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Group Title: Theodore Thinker's Tales
Title: Tom Headstrong, or, Always in trouble
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001894/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tom Headstrong, or, Always in trouble
Series Title: Theodore Thinker's Tales
Alternate Title: Theodore Thinker's tales
Always in trouble
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C ( Francis Channing ), 1812-1859
Clark & Maynard ( Publisher )
Publisher: Clark & Maynard
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1851
 Subjects
Subject: Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Francis C. Woodworth ; with illustrations.
General Note: Includes 9 full-page illustrations with ornamental borders and 6 small chapter vignettes.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001894
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002240036
oclc - 34161862
notis - ALJ0575

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
    Copyright
        Page iv
    Main
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        Page 6
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    Back Cover
        Page 97
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    Spine
        Page 99
Full Text















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THEODORE THINKER'S TALES


TOM HBADSTRONw

i ALWAYS IN TROUBLE.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS.

BY FRANCIS C. WOODWORTH.


S NEW YORK:
'CLARK & MAYNARD,
8 PARK ROW.
























Entered according to Act of Congress, n the year 1851,
BT CLARK, AUSTIN & CO,
In the Cerk's Office of the District Court of the United states for the
Southern District of New York.
/







$ m Ikhstrang;




THE WILLOW-LANE SCHOOL
In a large school, where there
are a good many, boys and
girls, it often happens that
there are all sorts of characters
-some good, some ba4d and
a.





6 TOM HEADSTRONG.
some which one hardly knows
whether to call them good or
bad.
It is a common remark, that
"it takes all sorts of people to
make a world," and it is true
enough. I have thought, some-
times, that it took all sorts of
boys and girls to make a dis-
trict school. At any rate, in
the school at Willow Lane,
first and last, there were nearly





TOM HEADSTRONG. 7

all sorts of urchins that one
could easily conceive of.
Some were always early;
some always late. Some were
neat and tidy .in their dress and
in their habits; some. did not
care how they looked, an4, it
was a very rare sight tskge
them with their faces and
hands clean. Some always had
their lessons well studied; some
almost always tried the patience





8 TOM HEADSTRONG.
of their teacher, when they had
to write, or read, or spell, or
do sums on the slate. Some
were whispering half the time,
while they were at school, and
making up mouths at the rest
of the boys and girls, or engaged
in some other branch of mis-
chief the other half.
And I do not suppose that
the school at Willow Lane
was very different from other





TOM HEADSTRONG. 9.

District schools in the country.
I presume that almost all sorts
of boys and girls can be found
in any one of them.








TOM HEADSTRONG.


Among the rest of my school-
mates, there was one of whom
I must give you a little sketch.
I mean Thomas Bridgeman, or,
as he was more generally called,
Tom Headstrong.
"Was he a good boy, or a
bad boy?" you inquire.





TOM HEADSTRONG. It

Really, I hardly know how
to answer that question. He
was certainly not a very bad.
boy, and I don't know that I
ever heard the schoolmaster
call him a very good boy. I
suppose, however, that you will
fo m some kind of an opinion
about him, when you have read
his history;, and I should not
Wonder if that opinion was
correct.





12 .TOM HEADSTRONG.
Nobody ever thought him a
wicked boy. He never quar-
reled, or certainly he did not
quarrel any more than other
school- boys did, who were
thought to be pretty good boys,
though not the very best, as
they do not quarrel at all.
His worst fault was, that he
was headstrong; and this fault
of his gave him his name, Tom
Headstrong. He nt ver seemed





TOM HEADSTRONG. 18

to stop to think whether he
should do any thing or not.
Instead of that, he did the
thing, and stopped to think
afterward.
His parefits tried, when he
was a mere child, to break him
of this habit. So did his teacher
in the Willow-Lane school, and
so did his teacher in the Sun-
day-school. But Tom did not
grow any more careful. I am





14 TOM HEADSTRONG.
afraid he grew more careless.
That is very often the case.
If a boy does not break right
off from a bad habit, the
habit is apt to grow upon him,
until it becomes" part of his
-character; and then it is the
hardest -work in the world to
break off.
I said his teacher in the
Sunday-school tried to break
him of this habit. I must tell





TOM HEADSTRONG. 16

you what happened to Thomas
once, when he was on his
way to the Sunday-school, and
what his teacher said to him
about it.

