• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Chapter I: The Duran homestead
 Chapter II: The birth of Charl...
 Chapter III: His early trainin...
 Chapter IV: Charles Duran...
 Chapter V: Charles's habits
 Chapter VI: The fatal night
 Chapter VII: Sickness and...
 Chapter VIII: Conclusion
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: Charles Duran, or, The career of a bad boy
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001857/00001
 Material Information
Title: Charles Duran, or, The career of a bad boy
Alternate Title: Career of a bad boy
Physical Description: 59, <4> p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Author of The Waldos
Carlton & Porter ( Publisher )
Methodist Episcopal Church -- Sunday School Union ( Publisher )
Publisher: Carlton & Porter :
Sunday-School Union
Place of Publication: New-York
Publication Date: c1850
 Subjects
Subject: Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sunday school literature   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1850   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1850
Genre: Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the author of "The Waldos."
General Note: Publisher's advertisement: <4> p. at end.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001857
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
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oclc - 45490780
notis - ALG3966
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PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Chapter I: The Duran homestead
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Chapter II: The birth of Charles
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Chapter III: His early training
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Chapter IV: Charles Duran at school
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Chapter V: Charles's habits
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Chapter VI: The fatal night
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Chapter VII: Sickness and death
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Chapter VIII: Conclusion
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Advertising
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Back Cover
        Page 64
        Page 65
Full Text



























S. CHARLES ON HIS DEATH BED.- SEE PAGE 52.



h.







1 ARLES 'DURAN:4'


03,


THE CARB.~ R OF. A BAD BOY.





'H..- E W A L DOS."











N Dork: .
ISHED BY A'.;LTON &d PORTER,
Ii T-af:O 'OL UNIt,) 1I.. uIiLBK-KiP l gI "I "














N


- 9.


Enrered accordjnm to Act oi Oongrpsl m life year 1850. by

LANE & SCOTT,
in tre Clik' 4C fl'e of Ihe Dietrlrr Court or the SouLnern
District of New-York.




















The house-Court-yid-'..--The well- Oken
,A ,.
'.. I I I N,







i. R T~il Of S 4AqOES..








ENcts on the parents-The Janese Parenal expecla-
tions-An instance of di -appdintment-Ann's pro-
**'.S.






' phecy .. .. . .

OHA'PTER I.









His EALY TRAurrNo.
The Duahouse, or i-y.dulg-The well-OakThe
eMbfihdsfW fti.-I will"R I on't "e-Fsauh s reo





.e ... ......... ..
CHAPTP E









* HISEARSL TRAINTNO.


Sihdfessuia. I tvill "-" I on't "-Faulrl c~f
'a........................




- CONTENTS.


. CHAPTER IV..

OHARLES DURAN AT SCHOOL.

Good children at home are good in school-Conduct-
Inattention to studies-Unkind to hin school-mates-
Samuel Howard-Helen Fay-John and Louisa-Se-
vere whipping-Mr. Spicer-Charles expelled from
school... .. ....... Page 24

CHAPTER, V.
SCHARLES' HABITS.

Good habits-Proverbs qfIhe Rabbing-Charles not
improved--Idleness-Fishing and hunting-No idle
boy can be good-Shooting-Roughness of manners
-One vice is followed by another-Lying-Sabbath-
breaking-lntemperance-A standard of wicked-
ness.. .. ... .. .. .... 81

HAPTER VI.
THE FATAL NIGAT.

Village bails-Description-Culpability of parents-
Demand for money-Fit-House stoned-Windows
broken in-Mr. Duran with.the bag-Charles's wrath
appeased-The ball-Charles intoxicated-Falls to
the door-Brought home speechless-Laid upon his
death-bed . .. .... 9






CONTENTS. 7

CHAPTER VIL

SICKNESS -AND DEATH,

Sufferings from the debauch-Crisis-Favorable change
S -Hopes of recovery cut off-Consumption-Con-
trivance to change his position-State of mind-The
minister visits him-No evidence of penitence-The#
S- dying scene . ... Page 50

CHAPTER VIlL

BEH CONCLUSION.

SThe way of transgressors hard-Disobedience to parents
a fearful sin-Parental reilraint-Pleasures of parent-
S al approbation-rDisobdience in scholars-Reflections
-Sporting habits in children noq.to be encouraged-
Importance of early religious training--History of
young Duran a warning to Sabbath-breakers, &e.-
S Beware of the first sin-The End ..54












CHAPTERR I. ..
S THE DURAN HOMESTEAD.
Big6tRs giviitg thl-&i fory of Chatjt
Dura i fbittl, life, and early.di th,':
SI wi'l' iarthialy describe his father's
residence. It -was itgated in the
town of.--, in the 'State of Con-
nectinut, and' about six miles fromI
the- west bank of the beautiful Con-
necticut river. The *muse stood on
a level road, running 1 and south,
and was about one mile fton the cen-
tre of the town.
Mr." Durdn's house was large and
commodious. It was built of wood,
-two states high, and painted a deep, :
.4%




