• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Truth Will Protect Itself
 Rashness and Bravery
 Female Teaching
 Capital Fun
 Youthful Tyranny
 The Sleigh-ride
 Disappointed Hopes
 Young Men at Home
 The Fruits of a Hasty Spirit
 Conclusion
 Back Cover
 Spine














Group Title: The boy of spirit : : a story for the young.
Title: The boy of spirit
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001889/00001
 Material Information
Title: The boy of spirit a story for the young
Physical Description: 117 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tuthill, Cornelia L ( Cornelia Louisa ), 1820-1870
Tuthill, Louisa C ( Louisa Caroline ), 1798-1879 ( Attributed name )
Metcalf and Company
Wm. Crosby and H.P. Nichols (Firm) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Wm. Crosby and H.P. Nichols
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: Stereotyped and printed by Metcalf and Company
Publication Date: 1851, c 1845
Copyright Date: 1845
Edition: 8th ed.
 Subjects
Subject: School children -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Murder -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dueling -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1851   ( local )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Also attributed to Louisa C. Tuthill in OCLC database.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001889
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222474
oclc - 45617400
notis - ALG2719

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Copyright
        Page iii
    Truth Will Protect Itself
        Page iv
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Rashness and Bravery
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Female Teaching
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Capital Fun
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Youthful Tyranny
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The Sleigh-ride
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Disappointed Hopes
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Young Men at Home
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    The Fruits of a Hasty Spirit
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Conclusion
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Back Cover
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Spine
        Page 121
Full Text






































The Baldwin Library
R. Umi3 of~
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is moment that James Adair appeared, three long, loud cheers rent the air'i p. 11.








THE


BOY OF SPIRIT.




A STORY




FOR THE YOUNG.






EIGHTH EDITION.






BOSTON:
WM. CROSBY AND H. P. NICHOLS,
III WASHINGTON STRa T.
1831.



















Entered according to Act of Conarces, in the year 115, lby
WaL CROSBT AND H. P. NICHOLS,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of
Massachusetts.























CAMBRIDGE'
STEREOTyPED AND PRINTED nY
METCALF AND COMPANY,
PRINTERS TO THE UNIVERSITY.


















CONTENTS.

-4--

CHAPTER PAGH
I. TRUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF 1
II. RASHNESS AND BRAVES 13
III. FEMALE TEACHING .
IV. CAPITAL FUN 33
V. YOUTHFUL TYRANNY 42
VI. THE SLEIGH-RIDE 8
VII. DISAPPOINTED HOPES 75
VIII. YOUNG MEN AT HOME 87
IX. THE FRUITS OF A HASTY SPIRIT 101
X. CONCLUSION 110















THE BOY OF SPIRIT.




CHAPTER I.
-4-

TRITH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.

IT was a bright afternoon in summer, when a
party of boys came loitering down the street which
led to the Latin Grammar-School, at Newton.
Halloo, boys what 's the matter there ?"
shouted one of them, who was somewhat in ad-
vance of the rest, as he saw his companions halt-
ing upon the sidewalk and crowding around two
of their number.
"Nothing, only a little fun," was the reply.
"Bob Jones is getting a slight beating for calling
Frank Pierson a liar."
That 's right. Give it to him, Frank! ex-
claimed Tom Carter, the tall, thin boy with sandy






TRUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.


hair, who had asked the first question. No one
living should call me a liar and go unpunished."
You are a brave lad," said a gentleman who
had approached the excited little group, unper-
ceived, accompanied by a fine looking officer in
naval uniform. I do like to see boys show a
proper spirit, don't you, Captain ?"
Certainly I do; but I should probably differ
from you as to the meaning of the term. I think
the quarrelsome, impatient disposition but too nat-
ural to boys is a very improper one, and should
be promptly discouraged. It is because these dis-
agreeable qualities are so much fostered in the
youth of this country, that so turbulent and un-
manageable a disposition is beginning to manifest
itself among our citizens; and, if it is not repress-
ed, our republic cannot exist for another half-
century. But excuse me, Sir, I did not see that
your son Frank was a party in the quarrel."
At this moment the crowd around the combat-
ants dispersed, and Mr. Pierson saw his son com-
ing towards him with a bruised eye and a cheek
flushed with rage and exertion. What have
you been about, my boy ?" he asked, without any
apparent displeasure at the angry countenance
and bearing of his son.
Bob called me a liar, Sir, and I beat him,
that 's all," was the reply.







TRUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.


"Very right, Frank," said the father, slapping
him on the shoulder in sign of approbation. I
hope he will not soon forget the lesson you have
given him."
No, indeed, he '11 remember it for many a
day, for I knocked one of his teeth down his
throat, and came near sending his eye out the
back of his head. Impudent scoundrel !"
"Did he retract the assertion in consequence
of the beating he received ?" asked Captain Adair,
very gravely.
Not he, Sir; and it would have done no good
if he had. I never will accept an apology from
any body, if I have to pocket an insult with it."
That boy ought to go into the navy, Captain.
He has a noble spirit, and would be an honor to
his country," remarked Mr. Pierson, as he looked
with pride upon the excited boy.
I do not doubt that he has excellent traits of
character," replied Captain Adair, but I differ
from you as to the profession for which he is fit-
ted. Every restraint should be placed upon so
inflammable a spirit. For one, I look upon fight-
ing as the painful duty of an officer, which he
will always avoid when unnecessary, constantly
remembering, when forced to conflict, that it is for
his country, not himself, that he is engaged, so






4 TVRTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.

that all personal feelings of anger may vanish, and
he can pity even the foe that he vanquishes."
From any other man Mr. Pierson would have
considered this remark as an indication of cow-
ardice.; and, as it was, he could scarcely repress
his vexation, that what he called the ioble spirit
of his son," should be unappreciated by one
whose good opinion he was extremely anxious
that he should obtain.
:, At the door of Mr. Pierson's house the. gentle-
men parted, and Frank, who had accompanied
them in silence, ran up immediately into the nurs-
ery, where. he thought that he should find his
mother, for his bruised eye was aching sadly, and
he wanted her to bind a handkerchief around his
head..
Ah, fighting again, Frank!" she. exclaimed,
in a tone of sorrow.
: it is nothing, mother, only my eye is a lit-
tle hurt. Will you have the kindness to put Sis
down for a moment and see if you can do any
thing for it-? "
- "Certinty,. nry. son. -However much in. the
wrong you.may be, I do not like.to.see you suffer."
So saying, the mother handed the baby to the
nurse, and led Frank towards the window that she
might see if the injury were a serious one,. No






TRUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.


wonder that she sighed, to see the fine, bold face
of her boy so deformed, his manly features dis-
torted by passion, and the expression of the one
dark eye which was alone visible marred by the
swollen and discolored appearance of its compan-
ion.
The mother had tried to inculcate lessons of
peace, but the father's voice was more powerful,
and he had often said, that he would prefer to see
his son die in revenging an injury, rather than
have him live disgraced by even apparent pusilla-
nimity. His preference was in a fair way to be
gratified, for Frank, his only son, had learned to
resent even a look that he considered injurious,
and no one could ever say that he had ever par-
doned one insulting word.
On the following day, when the boys of the
Latin school assembled, at the usual hour of inter.
mission, in the large playground adjoining the
building, they missed two of the most active of
their number. Frank Pierson had suffered too
severely from the conflict to make his appearance,
and some weeks passed before Robert Jones re-
covered his sight, and then his face remained dis-
figured by the loss of a front tooth. There was
a spirited discussion among the boys of the events
of the preceding day, and the conduct of Frank







TRUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.


Pierson was almost unanimously approved, while
the injury he had received was considered hardly
worth mentioning, in comparison with the punish.
ment which he had inflicted upon his enemy. But
among children the most exciting. events are
scarcely a three days' wonder, and bruised eyes
and broken teeth were soon forgotten in various
games of skill and chance.
For a few moments there was perfect harmony,
but then an angry voice exclaimed, ".You
cheat, James Adair; it is not your turn.'
If you think I do not play :honestly, perhaps
I had better not play at all," was the quiet reply,
as James Adair, with a somewhat flushed cheek,
turned to leave the set with. whom. he had. been
playing at marbles.
He owns it, boys. He dare not deny it now,
though he is not over fond of the truth in gen.
eml," continued. Thomas Carter, still more pro,
evoked by the calm way in which his first assertion
had beenireceived.
This taunt met the quick ear of James Adair,
and, for a: moment, his resolution faltered. His
eye flashed and his hand was raised in a threat-
ening manner, but after a slight pause it drop.
ped, and'with a quick step he left the playground,
as if fearful of testing the strength. of his. own
principles.







TKUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.


The afternoon session. of the.school had. but
just commenced when an accident occurred which
caused quite a commotion. As Mr.. Martin, one of
the assistant teachers, who was no favorite: with
the boys, was about to take his seat upon the plat-
form, the chair gave way under ;him, and ,he fell
sprawling upon the floor, to. the no small amused
ment of the whole school, who burst-into one loud
peal of laughter.at the sight of their fallen instruct-
er. .The discomfitted man rose.to his feet with
an exceedingly mortified air, and .hegan to.em~i;
ine the remains of the chair, to discover thd cause
of the. accident. His, countenance became still
more grave when' he perceived. that the legsbhad
been almost sawn .ff by some mischievous. ld,
and two or three -intelligent glances were ex
changed by the boys on a form .near him at this
discovery, as though the fact were not as new to
them as to their preceptor.
S. Mr. Franklin, the principal of the school, now
came in, and, hushing at once the tumult,.inquired
its cause.. When informed. of the trick which had
been played upon Mr. Martin, he-began in.a'mild,
but very serious manner, to show the impropriety
of such conduct. He said, very-truly, that what
was generally called sport among boys was at the
expense of some one's feelings, and that the in.






8 TRUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.

dulgence of propensities which were deemed
merely mischievous in youth might make them
bad and hard-hearted men. The moment a boy
began to consider even a slight interference with
the comfort of another as of no consequence, or
to derive amusement from their mortification, he
made one step towards becoming an injurious
member of society, and a cause of sorrow to
those who loved him. God has given us no right
to torment the meanest insect, much less to inflict
a moment of unnecessary pain on any human be-
ing. If a large boy but held a smaller one in
some dangerous position for an instant, that he
might frighten him and laugh at his fears, he had
committed a sin against his Maker, who will con.
sider each of us responsible for the happiness of
those around us, and will call us to account for
every second of misery of which we have been
the voluntary cause. We argue the extreme
goodness of God most especially from his adapt-
ing the minutest objects to give us pleasure, even
fitting our senses to receive delight from the odor
of a flower, or the coloring of its petals. Should
we not at once feel convinced that his spirit could
not be one of love, if it were proved that he had
constructed the thorns for the purpose of woun .1
ing the child who attempted to pluck the rose ?







ThUIIM WILL FXOT.I.ET ITOiNLY.


Yet are we not bound to imitate his spirit in every
action, and if it be not .godlike to give unnecessary
ry pain, can it be noble, or manly, to.derive. grat-
ification from -the petty, annoyances. which; ve
may occasion to others ?
- After dwelling at length upon the absolute sin-
fulness of the practice of teasing, among boys,
Mr. Franklin, begged; them riore particularly to
consider the disrespect of such an act as the. one
which had just been,.committed. If .the .Sn-of
God, when on earth, could have: been subject to a
poor carpenter, and divine wisdomrpaid respect.to
human weakness and ignorance, how much more
was it their duty to reverence these-who.could not
possibly be as much their inferiors, Their Crea-
tor had deputed his authority to their iparemts,
those parents to their teachers,-and to refuse them
honor-was to rebel against the Most High.
SThese were some:of the remarks which Mr.
Franklin made, and there. were those among the
boys who yawned and thought them very dull,
while others would have been glad to hide their
faces from the piercing eye of their instrueter.
Will any one tell me,' .he continued, who
of the. boys was absent from the playground dur-
ing the intermission ? "
I can," said Tom Carter- with a triumphant







TRUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.


smile; "I saw James Adair enter the school-
house alone, about half an hour before school
commenced."
Mr. Franklin looked somewhat perplexed at this
intelligence, and called James Adair before him.
" Is it possible," he said, that you were the au-
thor of this mischief?"
I was not, Sir," was the answer, in a respect-
ful but firm tone.
What proof can you give of this assertion ?"
"None, Sir. I trust my word will be sufficient.
I went from the playground into one of the reci-
tation-rooms, and there remained, reading, until a
few moments before school."
Mr. Franklin thought for an instant, and then
said, I cannot doubt the truth of what you say,
for I never knew you guilty of the least evasion;
but you must know who was here when you came
in. Can you tell me any thing about it ? Have
you the smallest suspicion of the culprit ?"
"Yes, Sir."
Who was it? "
"I cannot tell.
"Do you dare to say that to me," asked Mr.
Franklin, angrily. Do you not know that your
silence will be punished ?"
Yes, Sir, and I am willing to bear the penal-
ty," was the undaunted reply.






