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Title: Uncle Reuben and his budget of stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001897/00001
 Material Information
Title: Uncle Reuben and his budget of stories
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C ( Francis Channing ), 1812-1859
Clark, Austin & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Clark, Austin & Co.
Place of Publication: New York (205 Broadway)
Publication Date: 1851
 Subjects
Subject: Smoking -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1851   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Theodore Thinker.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
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Bibliographic ID: UF00001897
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002240045
oclc - 45501332
notis - ALJ0584
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page 1
    Frontispiece
        Front page 2
    Title Page
        Front page 3
    Copyright
        Front page 4
    Main
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    Back Cover
        Page 98
    Spine
        Page 99
Full Text













UNCOL RS3UBN AND HIS DOG.


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UNCL5 RBUBEN,

AND HIS





3T 94rahtnrr tiiukrr.



NEV YORK:
PUBLISHED BY CLARB, AUSTIN 00.
205 BROADWAY.
1851.
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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1851,
BY CLARK, AUSTIN & CO.,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the
Southern District of New York.








AND HIS


....---- -- .

UNCLE REUBEN.
My dear young friend, I am
going to give you a little of the
history of Uncle Reuben; and
then, if you like the man, (and
I want you should like him,) I




6. UNCLE REUBEN.
will tell you some of the
stories that I have heard from
his lips.
Uncle Reuben was not an
old man when I first knew him.
Indeed, he might have been call-
ed young at that time, though,
when he was called home to his
God, he was somewhat past the
middle age. He was not my
uncle, and, indeed, he was not
at all related to me.




UNCLE REUBEN. 7
"Then why, Mr. Theodore,
did you call him uncle% ?"
I will tell you. He was
somebody's uncle, if he was not
mine.
"Well, what of that? You
don't call all the men uncles
that happen to have a nephew
or a niece, do you ?"
No, I do not, I confess; and
I have a better reason than
that for giving Mr. Jamison-




8 UNCLE REUBEN.
for that was his name-such a
title. *
There are some men, especi-
ally in the country, whom every
body, almost, will call uncle.
I have been acquainted, first
and last, with fifty such men,
and I presume more than that.
I remember there was an Uncle
Ben in the neighborhood where
I was born and brought up.
I don't know that any body




UNCLE REUBEN. 9

ever called him by any other
title than that, since my first
recollection. He was a good
soul, too.
But I am not writing Uncle
Ben's history, and I must talk
about Uncle Reuben, accord-
ing to my promise.
Uncle Reuben lived about
half a mile from my father's.
His house was not what might
be called a very handsome one;




10 t UNCLE REUBEN.

$hough it was not quite as old
as the hills, as the boys at our
school used to say sometimes,
when they passed it, and saw
how brown and mossy the
shingles were which covered
its roof and sides; yet any body
could tell, the first glance he
gave it, that it had seen a good
many years.
In that house, before it be-
came the property of my friend,




UNCLE REUBEN. 11
lived Uncle Reuben's father,
and grandfather. It was built
before tHe revolutionary war,
I should think. The inside of
the house, too, had quite as old
a look as the outside. There
were stones enough in the
chimneys of the building to
serve for at least six modern
dwellings of the same size as
that. The kitchen fireplace
at Uncle Reuben's, the grand




12 UNCLE REUBEN.
place of resort, during the long
evenings of winter, for the boys
in the neighborhood, would be
an object of great curiosity for
some of my young readers, if
they could get a glimpse of it.
Why, it was so deep and wide,
that you could have put into
it at once a whole load of wood
such as we buy in the city.
One of the dearest spots I
used to visit, when I was a boy,




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UNCLE RAUBEN. 16
was that old brown house; and,
even after I left Willow Lane,
when I thought of all I enjoyed
in that neighborhood, the brown
house was among the places I
cherished with the most love.
I must give you a picture of
Uncle Reuben's house, I guess,
just as it looked when I last
visited it. It was occupied by
another family then, but it had
preserved much of its former




