• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 Stories for little Clara
 Margarita: The martyr of Antio...
 Harriet Butler
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Stories for little Clara
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001839/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories for little Clara
Physical Description: xix, 75, 81 p., <3> leaves of plates : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Simon, James K ( Publisher )
Wyeth, S. Douglas ( Samuel Douglas ) ( Stereotyper )
Publisher: James K. Simon
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Stereotyed by S. Douglas Wyeth
Publication Date: 1851, c1843
Copyright Date: 1843
Edition: 2d ed.
 Subjects
Subject: Saints -- Biography -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Truthfulness and falsehood -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Selfishness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Biographies -- 1851   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Biographies   ( rbgenr )
individual biography   ( marcgt )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs. Anna Bache.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001839
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221549
oclc - 06567033
notis - ALG1773

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page vi
    Stories for little Clara
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
        Page xix
    Margarita: The martyr of Antioch
        Page 1
        Contents
            Page 2
        Margarita
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 52a
        The sail boat
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
        The fire
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Wishes
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
    Harriet Butler
        Page H 1
        Page H 2
        Contents
            Page H 3
            Page H 4
        Harriet Butler
            Page H 5
            Page H 6
            Page H 7
            Page H 8
            Page H 9
            Page H 10
            Page H 11
            Page H 12
            Page H 13
            Page H 14
            Page H 15
            Page H 16
            Page H 17
            Page H 18
            Page H 19
            Page H 20
            Page H 21
            Page H 22
            Page H 23
            Page H 24
            Page H 25
            Page H 26
            Page H 27
            Page H 28
            Page H 29
            Page H 30
            Page H 31
            Page H 32
            Page H 33
            Page H 34
            Page H 35
            Page H 36
            Page H 37
            Page H 38
            Page H 39
            Page H 40
            Page H 41
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            Page H 43
            Page H 44
            Page H 45
            Page H 46
            Page H 47
            Page H 48
            Page H 49
            Page H 50
            Page H 51
            Page H 52
        The translation; or, Papa's birthday
            Page H 53
            Page H 54
            Page H 55
            Page H 56
            Page H 57
            Page H 58
            Page H 59
        Selfishness reproved: A dialogue
            Page H 60
            Page H 61
            Page H 62
            Page H 63
            Page H 64
            Page H 65
            Page H 66
            Page H 67
            Page H 68
            Page H 69
            Page H 70
            Page H 71
        The wolf
            Page H 72
            Page H 72a
            Page H 73
            Page H 74
        Alden and the lady
            Page H 75
            Page H 76
            Page H 77
        The sailor boy's farewell to his mother
            Page H 78
            Page H 79
            Page H 80
            Page H 81
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
























"These are intended for temptations-


d keep me on my guard."-p. 34.


I


YL--- ---' --'- -' -"-- ''' Y'------'---------- ----''~rY


M %^OWOV%^ jif~-~ ~ ~ ~ -~~- ---~~L~IILLIUIUIIIIMUI~~


nr








STORIES

FOR


LITTLE CLARA.


BT


MRS. ANNA BACHIE.
Author of the "Fire-Screen," "Little Clara," "Clara's Amusemm, nt
"Sybils' Cave," &o &e.


SECOND EDITION.


PHILADELPHIA:
JAMES K. SIMON, 141 S. FIFTh STiEEF
1851.

























Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1843,

BY JAMES K. SIMON,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern
District of Pennsylvania.




------------------ ------------------------^




STEREOTYPED BY
DOUGLAS WYETH, Agt
No. 7, Pear St, Philad















INTRODUCTION.


"0! Jane," exclaimed Little CLARA, when we were
counting our pleasures, we forgot to count the stories and
verses we hear."
LIrrTTL Ca~.JA, page 169.

Many of my young friends have expressed a desire to hear
some of the stories related by MR. and Mas. HowELL, for
the amusement of their beloved children. In compliance
with their wishes, I now present them with this little volume.

THa ATHaoR.










CONTENTS

OO


STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


InTRODUCTION .
MARGARITA, THE MARTYR oi ANTIOCH
THE SAIL BOAT
TnE FIRE *
WISHES .
HARRIET BUTLER *
THE TRANSLATION
SELFISHNESS REPROVED *
THE WOL *
ALDEN AND THE LADY
THE SAILOR BOY's FAREWELL


PAGE
Svi


* 53
S 69
* 72
5

53
60
S 72
S 75
S 78











STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.




NE very cold Sunday evening, the
Howell family were as usual, as-
sembled in the front parlour, en-
joying the quiet of the day and the hour,
in their comfortable home. It had snowed
on Saturday night, but the Sunday had
been clear and cold. The moon shone so
brightly, that the reflection from the
vii





STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


whitened house-tops was almost dazzling;
and the shadow cast by every leafless
tree, was as distinct as though it had been
penciled on the snow. Mrs. Howell loved
this tranquil light, and the children loved it
too; for on moon-light evenings, unless their
parents had some unusual duty to attend to,
the shutters were left open, and they sat
and talked with their children, until it was
time for the latter to go to bed.
They had just finished singing a hymn,
and were sitting in silence, unbroken by any
sound, except the murmur of the fire in the
well-filled stove. At last Jane spoke.






STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


"Mother," said she, "this afternoon at
Sunday School, Mr. Williams was telling us
about the sufferings of the Early Martyrs;
and he read some verses from the New
Testament about their trials."
" Do you remember the verses ?" said her
mother.
"Yes ma'am;" answered Jane, "1 thought
them so beautiful, that I marked the place,
and after I came home, I learnt them."
"Let me hear you repeat them."
Jane repeated from the 11th chapter of
Paul's Epistle to the Hebrews, beginning at
the 35th verse.


ix







:. STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.

"Women received their dead raised to lfe
again ; and others were tortured, not accept&
ing deliverance, that they might obtain a
better resurrection.
And others had trial of cruel mockings and
sourgings; yea, moreover of bonds and im-
prisonment.
They were stoned, they were sawn asunder,
were tempted, were slain with the sword, they
wandered about in sheep-skins and goaD-skins;
being destitute, afflicted, tormented;
(%jkwom the world was not worthy) they
wandered in mountains, and in dens, and
caves of the earth."






STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


Glorious they were, that noble army of
martyrs;"-said Mrs. Howell. Their suffer-
ings are over now, and they are blest in His
presence for whom they suffered-but their
names and their memories remain, for an
example and an encouragement to us."
To us, mother !" said Clara. A4 we
in any danger of being tormented andlkilled,
as the martyrs were ?"
My child," said Mrs. Howell, "God has
blest us exceedingly, by placing our lot in a
land where we enjoy civil and religious
liberty; that is, we are under the protection
of laws which defend our lives and proper-


A


XI





STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


ties. Our rulers cannot take away our
estates, or cast us into prison, because our
religious opinions differ from theirs;-but
their are still many places in the world
where Christians do not enjoy these privi-
leges. Every Missionary, for instance, must
mal up is mind to run the risk of becom-
ing a fartyr."
Clara," said Jane, don't you remember
the Missionaries that were killed and eaten,
in the South Sea Islands?"
"And poor dear Mrs. Judson, Clara;" said
George. Don't you remember how sorry
we were for her, when her husband was in






STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


jail, and her poor little baby was so sick,
and when she had to ride so far in that jolt-
ipg cart, under the hot sun."
"And there are trials, my children," said
Mrs. Howell, and heavy ones too, that do
not touch life or limb. Trials that wring
the heart, and bewilder the mind, and make
life itself an hourly martyrdom,"
"What kind of trials are they, mother ?"
said George.
In the verses that Jane has just repeat-
ed," said his mother, "trials of cruel mocking,"
are mentioned. To some dispositions, ridi-
cule and contempt are severer punishments


ii





STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


than any bodily pain. Many of the early
martyrs were, no doubt, beloved and cher-
ished by their friends, and honoured by their
acquaintances, before they became Christ-
ians. Then they were mocked and sneered
at, despised as fools-or told that they were
drunkards, 'filled with new wine.'"
"But, mother," said George, I would not
mind that, if it was for Christ's sake."
"Would not you, my son ?-You know
little of your own heart, dear. Why were
you so angry with Tom Sandford, when
he laughed at you for going to Sunday
School ?"


xiv






STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


Well ma'am," said George, reddening--
"he was so provoking."
"My dear boy, meekness is a Christian's
duty. 'Blessed are the meek'- says our
Saviour."
"But mother," said George, "I am not a
Martyr. And they were men and women,
and I am only a boy."
"No, my dear," said his mother--" You
are not a martyr; and indeed you do not
show much of a martyr's spirit. You are
too ready to resent, and to return evil for
evil, when you fancy yourself ill-treated.
But if you are only a boy, Christian boys and


XV





STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


girls have their little trials, which seem as
heavy to them as greater trials do to men
and women, and it is just as much their duty
to bear them in a right spirit. Whenever
you conquer a wrong feeling, or perform a
difficult duty, from a desire to obey and
please your Heavenly Father, you exercise
the same spirit which enabled the martyrs
to bear their horrible persecutions. And
whenever you act rightly from such a
motive, your Lord and Saviour will accept
it, as done for his sake."
Mother," said George, in a low voice,
" I'll try."







STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.


"God helping you, my son," replied his
mother, "I hope you will.-It is also said
that the martyrs were tempted.' Their
heathen friends doubtless tried to persuade
them to turn back from Christ, by represent-
ing to them all the privileges they might en-
joy if they did not become Christians; by
promising them advantages, pleasures, and
honours; by telling them how it grieved their
parents and friends, and by entreating them
to turn back, for the sake of those who loved
them. It is a hard thing, my children, to
resist the pleadings of those we love."
"Yes, indeed;" observed Ruth Archer,
2


00
xVU





XViii STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA.

"Children must have been sorely tempted,
when parents, who had been kind and good
to them, prayed them not to become Chris-
tians. Hard work to resist a parent's tears !"
"But these things are over now ;"-said
Clara.
Trials and temptations, Clara," replied
her mother, are never over, until life is at
an end. All Christians must 'watch and
war'---war with temptation, and watch over
the sinful inclinations of their own hearts.
Perhaps there is no Christian living, who
has not, in the beginning of his Christian
course, felt what it is to be tried by 'cruel







STORIES FOR LITTLE CLARA. xix

mockings' from irreligious acquaintances,
and tempted by the persuasions of irreli-
gious friends, to go on in self-pleasing and
forgetfulness of God.
Mother," said George, "can't you tell
us a story about a Martyr."
Mrs. Howell was silent for a few minutes,
and then began







MARGARITA

THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH,

AND OTHER TALES.


BI


MRS. ANNA BACHE.
Author of the "Fire-Screen," "Little Clara," Clara's Amuemenuts
"Sybils Cave," e& &e.


SECOND EDITION*


PHILADELPHIA.
JAMES K. SIMON, 141 S. FIFTH STREET.
1851.















CONTENTS.


MARGARITA
THE SAIL BOAT
Tax FIRE
WIsaHs .


*


**

* 0


PAGB
3
* 63
69
* 72








MARGARITA,
THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


N the reign of the Emperor Probus
an aged Pagan named Callias, was
Chief Priest in the Temple of the
Sun, at Antioch. You know that the Greeks
and Romans, among their many idols, wor-
shipped the sun, under the figure of a beauti-
ful young man, called Apollo. Callias had
one child; his daughter Margarita.
Her mother died when she was a hi
This story is taken from Milman's beautiful poem of the ge
title.





