• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Resurrection of Lazarus
 The two altars : in six parts
 Faith, hope and charity, or, The...
 The alphabet class : written for...
 Orders and symbols
 Songs and choruses for May-Day...
 Heathen and Christian worship
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: child's offering, or, Flowers for all seasons
Title: The child's offering, or, Flowers for all seasons
CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001826/00001
 Material Information
Title: The child's offering, or, Flowers for all seasons consisting of hymns, oratorios, dialogues, colloquys, and single pieces for the use of Sabbath schools
Alternate Title: Flowers for all seasons
Resurrection of Lazarus
Two altars in six parts
Songs and choruses for May-Day exhibition
Heathen and Christian worship
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : ill., music ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Usher, James M ( James Madison ), 1814-1891 ( Printer )
Thomas, Abel C ( Abel Charles ), 1807-1880
Quinby, G. W ( George Washington ), 1810-1884
Universalist Sabbath School Depository ( Publisher )
Publisher: J.M. Usher
Universalist S.S. Depository
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1850
 Subjects
Subject: Sunday school literature   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children's plays   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1850   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Hymns -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1850
Genre: Children's poetry   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Hymns   ( rbgenr )
 Notes
General Note: A collection of works originally published by J.M. Usher in 1848 and reissued by him in 1850 as Child's offering, some with original t.p.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement: <2> p. at end.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001826
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA1966
notis - ALG4324
oclc - 20677808
alephbibnum - 002224065

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Resurrection of Lazarus
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
    The two altars : in six parts
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
        Page B-9
        Page B-10
        Page B-11
        Page B-12
        Page B-13
        Page B-14
        Page B-15
        Page B-16
    Faith, hope and charity, or, The pilgrim's rest : an entertainment for Sabbath school exhibitions
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
        Page C-4
        Page C-5
        Page C-6
        Page C-7
        Page C-8
        Page C-9
        Page C-10
        Page C-11
        Page C-12
        Page C-13
        Page C-14
        Page C-15
        Page C-16
        Page C-17
        Page C-18
    The alphabet class : written for school exhibitions
        Page D
        Page D-i
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
        Page D-4
        Page D-5
        Page D-6
        Page D-7
        Page D-8
        Page D-9
    Orders and symbols
        Page E-1
        Page E-2
        Page E-3
        Page E-4
        Page E-5
    Songs and choruses for May-Day exhibition
        Page F-1
        Page F-2
        Page F-3
        Page F-4
        Page F-5
        Page F-6
        Page F-7
        Page F-8
        Page F-9
        Page F-10
    Heathen and Christian worship
        Page G-1
        Page G-2
        Page G-3
        Page G-4
        Page G-5
        Page G-6
        Page G-7
        Page G-8
    Advertising
        Page G-9
        Page G-10
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
    Spine
        Spine
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t'







THE


CHILD'S OFFERING;

OR,

FLOWERS FOR ALL SEASONS:


CONSISTING OF

IIYNS, ORATORIOS, DIALOGUES, COLIOQUYS,

AND

SINGLE PIECES;

FOR

THE USE OF SABBATH SCHOOLS.







BOSTON:


PUBLISHED


BY


J. M. USHER


Universalist S. S. Depository, 37 Cornhill.


1850.












RESURRECTION OF LAZARUS.


SCENE.,-n the house of Joanna, in the town of Bethany
Enter Susan, on her return from the house of Martha
and Mary.
Joannaa Welcome, Susan; happy am I to see
thee; for thy society to me is always pleasant
and profitable; thy lips always speak of mercy,
and kindness is thy constant companion.
Susan. Nay, my sister; thy words savor too
much of flattery; for I perceive such imperfec-
tion in my best efforts, when viewed in the light
of our holy law, that deep self-abasement becomes
me more than the encomiums of one of Judah's
daughters.
J. I perceive an unusual solemnity in thy
countenance, and thy voice betrays the emotion
of a troubled heart; tell me, hath any calamity
befallen thee or any of thy kindred ?
S. Thou hast heard, I doubt not, of the be-
reavement which has befallen our sisters Martha
and Mary. Lazarus, their only brother, sleepeth
with his fathers. And although many of the
chief of thq Jews have sought to comfort them,
still their grief is deep, and their lamentations
unsubdued.
J. I had heard, and it is well thou hast been
there; they are worthy of our sympathy; and






2

thou, above all thy kindred, art suitable to act
the part of a comforter.
S. Would that they might find a comforter!
But there is one thing which renders them incon-
solable; the absence of their friend, whom they
believe to be the great Prophet of Israel. They
often say, If he had been here their brother had
not died."
J. Is it possible ? Do they think that the
Nazarene could have saved the life of their
brother ? It is the mighty God of Jacob only
that giveth life and health to man.
S. True, my sister, but thou hast doubtless
heard of the mighty works wrought by him of
late: how he made the blind to see; the lame
to walk; and the dumb to sing; the lepers, also,
have been cleansed; and even the dead restored
to life. Are not these the works spoken of by
our prophets, as being performed by our own
Messiah ?
J. True, they are; but art thou sure that
these miracles are real ? Are they not the work
of an impostor ? Have any of the Rulers be-
lieved on him ?
S. Whether the rulers have believed on him
or not, I cannot say; but it seems to me that
imposition is impossible. Most of the works
were wrought in the presence of multitudes of
our people, and under such circumstances as to
forbid the thought of imposition. Remember the
thousands in the wilderness fed by his hand;
they were so fully convinced, that they thought
to proclaim him king. And it was only the
other day, as he entered the city of Nain, he met









a procession of mourners bearing the body of a
lovely youth to the resting place of his fathers,
when he was moved with compassion, for the
dead was an only son, and his mother a widow.
Then he commanded the bearers to stand still;
and when all had gathered round to inquire
what it meant, he touched the bier and said,
" Young man, arise !" and he arose and returned
with his mother. Surely there could be no
imposition.
J. These things are indeed wonderful, and
fulfil the predictions of our prophets; perhaps it
was these which led the sisters to believe on
him. I would that he had been here; they
would at least have had his counsel, and per-
haps he would have healed their brother. Does
any one know whither he has gone ?
[Enter Esther, toith a crown of powers. Esther's
salutation-]
My mother!
J. Come hither, my daughter, thou hast done
well to come; but tell me why thou hast left
thy sisters, and returned alone ? Do the society
of age, and the words of experience, have greater
attraction for thee than the company of youth
and the mirth of innocence ?
E. Thy society, and the lessons of virtue and
experience, are always precious; but it was not
these that led me at this time to leave the com-
pany of my sisters; but while sitting beneath
the shade of those venerable trees at the entrance
of our village, making this crown of flowers,
gathered near the foot of Mount Olivet, there
came from the way of the wilderness a company