16 UNCLE REUBEN.
appearance. I am afraid they
have pulled it down by this
time, though. It was getting
to be a very old house when I
saw it last.
The reason why I was so
fond of the old house, was that
I loved Uncle Reuben so much.
If you should inquire why I
loved him so much, I am not
quite sure that I could answer
you. This I know, however,




UNCLE RtUBEN. 17
Uncle leuben was one of the
best men that ever breathed,
or we children were greatly
mistaken. That was the char-
acter which he got among us,
and that was the character
which he always had, as long
as he lived.
He was fond of children, and
we all knew it. That might
have had something to do with
our opinion of him. I don't




18 UNCLE REUBEN.
pretend to deny that. Children
do not often love those very
much who do not love them.
I said that he was fond
of children. You would hive
thought so, if you had seen a
group of them listening to his
stories, or, perhaps, joining with
him in the innocent sports that
children like so well. You would
have thought so, if you had seen
him walking out, attended by




UNCLE REUBEN. 19
Ponto, the family dog, who was
almost always in company with
him, and who generally insisted
on his right to carry any basket
or parcel that his master had
with him. You might gener-
ally see at least half dozen
boys and girls around the good
man when he walked over to
the village store.
I said, too, that Uncle Reuben
was a good man. There were




20 UNCLE REUBEN.
other reasons for thinking him
a good man, besides his kind-
ness and love for children. No
one, for miles around, would go
further to help a person in dis-
tress. No one was ever more
ready tflend a hand when any
of the neighbors were sick. He
was good to the poor. Many
and many a time have I heard
a poor man or woman tell, with
tears, how kind Uncle Reuben




UNCLE REUBEN. 21
had been in seasons of want
and suffering.
He always had worship in
his family, morning and even-
ing; and it was delightful to
join, as I used sometimes to do
in the evening, in his prayer
and hymn of praise.
And that reminds me that
Uncle Reuben was a Sunday-
school teacher, and that it was
in his class that I first made my




22 UNCLE REUBEN.

acquaintance with the Sunday-
school. But I must tell you
the rest of what I have to say
about Uncle Reuben as a teach-
er, in another chapter.







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UNCLE REUBEN. 25


BLOSSOMS AND FRUIT;

Or, "By their fruits ye shall know them."


It was a treat to hear Uncle
Reuben talk to the scholars.
He did not preach to them;
that is, what he said to them
did not seem like preaching.
He gave a great deal of excel-
lent advice, and explained the




26 UNCLE REUBEN.
lesson as well, almost, as the
minister; but he mixed so many
stories with all he said, that he
never tired the children. They
would have listened patiently,
any time, two hours instead of
one, to Wncle Reuben's remarks.
I do believe they were always
sorry when he stopped talking
to them.
One day, these words of our
Savior occurred in their lesson,




UNCLE REUBEN. # 27
"By their fruits ye shall know
them." I shall never forget
what he said when he came to
that text. I think I can re-
peat his remarks, very nearly as
he uttered them, now. Would
you like to hear them, young
friend? I will give you some
of them, at any rate. He said:
Last suaner I passed through
an orchard belonging to my
kind and obliging friend Captain




28 UNCLE REUBEi.
Nash. It was in the month of
June, that sweet and charming
month,when the apple-trees are
in bloom, filling the air with
their delicious fragrance. Those
who have never seen an orchard
of apple-trees at this season of
the year, cannot imagine how
much beauty there is in these
blossoms, and how much sweet-
ness there is in their odor. I
was delighted with the appear-




UNCLE REUBEN. 29

ance of the orchard. So was
the captain, who was with me
at the time. We seated our-
selves under the shadow of one
of these trees, and talked to-
gether, for a good while, about
the kindness and love of God,
in scattering every where in the
earth so much beauty and love-
liness. We both agreed, too,
that there was a fine prospect
of fruit in the autumn. 1 was




30 UNCLE REUBEN.
very glad of this prospect, for I
knew very well the quality of
the fruit which might be expect-
ed from these trees. I knew
that the captain had taken a
great deal of pains in grafting
his trees, and that among the
number were the golden pippin,
the spitzenberg, the bellflower,
and the greening-apples which
make one's mouth water, only
to think of them.