I *









THE LIBRARY BOOK.
------ ------

Thomas was going to Sunday-
school, when he was quite a
little boy. It was rather muddy
that day; and his mother told
him he must be very careful,
and not soil his nice, clean pag-
taloons. "You had better keep
hold of your brother's hand, all









































GOOIG TO UriDAYT-8IOOL





4





TOM HEADSTRONG. 19

the time," said she. Tommy
did keep hold of his brother's
hand most of the time, though
not all of the time. He thought
he would walk on the other side
of the road, so as to get a bet-
ter chance to look at Captain
SFitch's ducks, who were gab-
bling away at a great rate, as
Tom and his brother passed
the house.
*So he twitched away his
r5





20 TOM HEADSTRONG.
hand, and ran across the road,
just as fast as he could run.
He did not look to see where he
was going to step, and before
his brother George could over-
take him, he fell flat into a
mud-puddle.
What a looking object he
was, when he got up! His
clothes were all covered with
mud, and the library book he
had got at the Sunday-school,





TOM HEADSTRONG. 21
and which he was carrying
back, was completely spoiled.
Well, the boys went on
to school. Tommy's brother
George washed off the mud
from the careless boy's clothes,
as well as he could, though
when he got to school, he
"looked as if he had been
through the wars," as Harry
Bliven said. We all had to
laugh when we saw him. We





22 TOM HEADSTRONG.
could not help it, if it was
Sunday.
When Tommy showed his
teacher the library book, all
covered with spots of muddy
water, he was told that the
book was spoiled, and he felt
very sorry -about it. But the
teacher told him it was not
enough to be sorry about spoil-
ing the book. He must make
up his mind that he would not





TOM HEADSTRONG. 23

be so careless and headstrong
in future.
Tommy blushed, and hung
down his head; for all the
class heard what the teacher
Said to him.
That day, after he got home,
and after his mother had told
him what she thought of his
bad habit, Tommy made up
his mind that he would break:
himself of the habit; for he saw





24 TOM HEADSTRONG.
that he was so headstrong that
he was always getting into
trouble.
That was a good time for
him to turn over a new leaf.
He was quite young then. It
would not have been very hard
for him, at that age, to become
as careful as any boy peed to
be. His habit was not very
strong then. It was after that,
that he got the name of Tom





TOM HEADSTRONG. 25

Headstrong. But Tommy very
soon forgot his good promises.
Though he was careful enough
for a day or two, he was as
headstrong as ever in less than
three weeks... It was strange
enough, wasn't it ?








THE MOCKING-BIRD.


Tommy was about nine years
old, I think-perhaps not quite
so old-when he got bit by a
dog. The dog that bit him
was not a mad dog, and the
reason why the headstrong fel-
low got such a biting was be-
cause he did not mind what












" DOst* TWOUO Tm OAG's I"


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C



r





TOM HEADSTRONG. 29
was told him by a much larger
boy, and because he rushed
into danger, without stopping
to think about it. This time
he thought of it afterward, if
he did not before. He was
obliged to think. He could
not help thinking, if he had
tried ever so hard. I will tell
you how it was.
"Tommy," said his father,
one day in summer-it was





80 TOM HEADSTRONG.
Saturday, and there was no
school that day-" Tommy, you
may go over to Mr. Smith'
and see if he has done with the
rake he borrowed last week.
If he has done with it, you may
bring it home. Tell Mr. Smith,
I am going to have a good
many men to work this after-
noon, and I shall want the
rake."
Tommy started off for Mr.





TOM HEADSTRONG. 81
Smith's house. Mr. Smith did
not live a great way from Mr.
Bridgeman's-not more than
a quarter of a mile, I should
think.
On his way, Tommy met
Jacob Handy, a boy much
older than he was, who had a
mocking-bird, in a cage. He
knew Jacob, and Jacob knew
him. The mocking-bird be-
longed to Mr. Roland, a lawyer,




82 TOM HEADSTRONG.
that lived in Willow Lane, and
the boy lived with the lawyer.
He had been to the village,
after the bird, and was carrying
it home. I believe Mr. Roland
had just bought the bird.
Snarl, Mr. Roland's dog, had
followed the boy, and he was
close by when Tommy stopped,
and asked if he might look at
the bird.
Jacob was a good-natured