TRUTH WILL PROTECT ITSELF.


Mr. Franklin looked very uncertain how to pro-
ceed, but he could not violate the rule which he
had established, that those who screened the au-
thor of any mischief must themselves suffer in
his place.
Mr. Martin," he said, after a pause, during
which every face before him exhibited the great-
est interest and anxiety, "I give this boy into
your hands, with permission to punish him as
much as you think the disrespect and injury you
have received deserves, unless he will give you
all the information upon the subject which is in
his possession."
This threat did not terrify James, or even make
him change color, and, though the flogging which
he received for his silence from the irritated
teacher was a severe one, he bore it with the
courage of a hero.
As soon as school was over, the boys all rushed
out into the yard, eager to talk over the occurrence,
and the moment that James Adair appeared, three
long, loud cheers rent the air. This expression
of the approbation of his companions mantled his
brow with a flush of pride, as he thought with
what apparent contempt they had looked upon his
leaving them a few hours before to avoid alterca-
tion. The cheering ceased as Tom Carter came







12 TRtTHi WILL PROTECT ITSELF.

down the schol-hotise steps, and a general hiss
demonstrated that, if the master was unacquainted
with the name of the culprit, the boys were not
equally ignorant. The fact was, he had boasted
of the trick he was going to perform to his com-
panions, and did not perceive, as he slipped out of
the school-toom, after executing it, that James en-
tered by another door from the recitation-room.
He now hastened away from the disgrace which
he had brought upon himself by his meanness, in
remaining silent while another was punished for
his fault.'
Tom Carter is the coward, after all," ,was the
general 'exclmation~, "and James Adair can.af-
ford to be called ii liar -by him, becauseevery ond
else knows that the accusation is false?"















CIIAPTERk 'I1.


RASHNESS AND tifiAVERY.

The town, ii which all the boysresided whose
acquaintance' we'have made id the. last: chapter,
was not vety large,lbut built with the same com,
pactnese es 'a city Yof greater extent. M. Pier.
son, being the *oily--lawyer of distinction in. the
place, and a man, -moreover -of- considerable
wealth:had, il is true, a very spacious house, sur-
rounded 'by a large yard filled with fine trees and
rate shrubs, but most .of the buildings near it
were ef wood and exceedingly close, together.
Upon the corner of the principal street, however,
there 'was .a fine brick hotel4 dnd here Captain
Adair and his family were residing for a short
time, until he should receive notice that his leave
of'absence was at an end. -Mrs. Adair was'daily
dreading the arrival of the fatal orders which






14 RASHNESS AND BRAVERY.


would separate her from a husband, who united
every quality which insures affection and respect.
Not far from the Clinton Hotel there was a fine
block of frame buildings, which had been lately
erected by the father of Thomas Carter, and in
one of them that gentleman at present resided.
He was a plain, money-making man, and, having
early lost his wife, his sons had grown up with
no ameliorating influences to soften and improve
the coarse, selfish natures which they had inher-
ited from their mammon-worshipping parent.
Mr. Carter only laughed when his son told him
of the trick which he had practised upon one of
his instructors, and would not probably have felt
much ashamed, had he known his meanness in
sheltering himself from punishment behind his
more generous schoolfellow.
The evening after the discomfiture of Mr. Mar-
tin and the unmerited chastisement of James
Adair, the air, which had been very warm, be-
came more fresh, and a breeze sprung up, which
soon increased to a perfect gale. Suddenly the
startling cry, "Fire Fire 1" rang through the
streets of Newton, and aroused the inhabitants
from their slumbers.
It must be Carter's block," exclaimed Mr.
Pierson, as, rubbing his breath from the window-







RASHNESS AND BRAVERY.


pane to see more clearly, he peered out into the
night to discover whence issued the bright flames
that were coloring the sky.
O, let me go to it, father, let me go to it,"
cried Frank, rushing into his father's bed-room
from the adjoining chamber, which he occupied.
You can do no good, my son," said his moth-
er, lifting up her head from the pillow, being un-
able to rise without disturbing the baby which lay
sleeping upon her arm.
O, indeed I can be of use, mother," pursued
Frank, earnestly. "All the boys pass empty
buckets, and you know I can climb up a ladder
like a squirrel."
"But you are so rash, Frank, that I am never
easy when you are out of my sight," said Mrs.
Pierson.
"Poh, poh, mother," interrupted Mr. Pierson,
who, in the mean time, was dressing with all pos-
sible speed, you will make a perfect baby of
that boy. He must run his chance like the rest
of us, and learn to take care of himself. Put on
your clothes quickly, Frank, or I 'II have the fire
all out before you get there."
Captain Adair had also been aroused by the
glare of the flames upon the windows of the ho-
tel, and, starting up, he called out to James that







16 RASHENSS AND BRAVERY.


the house of his schoolfellow, Tom Carter, must
be on fire. As both were hastily dressing, Cap.
tain Adair said: -
Now remember, my boy, that true courage is
prudent, as well as brave. Never risk your life
without it is to attain some great.good, or think
that there is any thing commendable. in.incurring
danger to accomplish an object which, might have
been secured without risk. Do. not let me see
you in the way of other people, or making a great
display of activity, but quietly see;where you can
be useful, and do exactly what you. are told .by
those older and wiser than yourself." ...
These cautions came from the lips of.one of the
bravest officers in the- United States. Navy, who
had clearly demonstrated to the world, that calm
prudence in the hour of danger is the proof of
a greater mind than that rashonie whih .often-de-
feats its own object.
4 Fire Fire! Play on the roof, there The
next house has. caught! :More hands at .the en-
gine wanted!: The water.is giving out! There
goes.the chimney! Engin .No. 7 to the. other
side! Fire! Fire!" .
Such were the.cries which reached the ears of
James Adair and Frmuk Pierson,-as, at the same
moment, they reached.the comer of. the street on







RASHNESS AND BRAVERY.


which the burning buildings were situated. Frank
had run so fast that he was quite out of breath,
and, for some minutes, incapable of any exertion.
No sooner was he recovered, than he became al-
most wild with excitement; springing up the lad-
der which was placed against the next house to
the one burning, he scrambled upon the roof with
wonderful agility, and, stationing himself where
he could take the full buckets which were con-
stantly passed up, began throwing their contents
wherever a spark had lighted. While his strength
lasted, he was, in truth, exceedingly useful, but
the buckets were very heavy and the heat so great
that his head became dizzy, and he would have
fallen from the roof if one of the firemen had not
caught him in his arms.
You are a brave little fellow," said the man
who had rescued him, but this is no place for
you."
Thus saying, he cried out, "Take this boy,
there, and pass him along down the ladder,--
easy, for he is fainting"; and poor Frank was
handed from one to another till he reached the
ground, where Captain Adair was busy in giving
various articles which had been taken from the
dwellings to those who would place them in safe-
ty. As soon as he saw the almost senseless son







Is IRASHNESS AND BRAVERY.


of his friend, he took him in his arms and carried
him away to a house remote from the heat and
bustle, where he slowly recovered.
In the mean time, James had stood at the end
of a long line of men, passing down the empty
buckets. Just as his father returned to the scene,
having prevailed upon Frank to go home, a pierc-
ing scream was heard from an old woman,. who
had acted as housekeeper in Mr. Carter's family,
"O, Tom will be burnt to death I thee is no
help for it I" she exclaimed, wringing her hands
in agony.
SWhere is .he.?" was the. anxious inquiry
which burst from the crowd.
S" In the farthest chamber in the. back wing.
He cannot be saved, for the back stairs are burnt,
and there is no. window in -the room, only one
leading, into the next chamber. O, that I.shaold
live to see this day!"
"'Why did not some one-call him?" was the
ready question.
* We only thought of ourselves, and he must
be asleep." .
S" Can nothing be done ?" asked Captain Adair.
The moment that. James heard of the' perilous
condition of his school-fellow, he left the lineirand
stepping quickly to his father's sidesaid, in'a low







RBAHNESS AND BL&VERY.


tone, He is not lost, father. Come with me,
quick, and I will tell you how.he can be saved."
Captain Adair knew that there must be some
feasibility in the scheme which James was about
to propose, and therefore lent an attentive ear
while he continued, earnestly : -
I know his room, and onee, in sport,'I climbed
down the chimney into it. I can go up the side
of the wing and run along to thetopof that.chim.
ney, and. then, if you will let me; down quick by
a rope, so that I can be drawn up if the room is
already on fire, I think I can save him."
The plan seemed reasonable, though danger.
ous, and, before the exclamationsof despair had
subsided, James and his. father wer ion the roof,
and. the Captain was holding with a steady hand
the rope on which hung the life of. his only son.
James felt his way through the chimney in safe-
ty, until he touched the floor, and. then, by the
light that shone thraogh the window from the ad.
joining room, which was just taking fire, he per.
ceivd -that Tom was still fast asleep in his bed.
He roused him quickly, and, before. the afirighted
boy could .careely comprehend- what was the
matter, the rope was tied around his waist. ..
Now make your way up the chimney as safe*
ty as you can, Tom," said. James, in cheerful






RASHNESS AND BRAVERY.


voice, at the same time that he called to his father
to pull up the rope.
As Tom disappeared from his sight, the light of
the flames flashed still more brightly upon him,
and their heat became almost insupportable. As
the fire crept along the thin partition, and burst
through the small window between the rooms,
James felt a momentary sensation of terror and
despair. But a heaven-born spirit whispered
courage, and, kneeling beside the bed whose oc-
cupant he had just rescued from death, he offered
a fervent prayer, that, if God were about to
remove him by a painful death, he would comfort
his mother, and take him to his own heavenly
kingdom. He still knelt, almost suffocated by the
smoke, when the cheerful voice of his father
aroused him from his stupor, as he shouted, -
"Now, my boy, quick, and all is safe."
Twice James fell, from giddiness, before he
could fix the rope around his waist, but the air
through the chimney revived him, and he was
drawn out upon the roof amid the shouts of the
multitude. Even Tom Carter was so completely
overcome by this heroism on the part of one
whom he had that day injured, that he wept like
a child.
Captain Adair and his son escaped as quietly






RASHNESS AND BRAVERY. 21

as possible from the congratulations and applause
of the crowd, and as they slowly made their
way home, the gratified father said, with deep
feeling: -
I see, James, that my instructions have not
been lost upon you. Go on as you have begun,
and I shall have reason to be pr~ud of my son.
God grant that you may alwa) s be ready to sacri-
fice your life for others, dnd so live that you may
never be afraid to die."
















CHAPTER III.


-4-

FEMALE TEACHING.