UNCLE REUBEN. 81
Well, some months after the
flowering season had passed, I
visited that orchard again. At
this time, as before, the cap-
tain was my companion. Alas!
what a different aspect these
trees presented, from the one
we had anticipated in the early
summer. There was only here
and there an apple, in the whole
orchard. I could have carried
away almost the whole of them




32 UNCLE REUBEN.
in a small basket. Indeed, I am
not sure but the capacious
pockets of the captain's pea-
jacket would have held them
all.
"But what was the reason
of this ?" you inquire. I hardly
know. There was some cold
weather in the early part of the
month of June. Perhaps the
flowers were chilled, and that
the germs of the fruit were




UNCLE REUBEN. 88

blasted in this way. Possibly
the caterpillars destroyed the
young apples, just as they were
beginning to form. It may be
that there were strong winds
during that period, and that the
blossoms were blown off befo 1
the appearance of the apples.
But however that may be,
there was no fruit on the trees
when we visited the orchard
last, or aitost none.




34 UNCLE REUBEN.
I need not tell you, little boys
and girls, that this was a sad
state of things. But I must tell
you some of the thoughts I had,
as I saw these trees in the au-
tumn, and remembered what a
V-AIbh harvest they promised when
enjoyed their beauty and
fragrance before.
I thought that, desirable as
blossoms were, they were not
half so desirable as good apples




UNCLE REUBEN. *

I thought that if we looked
pretty closely into matters and
things, we might, once in a
while, see something like what
I saw in the orchard among
men and women, and boys and
girls. It came into my mind,
that in the matter of character,
a generous supply of leaves
and blossoms was no certain
sign of fruit. You know very
well, little friends, that the only




36 UNCLE REUBEN.
way to tell whether people are
really good and pious, is by
their actions-by the fruit they
bear, in other words. Our Sa-
vior says, in relation to those
who make professions of good
character, that "by their fruits
ye shall know them." It is no
matter how many leaves they
may happen to have, no matter
how beautiful and numerous
their blossoms are-they are




UNCLE REUBEN. 0 87

not worth much, if they are not
followed up by fruit. Profes-
sions are well enough, but they
are not half so good as actions.
To be sure, when we see apple-
trees covered with leaves and
blossoms, there is some sign that
there will be fruit pretty soon.
We expect it; we have a right
to expect it. But we may be
disappointed, you see.
Take care, then, little boy.




38 UNCLE REUBEN.
Take care that you do not de-
ceive us, in respect to your own
promises. If I am not much
mistaken, I heard one of you,
the other day, telling somebody
that you went to church every
Sunday; that you attended the
Sunday-school, and learned the
lessons which your teacher gave
you; that you always said your
prayers night and molding; and
that you meant to be a Chris-




UNCLE REUBEN. 89

tian. Aha! here are lots of
leaves and blossoms-that is a
fact. I am glad to see that. I
like the beauty of these leaves.
I like the odor of the flowers.
But stop a moment. Didn't I
hear you talking rather angrily
to your sister a few weeks after
that ? and didn't you strike a
boy at school, not long after
that, on ylhr way home, because
he said something you was not




40 UNCLE REUBEN.
pleased with? What was the
meaning of these things? I was
almost afraid that there had
been a high wind, or that the
caterpillars had been along that
way, and that all those pretty
flowers had fallen off, or been
eaten up. How is it? "By their
fruits ye shall know them," the
Bible says. Now, you don't want
us to judge you by the leaves
and flowers you bear, do you?




