron. Run, now. The car-
Sriage will be here in half an




THE. GIRL'S~BTORY BOOK. 11 "
hour; and as soon as it comes,
dear father will want to start
off. You know he does not
love to wait, when the horses
are at the door."
Jeannette started, and ran to
find Susan. Susan was in the
door-yard, hanging clothes on
the line. "I will be ready in
a minute," said the girl; "just
as soon as J get through with
the clothes in the basket."




S 12 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK,

It only took Susan a minute
or two, as she said it would,
to get through with what she
was doing, and then she was
ready to help Jeannette put on
her new frock and apron. But
she could not find the thought-
less girl. She had seen her little
brother, who was just going out
to the barn to feed his rabbits;
and, without stopping to think,
she ran to the barn, with Eddy.




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 189
There were a good many
things worth seeing about the
barn, besides the rabbits. There
were some young goslings in
the barn-yard, and two or three
lambs, and a young colt, that
amused himself and the chil-
dren by running around the
yard, and throwing his heels
into the air.
And thpre was an old hen
in the barn-yard, too, that had




* 14 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.

chickens. Jeannette was a good
deal amused to see the old hen
ruffle up her feathers, and run
at her, when she threatened to
catch the chickens.
At last she thought it was
quite time to go and get ready.
So she ran back to the house,
and called loudly for Susan.
Susan came.
SWhy, Miss fJannette!"
said she, "where have you










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THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 17
been? I have hunted all over
the house after you."
"Oh," said the tardy girl, "I
have only been out to the barn
a minute, to see Eddy's rabbits,
and the lambs, and the colt.
I'll run and get my frock
now."
"Get your frock!" said
san; "why the carriage .
been gone ever so long." -
Poor Jeannette! she bur,




18 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
into tears, and cried nearly all
the time her father and mother
were gone. It was a sad dis-
appointment to her-the loss
of that ride. It was her own
fault, though, and she saw that
she had nobody to blame but
M IH self.
You might suppose that the
lesson she learned at this time
would have cured her of this
bad habit. But it did not cure




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 19

her. For a little while she did
better. But after a week or
two, she was, perhaps, as tardy
as ever.
I wonder if she will ever be
cured of her bad habit.' Unless
she turns over a new leaf in
this matter, she will be always
making trouble for herself and
everybody else who has any
thing to do with her.
Little girl! beware of this





20 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.

habit. Take care that you do
not get the name of being al-
ways too late.


e




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 21


THE NEW TEA-SET.


One morning-it was the first
day in the year, the time when
so many little boys get presents
from those who love theam--.
Jane Gregory had a nice tea-
set given her. There were
cups and saucers, and plates,
and knives and forks, and spoons,




22 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.

Sand I know not what else-
every thing that Caroline need-
ed to use in playing tea. How
white the cups and saucers were!
And they were so small and so
pretty, that the little girl could
not help clapping her hands
with delight when she saw
them.
Some little time after that-
I do not remember exactly how
long-Jane thought she should




THE GIRL'S *tY BOOK. 23
like to have three of her young
friends come to her house and
play with her. The names of
these girls were Mary Carpen-
ter, Fanny Morgan, and Jose-
phine Canfield. Her mother
was willing they should come.
She was a very kind mother,
and loved to please Jane.
What a pity that Jane did
not try hard to please her mo-
ther!




24 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
The girls came; and such
a time as they all had playing!
Caroline thought she had never
been so happy before in all
her life. But the sunshine did
not last all the afternoon. A
cloud came up-then a storm.
I will tell you how it was.
Jane brought out the new
tea-set, and they all sat down
to tea. They had tea, and
sugar, and milk, and biscuit,




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 25
and cake, and preserves. What
a fine time they might have
had, if it had not been for the
cloud and the storm!
"Will you have milk and
sugar in your tea?" Jane asked
each one of her visitors.
Yes," Mary Carpenter said,
and so said Fanny Morgan.
But Josephine Canfield, who
was as full of fun as she could
hold, said, No, she would not




26 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK
have milk and sugar, she would
take sugar and milk.
All the girls except Jane
laughed heartily at Josey's
answer. As for Jane, she did
not like it; and she took pains
to let all the girls know that
she did not like it.
"Why, Janey," said the fun-
loving Josephine, "don't make
up such a face about what
I said. I'm afraid the milk