10 CHARLES DBU1AN.
yrgj. In the front was a fine
.an.utFyardt In this yard were lilacs
of 'aI"~a growth ..eses~ of variouss
kinds, and flowering almonds. These
shruns blossomed early in the spring,
.and sent forth their.Afraance to per- .1
fqAe the.ar..
the ouS4L w a a rkih Cind.Rel-
t tted gamen,;pl p iNid ng aa .
une. of,. vegtades,,gepoeber-
i's, sour.ratsand sjp sberries. The
bordermaof tlawnio alley w4re decked
with giunies, .piaks4. a4s.eet-wil-
?j-. S-3[4i' .. : r a
Btweeon.tI gparen ap4 t Hp e
was the we1 Jiins\lwe restingg
on the top.of R.lhbippptAf aq'pvle
failed to the, upper e qs the
*d.otP:a-crtuiEqWn 4e fta (er.
,theIppjpr en4.ofithe . at-
;-tace a .bket.. Howm Iw-
t a





CHARLES DUOAN. 11
SrBfrgatard's sons remember with de-
lighthoe "old oaketibucket that hung
f infie well !" -
SOh ::then6rth side-of the house was
a- small orchard. In- the rear-were
- the barn, she.ds*crib,- and other out-
S"hbuildings. -
T'. he'^o7eaentr* mi' the-'immaedisie.
.ighborhood wre level or slightly.
undulated. On the north and east
Were freautiful iu.imeadows.. DOn the
soth a",.wesik'ere excellent tillage
an'k pasture lands.-~ The season that
I spent there was one -of nature's
bountifulness. The tall herd's-grass,
the-rustling corn, aft4ihe white-aed
grain r aved in the sUminer's breeze,
and- be ke the plenty that followed
the t ..i d ,industry of the husban&d-.
man. $he herds were feeding in th
fields. The- innocent lambs, f
K%1"




/ 4
12 osaawsrsstas,-
from .dase, Wa imaping ad fiwt4ia
abek-'es n .init4. soa .and some,
in the shade--while theifrmoa aemer
domaB wate&ak aswfigaor quietly
mfienticaSfig&eooeto h.bad .,pe-
viou'sy; oolleautedui&a.?) i.;, :
Half encircling these. premies-was
a ine stream Af wate7. vuqying tom.'
three to seven. y-eai in' width. It
was supplied witkhAae, trout oacli,
and prTch .*;It6 ipimui e, nB onto-
nonE msiaiEbsomapm" ies iSpressed
the" mi*&. 1vwith sad~ess. .This was
soon dispelledhoweyeE, by thewit-
teraig, tkt ees and th.enomaftnoes
of the l.brdd t*mlaa hcqped frmm spray
to spray, -r. quietlst, perlhed them-
:setesto"mhex' n' boan~ma he aches.
S. 'Soam i mdteistmaide z west of Mr.; BuTras, ous was a
Festst of thflty growth, covered with
*2* 1 :' ^




A"U OALES DRUAN
Svaried and beautiful foliage. Its
'shady bowers and -pleasant walks
made it -adi~ihtfutLplace of resort
-woape.fea ly towardthe timne of sui-
sotsg. jMai, seemed to lend to.it
t thoan pejge- i .ebaWS.. .- "
-.i Al . pe igf te own stood the
y, WJ1.mdwahnlptiwated I44snajppesr-
uane, .hnlt vngraWe. aRnd.ho* i. its
aspiciajsons.. ,In- that oldfljshiPed
church have been statled three suc-
cessive ministers of the gospel. In
tLQs,.hjgh-ba-ckwd,sqjarq pews were
other ~eneratiois -,wanttosit. These
:. pastors and their flops neIw sleep in
thee,gra'y., TAheir -soa ocoupytwair'
places in tke sactpary, aid .apipther
herald .of tke crro .pro4ainis to them
the word ofife. It wa.in tlis plea-
sant place, which I have -briefly de- e
Sacibed, that Chadles Duran wap boan.




14 unABS 1S~ti *

-a.-.-aarib' r.


'Ir tfib i b lfeIt e6tesvas^n<(Ba-
sin~~ai o j'eat iin -M.Dt~ian'fi~ i-
ly. -aes4igs la ..-4^l&dlet e
qnently mote' highly pYfed whenn atb
kae -received. Mn 4 )tiri had no
children, -aad& hwas-,h6* ast'- the
mridirn- life Tfr hiVttRhi chiad
seemed like -offE Iwi i 'di;?i
time.
It was amusing to see the effect
kileedown the, parents by this, tll
cently, mnipected eet.-- 'Well,
:lofly," -said MIT Jones,.-artei~bh
of. Mr Twu~ t ilwhe.e w had- jtst
betaL to- seethe fstta e visitant, aid
SwTho hal'ted a -large tnily of? hil-
S"drien,--" how do Mr. and Mrs. Duran
act with-th the Toy?' "Act ? why





CHMAES DUTRAN. 15

wn-up ii~then.
heiauos der-
~'bii -hey

ieapd k in
of hidden
"7 u?, -Mrs.