MRs. ADAIR was seated in her chamber, to
which sickness had confined her for many weeks,
a prisoner. She was a woman of small frame
and delicate organization, but the quick glance of
her eye bespoke great shrewdness of character,
and those who knew. her well could bear testimo-
ny to her strong sense and uncommon energy.
These qualities, however, did not detract from the
love with which she was universally regarded, on
account of the great amiability and kindness of
her disposition. She was, in fact, exactly the
woman to whom the education of sons should be
committed, -firm and uncompromising in princi-
ple, and consistent in conduct, but gentle and
sweet in voice and manner. James had been a
most kind attendant upon her sick bed, and even







FEMALE TEACHING.


now that she was better would leave his compan-
ions at play and sit beside her for hours, either
conversing with intelligence beyond his years, or
reading, in a clear, distinct tone, some interesting
book not above his comprehension.
Miss Clara Fessenden was one of those ladies
whom Providence seems to have kept single, that
many may have the benefit of their sympathy
and benevolence. She was a warm friend to Mrs.
Adair, and had often ministered to her wants
during her illness, and amused the tedium of the
hours with her animated conversation. A few
days before the one of which we speak, she had
mentioned, incidentally, that her Sunday School
class was at present composed of boys, and that
she found it very interesting. She had at first
taken them in the absence of their teacher, and,
upon his return, he begged that she would not re-
linquish the charge, as he was obliged to be irreg-
ular'in his attendance.
Mrs. Adair had a high respect for the piety and
intellect of her friend, and became anxious that
her son should share the benefit of her instruc-
tions. She now proposed to James that he should
renter the school for the purpose of joining her
class.
Re taught by a woman I not I, indeed, moth-







FEMALE TEACHING.


er!" was the reply, as he started up from his chair
and walked to the window, evidently feeling in-
sulted by the proposition..
"Then Iinay conclude, James," rejoined his
mother, mildly. that. henceforward it will be
useless for me. to give you any advice, as you
probably wil not condescend to listen to any more
counsel from the weak. lips of a woman."
Her sorrowful tone touched the warm .heart of
her son, and quickly returning to her side he
kissed her affectionately, .saying,--t No,. dear
mother, I shall never be too much, of a: man to be
guided. bf you,.but it. is a very diffret thing.:to
belong to a woman's class ia..Sunday School.
You, to be sure, know as much as father, but he
says, himself, that almost all the other ladies he is
acquainted with. are more like.parrots and pea-
cocks than reasonable beings,". ..
".That was a very ungallant -speech, Jameso'
said Mrs. Adair, smiling, and- I am aure your.fa-
ther must have been in sport: when he made it, for
I believe, he has a most profound- respect for my
much abused'.sex.' .
Now, motherN:do -be a little candid, Don't
women do very siHy things?" .oattinud James,
determined not to yield the point.
"If the avowal give you any pleasure my son,







FEMALE TEACHING.


I will own that I have seen some women who were
not exceedingly wise. Now tell me, honestly, m
your turn, if you think Miss Fessenden one of
these silly women."
James looked very attentively at the buttons of
his new overcoat, one of which he was in danger
of pulling off, before he replied,- Why, moth-
er, upon the whole, I reckon that she is a woman
of pretty good sense, but then even she has some
foolish ways. For instance, she called me dear
when she was talking to me, as if I were a baby,
and then, when Lieutenant McPherson was an-
nounced, I caught her taking a peep at herself in
the glass, and noticed that she talked to him in a
different tone of voice from the one which she had
been using when alone with us."
Mrs. Adair could not help smiling at the justice
of these observations, but she was not thus to be
diverted from her object.
Will you tell me, James," she asked," wheth-
er you think Miss Fessenden knows any more
about the Bible than you do ?"
Certainly, for she has studied it some twenty
years longer. It is well, though, that I did not
say that to her face, for no woman that I ever
saw could bear to have it insinuated that she was
out of her teens. I hate old maids."







FEMALE TEACHING.


A very unchristian aversion, and one that I
am sorry to hear you express," said Mrs. Adair,
gravely, I for it is not only unmanly, but very ill-
bred to speak slightingly of any class of women.
You do not talk like yourself this morning, and I
see plainly that you have imbibed some of Frank
Pierson's ridiculous notions. He is not to blame
for entertaining them, because they have never
been corrected; but there is no excuse for your
speaking in this manner. You say that you be-
lieve Miss Fessenden capable of instructing you
in the Bible. That is all that is necessary, if her
piety be such as to add weight to her precepts.
As to her information and sense upon other sub-
jects, you have no more right to ask, than if your
fencing-master understands Latin, or your French
teacher mathematics. But I have argued upon
the subject longer than I usually do, and might
have known that it would be a waste of words.
It is my request that you join Miss Fessenden's
class next Sunday, and I am very sure that you
will comply with it."
James was accustomed to obedience, but the
spirit of independence, or rather of evil pride,
which slumbers in every boy's heart, was
aroused, and he longed to resist. He stood for
several minutes looking out the window in silence,







FEMALE TEACHING.


and endeavouring to conquer his own ill-humor.
At length the clamor within was quelled, and,
turning round, with a smile upon his bright, man-
ly face, he said,- I will do any thing to please
you, mother, excepting to believe that there is any
other woman in the world to be compared with
your own dear self."
A very gallant speech, and a very just one,
James," remarked his father, who entered the
room at that moment, unperceived. It deserves
reward, so come down with me to the harbour, and
see the seventy-four which has just arrived from the
Pacific. She is a noble vessel, and the one of which
I shall probably have command in a few months."
This allusion to the expected departure of her
husband brought an additional shade of paleness to
the fair cheek of Mrs. Adair, but again it assumed
a brighter hue, as she looked down from the win-
dow upon the fine forms and graceful bearing of a
husband and son of whom she was justly proud.
When James was persuaded that any thing was
really his duty, he did it freely and openly, not
from the worldly maxim, to "grant graciously
what we cannot refuse safely," but from the con-
viction that no act of self-denial was a virtue, if
performed with a reluctant spirit. He openly an-
nounced at school, on Friday, that he was going







FEMALE TEACHING.


to join Miss Fessenden's Bible-clasa on the ensu-
ing Sabbath, and many of the very boys who
at first laughed at this determination were, be-
fore long, persuaded to accompany him.
Although not fearful of ridicule for himself,
James felt it his bounden duty to protect his new
allies from the vexatious remarks of their com-
panions.
"Come, boys, let those laugh who win," he
said, with great good-humor. "Nothing great or
good was ever attempted at which somebody did
not smile in the commencement. I must tell
you what I saw at the camp-meeting last summer,
for it made quite an impression upon my mind.
After tea, when all the people were either
walking about or chatting in the doors of their
tents, one poor old man came, and, seating him-
self down on a bench before the pulpit, began
singing, in a feeble voice, a real Methodist tune.
Every body laughed to see him apparently so
wrapped in his own devotion as to forget that
there was any one upon the ground but himself.
He sang on, in spite of the various jokes made at
his expense, and, by-and-by, another old man
joined him and he continued with still more spir-
it. In less than half an hour the bench was filled
with men singing in chorus, and then a circle of






FEMALE TEACHING.


listeners formed around them, among whom the
music became general, and the spirit of devotion
had so impressed itself, that, when the same old
man said 'Let us pray,' every one there fell
down upon the knees. I thought to myself,
then, that I would never dread ridicule again, but
respect an independent spirit, even if enlisted in
a bad cause."
Quite a Methodistical story, Jim," rejoined
one of the lively group, but I presume we shall
have plenty more of them when he has been in
Sunday School for a few weeks, though I believe,
on the whole, Miss Fessenden is not a Methodist.
Be a good boy, and remember all she says."
How many of the precepts of the world are
current even among the devout, who have never
questioned their truth, and are startled when the
hollowness and falsity of generally received opin-
ions burst upon them. Miss Clara Fessenden was
of a highly respectable family, who were as proud
of their spirit as of their blood. She had been
many years a Christian, before fully persuaded
that the virtue of meekness implied a surrender
of what she had always thought a justifiable pride.
On account of her own previous self-deception
upon this subject, she was the more forcibly struck
with its universal prevalence, and daily regretted






FEMALE TEACHING.


that, even in the church, there should be so much
of that proud spirit, which will not brook the least
infringement upon its own rights.
One Sunday morning, some action which had
recently excited much attention became the sub-
ject of discussion in her class, and, while she was
endeavouring to show the error of the principal
in the affair, one of her pupils exclaimed, -
"But, Miss Clara, no man of spirit could have
done otherwise."
What do you call a man of spirit ? she
quietly asked.
Why, one who knows what is due to himself,
and will not submit to insult," was the reply, in
an animated tone.
Will any of you tell me where the spirit is
commended which seeketh its own,' and will not
submit to the least injury, for I fear you know
not what spirit you are of.'"
The boys thought a moment in silence, some-
what perplexed by the question. All the pas-
sages in Scripture enjoining the surrender of our
own rights for the sake of peace seemed to force
themselves upon their minds, and they knew not
what to reply.
It may not be exactly Christian, Miss Clara,"
one of them at last observed, but it is what the






FEMALE TEACHING.


world acknowledges to be necessary, and every
man in his own heart approves."
But the world is at enmity with God, and the
heart is deceitful above all things," Miss Fessen-
dcn replied, in a serious tone.
Do you really think, then, Miss Clara," asked
IIhgh Gleason, whose flushed face showed his
excitability of temperament, "that religion is
meant to depress all that is noble and honorable
in our nature, and make us mean and cowardly ? "
"I will ask you, in return," she said, smiling
at his warmth, "if the only part of our nature
which is honorable is that which we share with
the brutes; for they, too, are capable of anger and
revenge ?"
But not of feeling an insult, or an unjust ac-
cusation," he replied, in an excited tone. "Is
not every man bound to defend his own reputa-
tion ?"
No, indeed !" answered Miss Clara, prompt-
ly; "a spotless character will vindicate itself, or
enlist warm friends in its defence. Would Wash-
ington have been obliged to fight any one who
had called him a coward, in order to prove his
bravery ? Had Howard, the philanthropist, been
accused of selfishness, would retaliation have
placed his benevolence in any clearer or higher
light ? "







FEMALE TEACHING.


Certainly not," Hugh replied, but these are
extreme cases, and every man's superiority is not
so universally known and acknowledged. For
instance, the schoolboy who is accused of false-
hood by his companions cannot have the same
testimony to his character."
At this example James Adair blushed, and lis-
tened attentively to hear what would be the reply
of his teacher.
I allow," she said, that a boy's reputation
may not be as firm as that of a man, but still, if
he is consistent, it will defend itself. In every
case of perplexity, however, the young, as well
as the old, have one bright example, from which
they have no right to swerve. From his cradle
to his grave, Christ might say,' The reproaches of
them that reproached fell upon me,' yet scarcely
did he even contradict one false accusation, made
in the spirit of malice. If they have called the
master of the house Beelzebub, how much more
shall they call them of his household?' Ask
yourselves, in each event of life, What would
Christ do if now in my place ? and I think you
will none of you feel justified in any manifestation
of that spirit which the world approves, because
it is of the earth, earthy."















CHAPTER IV.


CAPITAL FUN.