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 27
will all turn sour, if you scowl
so.9
Josey ought not to have said
that, though she did not de-
serve much blame, to be sure.
She did not mean any harm
by it; but she soon saw that
there was to be a storm as well
as a cloud. The girls laughed
as loudly as before, and a little
louder, I guess.
Jane's face grew red with




28 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
anger. She got up, gave the
table a push, and upset it. Over
it went, with every thing that
was on it. What a spilling
of tea and milk there was;
what a smashing of china; what
a jingling of knives, and forks,
and spoons!
That put an end to the play,
of course. There was no more
comfort to be taken that day
by any of the four girls. What






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UPSETTING THE TABLE




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 31
nonsense it was to upset that
table, and break that new tea-
set! And how bitterly did that
foolish girl repent of what she
had done, when she got over
her fit of anger! Don't you
think she would have given a
good deal 'the next day, if she
had not broken her tea-set in
such a foolish manner ?
But the loss of the tea-set
was not the worst of it. She




32 THE GIRL'S STORf BOOK.
felt ashamed to think how she
had given way to her temper,
and she was afraid that her
playmates were so much dis-
pleased with what she had
done, that they would not love
her any more.











































JULIA AND ANNA IN THE GARDEN.




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 85


THE BEE AND THE FLOWERS.
A TPA3IBIL

One fine morning in summer,
as a Bee was flying from flower
to flower, in the garden where
Julia and Anna were busy
taking care of the flower-beds,
he overheard the little Wind
Anemone and the Blue Violet
talking in a tone that showed




86 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
a great deal of earnestness and
some ill-humor. The Bee had
secured his load of honey, and
was ready to go back to his
hive. But he had some curi-
osity to know what his good
friends were disputing about;
and so he sat still, in the bot-
tom of a lily, where he could
not be seen, and listened to all
that was said.
The Bee soon perceived that




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 87
these neighbors were quarrel-
ing about very trivial things.
They were both anxious to
testify their regard for the
great Being who had made
them, and taught them to
bloom; and each one haihlr
own way of doing it. It "A
happened, too, that each one
not only thought her own way
better than her sister's, but
seemed to doubt whether the




38 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
other way was good for any
thing.
The Anemone did not like a
blue corolla-the Violet could
not bear a white one. The
Anemone thought her sister
was too gay-the Violet replied,
and said something about false
modesty. Then there was a
great deal of foolish discussion
about the difference in the
shape of each other's leaves




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 39

and petals. By and by they
began to speak on the subject
of honey; and they could not
agree any better than they did
before.
The Anemone said that er
sister shut her heart so closely,
that nobody could enjoy the
benefit of her honey.
The Violet said that was
better than to pretend to keep
the heart open, without any




40 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
honey, and she had known
some folks do that.
The first said, in defence of
her opinion, that we were re-
quired to let our light shine in
the world.
The other replied, that we
were taught, too, that we must
not do things to be seen of men,
and that we were not allowed
to let our left hand know what
our right hand was doing.




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 41
The two flowers disputed a
long time, and grew more and
more excited as they proceeded.
At last the Bee flew close to
the place where the flowers
grew.
"Stop a moment, my good
friends," said he. "You seem
to have a great talent for
hunting up things about which
you differ. But pray tell me
what have become of all the




42 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
things that you both agree in?
Do you not agree in most
things of importance; and is it
wise to magnify these little dif-
ferences so ? Pardon me, if I
tell you, that this angry dispute
is unworthy of the Anemone
and the Violet." When he
had said this, he kissed each of
the flowers, and hurried to his
hive.




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 48

People of different sects,
some of them, at least, may
learn a lesson from this Bee, I
think.


,.-L




44 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.


THE ORPHAN CHILDREN.


James and Emily had once a
very kind father and mother,
though their father died when
they were quite young. I used
to know the children very well.
How often have I seen them,
hand in hand, tripping along
to school! Their faces were




THE GIRL'S STORY B60K. 45
always lighted up with a smile,
and they had the name of being
very affectionate to each other
and very kind to their play-
mates.
The.mother of these chil-
dren was a very good lady.
She used to talk to them a
great deal about God, and
about heaven; and many a
time she led James and Emily
into her room, and knelt down




48 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
with them, and prayed with
them.
Oh! how much those chil-
dren loved their mother! They
thought they could not live
without her; and when once
she reminded them that she
might die, little James threw
his arms around her neck, and
cried, and said he hoped if his
dear mother died, that he and
sister Emily might die too, and




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 47
be buried where she was. The
wish that James had was not
right, but it was a very natural
one; and when I was a child,
I, too, have prayed that God
would let me die with my mo-
ther, because I loved her so
well.
It was in the autumn, after
the frosts had begun to tinge
the forest trees with so many
beautiful colors, that James




48 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
and Emily were called one
night to their mother's bed-
side, to see her die. She gave
them a great deal of good ad-
vice, and the last words she
uttered were cheerful and hap-
py. Oh! what a privilege it is
to see the Christian die! She
prayed that God would be kind
to her dear children, and lead
them to heaven; and then she
went to her rest.

