InH


j d -thFa _gh the ordi-
filft -.,Of. mw first




9 W IN 4 patted
fdlt of Wk~s- tender
-1~x tvSftk bti to
heldvi -,ge."
o fatiAl's a~dd-'





1 CHAUES VWAI.
ed thlbather. W nhat a bleasmg
will droi rH0 iBtanag the


i n Wrat i ttfe ra: B9oi4y

eveiintg. Our asppiweda blh'
oftea prove tP.Q .t. i $ sa.re ow '
poihmenit avl4 sOI4Y,-Tjjav ispA
the.- rnthlwr :.jld .4eiaev.y F.I t -
to her breast, andnd ly. .4s4jaiog-
ly.caress it a ,press -,Ai-itt,-lhfinds
and feet, soft as ivet4, with.a.r ~~,
And I-have eien that,. ail4,. th-rai
bow of -proni.: ~sn.+I 4niso. of sp
much joy, bi*gdvown tit plQ4theri
heaL,, ee it wp-.gra,.. wVtJi s.oicpt4o
the.grpv ., ,, ,,; .*
.ThouglMs like these; he\wever,
Never crossed the.,nui-4s of .t. ~iad
iMrs. Duran. They ,ea.ied ~ot that


* /






tdia.aqeath might blast their
MWPtd'li,'hem more lonely
. isiter ta^staid and
IMlidbe&aRheir4wr litfe,

lp vould
g^n|g a Ieappill I'that I




^N,^^f I isiw^.s,

Amtiire nmet.
15 ingi-t pled -eby


.I.iut'e1MrMrk,-bf Annu,

M9s$tPi 4 4niith w0he ;y
2 iat 1a6 ih hs Jim,
te^ft'el-itW!*yt.RiA ig."





18 CHALES- URAN.

CHAPTER III. "
j1-IIJ1EARLY"A)N9.. .
".WRAh .ai Ach.h in.the wakyok
kWdld-.Iif;, asg)d4aenmk iIsold.Je
will not 4epaut frj4i-"t. -Pr.y.. Ii6.
The proper trai-niagqef children is.,f
the. utmost..impeortga.ee. .:U pe i,.4e
.a great extentAe.pen4d4Aiw us-Ial- e
'ness and-; happinesss-ja 4Jte.-w-orld.
SAnd as the happiness-of4 pa~en4ts is so
iitimatelyr-con-aceted with the course
of conduct ,parsuedhby their chidren,"
it slotiid be with. them a-.const.as t 1
study how they may promnotp the ,
well-being of their, offspring.
On this subject much has been
said and wr-itteR., ,Some recommend
indulg6see as the surest way to give
a child a good disposition, and to lead
to the formation of correct habits.


r





CHARLES DURAN. 19
rirge the necessity of restraint
mldWilpromising obedience, on
0.~.a '. f ildtdren, to the com-
ilePWgdf'tjh'eir parents. There niay
Wk hifis iii "both. Children
liN g l ~:lk ift -'Wi'tb 'fea and love
t**1 rP*e.it4 andtl tWtOespect their
Strirnttinent 6f tchil-
S e4ifriS strictly parental.-
-KlitWlt slibiild- be the law
4'l1, il-tll Pr6per ind ulgeiice
ISlHi-ldvcl d; entire obedience
Ml -Pardlts and children
ItI lilS t rethi'eber the words of
4:tl'eb: "-Children, obey your
It i~1rfalit t4figs: for this is well
0,E unto the Lord. "Fathers,
eitW't y6ur children to anger,
te.bW discouraged." Col. iii,


WiaiM Mrs. Duran were very





20 CHARLES DURAN.
indulgent to their only child. His
wants were met with a liberal hand,
and -his wishes, as far as -possible,
gratified. ,If -his desires were not
immediately grated, he soon learn-
ed that a little cryin-g would accom-
plish his object.
Improper indulgence begets un-
lawful desires. Unlawful .desires
.can never be filly satisfied, So it
" was with Charles DiYran: every-
thing he saw, he wanted. When
he was not indulged, as lie could
not be always. he soon showed Iiis
bad spirit. Sometimes he pouted
out his lips, and.had a long fit of
the sulks.
Perhaps my readers. never saw a
child affected with the sulks. I will
briefly describe them. First. the
eyes begin to roll rapidly in their

-, ,I




ORARLES DURAN. 21
ad the sight turns, upward.
R 14t down a little; and lthe
J Sul thi mouth ae- Alightly
Sal back.' -The lower tip then
bS bMmi4eatly to 1te0 eCha. iea
Geomencese^hictigwows
b adtecoames ie
pret
thwe cyemtauisrd,
npeand.,the
bl I san-a Hlitle
'Athe alk so badly
1,emother sent him into
IdafiM epumon,- before sit-
Aditne. he coui not
t if in .phia sight!
er'-t. wiw tw' years old,
a Vety bad disposi-
Astea ef being correct-,
"'f6stetdd by the training
e&e- To the-domes-





22 G i DU&&&N.
tics in the family he vwas insolent..
a.d tnkind;.and even to his parents,
"- w"ill ",and-". won't'" were-said
wi feai s frequency. :.. Still t-he
deig .paei. .WQeald-... ,'ereAy .say
to-i him, '"ta shouldl& nti-,.doso,".
Giarles! YouL should say, '.I don't
wart to,' or, I do want to,'" as.the
case might be,. Thus they indirectly
taught him -disobedignce, which her;
was leasing fast neiugh:. without 1
Meh assistance. In t whis way did
tiese ,parents, with cruel kindness,
Help on-,the uinh of their child ..
Charles Duran, with all-his faults,
.was a bright, active boy. What he
needed was training,--pareital train-
'ing. His parents committed two
very common errors: they promised
him ;-arection for his disobedience,
without inflicting the punishment;
'- a p ,
" .: .,- ''





CKARL"N DURAN. 28

-ften repeated his sayings,
or.f hlvoiings, to otheoi,
11ence. Parent. should al-
~-~D~J;~ip~ S~o ~ tdftb# -tk, t e~lik
_?*vftco4wage~z~ag
f~is~ec~q -susit-
i-tey
iave




#kwLm*tu md- ai not
eu. frrss r~iI..:sing-
he. mPusic
bwaotmeSit is -kEd' the

.~rt .;

Ill P 4

3Nr 1~~: ~





CHARGES .URBAN.