MARGARITA,


and Callias, who had loved his wife dear-
ly, never married again, but lavished all
his love and care upon his little daughter.
He had her carefully educated in all the
learning and accomplishments of the time;
and as she grew up very beautiful and sen-
sible, he determined that she should be
Priestess in the temple where he was Chief
Priest. So Margarita was taught to worship
the sun. She used to stand before the statue
of Apollo, with a laurel wreath on her long
hair, and a little musical instrument
Sa lyre, in her hand, which she played
on, while she sang hymns in honour of the


4






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


Sun. Every body admired her beauty and
grace, and said that Callias was a happy
father. Callias thought so too, and loved
his beautiful daughter better and better every
day. He employed great part of his time
in devising things to please his'darling Mar-
garita, and thought no expense too great that
was to contribute to her pleasure. She lived
in a splendid house, her little feet trod on
marble floors, her neck and arms glittered
with jewels, and her fair limbs were clad in
the richest robes. When she slept, her
silken bed was shaded by costly curtains
and flowers and perfumes scented the air


5




MARGARITA,


around her. When she woke, she had a
faithful old nurse, who loved her dearly, to
wait and tend on her; to comb her beautiful
hair, and help her to dress herself; and she
had plenty of servants to do her bidding at
all times. Her table was supplied with the
most delicate food; her father bought her all
the books that could be procured, and decked
her rooms with fine pictures and statues.
She had a large garden of her own, and
whenever she chose, she could walk in the
stately woods round the temple of Apollo,
which were called the Sacred Groves. She
had carriages and horses to take the air as


6





THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


often as she pleased. Wherever she went,
crowds of people thronged to look at the beau-
tiful Priestess, and the wisest and noblest,
thought themselves honored by her acquain-
tance. Olybius, the Prefect of the East,
a young nobleman, next in honour and power
to the Emperor himself, loved Margarita,
and wished her to be his wife. Besides being
so high in station, Olybius was young, hand-
some, accomplished, generous, honourable,
and brave. Any Eastern Princess would
have been proud to marry him.
I do not know how Margarita became a
Christian. Perhaps, in one of her visits to


7





MARGARITA,


the poor, (for she was very good to the poor,
visiting and relieving them constantly;) she
met with some suffering Christian, from
whose conversation she learned to know the
one True God, and believe in Jesus Christ,
who was sent to save the souls of those who
put their trust in Him. However it hap-
pened, Margarita became a Christian.
"- And what did her father say ?"-asked
Clara.
Her father did nbt know it. At that time
the active persecution had ceased against
the Christians for a little while; and although
they were obliged to meet in secret to pray


8






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


and preach, people were not on the watch,
to seek them out and betray them. Olybius,
though a heathen, was a kind-tempered man,
and had no wish to trouble those who neither
offended nor resisted. Margarita's father
hated the Christians bitterly, and used to
boast that if his only child were a Christian,
he would himself give her up to the tormen-
tors. But Margarita knew how well her
father loved her, and shekept her own secret,
praying that God would enlighten her dear
parent, and when the time of trial should
come, would strengthen her to do or to suffer
whatever duty required. When Olybius,


9






MARGARITA,


pressed her to marry him, she put him off;
for she knew that God commands Christians
' not to be unequally yoked with unbelievers;'
-and this was a sore struggle for her young
heart, for she loved Olybius dearly; and if,
instead of being Prefect of the East, he had
been the poorest working man in Antioch,
and a Christian, Margarita would have mar-
ried him, rather than any other man in the
world.
There was a nobleman in Antioch named
Vopiscus, who envied Olybius, and wished
to be Prefect himself. This bad man gave
the Emperor to understand that Olybius


10





THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


favoured the Christians, and that the Chris-
tian influence, if not checked, would endan-
ger the Emperor and his government. Upon
which the Pagan Emperor sent orders to
Olybius to seek out all the Christians in
Antioch-to offer a full pardon to those who
would renounce Christ, and sacrifice to the
idols; but to condemn to death all those
who refused to do so.
"Poor Margarita !" said Clara.
When the Emperor's letter arrived,
Olybius was very angry, though he did not
know that Margarita was a Christian. He
knew what Vopiscus aimed at, and he was


11






MARGARITA,


determined that he should be disappointed.
He told Vopiscus, that he knew why he had
taken such pains to inform the Emperor that
the Christians were not persecuted in An-
tioch. "It is true," said he, I am sick of
seeing people tortured and executed, who
do no harm that I know of. If they offend
our gods, our gods can punish them. I would
rather win them by mercy, than crush them
with cruelty; but since my master, the Em-
peror, has sent me these orders, it is my
duty to obey them, and I will."
Margarita was present at this discourse,
and she was observed to turn very pale, and


12





THE MARTIN OF ANTIOCH.


press her hands upon her bosom. She looked
upwards, and her lips moved, but she uttered
no sound. They were all standing in front
of the temple of Apollo--and one of the
priests, observing her agitation, said-" She
is inspired by Apollo! Haste! bring the
laurel crown, the sacred laurel crown, and
put it on her head."-But Margarita put
aside the laurel crown, and whispered to
herself-" The crown, the crown of glory.
God give me grace upon my bleeding brows
to wear it !"
Her father thought she was suddenly
3

4


13






MARGARITA,


taken ill, and ordered the attendants to
carry her home.
Margarita shut herself up in her room
for the rest of the day, and speat the time in
prayer, and in considering what she could do
to help her Christian friends, in this season
of trial. She knew they were to hold a
funeral meeting that night, at the burial-place
of the Christians, near the city, and she hoped
to get there, in time to warn them of the
coming danger. As soon as it grew dark,
she wrapped herself in a long, thick veil, and
commending herself to God, stole out of the
house without being seen by any one, and
0,


14






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


took her way through the woods to the
burial-ground.
When she arrived, they had just finished
singing the funeral hymn. Fabius, the Bish-
op, a very old, white-haired man, was stand-
ing beside the grave; and near him, the three
principal men among the converts of Antioch
-Diodotus, Charinus, and Calanthias. They
were surprised to see Margarita coming in
such haste through the darkness, her hair
and dress wet with the heavy night-dews;
and they asked her what was the matter.
She told them of the Emperor's orders,
and that the Prefect's soldiers were already


15






MARGARITA


out to seek them, and take them to prison:
beseeching them to separate and seek for
safety in flight.
Is it so my child ?"-said the old Bishop.
"Does the heathen prepare for slaughter ?-
then we must prepare for death."
"Oh!" said Margarita, weeping,-" who
will lead the Christian flock to their pasture,
when you, our shepherd, are gone."
My daughter," said the Bishop, have
you forgotten the Master of the flock ?"
Oh! no;" said Margarita, "but to see
you suffer-to see you die-"
My daughter," said the Bishop, "when