UNCLE REUBEN. 41

Keep a sharp look-out, my
friend. Keep a sharp look-out
for high winds and caterpillars.
After you have said your pray-
ers-and I would not have you
omit them, on any account-try
to govern your temper, and to
show, by all your actions, that
you are sincere and earnest in
all your professions. Bear in
mind, that fruit is worth more,
a hundred times over, than




42 UNCLE REUBEN.

leaves and blossoms. Never
forget that.















































THB WIND-MILL.




UNCLE REUBEN. 45


FIGHTING WIND-MILLS.


It was while we boys were
gathered around the old kitch-
en fireplace, at Uncle Reuben's,
one cold night in winter, that
the good man talked to us about
fighting wind-mills. One of us
had been to a neighboring vil-
lage, where there was a large




46 UNCLE REUBEN.
wind-mill. The boy had never
seen such a thing before, and I
believe that none of us had seen
one before that time. We had
seen small wind-mills, such as
are fastened on the top of the
barn, or corn-house, or wood-
shed, and which are sometimes
made curiously enough, so that
when the wheel goes round, a
piece of wood, made to look
like a negro boy, will go up




UNCLE REUBEN. 4.

and down, just as if it was
sawing wood. We had all seen
such wind-mills, and some of us
had helped make them, too.
But we had never seen a wind-
mill so large, that when the
wind blew, and the long arms
went round, the shaft of the
wheel would turn a grist-mill,
and grind wheat, and rye, and
corn, just like a wheel that goes
by water.




48 UNCLE REUBEN.
In many parts of the country,
such mills as the one which Joe
Standish saw can be seen now.
The farmers in the neighbor-
hood where the mill is, bring all
their grain to such a mill, to be
made into flour.
"But, Mr. Thinker," you
say, "I should not think that
these wind-mills were as good
as those which go by water."
Why not?




UNCLE REUBEN. 49

"Because the wind does not
blow all the time; and when
the wind does not blow, I don't
see how they can grind any
grain.
They can't grind unless the
wind blows, to be sure.
Then why don't they have
water ?"
But suppose they can't get
water ?
"Why, they can get water.
4




50 UNCLE REUBEN.
They can build a dam across
the brook."
But what if there is no brook
to dam up? There are a great
many places that I know of,
where there is no stream for
ten or twenty miles around.
But you want to learn what
Uncle Reuben said about the
wind-mill that Joe Standish saw.
After Joe had told us how
the mill looked, and how it




UNCLE REUBEN. 51

seemed like a great giant when
it went round and round, and
that it really acted as if it was
alive; after the little fellow had
gone through with all that,
while we were staring at him,
and occasionally putting in such
expressions as children frequent-
ly use when they hear any
thing wonderful, Uncle Reuben
said, that if we felt disposed to
listen to him, he would like to




52 UNCLE REUBEN.
say a word or two. Well, we
were disposed, you may be sure.
We always were all eye and
ear whenever Uncle Reuben
chose to speak. What he said
to us was something like this.
This wind-mill in Stonytown
makes me think of another
wind-mill, which I should guess
was a good deal like it.




UNCLE REUBEN. 58






It seems there was once a wind-
mill-history does not tell us
exactly where, and I suppose it
is not much matter where it
was-which went round and
round, day after day, very much
like the one which our young
friend has just been telling us




54 UNCLE REUBEN.
of. It did no harm to any body.
It never knocked any body
down, unless he got under it,
within reach of its great arms.
What if it did use the air-it
did not hurt the air any. It
was just as good for breathing
after it had turned the mill as
it was before.
But there was a flock of
crows in the neighborhood, that
took quite a dislike to the in-




UNCLE REUBEN. 00

nocent mill. They said there
must be some mischief about it.
They did not all like its actions.
The swinging of those long
arms, for a whole day at a time,
really looked suspicious. And,
besides that, it was rumored in
the village, (and one of the old-
est inhabitants said there was
no doubt but the rumor was
true, for his grandfather once
told him that the affair actually