" :- j , : *. .. i
CHARLES DURAN AT SCHOOL.
CMAneEs.waist to.school.Q. I, was a~qer4il-y .sgeny t
to the diavtet ,sehabl, t ,fw fro.m
his fathers, house- .TeaOwcer py
that: they eaw t. whe h ch ldren
ame good. and,.xiewt at l~ne by.
their, d codaet i in. sGlI:ah. j Iwse
children who dtWiVad tigiwiprqy(i
will -generally ohey theiw teaches.;
and'lthosd selowls tha4.-ag obedient
gendraMy ieac, wel ..
How was it with,.QaaiWarls .Dan
at school? Did he obey his teacher?
At first, as all things in the school
were new and strange to him, he
was somewhat restrained. He soon,
however, becaine acquainted with





CHAERLES DUSWB& 25
teacher and the scholars, and as
earned. to break the itles of; -
school He became direspect- '
S"d oosidrbtsaodlet, ad. caused him

id 4l glidul t iai o -wry inattentive
1hIW. 1naL .. .. eM,..did. the
*emu 4w.m- leown;
. iaa-t t1 awStw 'more
Ser-PetaM& thlegreater
I_0 o alme -they--' were. not
A. i : do~A ough naturMy
'pSWt teaigi smart boy, -he
6deaa neeb tow grOw uip a.

W"isWr-II -tice in their
of this- boy is tha~e~
ess which he showed hip
If -e played with,.
lfM. qtitt* sure to get. :
thwaethe play wafthrough.





26 CHARLES DURAN.
He was -surly, selftwilled, and dis-
Sposed always ta have his own way
in every.tuhingi;
Oe day,; Samauel -foward,-.a boy
smai'er -than himself,. wxvfii ng his
kite.4fl1hereswus a-tii'kr^reuer and
the -kitefloated beaulifully in-theair.
Charles seized t1hee t wire, anid began
to pull in the !i~ Sasa.l erpnof
strated with liiaFbat i rt. ilwte -hae,
Sremnostrated'4he maere-'-m.gly was
-' Cha;iles .* ,npnl lied iin4 the. ites.
tore it- al to pieces;-aad broke. and
snarled the twine S..amel oised at
,the lss. of his pretty kitei, and
Charges Duran was mean ;enough
o' mimiic the,'boy whom he had
is i4nured. .-
-Att anesrer tieie;alittlegirldwhose
name was Helen Fay;smwas" return-
mi i-gtl schoolo: Charles threw a
\ ,* "





S oHAas mw AN. 27
,' and hit her on the cheek-
It. cut a great gash in her
O ttranBb d made the blood run freely. "
i; "Aw-stonei strack- a little higher,
1ai0s pmlpe baby have put out her
I a~ri t was, her face .was badly

%lleadtey p iikved -some
Rf itteti tuak are house.
~'lb ~oledb. iE -ttle children,
SlwdandLenisa, whom she sent to
bk*t l 'pThis peer, mother was in-,
i sgi~pep smAe-.very neat, and her
.* lidel a-oweie, always dressed in
F, ilkB s. clothes. Oharles D]tan,
,~il s nw t of&his element when
S,. as not in mischief, seeded to .
Sia tormenting these ittil
n their-way from school '
*-,fwhen they had on their: '
these l covered th'eA from





.. s an 'e r .
SheadAto foot with'dirt and mud. .I.
tdi a ^-pgghktrhnQiasi Lpouies |
wot A.hedmei Theita.mathed

'"saw the nqiglins 4ftevnekigfhb's
S ibMIedEllidf* u***d atw 4 *V b
So constantly was CharlesKinjur-
ing their smalletlbya .aaod, girlsdn the
shei tbhatnafld Lfr a 44ve.him.
If height h#rIWe thew pitied
hiHat The whole-shiooli seemed
glad; oae-ddp when, he-: ad shoved
a little.girl into a man wiudle, and
Supse-a.kai&Bkstambon amoiby's wriitiig
book-and.aspeied:i.%.be&seekthe Har
-.ter give,-hm ia se\vre v 'whipping -* .
sach a s]pe deseaved. -
It is-net sagieeabile1l dwell leingl t
th1a the. cndauwrdfrtbtis :-Ac in .
school Alie becarae', quaamisome
and disagreeable- thi o orne was |





CHARhES DURAN.


exitnles.t.-t him. He was
.sp.i.ep of *. the worst boy

S gi-nlrpiw,.as -asow-P s-. teacher,
4 Sal&oadkhr.neikt@o Ahiam till .he
I dlte*" -4tbhAi %aodontpnger.,. He
j t zr nar tI~his^& ^ p-k is mind
.d. l jttIP I3n, 6oL.. t-f his
A. t g JtieavatlehE ~ilien.kwinag the
s, Oacs!o.a. He called
tua0.ieeol- to order, w.al -then told
fg 4iatWwhat he had thinght of
(9f;lr Pebmi nlded him of his disobe-
0~Driece, of .his unkindness to his
.melanamtes, and of his general. ,
ect of his studies. He. told himl
i.nat do differently he would
up without friends, and, in al.
ility, in consequence of/
-e do.in to an early gr4ae-':

>4w>..