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-THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 51
Long and bitterly did these
orphans weep when they, saw
that their mother was dead;
but they did not forget the
many good counsels she had
given them while she was liv-
ing. They remembered where
she had directed them to go
for comfort. There they went,
with their eyes full of tears.
They went to their room,
aq knelt down together, and




52 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
asked the Lord to take care of
them, to make them good chil-
dren, to keep them from sin,
and to prepare them to go
where their mother had gone.
"I begin now," said little
Emily, who was more calm
than her brother, "I begin now
to see what a precious book
the Bible is. Do you not re-
member, dear brother, where it
says, 'When my father and my




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 53
mother forsake me, then the
Lord will take me up?' That
is for you and me, I am sure it
is. Don't cry any more, James,
dear James;" and she kissed
the tears away from her bro-
ther's face, and read to him
some of the sweet Psalms which
their mother loved.
But did the Lord take care
of those children? What be-
came of them ?" I hear you ask.




54 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
They remembered the les-
sons they had learned of their
mother, and of their Sabbath-
school teachers. And they did
not forget that God had said,
"Those that seek me early
shall find me;" and there was
something within their own
breasts that told them these
words were true.
The other day I took up a
newspaper, and as I was look-




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 55
ing it over, I saw that Emily
was dead. That notice in the
paper made me think of this
story. She was eighteen years
old, I believe. She died with
a bright hope of eternal life.
James is a minister of the
Gospel. I have not seen him
for several years; but I learn
that he is a good man, and
trying to do good to others.




56 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.


"WHAT IS AN ALLEGORY


"Mother," said little Sue, one
day, when she was reading a
new book which her father had
just bought for her, "Mother,
what is an allegory?"
"My dear," Mrs. Birchard
replied, "what makes you ask
the question ?"




THE GIRL'S STORB BOOK. 57
"Because," said Sue, "I have
come across the word ,in this
new book, and I don't know
the meaning of it."
"Why don't you look in the
dictionary?" her mother asked.
Sue replied that she had
looked in the dictionary, and
had read what the dictionary
said over and over again, but
that she was not any wiser for it.
"What does the dictionary




58 TIPE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
say, Sue?" asked Mrs. Birchard.
" Read it."
Sue read the definition from
the dictionary: "A figurative
sentence or discourse, in which
the principal subject is describ-
ed by another subject resem-
bling it in its properties and
circumstances."
Mrs. Birchard laughed, and
said, "Well, my dear, I do not
wonder that you are no wiser




.THE GIRL'S STORY BOQK. 59
after reading what the dictioln-
ary has to say about the word.
The definition was not intended,
I suppose, for quite as young.
girls as you are. It is difficult
to describe an allegory to chil-
dren, without giving them an
example. Let me see. You
have read some in the 'Pil-
grim's Progress,' have you
not ?"
"Yes, ma'am," Sue said."




60 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.

"When aunt Hannah was here
last winter, we used to read in
the 'Pilgrim's Progress' almost
every day. Aunt Hannah
told me what it all meant. I
could not understand it, with-
out her help. It is a beautiful
book. I liked it very much."
"Well, that beautiful book
is an allegory. A great deal
of truth, and very important
truth, too, is taught there in


-c~---,n~-~-- -*-J1--.----r




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 61

figures. That is, certain per-
sons and things represent, or
stand for, certain other persons
and things. Christian, Faith-
ful, Giant Despair, Doubting
Castle, Vanity Fair, are all
figures, each representing some
person, or something else; and
so it is through the whole book.
The 'Pilgrim's Progress' is
perhaps the greatest and most
wonderful allegory ever written




62 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
in the world. There are some
beautiful allegories in the Bible.
The eightieth Psalm is written
in the form of an allegory."
Mrs. Birchard read a few ver-
ses from the Psalm.
"That is very beautiful," said
Sue, "isn't it, mother?"
"It is, indeed," said' Mrs.
Birchard; "and there are a
great many other things in the
Bible, of the same kind, quite




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 63

as beautiful. I saw a new al-
legory the other day, a very
pretty one. You would like
that, I am sure. The book in
which I saw it is not within
my reach now. But I guess
I can repeat it pretty nearly
in the words of the man who
wrote it."
"Who did write it, mother?"
"Mr. Leonard Withington,
I believe. He is a very beau-




64 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.

tiful writer. You will say so
when I repeat the allegory to
you."













































THB BLEEPING CHILD.