4

of men. They sat down near to us, and ap-
peared to be very sorrowful; and while they
communed together, Martha (the sister of him
who died the other day) came, and falling down
at the feet of one who seemed chief, said, "Lord,
if thou hadst been here my brother had not
died." I came to ask if thou canst tell me what
this salutation could mean.
J. Strange salutation, truly! But, what did
the stranger say in reply ?
E. He took her gently by the hand, and lifted
her up; then, with a look of peculiar sweetness,
he said, t Thy brother shall rise again."
S. Stranger still, the words by which he com-
forted her. What more didst thou hear ?
E. Martha said, I know that he shall rise
again at the resurrection of the last day." Then,
(and oh, I shall never forget the manner in which
he spoke,) he said, I am the resurrection and
the life; he that believeth on me, though he
were dead, yet shall he live. Believest thou
this ?"
J. What answer did she make ?
E. She said, Yea, Lord, I believe thou art
the Christ, the Son of God, who should come
into the world."
J. to S. It must be the Prophet of Nazareth!
we shall see now if he will raise the dead.
(To E.) Did Martha tarry with the strangers ?
E. Nay. The Prophet inquired for her sis-
ter, and she has gone to call her.
S. How kind in him to hasten to the house
of mourning It becometh him, for the prophet
said, He shall bind up the broken-hearted, and




NW.I


5

comfort all that mourn." And how gracious the
words which he spake! Thy brother shall
rise again." But, tell me, my daughter, where
did thy sisters tarry ?
E. I left them beneath the palm trees, just as
thou interest the village. They were assorting
their flowers, and my brother and the brother of
Rebecca were with them.
S. Happy hours, spent by Judah's sons and
daughters, in gathering flowers to deck the brow
of youth and beauty! May your spirits bloom
in the Eden of God! But, here they come.
[Enter Jonathan, Ruth, Rebecca, Sarah, and
Josiah, with flowers.]
Jonathan. Hosanna! hosanna! The great
Prophet of Israel has come !
Joanna. Hush, my son; be not hasty to utter
with thy lips what may not be true. It is not
for one of thy years to judge of him who shall
reign in Judah upon the throne of our father
David.
Ruth. But, my mother, was it ever known in
Israel that any one could raise the dead ?
Sarah. Oh, happy sisters now they weep no
more. Their brother is restored to life !
Rebecca. I saw them, when Martha hung upon
his neck, and Mary kissed his feet.
Josiah. Yea, and many of the Jews wept for
joy; and some said, When Messias cometh,
will he do greater works than this man do-
eth ?"
Susan. (Devoutly.) "How wonderful are thy
works, 0 Lord of Hosts!"
J. Hearken, children; we would know the par-
1#







6

ticulars of this wonderful event which hath so
rejoiced you all. Tell us what this meaneth.
Jonathan. We were all sitting under the palm
trees near the entrance of the village, arranging
the flowers we had gathered, and making these
wreaths for our sisters, when there came near a
company of men. They must have journeyed
far, for they seemed weary and sad. They soon
attracted the notice of all who came in or went
out. I think they must have been known, al-
though they appeared to be strangers.
J. Were they Jews or foreigners?
Ruth. I think they must be Jews; they wore
our attire, and spoke our language. One of
them, in particular, attracted attention. He was
rather delicate, and of middling stature ; le wore
his hair after the manner of the Nazarenes; his
face was perfectly smooth, without spot or wrin-
kle. In his countenance there was such a mix-
ture of dignity and sweetness as to command both
reverence and love. He often wept when he
spoke, and in his manner there was both ease
and beauty. I was sure he was no ordinary man.
Rebecca. That is just as I thought. Oh, he
was so lovely!
J. Well, what did they do ?
Josiah. When a large company were come toe
gether, then came Martha and Mary. They
came in haste, and went directly to the Master,
and, falling down at his feet, said, Lord, if thou
hadst been here my brother had not died." And
when he saw them weeping, and the Jews also
weeping who came with them, he seemed much
affected.









Sarah. Yea, mother, he wept; and then lifted
them up, and said, Where have ye laid him ?"
and they said, Come and see."
S. Did he go?
Sarah. He did, and the Jews went also; and
the children ran before, to get near and see what
he would do.
Josiah. One of the Jews said to the men that
came with him, Do you. think he will restore
him to life ? and another, Could not this man,
who opened the eyes of the blind, have caused
that Lazarus had not died ?" and others, when
they saw him weeping, said," See how he loved
him !"
J. What happened at the tomb? We are im-
patient to know.
Jonathan. When they came to the tomb, he
said to them that stood by, Roll away the stone."
But Martha said, Nay, my Lord; it is not fit;
it is four days since he died." But he, turning
to her, replied, Said I not unto thee, If thou
, canst believe, thou shalt see the glory of God ?"
By this time the sepulchre was opened, and there
lay the body of Lazarus, cold in death. And
when they saw him, all wept aloud; but the
Master lifted up his eyes as if in prayer, and his
face shone, like as we have read of Moses, when
he came down from the mount of Sinai.
J. Did he descend into the tomb and lift him
up ? or what did he do ?
Jonathan. Nay; but lifting up his hand, as in
token of authority, he 'said with a loud voice,
Lazarus, come forth! Instantly we saw him
breathe, and then he sat up; for a moment all


r







8

was silent amazement; then one of the elders
said, "It was never so seen in Israel." And in
a moment the sisters clasped him in their arms.
Josiah. Then the Prophet commanded to loose
him and let him go; and when the bandages
were taken off, he looked around with astonish-
ment upon the multitude, and then fell down at
the Master's feet and worshipped him.
S. What said the Jews then ?
Sarah. Some said, Truly this is the Christ,
the Son of God, that was to come;" others seemed
displeased, and hanging down their heads, went
away; but most of the people, with the children,
rejoiced greatly, and some shouted Hosanna to
the King of Israel! Hosanna in the highest! "
E. Oh, mother, how glad I am! Shall we not
sing to our Messias? for surely the Lord hath
fulfilled his promise made to our fathers by the
prophets.
J. It is meet that all voices should be raised,
both young men and maidens, old men and chil-
dren; yea, let everything that hath breath praise a
the Lord; for he hath raised up a horn of sal
vation in the house of our father David.
(Aa sing.)
O THOU, by whom we come to God,
The Life, the Truth, the Way;
The path of prayer thyself hast trod :
Lord, teach us how to pray.








THE


TWO


ALTARS


IN SIX PARTS.











BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY JAMES M. USHER,
Universalist Sabbath School Depositry, 37 Cornhill.
1848.











Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1848, by
JAMES M.. USHER,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.


DIRECTIONS FOR SINGING THE FOLLOW-
ING DESCRIPTIVE PIECE.
THAT this piece may be well understood, and pro-
duce a good effect, there should be two altars upon the
stage, one near the centre, and one near the end. The
altar in the centre should have upon it this inscription:
TO ALL THE GODS."
On the other should appear the words,
TO THE LIVING GOD."
Beside the altar in the centre the Priestess should
stand, and behind should be a curtain hiding the Oracle
from view; it should be so fixed that it can be easily
drawn aside. The worshipers are represented as
listening to the voice of the Oracle as to the voice of
the gods, and should kneel whenever her voice is
heard. The Priestess should be a good singer, her
dress should be white, and she should wear a long
white veil fastened about the head and thrown back so
as to hang down upon her shoulders.
Each group of worshipers should number four, if
enough good singers can be found in the school, and
should bear in little baskets appropriate offerings of
Flowers, Fruits, Nuts and Grain. They should face
the audience, if possible, while on the stage. The
directions in the piece for kneeling should be strictly
regarded. Choruses sung with great spirit.