TOM HEADSTRONG. 33

.ad. He told Thomas he might
look at the bird, and hear him
sing-for he was a fine singer,
and could sing like ever so
many different birds. "But
you must be very careful," he
said, "and not touch the cage.
If you should do so, Snarl
would bite you, I'm afraid.
He keeps a sharp look-out for
any thing belonging to his
master; and if he should see
a





34 TOM HEADSTRONG.

you touch the cage, he would
think that you was going to
carry it off, or to hurt the bird,
and he would bite you just as
likely as not."
"But have you ever seen
Snarl bite anybody?" Tommy
asked.
"Yes, indeed," said Jacob,
"many a time. He almost bit
Joe Stanton's hand off, last
summer.





TOM HEADSTRONG. 85

How came he to bite Joe ?"
asked Tommy.
"It was down in the meadow,
one day, when we were all
raking hay. Snarl was watch-
ing the dinner basket. Joe
came up slily to the basket, to
steal some of the dinner. He
thought Snarl would not see
him, I suppose. But Snarl did
see him, or he heard him, one
or the other; and that boy got






36 TOM HEADSTORNG.
acquainted with Snarl's teeth
in a way that made the little
fellow sick of stealing ginger-
bread and cheese, I should
think."
"Snarl doesn't look as if he
were a bad dog," said Tommy.
"He is not a bad dog," re-
plied Jacob, "but he looks out
for his master's property as
closely as a cat watches a
mouse, for all that."




TOM HEADSTRONG. 37

The mocking-bird sang some
of his best tunes. Tommy was
pleased with him. "I wonder if
that dog will bite," he thought.
He thought so. He did not
say it aloud. If he had said it,
Jacob would have told him
again what he thought Snarl
would do.
Tommy rather wanted to
try Snarl. He did not at all
believe that so kind and in-




38 TOM HEADSTRONG.
nocent a dog as Snarl appeared
to be, would bite a boy for
nothing else in the world than
because he touched a cage.
So he came a little nearer
the cage, and put his finger on
the seed-cup. In an instant,
Snarl sprang at the little fellow,
and caught his hand. Oh, how
Tommy screamed! But it was
too late. The mischief had
already been done. One of his




TOM HEADSTRONG. 89

fingers was bitten so badly, that
it was sore for weeks afterward.
The doctor thought, at one
time, that he would have to
cut the finger off. But, by
taking good care of the wound,
the finger was saved.
Tommy carries the scar of
that wound to this day, and he
is more than thirty years old
now.








CROSSING THE BROOK.


It was perhaps some two years
after that affair, that Tommy
was in the field where Mr.
Bridgeman's men were at work
hoeing corn, and his father sent
him home after something-I
forget what it was.
Tommy ran, as fast as he












hI



4

0
0d







TOM HEADSTRONG. 43

could, as soon as he knew what
his errand was. On the way
home, he had to cross a large
brook. The water was deep
enough in many places to drown
a boy who could not swim.
There was a good bridge over
the brook, and Tommy ought
to have crossed that bridge.
But he did not cross it. He
thought he would "take a near-
er cut" to the house, as he said.




44 TOM HEADSTRONG.
Instead of going over the
bridge, which was, to be sure,
a little further, he went to a
place where an old tree had
fallen across the stream, and he
set out to cross on that tree.
Poor fellow! he had not gone
more than half the way over,
when he felt dizzy, and off he
fell into the water!
He did not get drowned,
though he came very near





TOM HEADSTRONG. 45
drowning-much nearer than
I should want to come to it.
Some men saw him fall, and
ran and helped him out. Oh,
how frightened he was! The
headstrong fellow!- why didn't
he remember that ducking, and
see if he could not keep out of
trouble? There was no good
reason why he should always get
into trouble. Why didn't he
think what he was about ?