I a aI--m 9 =A- T R2MM =T5a




S THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 67


Snnnrnrc, %nPmarq, anh 5~pp.
Al AIL(DMY.

A child fell asleep; and he
dreamed that three bright and
beautiful angels stood over him.
And while he wondered at the
sight, one of them spoke to
another, and said, "I have
brought this garment of pure
white, and this white lily, that




68 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
will never fade, to give to him
who is spotless and good." And
the boy saw that on the angel's
forehead was written her name.
It was Innocence.
Then another angel spoke
in reply, and said, Look in this
glass which I hold in my hand,
and you will see the picture
of this sleeping child's life to-
day. See how he has been
disobedient, and thoughtless,




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 69

and passionate, and has forgot-
ten God and his prayers. I,
too, would have given him this
casket of precious jewels, but I
cannot bestow them on such
a one." Then the boy read
the angel's name in her fore-
head. It was .Memory.
Then spoke the third angel.
"I, too, would have given him
this golden crown, if he had
been true and good." And




70 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
her name the child read. It
was Hope.
Then the sleeper trembled,
when he remembered how he
had spent a wicked and thought-
less day. And the angels bent
their bright eyes sadly upon
him; and Hope said, "We will
meet here again in a year from
this night."
Then the suddenly vanish-
ed, and the sleeping boy awoke.




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 71
Very sadly he thought of his
dream. But he resolved, from
that time, to lead a better life.
And every night he called up
all he had done during the
day; and repented when he
remembered that he had done
wrong, and asked for pardon
through Jesus Christ.
And so the year went round.
Again he dreamed; and in his
dream the three angels came




72 THE 6IRL'S STORY BOOK.
again, and smiled on him.
"Now," said Memory, "I can
give him the box of jewels-
the precious gems of virtue,
and the recollection of good
deeds, of kind and pure words,
and happy thoughts-better
than all the riches of the
world."
"And I," said Innocence,
"will give him now the lily that
never fades-the spirit of glad-




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 13

ness, and the white robe of pu-
rity, such as the angels wear."
"And I," said Hope, "have
brought for him the golden
crown.
Then the sleeping child
thought he beheld himself ly-
ing there, with the golden
crown on his head, and the lily
in his hand, and he was clad
in the white robe of Innocence
and the jewels of Memory, and




74 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
in the sky above him he heard
the sound of music; and look-
ing up, he saw many bright
ones, with harps in their hands.
The stars rose in the sky,
and the moon shed its light on
the child's face, and still he
slept on.
And they found him in the
morning, with a sweet smile on
his lips, as if he were in a
pleasant dream. But his eyes




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 15

never opened on this world
again. His spirit was not there.
That had gone up with the
angels.





76 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.


"WHAT IS THE MATTER?"


Do you see that girl sitting in
the yard yonder, all alone, with
her face as red as a beet, and
about as long too? That is
Mary Preston. She has been
crying. And what do you
think is the matter ?
"I guess somebody has been




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 17

teasing her, and she feels griev-
ed about it."
No, nothing of the kind.
"Has she fallen, and hurt
herself ?"
No.
"What is the matter with
her, then? What is she griev-
ed about ?"
She is not grieved at all.
"What made her cry, then?"
Don't you know that children




78 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
cry sometimes when they are
not grieved ? I have known
some of my little friends cry
quite as loud and as long when
they were angry as when they
were grieved.
"I hope this little girl is not
angry."
Well, perhaps that is nbt
exactly what is the matter
with her. I'll tell you what
has happened, and then, per-




THE GIR S STORY BOOK. '19
haps, you can judge for your-
self.
Her little playmate, Jesse
Ray, wanted to sit down in her
chair. Mary was not using her
little chair, and there was no
good reason why she should not
have let him sit in it a while.
Jesse asked for it as prettily as
he could. "Mary," said he,
"will you please to let me sit in
your chair ?"