"Do you not think, my dear George," said
Mrs. Pierson to her husband, one evening, that
it would be much better if Frank could be per-
suaded to remain at home after tea. He is ab-
sent every night, and I am constantly anxious lest
he should get into some mischief."
Pshaw I women are always over careful of
their children. Boys must run their chance in
this world, and there is no use in trying to keep
them out of it, for sooner or later they will know
all that is evil. I was brought up on this plan,
and you see I have not made so very bad a man
after all, have I, my dear ? "
This was almost an unanswerable argument to
Mrs. Pierson, who nearly worshipped her hus-
band, but her maternal heart was ill at ease, and







CAPITAL FUN.


she continued, -" But Frank, you know, may
not be equally fortunate. I think the expression
of his face has somewhat changed of late, and
he begins to have a reckless, swaggering air,
which I do not at all like. I am afraid he has con-
tracted some intimacies during his nocturnal ram-
bles, which we should not approve."
Now, my dear wife," said Mr. Pierson, almost
impatient of what he deemed her feminine weak-
ness, just, once for all, put your mind at rest,
for if you are going to worry yourself every mo-
ment that boy is out of your sight, I might as well
bespeak your coffin immediately. He must run
his chance, I repeat, for he has too much spirit to
be made a baby of, so you will have to devote
yourself more. to Lucy, and practise upon her
your theories of education. I only hope that she
may resemble her mother as much as Frank does
what his father was at the same age."
This logic did not satisfy Mrs. Pierson, and as
she turned towards the bed on which little Lucy
lay sleeping, she sighed, and, as a tear dropped
upon the face of the unconscious child, she thought
what a sweet baby Frank had been, and wished
that he was again an infant in her arms.
While this conversation was taking place, Mas-
ter Frank Pierson was promenading the main







CAPITAL FUN.


street of the town in company with two boys, one
of whom was the mean-spirited Tom Carter, and
the other his own former enemy, Robert Jones.
He had not chosen his companions from any pref-
erence for their society, for in his heart he despised
them; but, in lounging about in the evening, he
frequently met them, and had thus contracted an
intimacy, which threatened to be exceedingly in-
jurious to his character. They were now plotting
together to devise some scheme of mischief by
which they might entertain themselves during the
evening, and as there is always ingenuity enough
among boys to suggest such projects, they were
not likely to be unsuccessful in getting up some-
thing, which would be, as they said, capital fun."
Any discriminating person might have seen that
there was danger of their becoming dissipated and
worthless men, as they sauntered along, with caps
pushed on one side, and affected impudence of
air, assuming the manners of city gentlemen, and
from time to time uttering such profane words as
they thought necessary to prove their manhood.
Thomas Carter and Robert Jones had both of
them cigars in their mouths, which they continued
puffing in the faces of the ladies whom they now
and then passed, but in this Frank could not imi-
tate them. He had made a desperate attempt at







CAPITAL FUN.


smoking, but it would not do, and, after having
made himself exceedingly sick for a few times in
attempting to acquire this bad habit, he was, to his
great mortification, obliged to relinquish it.
As this trio of would-be young gentlemen turned
round the corner of the principal street, they met
James Adair returning to the hotel from a circu-
lating library, with three large volumes under his
arm.
Does your mother know you are out ? was
Frank's laughing question.
Probably, as she sent me upon an errand,"
was the good-humored reply.
Well, then, I suppose she won't care if you
take a turn or two with us. Come along, and we
will have some sport on foot before we are half
an hour older."
"Thank you; but I have promised to com-
mence reading Ferdinand and Isabella' aloud to
mother, and I do not like to keep her waiting for
me."
What nonsense It is a right down shame
for a brave boy like you to be tied to his mother's
apron-string," remarked Tom Carter, who re-
membered too well the courage to which he was
indebted for his life to doubt for a moment that
James was as manly and spirited as it was possi.







CAPITAL FUN. 37

ble for a boy to be. He could not understand
how any one with such a disposition could be so
perfectly submissive to a woman, and had often
before expressed his surprise upon this subject.
"Good evening to you, boys. I only hope you
may enjoy yourself as well as I expect to," was
James's parting salutation as he hastened home.
When he entered his mother's apartment, our
young friend was quite disappointed at seeing a
lady seated by her side, as if she were settled for
the evening; but a smile of pleasure chased the
frown from his brow, when he recognized in the
visitor his favorite, Miss Clara Fessenden. She
was soon engaged in teaching him the Russian
game of backgammon, and her vivacity and intel-
ligence made the evening so short, that he was
surprised at the lateness of the hour when she
rose to take leave.
"I am sorry," she observed, "that I did not
know that Captain Adair was out of town, that I
might have left orders for a servant to call for me,
as I know your dislike to having James out at
night."
I have no objection to it when necessary,"
said Mrs. Adair. It is true, that both his father
and myself are averse to his loitering about the
street, at night, and misspending his time, but I







CAPITAL FUN.


can assure you that we have no fear in trusting
him from us at any time. Captain Adair is so
often absent from home, that it is necessary that
he should learn to supply his place, and wait upon
me and my friends. So you see, my dear Clara,
that you never need have the least hesitation in
calling upon him, if you are willing to accept of
his services."
It was at this hour that Frank Pierson and his
companions, having spent the evening in giving
sundry alarms to housekeepers and servants by
ringing door-bells and then dodging out of sight,
were standing at one of the corners of the street,
anxious to devise some new means of annoying
their neighbours. At length they decided to go
into a neighboring confectionary store and buy a
quantity of torpedoes, with which to give some
one a fright. Having cracked away a few for
their own amusement, they placed some upon the
pavement, that the next lady who came by might
tread upon them. They dropped them in the in-
side of the walk, just at the foot of a flight of
steps, and stationed themselves on the outside, just
leaving room for a lady and a young lad, whom
they saw approaching, to pass.
Miss Fessenden and James were so busy in
conversing about the palace of ice, of which they







CAPITAL FUN.


were reminded by the frosty evening, that they
noticed neither the boys nor the steps. The for-
mer, though a strong-minded woman, had very
weak nerves, and, as the torpedoes exploded under
her feet, she started aside, screaming and hitting
her foot against the lowest stone, and fell with her
head against the steps.
The boys, frightened at the cry of distress which
burst from the lady's lips, came immediately for-
ward to her assistance, and James was truly pained
when he recognized in them the authors of the
mischief.
For shame, boys he said, in a tone of hon-
est indignation. You, who talk so much about
being manly, ought to be above frightening a
woman. Do, Frank, give your arm to Miss Fes-
senden, and endeavour to help her as far as your
house, for I believe that is the nearest house of
an acquaintance. Can you walk even as far as
that, Miss Clara ?"
I will try," she said, in a faint tone, and, get-
ting up with an effort, she walked slowly between
her young conductors, while Tom Carter and
Robert Jones were glad to escape in an opposite
direction.
Mrs. Pierson was startled, in the loneliness to
which she was condemned by the absence of her







40 CAPITAL FUN.

husband and son, by hearing Frank cry out, in a
tone of distress, O, pray do come down, moth-
er. Miss Fessenden has fainted upon the steps,
and her head is very badly hurt."
Mrs. Pierson ran down immediately, followed
by the nurse, and, after some time, they were suc-
cessful in restoring life to the inanimate form that
lay before them. As soon as James saw his friend
in the care of Mrs. Pierson, he went immediately
for the doctor, who pronounced the wound a se-
rious one, and that there was danger of its affect-
ing her reason, if fever ensued. She was, how-
ever, so anxious to be carried home, that the phy-
sician was obliged to consent to it, and James as-
sisted him, with the utmost care and tenderness,
in placing her in the carriage.
As the sound of the wheels died away, Frank
turned to his mother with such a sorrowful, con-
science-stricken look, that she saw at once that he
had been instrumental in causing this accident,
and now bitterly deplored his fault. But though
a woman of good principle, she was a weak one,
and could not bear, at this time, to inflict still fur-
ther pain upon her son, by dwelling upon his fault.
She even tried to comfort him, and assured him
that she would assist in concealing his connection
with the fall from his father, as she knew he would







CAPITAL FUN. 41

be seriously displeased, if acquainted with all the
circumstances of the transaction. A few words,
in his present frame of mind, might have con-
vinced Frank of the meanness of such mischievous
pranks, and how utterly they were at variance, not
only with every principle of love and justice, but
with the spirit of a true gentleman.
In a few weeks, Miss Fessenden had recovered
from the fever which had been caused by the
blow upon her head, but there was an ugly scar
remaining upon her forehead, at which Frank did
not like to look. It would have been well if he
had seen it often, that he might have been re-
minded of his own error, and deterred from again
engaging in any amusement which might cost an-
other so dear.
















CHAPTER V.


-4-

.YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.

MRs. KINGSLEY was an only sister of Mrs. Pier-
son, who had been married shortly after the birth
of Frank, and had removed, immediately upon
her union, to one of the Western States. In a
little more than a year after her arrival at her new
home, intelligence was received of the birth of a
daughter, whom she had named Amelia, in honor
of her sister, and who was stated by the fond
mother to give great promise, both of intelligence
and beauty.
When Frank was in his fifteenth year, Mrs.
Pierson received the melancholy tidings that her
sister had died of a contagious fever, leaving it as
her last request, that she should take charge of
her only daughter. As Mr. Pierson was willing
that she should accept this responsibility, a letter








YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


was immediately written to Mr. Kingsley, express-
ing the sincerest sympathy with his loss, and the
willingness with which the last wish of hiq wife
would be fulfilled. It was also suggested, that it
would be well for his daughter to be sent to the
East before the cold weather should render the
travelling uncomfortable.
Mr. Kingsley, in reply, gratefully acknowledged
the kindness of the relations of his wife, in being
willing to receive his motherless daughter, but de-
clared that he could not have relinquished her
society, if he had not felt that she was of an age
when female care was indispensable. A friend of
his own was to visit Newton in the ensuing month,
and would take charge of Amelia, and place her
under the protection of her aunt.
Frank was delighted at the idea of this addition
to the family, and devised a thousand ways of
making the time pass agreeably to his cousin, all
of which he was at the moment sincere in his
determination to execute. He pictured her to
himself as a pale, interesting little girl, who would
look up to him for love and protection, and would
sympathize in all his joys and sorrows.
On the day in which Amelia was expected,
Mrs. Pierson's heart was filled with sad emotions.
She almost dreaded the meeting with the only







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


child of her lost sister, lest the image should be
too forcibly revived of one whom she could meet
no more on earth. Frank did not participate in
these feelings, but was all impatience to greet his
new companion. He did not loiter in the play-
ground an instant after school was dismissed, but
came home with all possible speed, and, throwing
his satchel down in the hall, pushed open the par-
lour-door eagerly, expecting to find the stranger
there.
Has not she come, mother ?" he asked, in a
disappointed tone, as he saw no one but Mrs. Pier-
son and Lucy.
"No; Tuzzen Melia has n't turn," lisped out
little Lucy, tottering towards him in all the glory
of a new pink dress, which she was not too young
to admire.
"I don't believe she 's coming," exclaimed
Frank, with an air of vexation. "Get away, Sis;
you are always under one's feet," and the impa-
tient boy gave his little sister a hasty push.
Come here to ma, my precious," said Mrs.
Pierson, in a petting tone, as Lucy began scream-
ing violently, more from anger at having her ca-
resses repulsed, than any hurt she had received.
" Frank, you are very cruel to treat this little dar-
ling in the way you do."







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


You know I did n't mean to hurt her," he an-
swered, impertinently, "but I should not care
much if something should stop her mouth for ever,
for she is eternally yelling. Yaw! yaw I yaw I
what a beautiful baby you are, making up that
mouth."
Frank, like many boys, had no toleration
for the little faults of infancy, and was sorely
vexed if any one dared to insinuate that he had
ever passed through such an age of helplessness,
or needed the cares which he was so unwilling to
aid in bestowing upon his little sister.
Mr. Pierson, perhaps, was somewhat to blame
for this disposition on the part of his son, for he
also had no scruples about complaining of the
noise that the baby made, and the annoyance that
it gave him. If, after Mrs. Pierson had been
awake half the night with the child, its screams
aroused him, he would say, pettishly, -"It is
strange, wife, that you can't keep that child still.
What is a woman good for, if she don't even
know how to nurse her own children!"
Like too many others, he viewed all the care
and anxiety which Mrs. Pierson suffered as the
natural lot of woman, and, instead of inquiring if
he could lighten it, felt himself aggrieved, if oblig-
ed to bear for an hour what she had borne for
5







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


years. Frank had caught his spirit, and deemed
his mother accountable for every fretful word
which fell from Lucy's mouth.
The discussion about Lucy ended, as usual, in
her removal to the nursery, and then Mrs. Pierson
tried to coax Frank out of his ill-humor.
Do try and look more pleasantly, my son,"
she said, "and put on another coat, for that one is
beginning to be very rusty, and I wish your cousin
to admire you."
Frank was too much used to this manner to be
moved by it, and he answered in a sullen tone, -
" I don't like that other coat, and I won't wear it.
I told you I 'd keep on this till it was all ragged,
when you would n't let me do about the other one
as I wanted to. This did look well once, but any
body might see that the other was made by a
tailoress, and I 'm too big to wear women's work.
They make every thing so bungling, that I can tell
a coat they have touched half a mile off."
But you know, Frank," interposed his mother,
" that Mrs. Simpson works for all the most fash-
ionable tailors, and has made some vests for your
father, which fit very nicely."
Now that 's all nonsense. She pretends that
she works for them, but Brigham told me himself,
that he never employed any women about his es-