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


the scourge shall rend my flesh, think of our
smitten Redeemer. When the fire is kindled
around me, think that it lights me on the way
to Heaven."
"Why, Fabius," exclaimed Charinus--
"I had expected to hear you rejoice that we
were called upon to die the martyr's death.
Let us go forth to the very throne of the
Roman-proclaim our faith, and call the
glorifying axe upon our heads.
"Hush, Charinus; said the good Bishop;
"That is not a proper spirit. We are or.
dered to bear our cross, not to make it. You
speak like one who thinks more of his own






MARGARITA,


glory than his Lord's. Beloved brethren and
sisters! let us all hold ourselves prepared,
like him beside whose grave we are standing,
to give the last awful testimony to CHRIST
our SAVIOUR. Yet do not let us tempt our
enemies to commit sin, by our own im-
prudence."
While the Bishop was speaking, the sound
of coming feet was heard, and lights, were
seen moving quickly among the trees. The
Bishop gave them his blessing, and told them
to disperse as quietly and quickly as possible.
But it was too late. The soldiers had
already surrounded the burial-ground. They






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


poured upon the helpless, unarmed Christians
-seized them, with rude words and blows;
tied them with cords, and dragged them
away to prison. The fierce old Callias,
eager to persecute, had got permission to
accompany the soldiers. When the Captain
was told that all the Christians were seized
and bound, Callias said-" Are you sure you
have them all ? Do not let one escape us."
As he spoke, he took a torch from one of the
soldiers, shook it, to make it blaze brighter,
and holding it aloft, looked eagerly among
the trees. In a remote corner, kneeling
beside a piece of rock, he saw a woman,


19






MARGARITA.


wrapped in a long white veil. "Here is one
more;" said he-and he rushed up to thl
kneeling person, seized her by the arm,
dragged her forward, and tore off her veil.
The torch-light fell strongly upon her face.
It was his own, only daughter-Margarita.
The next day Olybius took his seat in
the Judgment Hall, and commanded the
Christian Prisoners to be brought before
him. Diodotus, Calanthias, and Charinus,
being men of noble birth, were ordered to
appear first.
Olybius spoke kindly to Diodotus, and
asked him why he had forsaken the faith of


20







THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


his fathers. Diodotus, who was a wise and
Jrave man, answered firmly, but with proper
respect for the rank and office of Olybius.
He pointed out the folly and wickedness of
worshipping idols, fashioned by the hands of
men from wood and stone; and he spoke of
the power and purity of the one true God,
so impressively, that every body present was
listening attentively-When Charinus broke
rudely in upon his discourse, and reproved
him for speaking so mildly. Then Charinus
turned to Olybius, and addressed him in a
very insulting manner, calling him another
Pilate, and defying him to do his worst.


21







MARGARITA,


Olybius was justly displeased at the insolent
behaviour of Charinus; he commanded him
to be silent, and addressed the old Bishop.
The meek old Christian stood forward, and
mildly requested the Prefect to give him a
few minutes patient hearing. Then he began,
and described the creation of the world, the
disobedience and fall of man, the means pro-
vided by God for the pardon and restoration
of sinners, and the fulfihnent of prophecy in
the life and death of the Lord Jesus Christ.
Then he spoke of the second coming of the
Lord, in might and glory, to judge the earth.
How the graves should open, the sea give up






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


its dead, and all created souls stand forth to
be judged. Prefect," said he,-" thou and
I shall stand there, to give in our account of
this day's doings; and Christ shall render to
each of us his due reward."
While the venerable man spoke there was
a deep silence in the hall. The very soldiers,
hardy veterans as they were, turned pale, and
leaned their cheeks upon their spears. All
were awed by the mild majesty of his words,
and Margarita prayed silently-- Merciful
Jesus, turn their hearts !"
But again Charinus broke in with rude
scoffs. "What! heathens,"-said he, "do


23







MARGARITA,


you shake at an old man's voice? What
will you do when the archangel's trumpet
sounds for judgment?"
Charinus," said the Bishop, for shame!
If you love your own soul, be silent. Pride
must fall. Boastful Peter denied his Lord,
and you may yet fall away from the faith."
"I!" said Charinus-" never." And he
would have gone on, but Olybius broke up
the assembly. He ordered the Christians to
be led back to the prison, and took Callias
home with him, that they might consult to-
gether how to save Margarita.
Margarita lay for several days in her dun-


24





THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


geon. Poor girl! it was a sad change for
one so young and delicate, who had been so
tenderly brought up. Her silken bed was
exchanged for one of musty straw; instead
of marble floors, her feet were on sharp
flints; instead of perfumed lamps illuminating
her stately hall, the little light that found its
way through the grated windows, showed the
rough stones of her prison, trickling with
damps, and swarming with reptiles. Her
dainty food was replaced by bread and water;
her embroidered robes by sackcloth; and
instead of golden bracelets, her delicate arm


25





MARGARITA,


were loaded with iron chains. Poor Mar-
garita !
But her faith and patience did not fail.
She slept peacefully on her straw: she ate
thankfully of her coarse food; she prayed
constantly that God would turn more hearts
to Christ; and she sang hymns so sweetly,
that the jailor's family, though they were
heathens, used to stand in the entry near the
door of her dungeon, and cry while they
listened to her. It was only when she thought
of her father and Olybius, that her heart
grew sick-but she left all things to the will
of God.





THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


Meantime, Callias and Olybius had not
forgotten her. They hoped that after a few
solitary days in the dungeon, fear and suffer-
ing would make her yield. But they did not
know how strong the grace of God can make
a tender heart. At last her father could
bear his suspense no longer, and he got
permission to visit her.
Margarita was very glad to see him. She
expected that he would be angry with her,
and reproach her. But the Father's love
had triumphed over the Heathen's anger, and
when his pale daughter threw herself on his
bosom, he embraced her, and wept.