80 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
But Mary said, "No," and
sat down in it herself.
Mary's mother saw what was
going on, and she did not like
the way in which her child
acted.
"My dear," said she, "give
Jesse the chair."
The little girl obeyed, and
rose from the chair. Jesse sat
down in it. But Mary burst
out crying. Do you think




THE GIRlS TORY BOOK. 81

that was because Mary was
grieved ?
"No, sir; I should think
something else was the matter
with her."
And so should I. She did
not like it, because she could
not have her own way, and her
own way was a very selfish one
indeed.
I have heard of a dog in a
manger, where a horse was eat-
6




82 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
ing hay, who kept up a furious
barking~ so that the horse was
frightened away.
Now the dog did not want
to eat the hay. Dogs do not
eat hay at all. He was so self-
ish that he would neither eat
the hay himself, nor let the
horse eat it. It seems to me,
that Mary (though she was
generally a very good girl, I
must say); it seems to me that




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 88

Mary, in this matter of the
little chair, acted very much
like the dog in the manger.
She did not really want the
chair herself, and she was not
willing that Jesse should have
it.
"I should think that was
a very foolish thing to cry
about."
Yes, it was foolish enough.
Mary showed a bad spirit, too.




84 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
I hope you will never act as
she did.* Mary felt very sorry
for her conduct afterward, and
promised her mother that she
would never do so again.




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 85


CHASING AFTER PLEASURE.


The way to find pleasure is not
to chase after it. Stay where
you are, and make the most
and the best of what you have
and are likely to have, and you
will be happy enough, if I am
not much mistaken.
Some girls and boys-I know




86 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
a good many such-spend half
their time in sighing after some-
thing they cannot get, and if
they could get it, just as likely
as not they would not be any
happier.
Stella Bridgeton is never
happy. I scarcely ever see
her enjoying herself as other
girls do of her age. I used to
think it was very strange; but
I found out the reason awhile




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 8s

ago. I saw that she was always
chasing after pleasure. She
forgets that pleasure is close to
her, and that she has no need-
to go a rod to get it.
If she owns a pretty doll,
she does not seem to care much
for it, if she happens to see one
somewhere that she takes a
notion is prettier.
She makes me think of the
butterflies I have seen in the




88 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
meadow, when the ground is
covered with blossoms of the
clover, and the dandelion, and
the buttercup, and the lily.
The foolish butterflies will not
stop to enjoy any of the flowers,
but will just sip a little honey
from one, and then fly away to
another, because they think it
a sweeter flower than the one
they have left.
Stella makes her friends very






-A I
\/(

^"j*\A' ^W I
Y :^ Vu&WyZryy(A f~yl- ^P '^^^ ""S


BUTTERFLIES.




THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK. 91

w*ihappy by her not enjoying
the things she has, and by her
frequent teasing for something
else.
Children are not the only
ones, I am sorry to say, who
spend their time in chasing
after pleasure, after the fashion
of the butterfly. Thousands
arediving for this world alone.
They have scarcely a thought
about any thing higher. One




92 THE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
might suppose that such people
would be very happy. But
they are not at all happy.
They run so hard after pleas-
ure, that they run right over
it. They think it is a great
way off, while they are already
stepping on it. Oh, what folly
it is to waste all the precious
hours of life in this manner!
I tell you what it is, my dear
young friend, if you want to




STHE GIRL'S STORY BOC-. 93

be happy, you can be. I'll tell
you another thing, too, while
I'm about it. If you are not
happy with the things you
have already, there is a very
poor chance that you will be
happy, if you should get the
things which you are whining
after.
Never chase after pleasure.
Make the best of what you
have. That is the secret of




94 !fE GIRL'S STORY BOOK.
happiness. Did you ever read
those beautiful lines of Mrs.
Osgood, about the way to be
happy? She gives a little
dialogue between a mother
and her daughter. It might
have been Stella and her mo-
ther, for aught I know.




TH GIRL'S STOfY B6 95,




The child speaks first, and
says to her mother:
CHILD.
I wish I had a golden star,
I'd wreath it in my hair:
Look, mother, how it shines afar!
'Tis like a jewel rare!

And then the mother answers




S Is*ahG IB1 OY

her in the following beautiful
words:
MOTHER.
Yes, love; but see! you might
have had
Aktwsure far more sweet;
In gazing on that star, you've
crushed
The Heart's-ease at your
feet.




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