THE TWO ALTARS. 7

Part Third.
SONG OF POMONA'S WORSHIPERS.
Ala- The May Queen."
Can you tells us, gracious Priestess,
Where Pomona's altar stands ?
We bear for her an offering,
Within these feeble hands;
We are weary with our journey now,
And willingly would we stay,
But we would be true to our gods ever,
So, Priestess, inform us the way.

RESPONSE OF THE PRIESTESS.
AIm-" 0 come, come atway).
0 bless'd be the power
That led you to this altar;
You here shall rest, and here be blest,
On this happy hour.
Pomona meets her votaries here,
Receives their gifts and hears their prayer;
0 give your offering rare,
On this happy hour.

POMONA'S WORSHIPERS.
A.R-" The May Quern."
We have heard thy word with gladness,
And thy promise brings good cheer;
Pomona 's great among the gods,
Her goodness guided us here;
So now we 'll pay the offering due,
Then at this shrine we'll bow,
For we would be true to the gods, ever,
And true to our sacred vow.








THE TWO ALTARS.


We have come to pray Pomona
For her blessing on the year,
For Winter has killed our choicest trees,
Our orchards look barren and drear;
O breathe upon the withering root,
And quicken the dying bough,
For we would bring fruit to the gods, eve
Rich fruits, as we offer now.


/


n -


ANSWER OF THE ORACLE.
Ai -" I Sweet Home."I


[Worshipers kneel,]
Rich showers and bright sunshine the goddess
will give-
The withering fruit-tree new life shall receive;
Pomona has promised a bountiful year;
Arise, sing her praises, and banish your fear.


WORSHIPERS' SONG OF PRAISE TO POMONA.
AIR-" Sparkling and Bright."
(Rising.J
Anthems of praise we will ever raise,
The goddess of fruits addressing;
She has heard our prayer, she will crown the
year
With the richest of all her blessings.
[Chorus- in which Flora's worshipers and the Priestess join.
Then loud prolong the sacred song,
We will keep the chorus ringing,
Till more shall bring their offering,
And join with us in singing.
[Worshipers give place for others.-







THE TWO ALTARS.


Part Fourth.
SONG OF FERONIA'S WORSHIPERS.
Axa- "Rose of Lucerne."
We rose at early dawn,
Dull slumber resisting,
And o'er the dewy lawn
We quickly were hastening;
And ere the sun arose o'er the summit of the
mountains,
We gathered for Feronia the offerings we bring;
Feronia! Feronia!
To the altar of Feronia these offerings we bring.

Here are nuts of every kind,
We have sought them with pleasure;
We pray that we may find
In Autumn our treasure;
O crown the nutter's harvest with a welcome
abundance,
And we will bring the first fruits, an offering to
thee,
Feronia! Feronia!
And we will bring the first fruits, an offering t0
thee.

RESPONSE OF THE PRIESTESS.
Am 0 come, come away.
Feronia is near,
Her arms are on the altar;
Your gifts in love she will approve,
So banish your fear,
And bow before this altar fair;








10 THE TWO ALTARS.

The Oracle will then declare
What blessings you shall share
In this happy year.


ANSWER OF THE ORACLE.
AIR -"Sweet Home."
[Worshipers kneel.)
The band at the altar Feronia approves,
And towards them, in kindness, her sceptre she
moves;
The nutters shall sing, when the Autumn is
come,
A song with the fruiters, of sweet Harvest
Home."


WORSHIPERS' SONG OF PRAISE TO FERONIA.
An" "Sparkling and Bright."
[Rising.]
Gaily we '1l sing, while our nuts we bring,
To increase Feronia's treasure;
We will sing her praise in the sweetest lays -
We desire no greater pleasure.
[Chorus in which the Priestess and other worshipers ioin.1
Then loud prolong the cheerful song,
We will keep the chorus ringing,
Till more shall bring their offering,
And join with us in singing.


Worshipers give place for another group.]








THE TWO ALTARS. 11


Part Fifth.
SONG OF CERES' WORSHIPERS.
AIa-" Orphan Ballad Singers."
0 weary, weary are our feet,
And long has been the weary way;
0 where is Ceres' mercy-seat,
The altar where her votaries pray?
We cannot long our course pursue,
We soon must lay these offerings down;
O tell us, Priestess, tell us true,
Where, where is Ceres' altar found ?

RESPONSE OF THE PRIESTESS.
AIR "0 come, come away."
Your trials are o'er -
You see, upon this altar,
The cheering words, To all the gods;"
0 wander no more,
For Ceres meets her votaries here
With blessings rich, their hearts to cheer;
Dismiss your trembling fear--
Great Ceres adore!

CERES' WORSHIPERS.
AIR "Orphan Ballad Singers."
0 weary, weary are our feet,
And faint and weary is our way;
We 've begged our bread from street to street,
As hither we have come to pray;








12 THE TWO ALTARS.

Our homes by famine are oppressed,
Our friends are hurried to the grave;
We bring thee all which we possessed;
0 save us, gracious Ceres, save.

ANSWER OF THE ORACLE.
AIR "Sweet Horne."
[Worshipers kneel.]
Great Ceres now hastens the needy to bless,
And famine no more shall the orphan oppress;
The goddess will spread, with a liberal hand,
The great harvest-table all over the land.

WORSHIPERS' SONG OF PRAISE TO CERES.
AIa "Sparkling and Bright."
[Rising.]
Ceres, divine! we are ever thine;
Farewell to fear and sorrow;
Though clouds to-day o'erspread our way,
We shall have a bright to-morrow.
[Priestess and other worshipers join the chorus.]
Then loud prolong the cheerful song,
We will keep the chorus ringing,
Till all shall bring their offering,
And join with us in singing.


Part Sixth.
(During the singing of the last chorus, two Christiana enter and knee
at their altar. They sing while kneeling.]
CHRISTIANS' SONG OF ADORATION.
Ai-" The Watcher."
To thee, Eternal Father, Creator, God and Friend,
To thee, before this altar, in gratitude we bend;







THE TWO ALTARS.


Thou


art of


every


clime,
Its beauty, life,
divine


Thou

Receive


season,


perfection,


art, and we, 1
overflowing hand
e the golden har
land.


thy


in


every


peace,


children,


rvest, the


land and


plenty all


from thine


fruits of


every


miL


N 1 A


hnou art, u uoad we pra
and we are blest;
No other God beside Thee


ise thee. Thou


can give


art,


our spirits


rest;
No other God can keep us from danger and from
fear;
No other God can love us, or hear and answer


prayer.
Thou art and we adore Thee.


nations blest-
O love us still, we pray
enly rest.


Thou hast all


Thee, and give us heav-

ise.J


REPROOF AND INVITATION
PRESTESS.
AIR "O come, come away."


OF THE


0 why thus aside!
Why spurn this sacred altar!
The gods will frown their vengeance down;
Thy prayers they deride.
0 turn unto this altar now,
And with rich offerings pay thy vow;
O come, or vengeance now
Shall humble your pride.


13


/\


Ll







14 THE TWO ALTARS.

REPLY OF THE CHRISTIANS.
AIR- The Rose that all are praising "
The gods can never harm us;
There is no God save one;
He makes the worlds above us
In endless circles run;
He forms the light, he gives the rain -
With golden harvest crowns the plain;
He is Ceres and Pomona,
He is Flora and Feronia,
He is all the Gods in one.
He is God of every nation;
He dwells in every land,
He holds the vast creation
In his Almighty hand;
He is our Father and our Friend;
His love for us will never end
He is Ceres and Pomona,
He is Flora and Feronia,
He is all the Gods in one.