THE CROW'S NEST


Tom and several other boys, of
whom I was one, were once
rambling in the woods. Near
t.i' top of one of the tallest
trees, there was a crow's nest.
"I'll have that nest," said Tom;
"see if I don't."
We all told him that it would




























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H9














C








r


















r

j






j





TOM HEADSTRONG. 49

be a very dangerous undertak-
ing, and tried to stop him. But
it was of no use. Go he would,
and go he did.
He found a good deal of
difficulty in climbing the tree.
He succeeded, however, at last,
in getting up within a short
distance of the nest. But, for
some reason or other-I think
because there were no small
boughs that he could cling to-




50 TOM HEADSTRONG.
he could not climb up the limb
that had the nest on it.
Well, he sat there for some
minutes, wondering whether it
was best to venture any further
or not; and the conclusion
finally was, that he would give
up the nest, and come down.
"I'm going to give up the
nest," said he.. "I don't believe
there are any eggs in it, or any
young ones either. I am going





TOM HEADSTRONG. 51

down now." It was very much
after this fashion that a fox
talked, once on a time, when
he found that the grapes were
so high that he could not
reach them. They were "sour
grapes," you know.
Tom started to come down.
But before he got far, a broken
limb caught his clothes in such
a way, that he could get no
further; and there he hung,





52 TOM HEADSTRONG.
not exactly as Absalom did,
but still in a way that did not
please him at all.
What was to be done ? Not
one of us dared to climb the
tree; and if we had climbed it,
very likely we should not have
been in a situation to give him
much assistance. Something
must be done, though-so we
thought; and it was pretty
clear, also, that that something





TOM HEADSTRONG. 53

ought to be done speedily.
Not at the time thinking of
any thing better to do, one of
us ran to the field, about a
quarter of a mile off, where
some men were at work, and
got one of them to come, post-
haste, to the rescue of Tom
Headstrong.
Tommy presented a rather
laughable sight, when the man
came to take him down from





54 TOM HEADSTRONG.
the tree. You can imagine
how he looked, dangling like a
scarecrow on that broken limb.
If we had not known that there
was a good deal of danger in
his case, we should all have
shouted with laughter, so that
the woods would have heard
the echo for a mile.
As it was, however, we look-
ed as sober, I suppose, as any
deacon, until Tom had got





TOM HEADSTRONG. 55

safely down. We did laugh a
little then. Poor Tom! he
always looked crest-fallen after
that, when anybody alluded to
the story of the crow's nest.








SHOOTING SQUIRRELS.
(8EE FONTISPIECE.)


Tom took it into his head, one
fine day in the fall of the year,
that he would go out with his
brother, and shoot some gray
squirrels. Tom was not much
of a marksman. Still, I believe,
he did shoot a squirrel or two,
before night.





TOM HEADSTRONG. 57

But the story of hunting
squirrels does not end here.
Tom shot something very dif-
ferent from a gray squirrel.
He shot himself. The head-,
strong fellow! I almost wonder
Mr. Bridgeman let him have a
gun, when he knew he was so
careless.
Tom had wadded his gun,
and primed it. It was all ready
to go off, you see, if it was only





58 TOM HEADSTRONG.
cocked. Well, Tom cocked it.
Then all that had to be done,
to make it go off, was just to
pull the trigger.
Look out, Tom! That is
rather dangerous. You had
better not carry your gun far,
while it is loaded and cocked;
and certainly, if you do, you
must carry your gun very
carefully.
I don't know whether Tom's






















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Fil

Pill


ILI





TOM HEADSTRONG. 61

brother knew the gun was
cocked or not. I hardly think
he knew, else he would have
told Tom to look out.
The two lads went along
through the woods, for some
distance, looking after squirrels.
Tom's gun was cocked all the
time. By-and-by they saw a
weasel on the ground, running
with all his might. He was
frightened, and took shelter in





62 TOM HEADSTRONG.
a heap of brush, which had
been piled up there.
Tom, without thinking-he
seldom thought, you know,until
it was too late-pushed the
but-end of his gun into the
brush-heap, to scare- the weasel
out of his hiding-place. In an
instant the gun went off, and
half a dozen shot went into one
of Tom's arms. I guess Tom
and his brother were quite as





TOM HEADSTRONG. 63

much scared as the weasel,
then.
That was the most serious
accident, I believe, that ever
happened to Tom Headstrong.
He was terribly hurt, and so
faint that he could not walk
home. His brother had to
leave him for nearly an hour,
to get a horse and wagon for
him to ride home in. All that
time Tom lay on the ground,