56 UNCLE REUBEN.
did happen when he was quite
a young crow, and that he saw
it with his own eyes,) it was
rumored that a good-natured
crow went to look at the wind-
mill one day, and that the great
thing hit him a knock with one
of its arms, and killed him on
the spot.
Some half a dozen of the
flock of crows that felt so much
alarmed, were talking together,




UNCLE REUBEN. 51

at one time, when the conver-
sation turned, as was generally
the case, upon the giant mill.
After talking a while, it was
thought best to call a council
of all the crows in the country,
far and near, and to see if some
means could not be hit upon,
by which the dangerous thing
could be got rid of.
Well, the council was called,
and the council met. Such




58 UNOCL REUBEN.
a cawing and chattering was
never heard before in that
neighborhood, I venture to say.
They appointed a chairman
-perhaps I ought to say a
chair-crow.
"Why not scare-crow, Mr.
Thinker ?"
Just as you like, boys, only
let me go on with Uncle Reu-
ben's story. They appointed a
scare-crow and other officers,


















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UNCLE REUBEN. 61

and proceeded to business. As
is usual in public meetings of
this nature, there were a good
many different opinions as to
the question, what it was best
to do with the wind-mill. Most
of the crows thought it was a
dangerous thing-a very dan-
gerous thing indeed; but then
as to the best mode of getting
rid of it, that was not so easy a
matter to decide.




62 UNCLE REUBEN.
There were some crows at
the meeting, who were for ad-
journing at once, and going
right over to the wind-mill, all
the crows in a body, and de-
stroying the thing on the spot.
In justice to the crow family in
general, however, (for I must
say for one, that I have a good
deal of respect for their wisdom
and cunning,) it ought to be
stated that those who talked




UNCLE REUBEN. 63
about this warlike measure were
rather young. Their feathers
had not grown out to quite
their full length, and they had
inot seen so much of the world
as their fathers had.
After there had been a good
deal of loud talking, (crows
usually talk loud, as you are
probably aware, but on this oc-
casion some of them almost split
their throats;) after there had




64 UNCLE REUBEN.
been a good deal of loud talk-
ing all over the great elm-tree
where the council was held,
one old crow said he had a few
questions to ask. He had a
plan to recommend, too, per-
haps, and perhaps not. It
would depend upon the answer
to his questions, whether he
gave any advice or not.
He would beg leave to in-
quire, through the chairman,




UNCLE REU9BEN. 65

whether the wind-mill had ever
been known to go away from
the place where it was then
standing, and to chase crows
around the lot, for the purpose
of killing them.
It was decided that such
conduct on the part of the
giant had never been heard of.
Even the oldest inhabitant,
who had heard the story from
his grandfather, about the un-
5




66 UNCLE REUBEN.

happy fate of the crow that
perished by a blow from the
giant's arms, did not remember
ever to have heard that the
wind-mill made such warlike
visits.
"How, then," the speaker
wished to know, "was that crow
killed in old times ?"
The answer was, "By ven-
turing too near the mill."
"And that is the only way




UNCLE REUBEN. 67

that any of us are likely to get
killed by the wind-mill ?"
"Yes," the scare-crow said;
"that is the way, I believe."
And the crows generally
nodded their heads, as much as
to say, "Certainly, of course."
"Well, then," said the old
crow who asked the questions,
"let's keep away from the mill.
That's all I've got to say."
And the whole council set




68 UNCLE REUBEN.

up such a noisy laugh, that
if you had been passing that
way at the time, you would
hardly have been able to hear
yourself think. The meeting
broke up. The general opinion
was, that the advice of the last
speaker was on the whole the
safest and best that had been
given.
And just so I think. The
crow's advice is good for boys




p UNCLE REUBEN. 69
and girls, too; quite as good as
it is for the crow family.
I sometimes hear people talk-
ing as loud as the crows did in
their council, about this and $
that great piece of wickedness.
"It must be put down," they
say. "We must put it down,
or it will put us down; one or
the other." Well, I generally
think, when I hear such loud
complaints, and when I am