ARGUMENT OF THE PRIESTESS.
Am- "Eden of Love."
0 why do you come with fair words to deceive us ?
0 why would you lead us by falsehood astray ?
We have heard from our gods, and we know
they are near us,
They have answered the prayers we have
offered to-day;


* Hymns of Zion.







THE TWO ALTARS.


They have answered in love, by th
saying,
"We come with our blessings, no
laying,
To crown all who bring their rich
obeying
The call we have made, Crown
to-day.'"


eir Oracle,

longer de-

treasures,

our altars


CHRISTIANS' REPLY AND TRIUMPH.
AI -"The Rose that all are praising."
Thou long hast been deceiving,
Thou long hast been deceived;
Thou art too much believing,
Thou hast too much believed.
The Oracle, in which you trust,
Is, like yourself, a child of dust;
O see her guilt unbounded
(Christians draw the curtain and expose the Oracle.]
Your worship is confounded;
O let this truth be sounded,
The Lord is God alone.

WORSHIPERS' RENUNCIATION AND AVOWAL
Am The Rose that all are praising."
[Turning to the Priestess and Oracle.1
Adieu, ye false deceivers,
A long and last adieu;
We are no more believers
In gods proclaimed by you.
Around the Christians' altar now,
Before the living God we'll bow;
To Him present our offering,
And trust him for his blessing;


16








15 THE TWO ALTARS.

Aud shout, his name addressing,
The Lord is God alone !
rWhile singing the last verse, the worshipers should take their ofbr.
ings from the Priestess' altar, and, kneeling to the Christians altar,
reach them forth, aa if in the act of presenting them, and thus siq
the last four lines.]
CHRISTIANS' INSTRUCTION.
AMa-" The Watcher."
The Lord requires the offering of pure and con-
trite hearts;
To all who bring this treasure, He saving grace
imparts;
He asks not gold or silver, not flowers or fruits
most rare,
But bring him virtue's treasure, and he will hear
your prayer.
His Oracle will answer, within the soul's pure
shrine,
And every hour of worship will bring you joys
divine;
Then bow, thou false deceiver --deluded Priest-
ess, bow, [They kneel.]
Before the Christians' altar, and pay to God
your vow.

SONG OF UNITED PRAISE.
AI "'Sparkling and Bright."
Anthems of praise we will join to raise,
The Christians' God addressing;
With his heavenly rays he has cheered our ways,
He is author of every blessing.
EChorua to be repeated]
Then loud prolong the sacred song;
We will keep the chorus ringng,
Until a universe shall come,
And join with us in singing.








FAITH, HOPE AND CHARITY;


OR,


THE


PILGRIM'S


REST


AN


ENTERTAINMENT

FOR

SABBATH SCHOOL EXHIBITIONS.


BY G.


W. QUINBY.


BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY JAMES M. USHER, CORNHILL.
1848.












DESCRIPTION.

THE design of the following piece is to rep-
resent the condition of one who had lived for
sensual enjoyment alone, without spending a
thought on the principles of religion, the wants
of the soul, or that peace and joy which Chris-
tian Faith, and Hope, and Love, are calculated
to awaken in the heart when sincerely received
and warmly cherished. It also brings out the
offices of these Graces, and presents the happy
change produced in the mind and feelings of
such a person when blessed with a true Chris-
tian conversion. The chief beauty of the piece
consists in its simplicity, and the consequent
readiness with which its design is conceived and
comprehended. Let all who use it be careful
to attend to the following description of
ARRANGEMENT.
Let as many of the school, of both sexes, as the
stage will well accommodate, to leave room for the
principal parts, (ten, twenty, thirty or forty, more
or less,) be placed upon the stage in the form of a
new moon. The outer row will be a semi-cir-
cle. The largest scholars should be in the mid-
die, running off to the smallest at the extremi-
ties. The front row should all be small children.
Between this and the outer row, in the centre,
they will stand some five or six deep, and the









larger should be in the rear, so the faces of the
whole may be een, one above another, by the
audience. And if those in the rear could be
elevated a little, so much the better for the effect;
and if they could all be decorated with garlands
of flowers it would add to the beauty of the
scene. In the centre let one of the largest female
speakers stand, holding a banner, upon which is
inscribed, in distinct letters,
BAND OF HAPPY CHRISTIANS.
Directly in front of this company of Christians
a miss will be seated, fifteen or sixteen years of
age, representing a PILGRIM OF EARTH, dressed
plainly in white, if you please, but with a black
lace veil over her head and face, indicative of an
unsettled and distressed state of mind, with her
handkerchief at her eyes, as if weeping. By
her side, and at a little distance from her, stands
her little daughter,* who seems thoughtful and
interested in her mother, though the latter gives
no heed to the child. The little girl should be
six or seven years of age, dressed plainly, but
prettily, with a wreath on her head, and flowers
in her hand. At a distance from this company,
and concealed as much as possible from the audi-
ence, are three girls, about twelve years of age,
corresponding with each other in size and appear-
ance as much as possible, dressed in pure white,
with beautiful flowing head dresses, surmounted
with a sort of golden crown; they are to repre-
sent FAITH, HOPE and CHARITY, each bearing a

She should be a good speaker.







4

white banner,* on which is inscribed, in distinct
letters, the name of the office whiP the bearer is
designed to represent. These girls should be
good singers, with distinct enunciation. When
all has been thus arranged, the Pilgrim of
earth," who should know how to speak with
effect, sits in the position I have described for a
minute or two, (during which time there should
be a perfect stillness on the part of the Band of
Christians,) when she arises, and with a clear
tone, and touching cadence, pronounces the fol-
lowing
SOLILOQUY.
This world hath many sorrows. How sad and
lonely is my heart! Tears are my meat by
night and by day! Oh, where shall I find rest
for my weary spirit? I have sought it in the
giddy fascinations of pleasure-in the gratifica-
tion of sinful indulgences--in the luxuries of
wealth in the smile of flattery in the charms
of friendship; but, alas! alas! these have all
failed me! Instead of peace, they have too often
brought wretchedness! There is still an aching
void in my soul! My present existence, what is
it worth? And the future is all dark, dark,
DARK to me! The dearest idol of my heart has
been torn from my embrace, and now lies in the
churchyard grave My loved children, beau-
tiful Nelly, and little James, and lovely Susan,
like the sweet birds of summer, have sung their
last earthly songs and departed for another clime;

These three banners should not be as large as that for the
band, and the latter should have a longer staff.
1*









and here am I, with faded form, and withered
hopes, and lost fortune, friendless and alone, with
a heart full of grief! Oh! for what do I live ?
[She sinks again into her chair, when her little
daughter steps forward, takes her by the hand,
and affectionately addresses her as follows: -]
CHILD.-- No, no, mother, not alone. Don't
say so. Is not your dear little Lizzy with you ?
MOTHER. Yes, my child, you are still spared
me, and for this I am truly thankful to God.
CHILD.- And our Sabbath school teacher has
told us that we can never be alone; for our heav-
enly Father is always with us, and that if we
seek Him in spirit we shall feel that He is very
near to us.
MOTHER. -I know that is what Christians
say; but, alas! I have given no heed to their
declarations, and no thought to my Creator.
CHILD.- And I read in a pretty book to-day,
that Jesus was a friend to all the sorrowful, and
has invited them, saying, Come unto me all
ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will
give you rest." Are you not one of the heavy
laden, mother ?
MOTHER. My dear one, you seem to know
more about these things than even I, who am so
much older, and who ought to be able to teach
you.
CHILD. Have you never read in the Bible,
that out of the mouth of even babes and suck-
lings the praise of God shall be perfected ?
MOTHER. Oh! how have I neglected the
cultivation of the higher and holier energies of
my being! Truly can I say, "I am without
1*