64 TOM HEADSTRONG.
with the blood running from
his wound.
I remember how he looked,
after he got home. I went
over to see him, for Mr. Bridge-
man's house was not far off
from my father's. "Poor Tom
Headstrong!" I thought, when
I saw how pale his .face was,
and how much he suffered
from his wound: "Poor Tom
Headstrong! when will you





TOM HEADSTRONG. 65

learn to think before you
act "
It was a long time that Tom
had to remain in the house,
under the care of the doctor.
But, at last, he got so much
better as to be able to go out
again. He never got entirely
over that wound, though. The
arm which was hurt was always
a little lame, and it had turns
of being quite painful. Once,
5





66 TOM HEADSTRONG.

I recollect, when he took a
severe cold, by going in swim-
ming too early in the spring:
he could not use his arm for
several weeks, it was so painful.





TOM HEADSTRONG. 67


WHAT HAPPENED TO THE CHINA WARE.


Sometimes things are broken,
when nobody is to blame. I
have no doubt but hundreds
of cups and saucers, bowls and
plates, are all smashed to pieces,
when it would be wrong to
charge any one with careless-
ness about the accident. Still,





68 TOM HEADSTRONG.

in most cases, when things are
broken about the house, it is
because some one has been
careless.
Tom Headstrong did more
mischief, in the way of break-
ing things, than all the rest of
Mr. Bridgeman's family put
together.
I remember that one day his
mother gave him some money,
and sent him to Ryetown, to





TOM HEADSTRONG. 69

the crockery store, to buy a
new set of China ware. She
sent him with a basket, and
charged him to be particularly
careful.
Tom was old enough, at this
time, to be careful. He was
certainly old enough to be
careful after he had been cau-
tioned by his mother; and Mrs.
Bridgeman thought that she
must begin to intrust her son





70 TOM HEADSTRONG.
with such errands as this. "If
he is not careful now," said she,
"I wonder when he ever will be."
Now, Tom Headstrong, let
us see what you can do. Mind
your P's and Q's. Take care
of the china ware. "This side
up, with care," as the merchants
mark their boxes sometimes,
when they send them away,
filled with crockery, and glass,
and things of that sort.























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3n
LaLd IME -som





TOM HEADSTRONG. i8

When Tom got to the store,
he did the errand well enough.
He had a good memory.' He
could remember what was told
.him, if he made up his mind
that he would do it, as well as
anybody.
After he had bought the
ware, and paid for it, the mer-
chant put it into the basket
which he had brought, and
Tom started homeward.





74 TOM HEADSTRONG.
Well, nothing happened to
the careless fellow worth telling,
until he had got almost to his
father's house. Any one who
had seen him just turning off
from the turnpike-road, to go
down to Willow Lane, where
his father lived, might have
thought that this time Tom
would not meet with any acci-
dent.
However, the old saying is,





TOM HEADSTRONG. 75

"All's well that ends well."
And it is hardly ever wise to
make up our minds whether
any thing will turn out well or
not, until we see the end of it,
or, at any rate, until we get so
near the end that we can al-
most see it.
Just as Tom was turning
the corner, to go down Willow
Lane, he saw a German woman
with some apples and pears in





76 TOM HEADSTRONG.
a basket. She carried the bas-
ket on her head. "That is
strange," thought the boy with
the china ware. And he stop-
ped, and looked at her, as she
trudged along with her load.
She did not seem to find any
trouble in carrying her fruit in
this manner.
I wonder if I can do that
thing," said Tom to himself.
If I had been there, I should





TOM HEADSTRONG. 77

have said, "You had better not
try, at any rate." I was not
there, however. No one was
there but Tom himself and the
German woman; and she, by
the time that the headstrong
boy thought about trying to do
that thing, had got a good way
off from him.
Tom did not think long.
That was not his way. He
lifted his basket of china ware





78 TOM HEADSTRONG.
to his head, and balanced it
there. "Bravo!" he thought.
"That is pretty well done to
begin with. Now I'll take my
hands away from the basket, as
the woman does."
He did so. And what do
you think came next? Down
the basket tumbled on the
ground, and almost all the
ware was smashed to pieces.







TOM CAST AWAY.