70 UNCLE REUBEN. $
called upon to take up arms
against the monster, whatever
it is, I generally think that
perhaps the advice of the old
Escrow is as good as any, in this
case.
I remember, when I was a
boy, there was a wasps' nest
right under the eaves of my
father's barn. It was a monster
of a nest, as big around as a
plate. I used to watch the




S UNCLE REUBEN. o1
busy wasps, day after day, as
they flew into and out of their
nest. "Something must be
done," I said at last. "These
wicked wasps will sting us all,V
yet." It is true they had lived
there peaceably enough for
weeks, and had never offered
to sting any body. "But they
must be put down," I said. And
so said my brother.
So one day we managed to




72 UNCLp REUBEN.
get a ladder up to the eaves
of the barn, and up we both
climbed, each with a club in
his hand, to knock down the
Dangerous wasps' nest. We did
knock it down, sure enough.
But such a buzzing as we got
around our ears, to pay for it,
I never want to hear again.
We both got stung in a dozen
places. I could not see out of
one of my eyes for a week after




UNCLE REUBEN. 78

that, my face was stung so badly
and swelled so much. Now
you see how foolish we were, in
knocking down the wasps' nest.
Nobody, I presume, would ever
have got stung by those wasps,
if we had not meddled with
them, and tried to put them
down. This "putting things
down," I have generally found,
is a losing game, all around.
I once attempted to "put




14 UNCLE REUBEN.
down" a boy at school. He
was a bad boy, I thought, and
so a good many others thought.
He said bad words. He was
a very foul-mouthed fellow. It
is true he never did any harm
to me; but I thought he would
do some, if I did not contrive
some way to stop it. He was
none too good to quarrel with
me, that was certain.
So I made up my mind, that,




UNCLE REUBEN. 75

when I got a good chance, I
would give him a flogging-a
good sound flogging-one that
he would not forget for the
whole winter.
The chance did come, as I
9
thought. He had been using
some hard words to a boy who
sat on the same bench with me.
"You rascal !" said I, "if you
don't stop, I'll flog you."
He did not stop. He did




76 UNCLE REUBEN.
not so much as answer me, or
look toward me.
I struck him-struck him
once-and then he turned upon
me, and instead of his getting
the great flogging that I had
talRed of, I got it myself. I
could not put him down so
easily, you see. And I made
up my mind, then, that the best
thing I could do with that bad
boy, was to keep away from him.





UNCLE REUBEN. 77

I let him alone, after that, and I
don't remember that I ever had
any trouble with him, though
lots of the boys, who did not
see fit to let him alone, got
pretty roughly handled by him.
There is Captain Stratton,
who lives down by the saw-
mill. He has got the name,
you know, of being a cross and
crabbed sort of a man. I don't
know how that is, exactly. I




78 UNCLE REUBEN.
suppose he is not quite so good-
natured as some of the rest of
our neighbors. But whether
he is or not, most of the boys
and girls dislike him, and some
of them love to tease him, be-
cause he is so cross.
My little friend Emneline
Parry and her brother thought
they would tease him, summer
before last. You know the old
man always has a fine garden




UNCLE REUBEN. 19

in the summer, and the flowers
in his yard are as pretty as can
be found for miles around.
Emeline had found out how
pretty his flowers were, and
she knew, too, how much he
thought of them, and how he
disliked to have the children
come and break them off, and
carry them away.
"Charley," said she to her
brother, one day, when they




80 UNCLE REUBEN.
were passing the captain's house
on their way home from school,
"let's go over into old Stratton's
yard," (many children called
him "old Stratton," though they
ought not to have called him
so,) "let's go over into old Strat-
ton's yard, and get two or three
of his lilies. The stingy man!
I want to get some of his lilies,
just to tease him."
Charley at first did not like









cir























































~









































EMELINE PICKING THE LILIES.