6

God, and.without hope, in the world. May the
light arise upon me, and dispel the darkness
from my heart!
CHLD.--Do you not remember what our
preacher said last Sunday, mother? that "virtue
is happiness, and that faith, hope, and charity are
what we all need in our hearts, to fill us with
peace, and trust, and rest."
MOTHER. I do, my child, and henceforth for
these will I seek. May God lend me His grace
to sustain me, and give me His truth to direct
me in the way in which I should walk. Oh !
I would breathe His love, and live upon His
spirit!
[A soft, sweet strain of music from a melodeon,
or good accordion,* in a concealed place in the
rear of the "Band of Christians," is now
heard. As soon as it dies away the child says,]
Hark, mother; listen, listen! the angels are
whispering us."
[Faith now approaches, bearing her banner, and
singing in a sweet, spirited tone, as follows:]


- --U--


a


S-a


p


It'


hip w m


grim 3of e "to thee, Com-fort and rest, and

There should be little or no musical accompaniment in
this piece. The melodeon can be dispensed with, if necema
ry. The singers should be well trained.
These tunes are from the ( Descent of the Beatitudes."


i


II.-
I -.Wd


i


.... II


blor--


~t~f~













joy, and peace, Oh, give thy heart to me.

[Chorus, with animation, by the Band of
Christians: "]




She comes1 She comes! The beau-te ous and




blest! Oh take her prof fer'd
_.. I _


^rZ4^ -I-1
dm A mi


gift, sad one, And thou si


[Faith, with the
the floor, and
her right arm,


ialt be at rest.


staff of her banner resting
a beautiful wreath hanging
speaks as follows :]


on
on


PILGRIM OF EARTH, your prayers are an-
swered. I stand before you! Dark is your
soul, and multiplied your sorrows! But remem-
ber, oh, remember, Earth hath no sorrows that
Heaven cannot heal!" Look on ME! Do you
know my name ? Or from whence I came ? or
the nature of my mission ? No, I perceive you
do not. A film of unbelief rests upon your eyes.
Let me remove it by a touch from my wand,









[She makes a graceful movement with her right
hand towards her, without changing her posi-
tion, or touching the face of the Pilgrim of
earth," and continues:]
Now you behold me, and you see that my
name is FAITH. Some call me the "Queen of
bliss." I come from the spirit-land, where God
reigns; where sin and sorrow are never known;
where the soul feeds upon love, and where all
the desires and affections blend like the harmony
of the sweetest music.
[A very soft strain is heard from the melodeon, and
she adds :]
Let me sing to you of my mission- why I
leave the bright scenes of my home in Heaven
to mingle with the discord and wretchedness of
earth.
I bring the mourner bliss for pain,
I give the suffering rest,
I make the doubting soul again
With peace and promise blest.
[Chorts, by the Band of Christians: "]
She comes, she comes !
The beauteous and blest;
Oh, take her proffered gift, sad oAe,
And thou shalt be at rest.

I gild the portals of the tomb -
Make light the darksome way -
Triumph o'er death remove its gloom,
And take its sting away.
[Chorus:]
She comes, &c.










[Faith speaks :]
Pilgrim of earth! Millions have spurned me
from their presence, and have lived and died in
sorrow! Other millions have received me in
sincerity and meekness, and faithfully cherished
me in their hearts, and now how blest! Look
upon this Band of Christians." They were


once as sorrowful ar
but they sought me
HOPE and CHARITY.
gifts we brought, and
joyous they appear.


nd wretched as even you ;
and my two lovely sisters,
They received the sacred
now behold how happy and


[Chorus by the Band, with spirit:
She comes, &c.


FAITH.- Pilgrim of earth, will you accept
of me, and the blessings I secure ?
PIrGIM. I will!
FAITH.- Then, in the name of Him who sent
me, I crown you with the wreath of Faith. May
it ever rest upon your brow, and shed a holy joy
around your heart.


[Faith places the wreath on her head, the
removed as she approaches. Then
ronnd her, and takes her position in
of the Pilgrim of earth," but near
sininng, joyfully, as she goes :]


veil being
she moves
i the rear


her


seat,


Daughter of earth, your lot, how sweet,
Now Faith your soul sustains;
I '11 lead you safely where you '1 meet
Your loved and lost again.
[Chorus, by the Band:]








10

She 's crowned! she 's crowned!
The sorrowing is blest,
With faith to meet her cherished ones
In the bright world of rest.
CHILD. Dear mother, I am so glad that you
have done weeping! That you look happy, and
smile again! Was not Faith very beautiful ?
MOTHER. Oh, yes, my child, so beautiful I
fear I never shall behold her like again; and her
words were so gentle, and so full of encourage-
ment, that hope begins to awaken in my heart
already.
CHILD. Yes. Did she not tell you that she
had two sisters, HoPE and CHARITY-that these
were, also, very lovely ? And if they are sisters
they will wish to be companions for each other,
as our Sabbath school teacher told us; so Hope
will soon be here, for she is never far from Faith.
[Strains of music from the melodeon are now
heard, and Hope comes, singing :j


My name is Hope, thou Pil - grim,


-,t. TLT -ROM
-a- --
_-8; --^|~^9- ~LB-a,^ *u -- --Bf


Tha


child dren, And ban ish doubt and fear.







11




Pris-oner sad and lone ly, In dungeons black with

__- -A- _-W-%-_-- .-_
gloom, Looks for my pres-ence on ly, To

-- ---1-- --. --.- =-^ -- -rc-.- -i ^-i-- -- -]w---

light his nar-row room. Looks for my pres-ence


-@

on y, To light his nar row room.

[Chorus, by the Band, to be sung in the last four
strains:]
All hail! sweet Hope, we greet thee
With joyful heart and voice;
Earth's pilgrim now beholds thee,
And Christian bands rejoice.

IIOPE.-Pilgrim of earth, I know by your
countenance that FAITH, a sweet sister of mine,
has been this way. I go where she leads; and
still I point to the glorious future. Yes, I speak
of "blessings to come." Your loved ones have
gone down into the grave, and your house is
left unto you desolate." I come to remove this
desolation, by pointing to that house not made







12


with hands, eternal in the heavens," where the
objects of your affection are now reposing on the
bosom of bliss. There, in that pure, and sacred,
and spotless world, do they dwell. The tomb is
but the way that leads thither. Oh, look up,
Pilgrim of earth! look up to God and to heaven!
and mourn not, but rejoice! The chequered
scenes of earth, with its sorrows and joys, will
soon pass away, and then you will join the blessed
in that paradise of bliss, where
Glory beams on all the plains,
And Hope for Joy is given;
Where music swells in sweeter strains,
And spotless beauty ever reigns,
And all is love in Heaven."
[She sings again:]
I come your grief to lighten,
With promise make you blest,
Your pathway quick to brighten;
Receive me and find rest.
Look up to God, thou pilgrim,
Thy Father's goodness see;
He loves each of his children,
Though deep in sin they be,
[Chorus, by the Band:]
All hail! sweet Hope, we greet thee
With joyful heart and voice;
Earth's pilgrim now receives thee,
And Christian bands rejoice.
HonP. -Pilgrim of earth, will you now accept
of me and the blessings I secure?
PILRIe. I will.