CHARLES DURAN.


Mr. Spicer then addressed the
scholars, and said, "All of you who
think Charles Duran ought to be
expelled fom the school for con-
tinued bad codeauct raise your right
Handss" In a moment every right
hand was raised ap!
Then Mr. Spicer said, in a solemn
and affecting In er, "A Charks Du-
ran,. With th eW of your, school
mates, you are epeeId from tkis school,
sfor0 bad conMAet."











* I
-^ ,j.*^ '


' -. .^ ^:. ^ -*'^ a s ^-


30






OHARBL t DURAN.


.cH..E.R V.,
S ,IO H IRJ 8'8 R- A 1x T 0s.
GooD habits are of the greatest imr-
portance. If they are cultivated- by
the young, 'they become field and
permanent. Civil habits, unless they
are correted, wit ease in num-
ber and strength. W young should
beware ofth~ e first evi habit A boy
does not becomtW'a bad boy all at-
once: he gives way to one bad
habit, and then to another. One
small sin prepares the way for an-
other and a greater one. -Dr. Clarke.
says, "Sin is a small matter in its
commencement; but by itdulgeniee
it grows great, and multiplies itself
beyond all calculation." The :old
rabbins used to say it was like a


81






82 CAS Ia .
spider's web at first, and that it in-
creased till it was like a cart-rope.
This is seen in the ease of Charles
SDuran; H is xpulsioi f ii school
. di4 i" the witkgew ff:is bad deeper,
Sand, intea4 f bJeigr a irly, Win-
dustrios -oy, .ond -t hi .sdies,
and attentive yh vrisw duties,
I he ww jile, $zy j|^ ices
WhAn le 1 gW .to. have bwA -in
school, e as fig nd idling
S away hies time eal9ng mrnrgina of
tb. brook i,,pd rive. : e soon
SlearnL o -pa a goi, id nouch of
his time .was peout i the woods,
hunting. bir4s, 4 qirrels, and rabbits.
Idle. babit e re vry 4"geras.
A boy or wi that is haitually idle
S cannot be good.,tak that., The
devil will always find mischief for


5~" Trmr~lp~n-TFF~




~~_i
;*
r
;1. ~s~
d;,


'1.










I
^













;


v~.'


4t


0


-"- 7~r "";";~-: ~'~A~l'~
r 14




S ," ; o ...- '-


CHABLES DURAN.
such persons, and he will be .-ry
sure to get them into it.
Charles had, what many boys de-
sire, a gun, and was very fond of
shooting. Besides shooting squirrels
and bird heb would shoot At marks
on his ftlies oatMldBdings and
fences.' 1'here was not a door, not
a boad not a post, and scarcely a
rail, in all the out buildings and
fences; that was not ftll of shot-
holes. This kind -f shooting was a
dang as practice. I wondered,
when I # miined the premises, that
the barn and` sheds had not taken
fire from the b-iring wads.' It was
dangerous also to the poultry and
cattle. Butr e thought nothing of
these things; from day to day it was .
shoot! shoot f shoot!
Pursuing this course, it is not






86 OHARLES DURAN.
strain that Charles should grow up
rou his manners, and coarse in
his language. Gentleness is lovely
always, wherever found; but it ap-
Spears mpt lovely i children and -
youth. It indicates a good heart,
S iad good trwiinig. -It helps young
persons into the best society, and
secures them warm and valuable
friends. Roughness of manner drives
our friends from us, and prevents
many from becoming friends. This
fact is illustrated in the history of
this spoiled boy. He might have
had a large circle of friends but
now few, very few indeed, loved or
esteemed him.
SOne vice does not long remain
Alone. Idleness begets vice. Vicious-
ness shows itself in various forms: in
lying, Sabbath-breaking, theft, swear-
I. .- "


: .. -.A& A ... -





ORAiaLs DURAN. 87
ing, and ieprace. Gharles
gera- woseand lworse,--adding i5
to ein. HMebecame greatly jdicted
to swefarig. He frequent spefit
.the Sabbath in wandering .bout the
fields, instead of attending church.
He foasd, t& hedete ed always -
do, kindred spirits, 'ith whom he
associated. With these he learned
to drink to excess, and was not un-
frequently under the influence of
strong drink.
There is a standard in vice as well
as in virtue. While some are held '
up as models of virtue, others -nray
be regarded as the very peisonifica-
tion of evil. We should learn to
profit by both,--be eneon-O
one, and warned by the i.
The unfortunate boy w
I am detailing finally beca pe a pid

*-y "' .^^3






S38 CHARLES DUAN.
verb in his native town. Good mo-
thrs often exhorted their children
n&to be like Charles Duran! Who
of my little readers would like such
a disti i on as this? Try to live so
that pare may point you out as
good examples for their children to
follow.