27






MARGARITA,


( Oh !" said he, what a place is this for my
Margarita-my tender, lovely child. This
foul dungeon-this damp and stifling air-
Oh! my child, that I was so proud of; that
was so happy, and so good, and so dutiful."
Poor Margarita thought she could have
borne her father's anger better than his sor-
row, and she tried to comfort him. But the
old man could not be comforted.
Oh !" said he, what will become of me
in my old age. I had but one child, and her
I have lost. I must sit at home all day long
by myself. No sweet voice to cheer me, no
daughter to wait on me, and watch me while


28






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


I sleep. If I grow lame and blind, I must
have slaves to help me about, for I shall have
no child. Strangers will tend my sick bed;
strange hands will close my dying eyes, and
there will be none to weep over the old
manl grave."
"Oh! God," said Margarita, weeping-
" have mercy! Strengthen me to bear this.
This is worse than the scourge or the stake."
When Callias saw his daughter's tears, he
hoped she would yield, but she was firm.
Well then," said he, will you pretend
not to be a Christian, that you may not be
taken from me ?"
4


29






MARGARITA,


"Father," said Margarita, "those who
disown their Lord on earth, he will disown
in Heaven."
At last, the poor old father was obliged to
leave the prison, and he went mourning to
Olybius, to tell him how ill he had succeeded.
Three days more, Margarita remained un-
visited in her dungeon. She saw nobody,
not even her jailor, for her scanty food was
put through an opening in the door On the
night after the third day, she was waked from
her sleep, and desired to rise, by some one
she could not see. She asked if the hour
of execution had arrived, but received no


30






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


answer. So she commended herself to God,
and stood still. They tied a thick bandage
over her eyes, and took hold of her arms to
lead her forth; for by this time, the damps
of the dungeon had so swelled and stiffened
her limbs, that she could scarcely walk with-
out help.
They led her out of the dungeon, through
long passages and up many stairs. At last
they opened a door, and Margarita felt the
wind blow softly on her face. Oh! how
sweet was that first breath of pure air to the
innocent prisoner. After what seemed to
her a long walk, her guides led her up a flight


31







MARGARITA,


of stone steps, and then into what she sup-
posed by the sound of their footsteps, to be
a large, lofty room. They placed her on a
seat, and left her.
Margarita sat still for some time, before
she ventured to uncover her eyes. The air
felt warm and sweet, as if filled with the
scent of fresh flowers ; she put out her hands,
and felt that she was sitting on a silken couch.
It was almost happiness to one just taken
from a dungeon, to lean on that soft couch,
and inhale that sweet air. While she sat
wondering what was to happen next, she
heard a strain of low music float round her.


32






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


She could refrain no longer; she lifted up
her hands and untied the bandage.
She found herself in a spacious saloon,
splendidly furnished, and lighted by alabaster
lamps, which shed a soft, gleaming lustre,
like moonlight. The rich curtains were
partly drawn back from the windows, and
she saw the starry sky beyond, and felt the
breeze coming from the dewy gardens below.
Garlands were twined round the pillars, in-
cense was burning in golden vases, and before
her stood a marble table, spread with fruits,
sweetmeats, and cakes, in golden dishes, and
rich wines in jewelled cups. All was splendid,






MARGARITA,


beautiful, and delicious, and while she sat
looking about her, the low sweet music,
continued to sound.
These are intended for temptations, no f
doubt;" thought Margarita. "God keep
me on my guard."
She heard some one approach. She looked
up and saw Olybius.
He addressed her with great respect, but
Margarita said Lord Prefect, do not mock
me. If my hour is come, command your
slaves to lead me forth to die."
SMargarita," said Olybius, give me your
hand." She gave him her hand, and he led






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


her to a window, and asked her to look out,
and tell him what she saw.
To the right," said Margarita, "I see
Apollo's temple with its snow-white pillars,
and the groves of Daphne. Beyond, I see
the stately towers of the city."
Now look to the left;" said Olybius--
what do you see there ?"
S" I see," said Margarita, "a piece of ground
fenced in, where dark forms, as of hurrying
myn, pass and repass. I see great piles of
wood, and strange instruments of iron. I
see a block, and a man standing beside it,


35






MARGARITA,


feeling the edge of a large axe, while another
man holds a torch."
"There then, Margarita," said Olybius,
"you see the fate you would prepare for
yourself-the axe and the burning torment.
Now look at what my love would prepare
for you. This palace to dwell in, these gar-
dens and groves for our pleasure. These
silken couches to rest on, these dainties
to refresh us. Look at yonder throne-my
throne-there, by my side, shall Margarita sit
the wife of great Olybius. All the provinces
of the East shall do you homage; your life
shall be one scene of royal luxury, and Oly-







THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


bius will love and cherish you always-his
own, only beloved Margarita. Now make
your choice."
"It is made;" said Margarita,-" to die."
Olybius began to reason with her, but she
stopped him, and said-" To-morrow night,
the Christian victims will have ceased to
suffer. Their bodies will be destroyed, but
their souls will be in Heaven. In a few
short years, Olybius, perhaps in a few short
days, you too must leave your kingly state,
and lie down in the dust. Our bodies alike
must perish. But the soul, the soul, Olybius
-what will become of that. Oh! if this


37







MARGARITA,


world were all, Olybius, how gladly would I /
accept your honouring love. But I dare not
wed the enemy of my Redeemer."
Olybius did not know what to say, and
Margarita went on.
"Roman I know you are brave. I know
your spirit pants for glory. There is a thirst
in your inmost soul, that earthly triumphs
cannot satisfy. I will tell you how to win
eternal happiness, and eternal glory too."
Olybius looked at her with wonder, for the
colour rose on her pale cheeks, and her eyes
sparkled, even more brightly than he had
seen them in her happiest days.


38






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


Dear Margarita," said he," can you tell
me how I can win an immortality that may
be shared with you."
"Yes," replied Margarita--"I can. Be-
lieve in Jesus Christ, and I will be your wife.
We will suffer and die together; and together
God will take us to that rest, prepared for
those who love their Saviour."
Much more Margarita said, to persuade
Olybius to become a Christian; but he would
not listen to her. At last, finding he could not
shake her determination to die, rather than
worship the idols, he went away in anger,
and sent her father to her. The old man


39







MARGARITA,


thought it impossible that she could withstand
the offers of Olybius, and he came in, full of
hope and joy congratulating himself that his
daughter would be Queen of the East-and
the suffering girl had to go over her dreadful
trial a second time, in undeceiving her father.
At last, she was led back to her dungeon.
The next morning, the Christians were to
be led in procession through the streets of
Antioch, to the Amphitheatre, where those
who refused to offer incense to the heathen
gods, were to die. Olybius was almost dis-
tracted at the thought of Margarita's danger.
He sat up all night, forming plans for her
.f