13

HOPE.,-Then, in the name of Him whom I
serve, I crown you with the garland of HOPE.
May it ever rest upon your brow, and shed a
holy joy around your heart.
[She places the wreath on her head in a similar
manner to Faith, and, passing around her,
takes her position with the latter, singing as
she goes:]
Pilgrim of earth, your lot more sweet,
Now Faith and Hope remain,
We 'll lead you safely where you 'll meet
Your loved and lost again.

We '11 lead you by the living spring
Where healing waters flow;
Now courage take, and cheerful sing,
As on your way you go.
[Chorus, by the Band:]
All hail! sweet Hope, we greet thee
With joyful heart and voice;
Earth's pilgrim now receives thee,
And Christian bands rejoice.

[A strain is again heard from the melodeon, and as
it dies away, CHARITY approaches, singing cheer-
fully :]


I come to you, 0 daugh-ter, With
2







14


peace to fill your heart: Your tears, that flow like


Z Ad4s4


She comes The last is Charity,With joy we own her might!


Hail,sweetest of the sisters three,Mild,soft-eyed child of light,

CHARITY. You have received my lovely com-
panions, Faith and Hope. Your eyes are open
A smile is upon your brow! Your heart is at
rest! Faith has given you a holy confidence in
the paternal goodness of God, while Hope has
pointed with her finger, bright and beautiful, to
yon blissful world, and assured you that hearts
torn asunder by death shall be reiinited in one
bond of eternal peace and blessedness. This is
all well; but it refers only to yourself. I come
to awaken an interest in your heart for others.
I am Charity. I am on a mission of LOVE.
You may have faith and hope, but if you have
not charity, your heart is hard and cold, and you
are not yet truly blest. Without me the world







15


would be destitute of sympathy for the unfortu.
nate. I bring peace on earth and good will to-
ward men. I would have them love their ene-
mies; bless those that curse them, and do good
to those who despitefully use them. And let me
assure you that a child of earth, to enjoy per-
feet reconciliation, and experience that happiness
which religion, pure and undefiled," is capable
of affording, must practise benevolence. "Faith
without works is dead." Have you cherished the
thought that there is nothing for which you
should live? Do so no longer. Look around
you; there is enough for you to do. The poor
and unfortunate are in want of your aid. Oh,
cultivate LOVE in your heart for your race, and
thus prove a blessing to the world.
[She sings:]
Thy burden I will lighten,
Though Faith thy guide may be;
Though Hope thy patl may brighten,
I 'm greatest of the three.
[Chorus:]
She comes! the last is Charity;
With joy we own her might;
Hail, sweetest of the sisters three!
Mild, soft-eyed child of light.
CHARITY. Pilgrim of earth; will you accept
of me and the blessings I secure ?
PILGwI.- Most joyfully I will!
CHARITY.- Then, in the name of Him whose
nature I represent, I crown you with the wreath
of LOVE. May it ever rest upon your brow, and
shed a radiance of joy around your heart.







16


[She repeats the ceremony of Faith and Hope, and
when the wreath is placed on her brow, the Band
of Christians respond loudly and distinctly in
concert :]


And now abideth Faith,
these three; but the greatest
ity."S


Hope, Charity,
of these is Char-


[Charity moves to her place with Faith
singing :]
Now, pilgrim, rest is given
Unto thy weary soul;
Thy joy is such as Heaven
Rejoices to behold.


and Hope,


[Chorus :]
She comes; the last is Charity;
With joy we own her might;
Hail, sweetest of the sisters three!
Mild, soft-eyed child of light.
[Pilgrim now arises and says, holding her
tie girl by the hand: ]


lit-


How full of peace is my heart! Father, I
thank thee that thou hast given me the garment
of praise for the spirit of heaviness! I am now
in possession of the Faith, Hope, and Charity of
my dear Redeemer; -a faith that works by
love "- a hope sure and steadfast, and a charity
which includes a world in its warm embrace,
and which never faileth. With these for the con-

Ist Cor. 13: 13.
t The three banners will now be in a row, with the large
banner in the rear above them.
2*







17


stant guests of my soul, will not my days be
passed in a peaceful tranquillity, and my last hour
e sweet and blessed ?
CHILD. Oh mother, I am so glad that thest
beautiful sisters have happened along this way!
Will you always look as happy as you now do,
and keep the tears from your eyes, and smile on
your little Lizzy ? Will you, dear mother ?
MOTHER. Yes, my dear one.
CHILD.- Oh, then I'll be happy, and you'll
be happy, and we will all be happy together; so
let us all sing a happy song.
[All sing, with spirit :]*
Rejoice! rejoice! a happy band
Of Christians blest are we;
In Faith, and Hope, and Love we stand;
All hail these sisters three !
[Chorus :]
Rejoice rejoice! our happiness is full!
Attune each heart in praise to God,
Who rules and governs all.
[The standard-bearer of the Band of Christians
speaks in a distinct tone and says:]
Pilgrim of earth; behold this band of Chris-
tians. We sympathized with you in your grief;
we now rejoice with you in your gladness!
Take your place in our midst, and let us pursue
our journey through the world together in love.
[She does so, leading her child, and the speaker con-
tinues:]
Tune of FAITH, page 7.
2)








18


And that God's blessing may rest upon us, let
us all pray, as the blessed Master hath taught us,
saying -
Our Father I which art in heaven I hallowed
be thy name I thy kingdom come I thy will be
done [ in earth | as it is in heaven. 1 Give us
this day I our daily bread | and forgive us our
debts I as we forgive our debtors. | And lead us
not into temptation; | but deliver us from evil. |
For thine is the kingdom | and the power I and
the glory, I forever. T Amen."

The whole company should unite in this exercise, with
the palms of their lands placed together, and brought up to
the breast, and with raised eyes, speaking loudly, in exact
concert, to help the effect.


THE END.









THE


ALPHABET


CLASS.


WRITTEN FOR


MUWDIE1 IUZfl





BY ABEL C. THOMA8.




Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1847, by
JAXES M. UsHEm,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Maasachusetts.


BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY J.'M.
SABBATH SCHOOL DEPOSITORY,
1848.


USHER,
37 CORNHILL,









THE


ALPHABET


CLASS.


WRITTEN FOR








BY ABEL C. THOMA8.




Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1847, by
JAMES M. UsHER,
nl the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.


BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY J.'M.
SABBATH SCHOOL DEPOSITORY,
1848.


USHER,
37 CORNHILL.