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


tablishment, and I believe him. As for that mean
coat, I won't wear it, so there 's no use in talking
about it."
Mrs. Pierson had become so accustomed to the
disrespectful manner of her son, that it did not
pain her as it once would have done, neither did
she make any effort to correct the fault, having
learned to consider the case almost hopeless. She
only sighed deeply, and went on sewing in silence,
till a carriage drove up to the door, containing
Amelia Kingsley and her protector, Mr. Masham.
Frank Pierson, like some older persons who
have been educated in the city, associated all ex-
cellence with a certain elegance of dress and man-
ner. When he saw his cousin alight, he was per-
fectly persuaded that he should never like her,
though this conviction may have arisen, in part,
frortm his own ill-humor at the time. Still, it
would have been with difficulty that he could ever
have conquered his disappointment at her decid-
edly unfashionable appearance. As there had
been no person of taste to order the mourning of
the poor little motherless girl, it had been left to a
country milliner, who certainly did all that she
could to disfigure her little customer. Amelia
was, moreover, at that age when girls are most apt
to be unprepossessing in appearance, for she had







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


grown very rapidly, and had, beside a stoop in
the shoulders, a limberness of frame which made
her exceedingly ungraceful. Her voice, too, was
a little coarse, and, when she burst into tears at the
sight of her aunt, her large mouth assumed so
hideous a shape, that the fastidious Frank turned
away in absolute disgust.
Now there was nothing in all this to justify the
smallest prejudice, and the forlorn appearance of
her niece only excited commiseration in the heart
of her affectionate aunt. But with Frank, pride
was stronger than any other feeling, and, having
pronounced his cousin decidedly ugly and ungen-
teel, he did not care what else she might be.
From that day, Frank and Amelia were con-
stantly at enmity. Both had strong wills, which
had been petted and strengthened, and both were
now determined not to surrender their rights. But,
though obstinate, Amelia was warm-hearted and
sensible, and if Frank would have given her even
a few days respite from teasing, she might have
learned to appreciate his many good qualities, but
this he was not inclined to do.
One of Amelia's worst faults was a habit of
crying at every little thing which occurred to
trouble her, and for this failing Frank had no com-
passion. He declared that he meant to break her







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


of it, and, in pursuance of this design, if he found
any subject disagreeable to her, he would recur
to it instantly. One of these unfailing themes
for altercation was the appearance of the little
girl herself upon her first arrival. Frank would
describe the clothes that she wore in the most
ridiculous style, mimicking her air and manner,
and declaring that they were those of all Western
people. Amelia would try to restrain her tears,
but the scene generally ended by her running
weeping to her aunt, exclaiming,-" Won't you
stop Frank, aunt ? He has been teasing me again
about that big bonnet and short-waisted dress that
I wore when I came here, and he keeps on, though
I tell him that I did not make them, and was not
to blame for them."
Don't mind him, Amelia," Mrs. Pierson
would say, it is always the way with boys. They
will tease, and we must not get out of patience
with them. Your cousin don't mean any thing."
If Mrs. Pierson suggested that Frank should
go anywhere with Amelia, he always had some
ready excuse. If he were to be at any place of
amusement himself, he was very apt to say, -
" It's no place for girls, they are always in the
way," never considering how ungenerous it was
in himself to debar her from every pleasure, lest







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


he should have to make some slight sacrifice.
Upon the pernicious plea, that boys will be
boys," he was allowed full scope for his selfish-
ness, and in a fair way to make any woman mis-
erable, who should in after life intrust her happi-
ness to his keeping.
Come, Frank," said Mrs. Pierson, one even-
ing, do go with Amelia and see Mrs. Adair. She
has a little girl staying with her just your age, and
you and James can amuse yourselves, while Ame-
lia and Anna Evelyn get acquainted. Mrs. Adair
was here last week, and told me that she was very
anxious that her young friend should have some
companions, and particularly wished your cousin
to call upon her."
You always ask me to go when I am engaged
about something else, mother," said Frank, in a
cross tone. "Amelia must find somebody else to
trot about after her, for I can't be tied to her."
But I insist upon it that you go with her to-
night, for it is your father's desire. He wishes
Amelia to visit more, and if you refuse to accom-
pany her, I must explain why she is kept so much
at home."
Mr. Pierson was generally indulgent, but when
he had set his heart upon any thing, Frank knew
that it was vain to resist, so he said, with a very







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


bad grace, -" Well, Miss, if I must wait upon
you, I '11 go to the door, and come after you in
an hour or two, and if you don't like that, you
may stay at home."
Amelia was obliged to accept this sullen propo-
sal, and was so much pleased with her new ac-
quaintance, that, when her cousin came for her,
she felt as if her visit had not been half long
enough.
From this evening, Amelia and Anna Evelyn
were intimate friends, and Frank found his time
pass so agreeably when he accompanied his cousin
to see Anna, that he no longer made any objec-
tions to escorting her there.
Anna Evelyn, though a very sweet girl, had a
great deal of discrimination and independence,
and could not endure to see any injustice towards
those whom she loved. She perceived in a short
time the petty tyranny which Frank exercised
over his cousin, and her manner to him very
plainly expressed her disapprobation.
What is the reason," he asked, one evening
when she looked upon him with more than ordi-
nary displeasure, "that you are always getting
vexed with me, and will never like me as well as
James, although I take quite as much pains to
please you."







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


Because I see that your politeness is to me
alone, and does not arise from any innate goodness
of heart, or respect due to my sex. When I see
you equally anxious to please Amelia, I may give
you credit for a more manly spirit."
But she is so provoking, Anna. She contra-
dicts and thwarts me all the while, and expects
me to give up to her, as if she were a queen. She
is younger than I am, and a girl into the bargain,
so it is no more than fair that she should yield.
She might as well do it peaceably, for I will make
her mind me, as she ought."
Anna's pretty little mouth grew still more con-
temptuous at this vaunt, and Frank said, by way
of softening her indignation,-" If you wdre my
cousin, I 'd let you do as you chose."
"Thank you; I 'm very glad I have not
that honor," said the little lady, proudly. I am
afraid that you will make a very tyrannical man,
if you continue to oppress all who are weaker
than yourself. To a noble spirit, the acknowl-
edged inferiority of women in physical strength
is the strongest reason why they should be pro-
tected and cherished. The same disposition which
would cause a boy only to fight with smaller ones,
because he can whip them, must induce you to re-
joice in the annoyance that you can cause to a







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


girl, when she is incapable of redress or retalia-
tion."
Now, indeed, Anna, you make me out worse
than I am," he exclaimed, getting quite angry at
the light in which she placed his conduct. "All
boys make their sisters wait on them, and mind
them, and it is a good thing for women to learn to
give up their wills when they are young, for they
will have to do it all their lives."
Well, it is certainly very disinterested in you,
Frank," said Anna, laughing, "to teach Amelia
this lesson, at the risk of ruining your own charac-
ter. I certainly did not give you credit for so ex-
alted a motive when I heard you declaring, a few
moments since, that you would leave her on the
road home alone, if she did not let you return a
book to the library in which she had just become
interested. I know that you wanted to get one
out for me in its place, and did not intend that I
should hear this threat, but I assure you, that I
wish no pleasure gained at the expense of my
friend. If you really want to gratify me, do try
and show yourself more noble than you do by
such conduct to an orphan cousin."
"What are you talking about so earnestly,
Anna ~" asked Mrs. Adair, who had just entered
the room, in another corner of which James and







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


Amelia were playing at draughts, while the above
conversation was taking place.
Frank left Anna to answer the question, and,
going up to his cousin, whispered to her that he
was going home, and she must accompany him.
O, please wait till I have finished this game,"
she said, in an earnest tone.
I will go with you when it is done, Amelia,"
interposed James, if your cousin is in a hurry."
"Very well," he replied, in an angry tone,
" and, since you have taken upon yourself to wait
upon Miss Amelia, she can call upon you when
she wants to go anywhere again."
Amelia understood from this speech, that, if she
did not return home immediately, Frank would
never accompany her anywhere again, so she
pushed away the board, saying, I think I
must leave," and, with a tear in her eye, prepared
for departure.
As the passionate boy was going down the stairs
of the hotel which led to Captain Adair's apart-
ments, followed by Amelia, he stumbled over a
colored servant-boy, who was stooping to pick up
something that he had dropped. Get out of my
way, you black scoundrel," exclaimed Frank, giv-
ing him a kick at the same time. The blow was
harder than he intended, and it sent the poor negro







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


rolling down stairs, crying out,-"0 Master
Frank, you 've killed me."
Shame on you, Frank! said Amelia. It
is Tom, Captain Adair's own servant."
Then let him keep out of my way," replied
Frank, in a surly'tone; but his countenance fell
when he perceived Captain Adair himself at the
foot of the stairs, with an expression of stern dis-
pleasure upon his countenance.
"Young gentleman," he said, I should like to
know what right you have to treat my servant in
this way. I consider myself responsible for his
comfort, and can assure you that I allow no one to
abuse him with impunity. I will see your father
upon the subject to-morrow."
Accordingly, the next day Captain Adair called
upon Mr. Pierson, but his principal object was to
persuade his friend of the injury he was inflicting
upon his son, by allowing him to exercise such an
imperious spirit.
You once said," he remarked, that you thought
Frank would do for the navy, and I expressed a
different opinion. I am more and more convinced
that he is not fitted for any station which would give
him authority over others. No person should have
the command of others, who has not perfect self-
control. Any one who vents his ill-humor on those







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


around him will find enough whom he may make
miserable, without being placed where greater
power will give a wider scope to his unbridled pas-
sions. You say that your son has a lofty spirit and
a noble nature. If so, do try and teach him that it
is unworthy of a man ever to exercise his anger
upon those who are defenceless. If he must inflict
injury, let it be upon his equals, not those whom
Heaven has bound him to protect, by placing them
beneath him."
My dear Sir," said Mr. Pierson, somewhat
irritated at having the fault of his son pointed out,
"you make a great matter of a very common
failing. Servants are so accustomed to being
spoken to in a certain way, that they will not mind
.any orders given in a more gentle manner. Mine,
I am sure, would laugh in my face, if I should
say, in a kind tone, Please to pull off my boots.'"
I think you are mistaken on this point," re-
plied Captain Adair. "On board ship, I have
never met with a rebellious look, and I give all
my orders as if I were addressing persons worthy
of respect, though Providence has made me their
superior in office. I am, it is true, obliged always
to use the imperative mood, but I take care to have
my voice always free from passion or excitement,
because I know that our inferiors feel as if they had
a certain power over us, which diminishes their







YOUTHFUL TYRANNY.


respect, if they can throw us off from our self-
command. I would just as soon punish my child
for hurting a servant, as a servant for hurting my
child, for I know that the one must learn obe-
dience, but there is great danger that the other will
become unworthy of respect, if allowed to vio-
late the rights of others."
I appreciate your motives, Sir, in giving me
this advice," said Mr. Pierson, rather stiffly, and
I will see that your servant receives no farther
harm from my son. So far only, I believe, I am
responsible to you for his conduct"
The Captain took leave, without appearing to
notice the irritation of his friend, who knew him
too well to doubt that he was actuated by the tru-
est kindness in thus counselling him. Frank was
reprimanded for his fault, but he had seen too
many examples of similar conduct upon his father's
part to lay his warning very seriously to heart.
Advice which has not its foundation in principle
has but little weight with the young, and the rea-
son why James Adair had remembered so well the
instruction which he had received upon a similar
subject was, because it was strengthened by ex-
ample, and based upon the words of Scripture:
" Masters, give unto your servants that which is
just and equal, knowing that ye also have a Mas-
ter in heaven."
















CHAPTER VI.


THE SLEIGH-RIDE.