..
^^' *






OIL&BLUS DURAN.B 89 "


CHAPTER VI.
THE FATAL NIGHTo
IN country villages, as welt s h
larger cities, parties often meet for
dancing; and balls are fiequerntly
held, especially in the winter season.
Many young people, whose thoughts
and time are not better -oacupied,
seem to derive a great dealofplea-.
sure from such amusements.
These gatherings frequently em-
brace a large number of the young
of both sexes, from the towns in
which they are held, and often many
from neighboring towns. They are
usually held at some tavern where
rum is sold. The parties arrive in
the forepart of the evening, a e
dance. comriences at eight ort om



.-





S 40


CHARLES DUBkN.


p


. ',t ;L. ',-


I


eight to nine o'clock, according to
arrangement. Wine, cordials, and
other ti atng dks, are freely
furnished, and freely used. Toward
a.idaight, when e~te, youag ladies
End sober young, men should be at
hoQe, the ball-supper is. served up,
jich. viands and sparkling ,drinks
are ,oa the table.- O-ne becomes
drunkenand another surfeited. The
.sound ofthe v~l is again head, mad
the merry dance is kept up till near
morning light. The parties then
gradually retire. Some of the young
ladies, from over eeiteiment in the
bathamber, aad subsequent ex-
posure tohe eight air, take severe
cold. become speedily onamptive,
and &bopmthe palace of toting and
nri, ar? carried tothe grave! In
ti4 country, where consurption is


. .'% -L- -Aa...widAnt. ,. . . " .


. -. .






OHABLES DUHAN.


so prevalent, and accomplishes its
work so rapidly, the distance from
the midnight ball-room to the grave
S is very short.
Most young men who attend balls
go home inflamed with wine. I say
most of them,. It is not uafrequently
the case, however, that some of
them cannot get hole. They have
to stay behind. until 'they lyve, i. a
measure, slept off the fmnes of str6~g
drink: and 'then, with bloodshot
eyes, fetid breath, arld staggering
gait, they reach their homes. Such
young men have received a new
impetus in the way that leads to
destrctidn, and such are the com-
mon fruits of a village ball.
Why do fathers and mothers,-
and some of them professedly Chris-
tiarrpaeents, too,-allow their dMgh-


`~ -
i. .;..; 1


Y


_'A"M -12r-. AL .


41






42 CHAseI"s DUR
ters to mingle in these scenes, and
expose themselves to the coatamin-
ating influence of such associations?
How any well-disposed mother can
do this Il ata aloss to determine.
Such a balL as I have described
was to be held in the town of .
Young men and young ladies im-
patiently waited for the time ap-
pointed to arrive. Among those
who designed'to attend this ball was
Charles Duran, then in his eighteenth
year. Notwithstanding his habits
and character, the position and re-
spectability of his parents prevented
him for being entirely, excluded
from society. 'ae was still further
Sided in gaining admission to such
parties by always having money.
While dome despised him in their.
heat. they were quite willing, for


~-4r ;-~ _.. ~~-----LL _L .-- ---- -- --~i~ ~q;QL~B~Sbl L4ir~~l~iYB*~--hje~i*~yl-l~ ~.Cr~YY9IYIY~e~:~I~C_.iY1qr_~.r~~~_i_






CRAILUS ~IIA1.


49


the sake of hiS pursw, toes- e .him
in theitronc nt)
The haibfctemy looked *r hyd at
rived. The pr"araiois wete made.
At night -te ball was to eoas
off After dinner, Charles asked his
father fbr money to bear i e ex*
penses of the :eVeniAg: -Mri Duran
gave aft-what he thb6ughit wbld be
sufficient for the oeeasio6. The-
amount did not satisfy him-: tiore
Swas asked. It was r refused; and
Charles, not htavlg fovtgotten his
early habits, immediately went into
a fit of rage. kre money he want-
ed, and mote he weuld have. He
went out, and arming himself with
stones and blocks soon commenced
a regular assault upot the house.
The weather-boards were battered,
one window was smashed in, panei


I




4


F~I~L~ Yilr~~Z~a%~rb~Fr~r~RC~*II~~~9: "' ~~l;l-~.~rr~T~,-Tllrr;~R~'~B~rr* ~-c--\ml*rr,~cr: -~zc~r;7cr-~Fl


SJry3~hJ~-t.li- -dLli~L~PI1~C~-~ i~l~-L;I~L~I~6~~ ~i~L~ *~"'1L-~~_ _~ ~E-IL~YL.~- -L__LI -L-i






44 CABLES W~VBN.
in the others were broken, and the *
fragments rattled on the floor t and
on the ground. The aged parents
trembled for their safety; while the
Sson, raving as a madman, seemed
bent on theiWd~~detru Stooping
somewhat with. age a .d ii great
fear, Mr. Duran went to the door,
with a hag in his hand, containing
Sa quantity of specie -.
Here, ChtAes," said' .he feeble
S old man, "come and get what
money you want, and don't stone
S the house any maoe."
Thus appeased, the demon be-
S came qviet. Charles helped him-
S self to as much money as he wanted,
.and was ready for the ball in the
Evening. Alas, what degradation
.for. parent! and what persevering
S depravity in a son!









r









L


CHARLES TAKING MONiY FOR TrE BALL.