THE ALPHABET CLASS.
WRITTEN FOR SCHOOL EXHIBITIONS, BY A. C. T.
SELECT five or twenty-five children-girls or
boys, or both, as may be convenient-the smaller
the better, provided they can read so as to be
distinctly heard by the assembly. If five, each
has the verses of five letters; if twenty-five, each
has the verse of one letter; and all in unison
have the letter U in the conclusion.
The children stand in a row, and the piece is
introduced by the superintendent inquiring,
Q. What do you represent ?
ALL. The Alphabet.
Q. How are you arranged ?
As. 1 A 6 F I1 K 16 P 21 V
2B 7G 12 L 17Q 22 W
3C SH 13M 18 R 23X U
4D 9 14 N 19S 24 Y
5E 10 J 150 20 T 25 Z
A.
A was an Ant, that was prudent and wise
In laying up food for her winter supplies;
And seldom would any of comforts be scant,
If all were as prudent and wise as the Ant.
B.
B was a Bee, that looked well to his hive,
And only by industry labored to thrive.
A wholesome example to you and to me
May even be found in the neat busy Bee.







THE ALPHABET CLASS.


C.
C was a Crow, that was thievish and sly,
Who kept far away when the farmer was nigh.
Though corn was his living, alas for his lot!
The corn-stealing Crow by the farmer was shot.
D.
D was a Dove, that was gentle and mild,
A type of what should be the heart of a child.
When Christ was baptized of the Father above,
There settled upon him the form of a Dove.
E.
E was an Eagle, both valiant and free,
That ever the type of our country shall be.
O long may it be ere adversity mars
The Eagle-borne flag of the stripes and the stars.
F.
F was a Fox, that was cunning and fleet,
And ne'er asked for poultry when wishing to eat.
But once there befell him a woful mishap-
The crafty hen-stealer was caught in a trap.
G.
G was a Goose, that was silly enough,
And when we had cooked him we found he was
tough.
We boiled him from morn till the kitchen was
dark;
He must have been one of the two in the Ark.
H.
H was a Horse, that was free to submit
To carry or pull as his owner saw fit;
And since to hard labor his life he devotes,
0 give him:good treatment and plenty of oats.






THE ALPHABET CLASS.


I.
I was an Ibis, a bird, we've been told,
Long worshipped by millions in Egypt of old.
Redeemed would the world be from many a
curse,
If none of mankind worshipped anything worse.
j.
J was a Jay-bird, that chattered all day,
And much we presume she had therefore to say.
S one gossips there are like this talkative bird,
vWho tell rather more than their ears ever heard.
K.
K was a Katy-did, that chirped on a tree -
But like other ladies much trouble had she;
For while "Katy-ID was her positive cry,
"Katy-DID N'T," some neighbor was sure to reply.
L.
L was a Lamb, that, in freedom from sin,.
An emblem of innocence always has been.
All cleaving to God, may it e'er be our lot
To be Lambs of His fold without blemish or spot.
1M.
M was a Mouse, that would nibble the cheese,
And not say to pussy," I '1 eat, if you please."
But pussy looked well to the care of the house,
And asked not permission to eat up the Mouse.
N.
N was a Nightingale, that without fee
Sang sweetly to all who chose present to be.
Don't you wish he would come, with companions
a few,
And perch near the window and serenade you ?






THE ALPHABET CLASS,


0.
O was an Owl, that was certainly wise,
For gravity sat in his solemn big eyes.
Some people in wisdom resemble this elf--
They both take it out in Thinks I to myself."
P.
P was a Peacock, the dandy and fop
Of all sorts of creatures that flutter or hop.
Both Peacocks and dandies in dressing excel-
What else they are good for, no mortal can tell.
Q.
Q was a Quail, that in harvest went round,
To gather the grain as it fell on the ground.
The farmer-boy caught him when Christmas was
nigh,
And ate the fat Quail in a holiday pie.
R.
R was a Rabbit, as timid and fleet
As anything ever man hunted to eat.
If I.had my way, an escape I 'd prepare,
And help the poor Rabbit away from the snare.
S.
S was a Snake; and I pray you take heed
Of the craft and the sting of the serpentine
breed;
And let me remark, ere the letter I pass,
Be specially cautious of" Snakes in the grass."
T.
T was a Tiger, of as beautiful skin
As ever enwrapped a fierce spirit within.
How often for worth is mere beauty received!
How often, alas we are sadly deceived






THE ALPHABET CLASS.

V.
V was a Vulture, that built his nest high,
On the peak of a rock towering up to the sky.
Alas, that a bird with so lofty a nest
Should not be with mercy and tenderness blest!
W.
W was a Wren; and would any one spoil
The nest that she finished with patience and
toil?
Not I, and npt you, I am sure, would have part
In spoiling her nest or in breaking her heart.
X.
The X was so cross that all animals craved
From a name with an X to be evermore saved;
And so not an ear of you all will we vex
With an alphabet name that begins with an X.
Y.
Y was a Yellow-bird, happy and trim,
That built his nice nest on an apple-tree limb.
Much better for him, in his youth or old age,
To be his own master than shut in a cage.
ze
Z was a Zebra, with stripes girded round,
Whose beauty and elegance far are renowned;
But like OTHER beauties, who shall not be named,
The Zebra is fickle, and hard to be tamed.
IU.
(In unison-and courtesy together.)
The U we have passed, nor esteem it amiss;
And plainly and simply our reason is this:
The name of an animal would not be due,
And might give ofence if we gave it to U!









RECENT DISCOVERIES.
FOR TWO VERY SMALL GIRLS, OR A BOY AND A
GIRL.
I. TELEGRAPH.
I 'VE heard of the Telegraph
Riding on wires;
Like lightning he travels,
And yet never tires.
He '1 take you a message
A thousand miles off,
And bring you an answer
Before you can cough.
In the snap of your finger
The Telegraph flees,
And your errand is finished
Before you can sneeze.
If ever I 'm troubled
With travelling desires,
I'll go by the Telegraph,
Riding on wires.


II. GUN COTTON.
I 've heard of Gun Cotton,
Quite recently made,
To help in man's warfare,-
A terrible trade !

But while it does mischief
By murderous shocks,







RECENT DISCOVERIES.


It may be found useful
In blasting of rocks.
Our muslins and calicoes-
(What a fate to forebode!)-
May be made of gun cotton,
And some day explode.
'T would make a sad tearing
Of nerves and of muscles;
So, ladies, be careful* -
Don't put it in padding !
The finger should be archly lifted in token of warn-
ing.














ORDERS AND SYMBOLS.
BY A. C. THOMAS.
1, Free Mason; 2. Odd Fellow; 3. Son of Temperance;
4. Daughter of Temperance ; -and afterward the Daugh-
ter of Zion is introduced.