UNCLE REUBEN. 83

the notion of venturing into the
yard. But he consented to do
so, after a while. They went
through the gate, and Emeline
began to pick the beautiful
white lilies.
"Here, Prince! here, Prince !"
they soon heard the captain
cry. "Here, Prince!" And in
a minute, a dog larger than
either of the children, came
bounding down the lane, and




84 UNCLE REUBEN. o
he ran straight toward Eme-
line.
"There!" bawled the cap-
tain, "you have got yourself
into a pretty fix, haven't you,
little miss ?"
Emeline screamed for help,
and so did her brother. They
would both have given all they
were worth in the world, to get
clear of the teeth of the dog.
But it was too late then. The




UNCLE REUBEN. 85

dog took hold of Emeline,
threw her down, and tore her
frock badly.
"There, that will do, Prince,"
said the old captain. "I guess
she will not pick any more of
my lilies, without coming and
asking me first."
Prince had not hurt the little
girl. I suppose he had been
taught not to hurt children,
but to scare them badly, and




86 UNCLE REUBEN.
to tear their clothes. At any
rate, Emeline and her brother
were a great deal more scared
than hurt; though, as you may
suppose, they both felt silly
enough when they got home,
and had to tell their mother
how Emeline's frock got torn
so badly.
Both of the children thought,
after that, that the best thing
they could do with such cross





UNCLE REUBEN. 87

men as Captain Stratton, was

just what the crow advised in
relation to wind-mills-to let
them alone. What do you
think, boys?


-*
.5
\\
~4~ ~




88 UNCLE REUBEN.


MY FfIRST AND LAST CIGAR


I must tell you a funny anec-
dote about a certain boy who
tried to learn to smoke, and who
made rather bungling work of
it. The boy-I might as well
say it right out-was Uncle
Reuben. The boy was no one
but myself. I thought it would




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m
co


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0
0IRo




%WCLE REUBEN. 91

be a nice thing to smoke as
neighbor Riley did. So, one
day when I had not much to do
at home, and my father let me
go to Ryetown to see the shows,
I stepped into a store, and
bought a cigar. I knew that
my father would not allow me
to smoke, if he knew it; and I
thought to myself that he never
would find it out.
That was wrong. It is al-




w


92 UNCLE REUBIt.
ways wrong to do any thing
which we know our parents
would not like; and we orught
to be just as careful not to do
it when they cannot see us, as
when they can see us.
I bought the cigar, and
paid one cent for it. It was a
small sum of money, to be sure.
But I don't think I ever spent
a cent more foolishly in my
life.




UNCLE REUBEt. 9
As soon as I had bought the
cigar, I lighted it, and went
out of the store, puffing as
much like a man as I could.
However, I had not gone far,
before I met John Burdick-
Jack, we always used to call
him. He was going a fishing,
I recollect, and had his hooks,
and lines, and pole, and bait
with him.
"Halloo, Reuben!" said he,




94 UCLLE REUBEN.
as soon as he saw me, "what
are you at ?"
"Nothing," I replied; "only
smoking a cigar." I tried to
look like a man as I spoke,
and held my head up rather
proudly.
Jack burst out into a fit of
laughter, and laughed until
he turned red in the face. It
was some time before he could
speak; and when he did speak,




UNCLE RFIBJk.
what he said did not raise my
pride much. "Well, I declare,"
said he, "you are a little the
drollest-looking smoker that I
ever did see!" and then he
went on laughing again.
I think my,face must have
turned as red as Jack's was,
though for a very different
reason. As soon as Jack was
out of sight, I threw my cigar
away, and made a promise that




*6 UrcIE RETB*t. I
I would never smoke again.
That was my first and last
cigar. Jack's laugh cured
me.








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