40






THE MARTYR OF ANTVOCH.


rescue, for he was determined to save her, at
all events. Macer, the Governor of the city,
was the friend of the Prefect. He knew
that the minds of the people were so excited
against the Christians, that any public at-
tempt to save one of their number, would
certainly occasion the ruin of Olybius, with-
out ensuring the safety of Margarita. He
took an opportunity to speak in private with
Olybius, and told him not to be uneasy; to
let Margarita be led forth with her friends,
and no doubt, that at the last moment, when
she saw the racks and burning piles, and
heard the lions roar, such a young and deli-


41






MARGARITA,


cate maiden could not hold out against such
terrors, and she would ask for pardon. Oly-
bius caught eagerly at this hope, and thanked
Macer for suggesting it.
The hour arrived, and all the inhabitants
of the city were abroad, to see the Christians
led to execution. They came forth, that
noble band! Aged men were there, and
stout soldiers. Tender mothers, and chil-
dren, too young to know the meaning of
what they saw. Pale, weak, and wasted
with long suffering, they were; but a holy
joy shone in their faces, and they sang a
hymn of praise as they walked along. The


42






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


rabble called them vile names as they passed,
struck them, and threw stones at them. They
replied only by praying for mercy on their
enemies, and patience for themselves-re-
joicing that they were counted worthy to
suffer for Christ's sake."
Was Margarita there ?" said George.
She was. Her jailor had taken away her
sackcloth gown, and in mockery gave her
wedding robes, and a garland such as the
noble maidens of Antioch wore on their mar-
riage day. They also brought the sacred
lyre, and left it in her dungeon. Margarita
quietly dressed herself in the wedding robes,


43






MARGARITA,


and when she came forth so richly clad, with
the flowers in her beautiful hair, and the
lyre, in her hands, the rudest of the mob held
their peace for a time, and looked at her
with admiration and pity. She was very
pale, her white arms were thin and wasted,
and the chains had left deep red marks upon
her slender wrists; but there was a patient
smile on her sweet face, and as she.walked
she played on the lyre, and sung the praises
of her Redeemer.
The procession paused before the throne
of Olybius, and he addressed the Christians
again, offering them pardon and freedom,


44







THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


on condition that they would burn incense
~before the idols They replied that they
could not sacrifice to Gods wrought by
men's hands.
"Fabius," said Olybius to the Bishop,
"accept o offers. Your old age should
teach you ;dom."
"My age makes me only mourn," replied
the Bishop, "that I have so little left of life,
to give to my Redeemer."
*' Diodotus," said the Prefect, brave sol-
dier, will you die in such ignoble warfare ?"
"Rather call it a nobler victory than
Roman ever won;" answered Diodotus.
5


45







46 MARGARITrk,

Calanthias, what do you say"---asked
the Prefect. -*
"I had thought," replied Calanthias,
"even in my flesh, to see the Lord come
down to avenge his bwn. But his will be
done. .I shall see him in H '
"Charinus ?"-said the Pre
"False Infidel !"--cried Charinus-" vile
heathen! we scorn you--we defy you. The
thunderbolts only wait our voice, to fall in
vengeance on your heads."
We will hear no more;" said the Pre-
fect. "Lead them to death."
Margarita saw her father sitting near






THE MAATYR OF ANTIOCH. 47

Olybius, and her heart yearned to her aged
*parent. She stretched'out her hand, and
burst into tears. Olybius rejoiced when he
saw those tears. He thought to himself-
"Macer was right. She will never hold
out;"-and he ordered the officers to lead
her also, away.
There was an awful silence. Olybius
leaned back on his seat, and listened ear-
nestly, but his heart beat so loud that he
could hear nothing else. Old Callias hid his
face, and wept.
Presently there was a gre$i. shout. Dio-
dotus had been thrown e lions. His







MARGARITA,


last words were-" Alas! poor heathens--
there is one fiercer than the lions-hunger-
ing for your souls."
"Calanthias died beneath the scourge,
and his last look was fixed smilingly on the
sky, as if he saw his Saviour, waiting there
to receive him.
The old Bishop and Charinus, were
chained to stakes, to be burned to death.
Fabius prayed for his murderers, and Chari-
nus abused them. The fires were lighted
round them-there was a pause-then rose
another loud shout-" One has sacrificed-
one has sacrificed!"


48







THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


"Oh! mother "--exclaimed George.
Oly bius and Callias started up-and a
man came running wildly towards them-
his hands and face scorched, and his half-
burnt clothes fluttering about him. It was
Charinus the boaster.
Foul wretch," said the Prefect--" what
means this ?"
"Foul wretch, indeed;" shrieked Chari-
nus. "I have denied my Saviour. The
blinding flames blew into my eyes-evil
spirits whispered soft sounds of water into
my ears-I could not bear the pain! I will


49







MARGARITA,


sacrifice to Apollo !"--and he ran howling
away.
"And Margarita ?" said Clara, sobbing.
She saw her friends die, and she looked up
to Heaven, and prayed for grace to die as
they died. They led her to the block, and
she knelt calmly down beside it, and crossed
her hands upon her bosom. The executioner
lifted the axe, but he could not strike her-
he stood trembling by her side. Just then
there was a cry among the crowd, that Cal-
lias was coming; and Margarita looked up
and said to the headsman-" Have pity on
me. Slay me before he comes, that my poor






THE MARTYR OF ANTIOCH.


father may not see me die." He could not
do it-he gave the axe to another; it rose-
it fell-and the fair head rolled bleeding on
the sand.
Macer brought the dreadful news to Oly-
bius. "This world's glory is over for me."
said the Prefect. "Vopiscus, take my office
if you will. No more power for me. Fatal
power! that has murdered all I love."
Callias turned away without speaking, and
went toward the city.
Callias, where are you going ?"-asked
one of the officers.
To the Christians;" replied the old man.


51






MARGARITA.


"To learn the faith in which my daughter
died, and follow her as quickly as I may."




O! mother,"-said Jane, "how shall we
thank God, that we do not live in such dread-
ful times ?"
By praying for those," replied her
mother, "who give up all earthly comforts,
and peril their lives daily, to carry the Word
of Salvation to the Heathen-and by striving
to perform faithfully, the safe and easy duties,
God has appointed for us."