SIT has come at last," said Captain Adair, as
he entered one evening with an open letter in his
hand.
What has come ?" asked his wife, anxiously.
"A letter from Washington, with my sailing
orders. I must leave you in four weeks, for the
America will be in readiness for the voyage by
that time. She will only be absent two years,"
he added, in a cheerful tone, endeavouring to
smother all emotion.
Mrs. Adair spoke not a word, but looked up in.
to his face for a moment with unutterable love
and sorrow, and then, dropping her head upon
his shoulder, burst into tears.
Alice, dear Alice, for my sake endeavour to
control yourself," said the husband, in that low,







THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


calm tone, which sometimes manifests more deep
feeling than the ravings of passionate grief.
" When you became a sailor's wife, you promised
to bear courageously these inevitable separations.
Do you repent your choice ?"
William, can you ask that ?" she replied, as
she lifted up her face from his shoulder, glowing
in refutation of the charge. "Would I give one
month of our wedded life for years in other soci-
ety ? No I had rather feel that I am your wife,
when oceans roll between us, than to take the cup
of happiness, unmingled, from another hand."
Captain Adair made no answer to this earnest
profession of devotion, but he folded his wife to
his bosom, and lifted up his heart in thanksgiving,
that he had been allowed to call such a treasure
his own.
The fo6r weeks which intervened before the
ship, of which Captain Adair was to take com-
mand, was in readiness, slipped rapidly away.
The evening previous to the day appointed for his
departure had arrived, and still there were many
last words unsaid, which the probable length of
his absence rendered absolutely necessary. While
Mrs. Adair was employed in final preparations for
his comfort, he took the opportunity to give some
advice to his son, which it might have tried her
fortitude to hear.








THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


My dear James," he said, "you have so often
seen me depart and return again, after a few years,
in safety, that you now can scarcely realize that
our separation may be a final one. It is possible
that a gracious Providence will allow us to meet
again once more, but still it is best to consider
that there is a chance of my being taken away
for ever. If such should be the melancholy event,
I commit your mother to your care, as a most sa-
cred trust, and you must promise me that, what-
ever new connections you may form in after
years, you will never separate, for any length of
time, from her."
Many boys of James's age would have been
too much overcome, by the possibility of such an
event as that to which Captain Adair alluded, to
reply to the question, but James had been taught,
from his childhood, that it was necessary always
to hold his feelings in subjection to his reason.
He now felt that it was right to consider the un-
certainty attending a sailor's life, and wished for
such directions as might be necessary in case of
any accident.
I accept the trust," he replied, in a solemn
tone. "From this time my mother's comfort
shall be my first study, and to render her happy
the principal aim of my existence."







THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


God give you strength, my son, to discharge
this momentous responsibility. If you fulfil this
promise, I have but little to fear for your own char-
acter or destiny, for, by doing what is right your-
self, you will most contribute to the happiness of
your devoted mother. You have sometimes thought
it hard that I opposed your wish to enter the navy,
but I was sure that such a profession was not cal-
culated to render you happy. You are ardent in
your attachments, and fond of congenial society,
and my profession demands a cooler tempera-
ment, and a greater readiness in detaching one's
self from familiar things. I have felt too keenly
the sacrifices which it requires from a man of
warm feelings and domestic habits, to wish to sub- .
ject you to the same privations. Moreover, I
could not thus deprive your mother of her only
remaining support and consolation. In a few
months you will enter college, and I wish that you
would try and determine, as soon as possible,
what profession you will pursue, as you can thus
study to more advantage. You have desired to
enlist in the service of your country; it is my
highest wish that you may be enrolled among the
soldiers of the cross. Could I live to see you
thus, I should bless the day that I first took you
in my arms. But I do not desire you to embrace
6






THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


this sacred calling, unless urged to it by a higher
voice than mine. It will be my constant prayer
that the spirit of God may thus direct your choice,
and to his grace I commit you. Prepare to join
me in heaven, my son, if we meet no more upon
earth."
The conversation was here interrupted by the
entrance of Mrs. Adair, and her husband found
himself so much affected by his conversation with
James, that he proposed immediately entering up-
on their usual evening devotions. In reading a
passage from the word of God, which he did in a
peculiarly solemn and impressive manner, the
mind of the excellent officer became tranquillized,
and he was enabled calmly, though with deep
earnestness, to pray for the blessing of God upon
those dear ones, who were so soon to be left en-
tirely to his almighty protection.
Were it only for the consolation that religion
can afford in moments of such trial, it were worth
every sacrifice that it ever required. To persons
of deep feeling, such partings are fraught with
misery, which can receive balm from no source
but the hope of eternal reunion. The young have
not yet learned by experience how often, in pass-
ing through this vale of sorrow, mankind need the
" rod and staff" of the Heavenly Shepherd. We






THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


would not fill their hearts with dread of the sor-
rows which may be in store for them, but only en-
deavour to persuade them to remember their Cre-
ator in the days of their youth, while the evil day
comes not, nor the years draw nigh, in which
they shall say, I have no pleasure in them.'"
Several months had passed since the America
sailed, but, as she was bound for a distant station,
no tidings had yet been received of those on
board. During this time there had been a marked
improvement in the character of James Adair.
The trust which his father had reposed in him, at
the early age of fifteen, had given him uncom-
mon thoughtfulness and dignity, without destroy-
ing his natural vivacity. It was delightful to see
how many ways he found of promoting the com-
fort of his mother, and cheering her into partial
forgetfulness of the trial, which weighed so heav-
ily upon her spirits.
Anna Evelyn, who was a ward of Captain
Adair's, had been adopted by him as a daughter,
previously to his departure, and was viewed in
that light by his wife. The charge of her educa-
tion amused many hours, and her quick mind de-
veloped rapidly under such judicious culture. To
her James was equally kind, and was not too
proud to join in her evening lessons in French







THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


and drawing. As they sat at the centre-table,
with their books around them, writing their exer-
cises together, and appealing for a word, now and
then, to Mrs. Adair, who was reading in a com-
fortable chair by the fire, a happier couple was
nowhere to be found. Before the end of the
winter James was so polite as to acknowledge to
his mother, that, if women had not the strongest
'minds, they were certainly most quick of appre-
hension, for Anna could speak three French
words where he could remember one, and her
sketch of the opposite house was decidedly supe-
rior to any drawing that he had ever executed.
It must not be imagined, however, that James
Adair had either lost his taste for youthful sports
or his share of human frailty. Though of slight
form and small muscular strength, he had been,
from his childhood, exceedingly fond of active ex-
ercise and boyish amusements. A more hearty
laugh than his never rang out from a crowd of
schoolboys, nor did any one relish more keenly
a good joke, provided it were not at the expense
of others. He had always hailed the first appear-
ance of snow with delight, and there were few
snowballs directed more expertly than those which
he sent in this merry warfare. Most of all, he
enjoyed a sleigh-ride, with plenty of musical bells






THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


and merry companions. His black eyes then
flashed with exhilaration, and his cheek wore a
bright, fresh glow, which gave something like
beauty to his expressive countenance.
During the first winter of Captain Adair's ab-
sence, an unusual quantity of snow had fallen,
and the roads in every direction were so well beat-
en down that the sleighing was excellent. One
bright evening James came into the parlour, look-
ing all animation, as he said,-" I am afraid,
mother, that you will not approve what I am go-
ing to propose, but I should very much like to
take a sleigh-ride with some of the boys this beau-
tiful evening."
To the ride I should'have no objection," she
replied, if the companions were such as I could
approve."
James hesitated, and then said, To tell the
truth, I do not think you like any of them, except
Hugh Gleason and Charles Adams, but, if I go,
they are to be in the sleigh with me, and we shall
see nothing of the rest, except at the tavern in
Franklin, where we are to have a supper."
"I should prefer not to have you go," said
Mrs. Adair, seriously. It would be much bet-
ter for Frank and you to take Amelia and Anna






THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


somewhere to-morrow evening, and then you
would not be led into temptation."
"But, mother, with all due respect to those
young ladies, I should enjoy myself much better
without them. When boys are by themselves
upon such an occasion, they have a great deal
more fun, for they are not all the while afraid of
being too boisterous, or of staying out too late.
I will, with pleasure, go with Amelia and Anna
to-morrow, in the day-time, but I very much wish
to go to-night. May I not, mother, this once ? I
seldom ask any such indulgence."
Mrs. Adair hesitated for a moment, and thought
how true it was that James gave up many of his
favorite pursuits and tastes to gratify her, and
that, after all, there would be but little danger in
his being a few hours at the hotel with compan-
ions whom he was obliged to meet every day at
school. She hoped that he had too much strength
of principle to be led by them, now, to do any
thing that was wrong, and the only evil that she
dreaded was the common one, in such excursions,
of drinking freely, on plea of protection from
the cold.
I yield this time, James, at length she said,
"though against my own better judgment, on one
condition. Promise me that you will not be in-





THE SLEIGH-BIDE.


duced to taste a drop of any thing intoxicating,
while you are gone. You have been brought up
in such habits of temperance that a very little
might affect your reason, and you know my motto
always is, Touch not, taste not.'"
"I can easily promise that, mother," said
James, delighted at finding the condition of her
consent no harder to fulfil. I do not love any
thing of the kind, and am not afraid of being
teazed about it, for the boys have learned that I
cannot be laughed into doing any thing wrong,
and now they generally let me have my own
way, without opposition. Please, Anna, see that
I have a warm brick ready, and find my comfort-
er and my lined gloves, while I go and tell the
boys to call for me in half an hour."
It was indeed a tempting night, for the air was
clear and cold, and the moon shone more brightly
than common, as if on purpose to be reflected
back with full lustre from the pure snow, which
entirely covered the earth. The sleigh into which
James Adair jumped, with great glee, was half
filled with buffalo-robes, and the horse so loaded
with bells that he went faster and faster, wishing
to escape their sound, not knowing that he in-
creased the music which he was trying to avoid.
A large sleigh contained the remainder of the






THE SLEIGH-BIDE.


boys, with the exception of Frank Pierson, Tom
Carter, and Robert Jones, who were in another
small one, like that James and his friends occupied.
When the party arrived at the hotel, none of
them had thought of being cold, but they had not
been in the house more than five minutes when
Robert Jones exclaimed, We shall all perish,
boys, if we don't take some whisky-punch to
warm ourselves. Shall I order some ?"
Not for me," said James, decidedly, "and,
if I may be the spokesman for the whole, I do not
think any of us need more than this warm fire for
our comfort."
Frank Pierson did not like dictation, and he took
it into his head that this remark was made to curb
his right of choice. His spirit took fire at this
idea, and he cried, in a loud, angry tone, Or-
der two glasses for me, Bob, as I was not brought
up on milk and water."
As he said this, Frank looked almost contempt-
uously at James, who laughingly observed, in re-
ply, It is excellent diet, I can assure you, and
one that I am not willing to exchange for any
less wholesome."
After the party, with the exception of Charles
Adams, had indulged so freely in such potations
that few of them had entire possession of their






TBE SLEIGH-RIDB. Wb

reason, James found little pleasure in their society,
for all enjoyment was destroyed by their boister-
ous mirth and coarse wit. James, though fond of
humor, had an instinctive dislike to vulgarity, but
his stern, disapproving countenance only excited
his companions, in their present state, to go to still
further lengths in their rudeness, till he became
so disgusted with their conversation, that he longed
for the moment to come when he should be free
from the necessity of listening to it. But no one
else was willing to go, and it was full two hours
later than they had promised to return, before any
of them would hear of departing.
Before starting for home, James proposed that
Robert and Frank, who were in the worst condi-
tion of the whole, should allow Charles Adams to
drive them, while he followed with Tom Carter
and Hugh Gleason. To this kind proposition
Robert Jones loudly objected, declaring that he
was perfectly sober, and threatening to whip
James for his impertinent interference.
For some miles the most sober party, who oc-
cupied the second sleigh, the large one taking the
lead, could hear the voices of their companions in
the rear, singing disjointed snatches of songs, in
loud, inharmonious voices. Suddenly, nothing
was heard but the quick jingling of bells, as if the
7






THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


horse were coming on at a furious rate. In a
moment more the maddened animal dashed past
them, carrying with him the front of a sleigh,
and dragging some one after him, who had be-
come entangled in the reins.
Gracious heaven !" exclaimed James, that
must be Robert Jones He will be killed. Where
are Frank and Tom ? I am afraid something
dreadful has happened to them."
As any attempt to stop the horse would be use-
less, and the large sleigh was too far in advance
to call for any assistance, James immediately
turned back to ascertain the fate of the other un-
fortunate boys. He had gone but a mile when he
perceived the sleigh upset upon a bank on the
side of the road, and one of his companions half
buried under it, while the other had been thrown
over the fence into a neighboring field. On rais-
ing the broken vehicle, they found that it was
Tom Carter, who had nearly been crushed by its
weight, but was still alive. While Charles en-
deavoured to restore him to consciousness, James
went to ascertain if Frank also was still living,
and found, to his inexpressible joy, that he was
unhurt, but too much intoxicated to be aware of
the danger from which he had just escaped.
The boys, who had come up to the rescue of





THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


their companions, felt a thrill of horror as they
heard the oath which was the first word that fell
from Tom Carter's lips, and thought in how fear-
ful a state his soul might have been ushered into
eternity.
When Tom, who was too much bruised to be
moved farther than to the nearest house, had been
placed there, under the care of Charles Adams,
until his friends from town could be summoned,
Frank was lifted into the sleigh in an almost life-
less condition, and the party proceeded home in
a melancholy mood.
As it was late when they arrived in Newton,
James thought that Mrs. Pierson would not hear
that night of the accident, and therefore conclud-
ed that it would be best that Frank should remain
with him. He sent word home to his mother that
her son had returned, but would stay at the hotel,
that she might be relieved from all anxiety on his
account, and not endure the pain of seeing him in
his present deplorable condition. The high-mind-
ed boy felt almost the pain which he would have
experienced if he himself had been the culprit,
when obliged to call for some one to assist him in
carrying Frank to his room. Luckily, Anna had
retired, so that she did not witness his degrada-
tion, but Mrs. Adair's quick ear caught the sound






THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


of the bells as they stopped at the door, and, on
going to the head of the stairs to ascertain if it
was her son, she was startled by seeing some one
brought up the steps, like a corpse. The ques-
tion, "Is that you, mother?" relieved her
from the dreadful fears that were rushing into
her mind, but it was with feelings of anguish that
she saw in what condition Frank Pierson had re-
turned. She approved, however, of the prudence
of her son in bringing him home with him, and
lighted the way to his chamber, where he was left
to sleep off the effects of the strong stimulants of
which he had so freely partaken.
The next morning, when, at a late hour, Frank
awoke and saw James sitting by his bed, he could
not at first account for his situation, until a partial
suspicion of the.truth flashed into his mind.
What became of Tom and Robert?" he
asked, endeavouring to hide his mortification.
Tom is by this time at home," replied James,
soberly, endeavouring to evade saying any thing
about Robert.
We had a merry time, and I suppose you
brought me here because I was not fit to go home,
for which I heartily thank you," said Frank, try-
ing to appear at ease and unconcerned about his
own misconduct.





THE SLEIGH-RIDE.


"Do you not remember being thrown out ?"
asked James, in surprise.
"Thrown out!" exclaimed Frank. "No, in-
deed Was any one hurt ?"
James paused, for he dreaded to disclose the
awful truth. At length he said, solemnly, -
"Thank God that he has preserved your life,
and not called you into his presence when so lit-
tle prepared to meet him."
Can it be, Bob, can it be that any thing
has happened to him ?" asked Frank, alarmed.
James could generally command his feelings,
but the shock which he had received the preced-
ing evening had unmanned him. The tears gushed
from his eyes as he informed Frank that Robert
had been found on the road, half a mile out of
town, dead, and so bruised that he could scarcely
be recognized, having been dragged thus far by
the infuriated horse.
Overcome by the tidings of the untimely end
of his wicked companion, Frank made many res-
olutions of amendment, and especially never again
to indulge in the use of the poison which was the
cause of this shocking death. But, alas! he did
not form these resolutions with the strength which
God gives, to aid human beings in extricating
themselves from the fetters of sin.






74 THE SLEIGH-RIDE.

James implored the Almighty for firmness to
resist similar temptation, and faithfully kept his
wise resolutions. He had seen so clearly, in this
instance, the degradation and misery to which the
use of ardent spirits may lead, that for many years
he felt a sickness of heart whenever he saw any
one partaking freely of them, and his example
and influence did much in restraining his compan-
ions from this fatal vice.















CHAPTER VII.


-4-
DISAPPOINTED HOPES.

ABOUT a month previous to the Commencement
of Yale College, Mrs. Adair removed to New Ha-
ven. A friend of her husband had rented for her,
at that time, one of the pretty little cottages in the
environs of that city, as she wished James to
enjoy the advantages of a home, during his colle-
giate course.
Mr. Pierson, who was also aware of the impor-
tance of this restraint upon young men, urged
Mrs. Adair to permit his son, who was to enter
College at the same time, to become a member of
her family. To this proposal, she was at first un-
willing to accede, on account of Anna Evelyn,
who was also to accompany her to New Haven,
for she feared that if so susceptible a girl were
thrown constantly into the society of a young man






DISAPPOINTED HOPEs.


like Frank, she might learn to forget his faults, in
admiration of his many fascinating qualities. But
James, who really loved Frank, in spite of his
errors, overcame his mother's scruples upon this
point, by declaring, that Anna had always shown
such an aversion to his friend, that it was only to
be feared that they would never be upon terms
even of common civility.
It is singular to how much more advantage the
generality of young men appear when away from
home, and separated from their own families!
Even many, who are in other respects exemplary,
seem to think that it is useless to waste their po-
liteness upon their mothers and sisters, but that
they, on the contrary, are the natural recipients of
their ill-humor.
Mr. Pierson was a man of the world, and pos-
sessed the polished manners that render a person
agreeable in society. Captain Adair was a Chris-
tian, and exhibited that courtesy which springs
from the conviction, that it is the bounden duty of
every one to add all in his power to the happi-
ness of those around him, and his quick tact
suggested so readily what might occasion unpleas-
ant feelings, that there was an indescribable charm
in his presence. Frank and James had both cop-
ied the manners of their respective parents, and





DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


Frank, alas! had too faithfully transcribed his fa-
ther's faults, and was everywhere more agreeable
than at home. Mrs. Adair, who had seen him
often in company with his mother and cousin,
where she had witnessed his rudeness and ill-tem-
per with pain, was now agreeably surprised by
discovering so many excellent traits in his charac-
ter. She found that he was by nature generous
and noble, but had been rendered selfish by the
extreme indulgence bestowed by a weak mother
upon an only son, and his passions had gained
fearful strength, from being commended as neces-
sary to a "boy of spirit."
It has been said, that Mrs. Adair was as firm as
she was mild in character. The moment that
Frank became an inmate of her dwelling, she in-
formed him that she could not permit him to in-
dulge in those passionate outbreakings to which
he had been accustomed, for they would render
the whole household uncomfortable. This re-
straint, though irksome at first, was, 'in the end,
beneficial, and the impetuous youth would even
receive a reproof from her with calmness, because
he had promised to do so, and piqued himself
upon his strict sense of honor.
Alas I how little those understand the true mean-
ing of this word, who use it so frequently, or ac-







DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


knowledge that "Wisdom alone can give them
honor, and grace deliver them a crown of glory."
What a noble fellow Frank Pierson is! was
a frequent exclamation among his fellow-students,
but still he had not half the weight and influence
with his companions which James possessed.
James's worth of character was acknowledged by
all, but only those resembling him sought his so-
ciety. His speeches in the debating clubs and his
superiority in the recitation-room were often dis-
cussed, while Frank was the hero of many a
frolic, and often applauded by those whose praise
was in itself censure.
One evening Frank and James had both invited
Mrs. Adair and Anna to go out with them, the
former to an exhibition of his society, the latter to
a meteoric lecture. Mrs. Adair declared that she
had no preference herself, as she only went on
Anna's account, and therefore she would leave it
for her to decide. She cautioned the young men,
however, against feeling in the least chagrined if
their invitations were refused, as both had been
made to her at the same time, and one must be
declined.
Anna hesitated for some moments, and seemed
unwilling to decide between them, while they de-
bated their rival claim with some warmth. In






DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


fact, she remembered the kindness that she had
received for so many years from James, and felt
unwilling to wound him, but her heart leaned to-
wards Frank, in spite of her better judgment.
" Perhaps I had better go with James," she said
at last, but her sorrowful glance at Frank showed
that she had not consulted her own wishes in
making this decision.
James read her thoughts instantaneously, and
the sudden paleness of his cheek showed more
than a momentary feeling of vexation. The only
words, however, which escaped his lips, were, -
" No, Anna, I think, on the whole, you will be
more amused at the exhibition than at the lecture."
Well, if you say so, I will go with Frank,"
she replied, with evident satisfaction, as James
hastily left the room.
Let us follow him to his own apartment, and
see him sitting by the large study-table, with his
head bowed upon it, and, if we can read the work-
ings of his mind, we shall learn to appreciate
his self-command and calmness of deportment.
In such natures, all feelings are deep and per-
manent. James had loved Anna from his child-
hood, and had unconsciously cherished the hope
that she returned his affection. Her reason, in
truth, approved of his excellent character, and she






DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


knew that he would render her life happy, but, with
strange inconsistency, she began to find the con-
stant anxiety in which she was kept by Frank's
variability more pleasant than the security that
James would always do right.
But this noble boy was never selfish, and at this
moment the thought that anguished him was, the
fear that Anna might have become irretrievably in-
terested in one unworthy of her, and he could not
contemplate with calmness the misery which, in
that case, would be in store for the object of his
boyish love. He felt that he could give no warn-
ing without causing his own disinterestedness to be
suspected, and yet he knew too much of Frank
to believe, that, in after years, he could ever make
any woman happy, unless there was some change
in his character. He now resolved to use every
effort, not to open Anna's eyes, but to render
Frank more worthy of her esteem.
From this day, James labored incessantly, both
by precept and example, to improve the character
of his friend, and, in some degree, his efforts were
blessed. He succeeded in saving him at that time
from intemperance, by persuading him that it was
a low vice, unworthy of a man of pride, because
it degraded him in the eyes even of those beneath
him, and gave them the liberty of naming him






DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


with disrespect and contempt. But, by appealing
to such motives, he only strengthened that self-
reliance and pride which can effect no radical
change, and Frank Pierson still possessed the same
passionate, imperious, disposition, which he had
exhibited since his infancy.
Three years had elapsed since the America
sailed, when Mrs. Adair received the joyful intel-
ligence that the vessel was under orders to return
home. She immediately commenced arranging
her present abode, that it might seem agreeable
in the eyes of her husband, and in her prepara-
tions to welcome him the weeks flew rapidly by.
As the time drew near when she might once more
hope to behold this beloved being, she became
anxious to be where she could receive the first in-
telligence of his arrival, and, leaving the house
under the care of Anna, went to New York, ac-
companied by James.
At length the tidings came, that the America
was only a few miles distant, and James went
down in the pilot-boat to meet his father, while
Mrs. Adair remained at home, endeavouring to
compose her agitated feelings. James did not
learn, until he had left his mother, that the colors
of the ship were at half-mast, and there were ru-
mors afloat that one of the officers on board had







DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


just died. At this intelligence, he was seized
with fearful forebodings, but he imparted them to
no one, and breathed a silent prayer, that, if any
sorrow were in store for them, he might have
strength to bear it himself, and to comfort his
mother.
As soon as the boat came within speaking dis-
tance of the ship, James heard the agitating ques-
tion, Who is dead on board ? and the fearful
reply, "Captain Adair." He had only time to
listen to the next painful interrogation, "When
did he die ? and the answer, Two days since,"
before he was ascending the side of the vessel, in
a state of apathetic calmness.
"My father's body,-you were not obliged to
throw it overboard ?" he asked of the first-lieu-
tenant, who met the son of his deceased com-
mander with every mark of sympathy and respect.
No, indeed," he'replied, grasping the young
man's hand with affectionate warmth. He lies
in his state-room, where he died like a brave man
and a Christian, commending his widow and or-
phan to the same God into whose hands he cheer-
fully surrendered his own soul."
Captain Adair had taken a malignant fever from
one of the younger officers, over whom he had
watched with paternal kindness. The object of






DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


his care recovered, but the excellent man himself
fell a victim to his own kindness. His only prayer
during his short illness had been, that he might
but live to meet his family once more, but when
he found that this request was denied, he mani-
fested perfect fortitude and resignation. His last
words were,-" Tell Alice, that, though often
separated in Time, we have always looked for-
ward to a happy reunion in Eternity. That is the
sailor's only home, and there I shall await her. In
that blessed haven I trust we shall at last both an-
chor, safe, with the child which God has given us.
'I know in whom I trust, and that he is able to
keep that which I have committed to him.'"
The first thing that aroused James from the
stupor into which he had been thrown, by the sud-
den tidings of this loss, was the repetition of this
message. The grief, the agony, which his mother
would feel, all rushed upon his mind, and, instead
of unnerving him still more, they seemed to give
him new strength. He remembered the promise
that he had given his father, to be her support and
comfort, and felt the responsibility that had so sud-
denly devolved upon him. With an incredible
effort, he mastered his own feelings, and only
asked to be alone in the state-room, with the corpse
of his father, for a few moments, before consulting






DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


with Lieutenant McPherson as to the preparations
for its interment.
The stricken spirit was alone with its Maker, in
the presence of death. 0, how much of beauty
there was in those cold features, which were never
distorted by the strife of passion, or the workings
of an ungoverned spirit. Love and peace dwelt
upon the high brow, and hovered in a smile upon
the parted lips, from which no words of profanity
had ever issued, and the voice of prayer had so
often ascended to Heaven. A stranger to Cap-
tain Adair, as he gazed upon his lovely remains,
might have divined that they had been tenanted
by a renewed soul, and have exclaimed, He
walked with God and was not, for God took him."
In that same apartment, in which the father
had poured out so fervent a supplication that the
grace of God might descend upon his son, and
consecrate hinA to his service, the Holy Spirit
seemed to enter into his heart, henceforth to make
it a temple pure and acceptable unto the Lord."
As he knelt by that couch, in brokenness of heart,
James Adair resolved to live the life of the
righteous, that his last end might be like his."
We will not attempt to describe the anguish of
Mrs. Adair, when the truth was broken to her by
James, as gently as possible, that her earthly hopes






DISAPPOINTED HOPES.


were for ever blighted. It is strange, that such
natures as hers can bear suffering so intense, and
still exist, and the only solution of the mystery is
found in the promise, that "as their day is, so
shall their strength be."
When Mrs. Adair returned to New Haven, she
could scarcely be recognized by her acquaintan-
ces, from the traces which sorrow and consequent
illness had left upon her countenance, until, in the
same kind, sweet voice, she asked after their wel-
fare, and expressed her sympathy with their joys
or their griefs. From this period, she only ap-
peared to live for the sake of her son, but she was
apparently cheerful and regular in the perform-
ance of her accustomed duties. The invisible
world seemed to be brought nearer to her, and
sometimes she would murmur, "A little while,
and I will come again and receive you to myself,
that where I am ye may be also."
Frank Pierson both loved and respected Mrs.
Adair, and the sight of her affliction touched him
to the heart. He manifested, at this time, so much
tenderness and consideration for her feelings, that
he became very dear to her, and still more pre-
cious in Anna's eyes, who considered a just ap-
preciation of her friend as the first of virtues.
He has a good heart, after all," she would say







86 DISAPPOINTED HOPES.

to herself, and that makes amends for every
thing."
Alas I that those hearts which the world so often
pronounces good," should be, in the sight of their
Maker, desperately wicked and deceitful above
all things."















CHAPTER VIII.


-4-
YOUNG MEN AT HOME

ABOUT the time that James Adair entered upon
his Senior year in college, he became convinced
of the propriety of his making an open profession
of religion. From this step he shrank with in-
stinctive modesty, fearful that he should disgrace
the cause in which he was about to enlist.
Dear mother," he said, one Sabbath evening,
when they were sitting together, conversing upon
the subject, you do not know how difficult it is
for a man to be a Christian."
Perhaps not," she replied, but I am aware
to how many more temptations they are subjected
than my own favored sex."
"They are, indeed," James remarked, with
earnestness. "The virtues which the gospel in-
culcates are always commended in a woman, but







YOUNG MEN AT HOME.


pronounced unmanly in us, when exhibited in their
full extent. I have been sitting this evening with
some of the students, who are among the most
moral in college, and yet there was scarcely a
sentiment uttered which was not at variance with
the principles of Christianity."
Then it is even worse than I thought," said
Mrs. Adair; but perhaps the conversation turned
upon some topic likely to elicit the enmity of the
heart against God."
That was the truth, mother," James replied.
" e were discussing the practice of duelling, and
I was the only one present who did not believe
that there were other circumstances which justi-
fled a man in taking the life of a fellow-creature
beside self-preservation, or defence of another
or his country. Instead of acknowledging the
moral courage of a man who could refuse a chal-
lenge, all of them agreed in branding such a man
with the odious name of coward."
"This is not strange," observed Mrs. Adair,
"for, the point being yielded that there is any
case in which revenge is justifiable, it is easy to
proceed to the conclusion that death is not too se-
vere a penalty for some injuries. The error is
one into which young men are liable to fall, when
reckless of life and daring of spirit."






YOUNG MEN AT HOME.


But you will be surprised, mother, when I tell
you, that, in my own heart, I almost approved of
some of the arguments which they used, and be-
gan to feel as if our Creator had not given us such
promptings only to be repressed. Is it not for
the good of society, on the whole, that violations
of others' rights should be sure of punishment in
this way, when they do not trespass upon the laws
of the land ?" asked James, with some warmth.
My son," said the mother, in a serious tone,
"you have allowed yourself to become some-
what confused, to-night, in your views of right
and wrong. When a little more cool, you will
readily perceive that no slight advantage can jus-
tify any course which must be condemned up-
on broad principles of equity. You see that,
after all, it is not so much the opposition of the
world as the tendency to evil in our own hearts
with which we have to contend, for we all have
' promptings,' which I do not believe are natural,
but suggested by bad passions. You must war
manfully, not only with 'the world,' but with
' the flesh,' and for this purpose you will need
the whole armour of God.' Take, then, to
your aid the grace which is pure, peaceable, gen-
tle, easy to be entreated,' and openly avow your-
self on the Lord's side."






YOUNG MEN AT HOME.


James, after much deliberation, resolved upon
taking this step. Mrs. Adair was anxious that he
should weigh the matter well in his own mind, but
still she felt almost certain as to the result of his
deliberations. It was the more important that he
should be fully persuaded in his own mind upon
this subject, because it was his earnest hope to
be allowed in a few years to minister at the altar
where he was now about to receive the holy sac-
rament.
When Frank heard that his friend was soon to
be thus open in his avowal of Christianity, he en-
deavoured to oppose his resolution, and to per-
suade him how much he was about to relinquish.
" You have always been strict enough, in all con-
science," he said, but now I suppose that there
will be no living with you. It is too bad for you
thus to cut yourself off from all the pleasures of
this life, at your age. I don't mind some men's
joining the church, for it seems very little hin-
drance to their enjoyment of this world's good, but
in your case it will be a very different thing. I
suppose now you will think it wrong even to play
a game of backgammon, for you could not touch
a card before you became so pious."
Would it not be better if you, too, had ab-
stained from all games of chance?" asked
James, mildly.






YOUNG MEN AT HOME.


I think the question an impertinent one," re-
plied Frank, angrily.
I am sorry, then, that I asked it," said James,
in a conciliatory tone, though my motive was a
good one in doing so."
The reason why Frank was so irritab e upon
this subject was, that he had met, that very even-
ing, with heavy losses at cards, of which James
was not aware. His friend, however, had been
informed, that of late Frank had contracted a
great fondness for the game of billiards, and, as
he knew no moderation in gratifying any of his
tastes, there was every reason to fear that he
might play to a ruinous extent. On Anna's ac-
count, to whom Frank had now openly avowed
his affection, there was reason to dread his indul-
gence of this propensity, and it was for the ben-
efit of example that James had refrained entirely
from a game, which he had self-command enough
to play without danger of infatuation.
It was fortunate, however, that this habit was
not acquired in the early part of Frank's colle-
giate course, for, on parting from his present as-
sociates, his mind was so occupied with other sub-
jects that he did not feel the need of the excite-
ment of cards, until he had nearly lost his taste
for them.






YOUNG MEN AT HOME.


On the same day that James was confirmed,
Anna Evelyn also received that solemn rite. She
did this with deep sincerity, although not so se-
riously disposed as her companion. It was strange
that Frank made no opposition to the same step,
on the part of his affianced wife, which he had op-
posed in James.
Religion is good for women," he said, and
no man of sense could desire a wife without it;
but it is a different thing with men. There is no
use in saying that Providence meant them to be
equally moral, for, if it had been so, they would
not have been given passions so much more vio-
lent. Anna will act as a check upon me, and,
by-and-by, when I get old, her counsel will be the
means, I trust, of bringing me into the right way."
During the remainder of his college course,
James maintained his consistency of conduct as a
Christian, and graduated with honor and the re-
spect both of the faculty and his fellow-students.
Frank did not hold so high a place in the opinion
of the former, as he showed very little deference
to their wishes or laws, and he had made some
enemies even among his classmates, but still he
had many warm friends, who prophesied that he
would make a noble- man, when the fervor and
impetuosity of youth had somewhat subsided.






YOUNG MEN AT HOME.


As Mrs. Adair had only removed to New Ha-
ven on account of her son, there was no longer
any reason for her remaining there, and she was
anxious to return to the place where she had last
been blessed with the society of her lamented
husband. James, also, was desirous to see again
a spot hallowed by so many associations, although
he could not bid adieu to New Haven without
some pain, as it was there that he had buckled on
the armor of God." He had ascertained that
he could pursue the study of theology with the
clergyman to whose preaching Captain Adair had
listened during his stay at Newton with so much
interest, and was desirous to commence preparing
for the profession which was so near his heart.
Frank almost dreaded returning home, he
had been so happy with Mrs. Adair and Anna;
but he felt ashamed of this reluctance when wel-
comed with delight by his devoted mother and
proud father. Mr. Pierson saw, with joy, the im-
proved appearance of his son, and believed that
he would before long become very distinguished
in the profession of the law, which he wished him
to pursue. Even little Lucy had not forgotten
her brother, in spite of his old propensity for
teasing, and showed such unaffected pleasure at
his return, that he felt conscience-stricken in re-
9






YOUNG MEN AT HOME.


membering that she had scarcely entered his mind
since his departure.
The meeting between Anna and Amelia was
rather an awkward one, as Frank had informed
his family of his recent engagement to Mrs.
Adair's adopted'daughter. Amelia disliked her
cousin, and had so often expressed this feeling to
Anna, who once participated in it, that she now
felt embarrassment even in mentioning his name.
But, by degrees, Frank's civility to herself abated
the dislike of his cousin, and she did not wonder
so much at Anna's preference. The young man,
however, did not deserve much .redit for this in-
crease of politeness, for it arose solely from his
finding her an agreeable, pretty girl, instead of
the awkward child who had first been introduced
to his acquaintance.
Mr. Pierson found every day some new reason
for being proud of his son. "I wish Captain
Adair had lived," he would say to his wife, to
see how false his predictions were with regard to
Frank. He is as spirited a youth as one could
desire, and yet he does nothing that is wrong."
Mr. Pierson, it must be remembered, had not a
very quick sense of the moral obliquity of any
action which did not trespass upon the laws of
honor, or those of the world. Neither did he




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