A laughable accident once
happened to Tom, which I
will tell you about, and after
that I guess you will think you
have heard enough about the
troubles of Tom Headstrong.
It was in the spring of the
year. The ice had just melt-





80 TOM HEADSTRONG.
ed in the streams. The brook
that ran through Willow Lane
was swollen so that it was a
great deal larger and deeper
than usual,'and the water Iowed
very swiftly. The meadows
were covered with water, and
large logs and pieces of timber
were swept off.
Tom thought it was fine
sport to watch the logs, and
rails, and branches of trees, and















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4
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TOM HEADSTRONG. 83

boards, and shingles, as they
floated down the stream, and
went over the dam. That was
all well enough, if he had been
content with watching. But
he was not.
There was a large log some
distance above the dam, floating
close to the shore. "I'll jump
on to that log," said he to a
boy who was standing at his
side. "I'll have a little bit of a





84 TOM HEADSTRONG.
sail, I guess." And without
stopping to think what might
happen to him, he jumped upon
the log. The log rolled over,
and tumbled Tom into the
water. Poor fellow! He lost
his hat, and came very near
losing his life. But he made
out to catch hold of the log
again, and down the stream
he went, as fast as a horse
could trot.





TOM HEADSTRONG. 85

He wished he was on dry
land now. But to get there was
not so easy a matter. The log
was floating in the middle of the
stream. The "little bit of a
sail" that he was thinking about
a few minutes before, was likely
to prove something more than
that.
For some time he was in
great danger of going over the
dam; and if he had gone over,





86 TOM HEADSTRONG.

he would certainly have been
drowned, or dashed to pieces
on the rocks.
How he did scream for help!
And it was well that he did,
for the boy who was with him
was so frightened that he ran
away as fast as his legs would
carry him.
Tom was saved. A man
heard him scream, and ran
Pnd reached a long pole to





TOM HEADSTRONG. 87

him, before he got to the
dam.
Tom Headstrong is now a
man. But he is just as care-
less and thoughtless as he used
to be when we went to school
together at the Willow-Lane
school-house. He will never
be cured of his sad habit now,
I fear. It is too late. He is
too old. What a pity he had
not begun earlier!





88 TOM HEADSTRONG.
I advise you, little friend, if
you have any such habit as
Tom had, to go to work at it
in season, and pull it up by the
roots, as you would a pig-weed
in the garden.

















































PULLING TI TH









MORE NONSENSE.
i ---- ---__ -

One day Tom had the tooth-
ache. A good many things
were done to stop the pain;
but they did no good-the
tooth kept on aching. His
mother thought he had better
have it taken out. It was a
long time before Tom could





92 TOM HEADSTRONG.
make up his mind to that. But,
by-and-by, he said, Very well,
it aches so hard, I can't stand it
any longer. I'll have it pulled
out."
It was one of his front teeth.
It did not give him half as
much pain when it was taken
out as he thought it would. His
father took a piece of thread,
fastened it around the tooth,
and pulled it out very easily





TOM HEADSTRONG. 98

indeed. The tooth was loose,
you see. That was the rea-
son it came out with so little
trouble.
The same afternoon Tom
was telling some boys how his
father had pulled out his tooth.
He told them that it gave him
hardly any pain, and that he
would just as lief have two or
three more out as not.
The boys thought it would





94 TOM HEADSTRONG.

be nice sport to see Tom pull
out a tooth or two. They
knew how headstrong he was;
and they thought they would
try and see if they could not
get him to make a fool of him-
self.
The boys were wrong. They
ought not to have done so; and
I guess they were ashamed of
themselves when they saw what
he did.





TOM HEADSTRONG. 95

They told him they would
give him ninepence (that is a
shilling in New York) if he
would pull out another tooth.
"I'll do it for ninepence,"
said Tom.
And he did do it. He got a
string, put it around another of
his front teeth, and then pulled
with all his might. He thought
it would come out as easily as
the other. But he was greatly





96 TOM HEADSTRONG.
mistaken. The first tooth was
loose-the other was not.
Oh how hard he had to pull!
It made the tears come, I tell
you. But the tooth came out
at last. What a foolish fellow!
He lost a good tooth, and had
to bear a great deal of pain into
the bargain. And all he got
for his folly was ninepence!




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