52



































Happy were the Brothers while


at on Silver Pond.-p. 68.











THE SAIL BOAT.


HE pretty village of Bloomdale
consisted of a single street, at
the upper end of which stood the
elegant mansion of Mr. Warder. Two little
boys appeared on the piazza, looking
eagerly down the road.
"I wish papa would make haste !" said
one of the boys, stamping impatiently on
the floor.
53







THE SAIL BOAT.


Poor papa; you would not wish to hurry
him this warm afternoon, would you ?" said
his companion.
"And poor Grey," said a pretty little girl,
in a pink frock and black silk apron, who
now appeared at the open door. "You
would not wish papa to drive poor Grey too
fast, would you, Harold !"
"No," replied Harold, laughing. "I don't
want to hurry either of them, but I do wish
papa was come, I want to see the new toys."
But we are not to have them, you know,
unless we have obeyed mamma in every
thing since papa went away-and mamma


54







THE SAIL BOAT.


says she will leave it to our own consciences
to decide."
I am sure of my gift then," said Harold,
jumping joyously. Fred, what do you say?"
Frederick reddened and was silent.
Harold and Frederick were twins, and
bore great personal resemblance to each
other. But whereas Harold was blooming,
robust, and restlessly active, Frederick was
pale, delicate, and quiet. Their characters
differed as did their persons. Both were in-
telligent, affectionate, well-mannered chil-
ren; but Harold was bold, hasty, and candid;
Frederick was timid, slow, and irresolute.


55






56 THE SAIL BOAT.

Harold could not always restrain his temper,
but never dreamed of disguising the truth.
Frederick's timidity sometimes tempted
him to deceive. During a long and danger-
ous illness which afflicted Mrs. Warder, her
sons had been committed to the care of a
fond, but weak relation, whose alternate
severity and indulgence, fostered the charac-
teristic defects of both brothers. On Mrs.
Warder's recovery, the grieved parents
found tares fast choking the good seed they
had endeavoured to sow in the minds of
their boys; and with many prayers and
tears, they laboured to uproot them.







THE SAIL BOAT


A gig drawn by a handsome grey horse,
at last whirled up the road, and stopped at
Mr. Warder's door. We will pass over the
clamorous welcomes of the children, and
suppose Mr. Warder seated at the tea table
with his family.
Another cup, my dear ?" said Mrs.
Warder.
"No more, thank you;"-replied Mr.
Warder, pushing back his chair.
"And now, Clara' jump on papa's knee,
and you, boys, stand beside me. What ac-
count have you to give me of these three
days? What does mamma say you have


57






THE SAIL BOAT.


done and left undone, since I went away?
nay," putting his hand playfully on Harold's
mouth-" let the lady speak first, my boy."
6" Papa," said Clara, I have learned all
my English lessons every day, and said them
without missing one word. And I have
translated half a page of French, and
hemmed a handkerchief, and watered your
geraniums, and made myself as useful to
mamma as I could."
"Clara has been a very good girl, indeed;"
said the invalid mother.
"And you, Harold ?"
"Papa, I learnt all the lessons you set me


4


58







THE SAIL BOAT.


and two more, and have not wished to dis-
obey mamma in any thing." "(Now, Fred,
speak up." Frederick coloured and looked
timidly at his mother.
I believe I must come to the assistance
of Frederick's bashfulness;" said Mrs. War-
der. He has been very industrious, very
assiduous in attending on me, and perfectly
obedient."
I am very happy to hear that;" said the
glad father--" so bring the square box out
of the hall, boys, and we will explore its
treasures."
The eager boys soon deposited the box at
6


59







THE SAIL BOAT.


their father's feet, and waited anxiously while
he sought for the key.
"You could not look more impatient, if it
were the chest of the Merchant Abudah,"
said Clara, who had just been reading Tales
of the Genii.
The box was opened. First came forth
a portable writing-case. Its silver-topped
glasses, neatly made pens, variegated seal-
ing-wax, and transparent wafers, were all
complete, all beautiful. The delighted Clara
scarcely knew whether to kiss the gift or the
giver first, when it was put into her hand.
"Oh thank you, thank you, papa. Look,


60







THE SAIL BOAT.


mamma, did you ever see any thing so
pretty ? Oh! what nice letters I shall write
to my cousin Sarah."
Next appeared some books. The New
Children's Friend was presented to Frede-
rick. Perils of the Sea became the property
of Harold, and Miss Leslie's admirable At-
lantic Tales made Clara's happiness com-
plete. But there is some thing else, papa;"
said Harold, peering into the box.
"Gently, my boy, gently;" said Mr. War-
der, stopping Harold's impatient hand. "I
will take it out."
Carefully Mr. Warder lifted out the mys-


61







THE SAIL BOAT.


terious parcel-slowly he took off its various
envelopes-the children, meanwhile, gazing
4" with wonder-waiting eyes."
I think I know what it is;" whispered
Harold. Yes, I am right!"--as the last
cover was taken off, and Mr Warder held
up a beautiful miniature Sail-Boat. Frede-
rick uttered an exclamation. Harold jumped
up, and clapped his hands; and Clara almost
let fall her writing-case.
You were wishing for a toy boat to sail
on Silver Pond. I have great pleasure in
giving you this beautiful vessel, since you
have deserved it. You must be joint owners."


62







THE SAIL BOAT.


"Frederick! my son!" exclaimed Mrs.
Warder, in terror, "what is the matter ?-
are you sick ?-Mr. Warder, he is certainly
very sick !"
The ashy paleness which had alarmed the
tender mother, changed to burning crimson.
Frederick shrank from the supporting hand
of his father.
Papa, mamma," said he, trembling very
much, and evidently nerving himself to the
effort with great difficulty; I-I am not
sick-but-please to hear me papa. Take
back your gifts. I do not deserve them-
but I won't deceive you-I won't."


63







THE SAIL BOAT.