'- mrMM L ek ^0I '~--^V~~~Uh~h/


Qil ;~~v s* ~zA.h4-vrrr/


1


a

* I


F~ ~-~~"' rCj~F~bi~P~~~:
t. ~'~






CHARLES DURAN.


The. evening came. Parties be-
gan to assemble. Arrangements
had been made for a great ball
The saloon was tastefully decorated.
The kitchen gave evidence that a
sumptuous repast was in prepara-
tion. The bar was fully supplied
with all kind of sparkling liquors.
As the new-corers arrived, they
met a smiling host, an attentive and
ready bar-tendr, and obsequious
waiters and servants.
Fancy the scene. Groups of per-
sons, gayly dressed, are in conversa-
tion in different parts of the ball-
chamber. More are constantly
coming ii. The' musicians, who
for some time have been tuning
their instruments, enter, and take
their place. Partners are selected,
the circle is formed, and the dancing


IIT Mat.
: : 2 '1 '-~~I_~~.;; '^ '~ ~~ -.i


47






CHARLES DURAN.


begins. A scene of hilarity ensues.
During the intervals, the merry
laugh is heard, wine is drunk, and
the glee becomes generaL Spark-
ling eyes are made more sparkling
by strong drink; and, under the in-
flnence of multiplied potatidns, the
coarse jest is now and then uttered.
In this scene of gayety and mirth
Charles Duran mingled,--a promi-
nent actor. A young and inexpe-
rienced girl had accompanied him
to the place. Round and round
wept he dance, and round and
round went Charles's bead. f.e
wafdlsh with money, and man-y a
friend did he treat at the bar. 2
ere the festivities closed he was un-
able to walk steadily. Still, stimu-
lated by the excitement of the occa-
sion, and urged on by unprincipled
4"
,fi,


48






CHARLEs DURAN. 49
comrades, he poured down the
deadly poison. His brain reeled
under its influence. He alternately
roared and laughed as a. maniac.
SAnother drink! another drink!" he
said. His youthful system could en-
dure it no longer: he uttered a moan-
ing, sepulchral groan, atd sunk to
the floor1
The ball was over, and the night
was nearly gone. A friend took
charge ofthe thoughtless young gk
that had accompanied Charles to
the dance. Two young men, his
companions: in riot, undertook to
convey him to his father's house;
T'Ple :dtrs were just beginning to
S fade away as he h the reached the
old. Speechless, and almost life-
less, they laid him upon his bed. It
proved his death-bed!
S 4 4

*""""*;>. -'^ **<- ^ ^*iai'^r"-"i *^ ** : .;. ^ ^ ^








,. HAPterB .






times wild, and partially deranged.
A violentt fewr ept in, ,a0pd4r 0 Iny
dye'he w*a confined tohisbed. Jii
suaring, we re me;.-; saihgb di

the fire within would onsur a him.,
B11 pa ^y an watphe4 y-
gretiof his -dilpee, -.egn dd. .1 in,
his power to reste his he
*.T!o ra ite o p be n4 t erlais
came. lThee was a ctiae for the
better. wa though h o that he
would get up. The hopes of his





08AE DUaA-D 61
parents we revived; and ,many
wre thewiahs that witA rteswl
healtkA there MU'.i : a refqrstaton
of mawis. ,tkhi- 'hwdver, there
vew.Mtle-
Thefse bhope& rf ceo weres
aooza Q* o ffC, a? disae aI
armed aowar fora, H.. ase j.ke
with a cough, and nigt e fbl-
loWed. WeIeyeawomre aittlennken,
but full f. exprausion. -iB county
na.eo wEs pale, and, slightly tinged,
with blue, gav evidence that conn
sumptio -had ma-rked 1dm fer its
victim, andthat tte grave must soon
sw.eo~w hio up: he was rapidly
si weredinto the ans of death,
Towad -Ael* aite rt of hiak.
nWe,rad*whatrivaince was adopted
to change kir positive in bed. Two
hooks were drive intq the ceiling,


'I'






CHARLES DURAN.


over the foot of the bedstead. To
Sthesepulleys were attached. These
ptlleyR$s iged with eordb, one
end f i nwau made fast to the
upper part of the bed, By hoisting
oatheweardahe could bi raised to
any desired angle' anc instead of
being bolstere up lie hung as if in
a haRimoek.*
During his illness CT hs gave
little evidence of any -change in his
feelings. N6o-srrow w& expressed
for anything in his past conduct. He
was sill fretful, still obinate. He
appearedlike one early sold to sina
TIntiniatc r of the paish came
in to py ith him. He found'him
ignorant of spiritual things. He
taated to him on th esbite of reli-
gion--urged him topptepare to meet
See rontirpie. -