Mrs. Warder leaned back, pale and
trembling, on the sofa. Clara and Harold
stood in mute astonishment. Mr. Warder
drew the agitated child towards him
"Explain yourself, my son; what does all
this mean ?
Papa, I can't take your gifts. I have
been very naughty. I have disobeyed mam-
ma. I have done great mischief. I have
broken the curious vase Captain Baldwin
sent you."
Mr. Warder looked at his wife.
The vase is certainly broken, my dear;
but Hannah told me Rover had done it."


64







THE SAIL BOAT.


"No mamma, poor Rover did not do it.
You told me not to go into papa's study
while he was away, but yesterday I went in,
just to get the book of plates that lay on the
table, and Rover followed me in, and I was
looking at the vase, and I just took it up in
my hand, and I thought I heard somebody
coming, and went to put it down again
quick, and it slipped, and fell to the floor;
and I was so frightened when I saw it all in
pieces, that I ran out of the room and shut
Rover in; and when Hannah went to fix the
room, she saw the broken vase, and Rover
laying beside it, and she thought he did it.


65






THE SAIL BOAT.


I was afraid to tell-but oh! papa, I have
been so unhappy ever since. I could not
sleep all last night for thinking about it-
and I remembered what you said to me last
week about-' Thou God seest me;' and I
wanted to tell, but somehow I could not-
and I put it off, and put it off--but when you
seemed so pleased with me, I felt so mean, I
could not bear it. Take back the book,
papa," continued Frederick, bursting into
tears-" and give the boat all to Harold, for
I don't deserve it-but I think I will never,
never try to deceive any more."
By God's help, my son, I trust you never


66







THE SAIL BOAT.


will;" said the father, as with glistening eyes
he embraced his boy. I freely forgive you
.he destruction of my vase. I would lose
fifty vases, rather than have my son guilty
of a falsehood. Go ask your dear mother
to forgive your disobedience of her orders."
The little penitent was quickly pardoned,
and received the kiss of peace.
"Now, my son," said Mr. Warder, I
know your timid disposition. I know how
hard it must have been for you to come
forward with an honest confession, when
concealment was so easy. You have sur-
mounted a strong temptation. I rejoice in


67






68 THE SAIL BOAT.

this proof of your increasing sense of dtty.
May God strengthen you in its fulfilment!
Take the boat," continued Mr. Warder,
after a short pause--" and when you are
again tempted to an act of deceit, remember
the SAIL BOAT."
Happy were the brothers while sailing
their boat on Silver Pond; but far happier
were the affectionate parents who rejoiced
over the imDrovement of their children.










THE FIRE.


FOUNDED ON FACT.


OT only in the" tented field,"
Are deeds of valour done;
Not only on a bloody deck,
Are wreaths of glory won.
A fairer crown, a purer fame,
The gallant heart repay,
Whose courage wears compassion's form,
And treads in duty's way.
'Twas night-but night in terror roused,
Wild shrieks and maddening cries;
Alarm bells rang, and crimson flames
Shot fiercely to the skies.
69






THE FIRE.


The ready streams were poured around,
And Hope had smiled on' Fear,
When e'en above the tumult wild,
A woman's shriek they hear!

" My child! my child !"-in slumber wrapt
Th' unconscious infant lay;
Destruction's fiery arms were flung
Around their helpless prey.
Again that shriek-all stand aghast-
The flames still towering higher;
Who dares to tread that furnace dread,
Ascends his funeral pyre.

"My child! my child !"-poor mother, who
Can to thy grief reply ?
She shrieks again-one ear has heard,
One heart has felt the cry.


70







THE TpIRE. 71

Springs from the crowd a warrior form-
As in revengeful wrath
The eddying flame curls wildly round,
And veils his awful path.
A pause-a crash-a fiercer gush--
Alas! he dies in vain;-
Light bounding through the blazing mass-
He lives! he comes again I
He comes!-what treasure holds he thus
To his brave bosom pressed ?-
The hero lays a sleeping child
Upon its mother's breast.













WISHES.


JiLIUS.

WISH I were a comet
To sparkle in the sky,
And have the looks of all the world
Admiring me on high.

EMILY.

I'd rather be a taper,
To cheer the winter night;
And shine on happy faces,
Rejoicing in my light.
72








WISHES.


JULIUS.

I wish I were Niagara,
Adown the rocks to roar;
And have my glorious waters
With rainbows crested o'er.

EMILY.

I'd rather he a streamlet,
To ripple through the wood,
And cherish the sweet flowers,
That deck my solitude.

TULIUS.

I wish 1 were an oak tree,
To lift my lofty form
Against the winds of winter,
And battle with the storm.


73











































"Please miss, will you let me walk under your umbrella ?"-p. 20O


J94c h~*\ ''^^^^^^^^^-------- ME<<.- n -- ----* w--rr uj n *In


LIC^^^//^^^A^S^^^^^SSV ^^^WW^W<^^^^^WV^ ^^^^^^^ye









HARRIET BUTLER,

OR


HERE THERE IS
AND


A WILL THERE IS A WAY,
OTHER TALES


BY


MRS. ANNA BACHE.
Author of the "Fire-Screen," "Little Clara," "Clara's Amusements,*
"'Sybils' Cave," &c &c.


SECdID EDITION.



PHILADELPHIA.
JAMES K. SIMON, 141 S. FIFTH STREET.
1851.

















CONTENTS.


HARRIET BUTLER *
THE TRANSLATION .
SELFISHNEss REPROVED *
THE WOLF .
ALDEN AND THE LADY
THF SAILOR Boy's FIAREWEL


PAGo




72

* 76
78









HARRIET BUTLER


OR
WHERE THERE IS A WILL THERE IS A WAY.

THE DESIRE TO DO GOOD.



ler, I wish I was grown up, and
very rich."
"As times go," said her mother, smiling,
" I think you are pretty well off as you are.
Don't you think so?"
"Oh! yes, mother. I know I am very
well off, indeed. It was not of myself I
was thinking."






HARRIET BUTLER.


What were you thinking of, then ?"
"Why m'am, I was thinking that in
almost every book I read, there is something
said about being useful; and I often hear
you and father say that there is no pleasure
like that of doing good. Now I should like
to be able to do good, and to be useful."
You did good yesterday, when you saved
your grapes, and carried them to Sarah
Thompson's sick child; and you are useful
to me now, while you are stitching that
wristband."
"Yes, ma'am; but these are such little
things."


6




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