-i 'J


I II 1 I3 11 "I rrII






ORLBEs DUBRAN. 5S
God. He offered prayer by his bed-
side. He lefthim, however, showing'
very little evid~ nbf penitence, and
entertaining ftb him very little hope.
C&arles fingered along till early in
*Marew, The da'r -of4 11i tre
came. T:he.I fiheir aid he. bit
o0ei? bed ^ ^y swt it the
4hoperwh i they nila at his
" biHrth.b eW nowt6 :to rid sh., la
of his cdO iig their e.yei p
tho. wei i now to perfborsnt tMtoce
for hin. He spike not Opprestre
stillne reiged inm the room. 1it
a stuu was heald, save the ratting
in. the ,'hreat of the dying youth.
The Ilast breath was. drawn; W-
for a.,momeat, quivered Up0a hM s
lip. The spirit took it fight; atd
the po A mother, ii angqr'sh of 0
exclained" is Cderd






CHARLes tinrS.


i G I. iT I b w. d
Tflt ad ^atedgra9st bstrd.
Eft eMAeee 6lalbdirg A

I fotgtftt -of +4-aetly did he
tm tn< fepatea tj and in
temrpeanc, amid earlyt-b go
d64 tt hio gran. v t
bb i pbenc to pmes&e fear*
ftatt i ChilMea itki &hey (soe
iwhkjat I bes-tforitiT., l
Mttfet restraint
ijboeA to therna te i a
x#isely obtained tht. Mi oa. yowth
should be uoder oincrtion
eadad bl' ofV ct :Mr Chil-
es, InaU .E &te tVsthatparental
control is opp thisve" tha ibould


,~s.. ....~, ,a~B~:s~."i~~_, ~ .


64




'4 *1


Camiss flrw. 56
learn to be thb kftI far A 'It is
etengh fbr Wilistftcted 4llit

ewat mai w nt.tMoeat

*flota totnpliano w




The school history 1hea NB-
tt wifrt n ide I* 1 t.! t, li take a
'r^taer atetpie*^^ igdB th umiht5
4t ybrthfal retdelt B&hdti%
ithin thAt lt iiot a gfeat
sefor theuito *i6te the rulte
of t$eie sdhoo* eglect Aeisi bos,
or fe ttnakat 4a tof/naies
their sfe 1. & his boy
thotglt. Tte ult tf Ais dbtte is
befe fttk Allt tethfdtidrer holed
o~~ei





HAES DURAN.


know that by such course of con
4they ira. i the fdi4

awhile1 pae, puihpiit; jiey

Ptho ay P pthirlaces
in t c^,^l; theputacquiri g
the habits which f if. not orrecte4,
W Wiring rin po'them by and by,
This boy's sporting ha ougbt
pt- to be ligkftly paed_ 9ver e
was: exceedis~y, f of .a gun,
The indulgkce of thi passion led
him into habits of ilegss and
crmelty. Boys should rarely, if ever,
be allowed the, usp of fe-r m
they are always. dagoUs, The
hbit. an4 a ciatio. twhito ch
their pe Jeads.arg, e y objec-
tionakble. B.y.q tat are constantly
around the brooks after little fishes


56






CHARLES DURAN. 67
anI in the woods in pursuit of little
birds, had better be at their 0oo
We always fear that idle boys. P
make idle men.
We see from the history of Charles
Duran the importance of early reli-
gious training. Had his parents
pursued a,diffqreet course with him,
he might have grown up to be a
blessing to them, and a useful mem-
ber-of society: Train up a child in
the way, he should go; and when
he is old he will not depart from it."
Prov. xxii, 6.
When, 0 when will parents lay
this to heart! How. many fathers
and mothers have been brought
down to the grave with sorrow, by
neglecting this important duty!
The history of Charles Duran is a
warning to all boys who are inclined
i!
^ .:






CH8 ARL DURAN.


to indulge in Sabbath-breaking; to
mr bad associations; to tipple; or
S visit Cdaces of improper if us
ment. See his dreadful etd I Mark
that fhtal night! Eettenctber that
he had been preparing for thalt ea-
son of riot and debauch by previous
indulgence. He Ogme not' to hi
wretched condition all at opee. He
was preparing fbt it in his early dis-
obedience,-in his neglect of instfrc-
tion,-in his unkindness to his school-
mates,-in delighting to injure those
who were smaller and weaker thaii
himself,-i-i his idle apotting habits,
---in the indulgence of his bad tern-
per,-in ministering to is perverse
will,--in his Slnday rambling,-in
associating with the v*l --it his
tippling habits,-and, fitially, in
throwing off all parental regard and


68





I
tARLE8s DURAN. 59
restraint He had now come to the
verge:of the whirlpool of destructi.
and, in: a frenzied moment, he threw
himself into the awful vortex Be-
ware of the first sin! "Enter 'not
into the paths of the wicked, and go
not in the way of evil men. Avoid
it, pass not by it, turn from it,-and
pass away." Prov. iv, 14, 15.




THE END.



4 ,








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By OLD HUMPHREY.' Three Illustrations. 18mo.,
pp. 219.
AN EXAMPLE FOR YOUNG EBN:
A Memoir of John Daklish. By SAxuZY DvUw.
18mo., pp. 92.

LETTERS TO LITTLE OBILDBEN.
Seven'Illustrations. 18mo., pp. 110.

APPEARANCE AND PRINOIPLE;
Or, a Sketch of Three Young Ladies at Sohool and
inhrr~ qent Life. 18mo., pp. 56.

ABNNB LEE AND HER I ISH NURK .
By Mrs. H. C. GADNEra. 18mo., pp. 158.
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