1. AN ancient Free Mason I 'm honored to be-
An ancient York Mason, accepted and free.
If you don't believe what I claim with my lips,
Come, try me by pass-words and signals and grips
2. Not a whit do I know of your mystical tie,
And so not a word of your claim I 'II deny.
An Odd Fellow I am as odd as you please,
For I 've taken in rank all the steps and degrees.
But if the high title you 're prone to deny me,
Come up to the mark, and be ready to try me !
3. Not having the knowledge to ferret you out,
I '1 grant your pretensions without any doubt.
A true Son of Temperance professing to be,
I 'm odder than you, and I 'm freer than he.
The Pledge and Cold Water is ever our boast,
And our number amounts to a gathering host.
4. A Daughter of Temperance frankly admits
The point of your Mason and Odd Fellow wits;
But still both my feelings and judgment incline
To side with the claims of this brother of mine.
And now let us speak to this hearkening throng
Of the several orders to which we belong.
I









1. Let 's first tell the people what gossips have said.
4. I'm willing-
2. I'm willing -
3. Then pray go a-head.
1. The gossips have said that the Masons called Free
Are not a whit better than men ought to be;
And that in their Lodges a witch plays a fiddle,
While members are marked with a hot iron griddle.
2. The Odd Fellows too (as the gossipers glean)
Are guilty of doings not fit to be seen;
And that every member, admitted by vote,
Must ride round the Lodge on the back of a goat.
3. The gossips have said that of water a tank
Is used in degrees of the Temperance rank;
And that, in obeying the Patriarch's wish,
Each member is soused like a frog or a fish.
4. A portion of gossip we also receive-
For some silly people profess to believe,
That members are made, every Temperance daugh-
ter,
By gulping down quickly a gallon of water.
1. And now let us tell what is truly our creed
4. I 'm willing--
2. I'm willing-
3. Then let us proceed.

1. In Oansa and CHARITY Masons diseern
The lessons that they in their Lodges should lam.
A wish I 'l express in my brethren's behalf,
Which will not offend, I am sure-
May every Free Mason be free with the pume,
To help the unfortunate poor.










S. Those lessons we all should in harmony heed,
And MUTUAL HELP is the Odd Fellows' creed.
0 may the bright day swiftly dawn on the earth,
When no one will seem to be odd,
Who helps all the needy thus keeping the law
Of a holy and merciful God.
3. Observing those lessons, our numerous bands
Add the TEMPERANCE PLEDGE to their solemn com-
mands.
He only is safe who is bound by a pledge,
Or written, or spoken, or thought;
And freedom, true freedom, consists in desire
To do whatsoever we ought.
4. The daughters of Temperance selfish may be
In seeking themselves from some evils to free.
Though mutual help is a part of their creed,
But few of their sex of the pledge can have need;
And so, in true zeal for the welfare of others,
The sisters are seeking reform of their brothers.
We seek it by gentleness hoping to draw
Mankind to observe every Temperance law.

[Enter Daughter of Zion.]
A Daughter of Zion comes hither to scan
Your claims in behalf of the welfare of man ;
And though she is pleased with the lessons that each,
By symbols and maxims, would utter and teach,
She prays that no soul may by these be enticed
Away from the Gospel and platform of Christ.
The Mason is Free when his spirit is right,
Unveiled and approved in the Grand Master's sight, -
The HOLY Grand Master who dwells in the light.
The Odd Fellow fills the true creed of his band,
When he carries his heart in an open hand,
Impressed with the seal of the HIGH Noble Grand.


0










The Temperance Orders of Daughter and Son
The end of their pledge shall have faithfully won,
When the MOST Worthy Patriarch, ruling above,
Confers the Degree of His Ransoming Love.
Devoid of this blessing, each mystical rite,
And mottoes and badges, we number as loss;
And symbols are vain, if they do not unite
Our souls to the Truth and the Love of the CRoss.



TO A PURE HEART.
INSCRIBED IN AN ALBUM.
O dark is the way of the Pilgrim of Earth,
Ere his spirit attains to a heavenly birth ;
The day-spring then bursts on his wearisome road,
And the world is lit up with the glory of God.
With face ever turned to the heavenly shrine,
There never was gloom on a pathway of thine.
Be ever thy prayer, whatever intervene,
0 Lord, in my heart keep Thy memory green.'














THE STAR AND THE CROSS.
BY A. C. THOMAS.
At a Sabbath School entertainment, a conspicuous position
should be assigned to a Cross, clothed ia evergreen, in the
heart of which should be an illuminated Sar. The follow-
ing should be spoken by a good speaker:
THE Birth of our Saviour The sign you behold,
That led the wise men to the manger of old.
There lay the Redeemer-more glorious far
Than the beams of that brilliant and heavenly STAR.
The Death of our Saviour! Behold the sad sign,
Of agony deep to the martyr divine
How sinks all the glitter of earth into dross,
When we view and reflect on the sorrowful CRoss !
Yet see how that Star, in its beautiful light,
Sheds mildly its lustre, illuming the night!
In the heart of the Cross it shall evermore shine,
And light'up the world with a glory divine.
And see how that Cross, in its evergreen robe,
Inviteth all mourners around the great globe
To scan, by the vision of Faith, Hope and Love,
The fadeless abode of the Kingdom above!
O shine, lovely Star! in all realms of the earth,
A symbol of Christ in his hallowing birth,
And lead us in paths that thy ray beameth o'er,
That we in his manger may humbly adore.
And lift us, 0 Cross! from the world and its strife,
To the throne and a crown of an endless life,
Where the birth-star of Jesus shines forth as a Sun,
And the joy of the CRoss is acknowledged and won
1*









SONGS


AND


CHORUSES


FOR


MAY-DAY


EXHIBITION.


BOST
PUBLISHED BY
Universalist Sabbath School
181


ON:
J. M. USHER.
Deptfitory, 37 CornhilL


~ ~~_ __ ___














Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1848, by
JAMES M. USHER,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.






ORATORIO FOR MAY-DAY EXHIBITION.
DIRECTIONS FOR SINGING, &C.
To perform this little piece with good effect, there
should be three altars upon the stage, and the children
should stand in groups of four each, around the altars,
or rather behind them. The altars should be decked
with flowers, and the children should wear wreaths
of them upon their heads, and carry bouquets in their
hands. The groups should be numbered as indicated
by the numerals at the beginning of the verses and
lines, and sing in the order thus prescribed,












SONGS


AND


CHORUSES.


SONG OF GRATITUDE.
AIR- Bounding Billows."


Welcome, welcome, quiet evening,
N. 1 Welcome is this happy hour;
Now our daily ramble 's ended,
Let us bless Almighty Power.
Yes, we '11 gladly join your praises
2. To our Father good and kind;
He has kept us, He's preserved us-
Glory to the Eternal Mind.
Let us, also, join your number-
3 God deserves united praise;
He has made us all so happy,
We should love him all our days.
Then in loudest praise together
Let our youthful voices rise;
1, 2, & 3. Glory to our God and Father,
Sound His praise through earth nd
skies.


_ __









SONG


OF THE


FLOWERS.


Amt Buy a Broom.'


3



S1



1 &3.


And now, as we 've rendered
our devotions,
Let us sing of the flowers
gathered to-day.


to God

we 've


Yes, yes, dearest sisters, with joyful
emotions,


Our voices
a lay.


shall join in so welcome


Bright flowers! sv
We 'll sing of tl
flowers of May.


veet flowers!
he flowers first


We '11 join you, we 'll join you;
first we will mention
The beautiful violet, so lovely


I ga
Yes,
3. yo
T is
ern
SweA
3. We
flo


y.
beautiful
*1-


ung violet
the riches
ed to-day.
et flowers!
'l sing ol


wers of


violet,


S
t


and

and


the modest


of all we have gath-


wild
the


flowers !
flowers first


May.


The May-flower and snow-drop, we
think them more lovely;
And surely their fragrance the violet
excels,


Am e


It 2t&


H-


1. 4









We own they are lovely -in fra-
grance superior;
2 & 3. But in beauty the violet is queen of
the hills.
Violets violets !
May-flowers snow-drops !
1,2, &3.- We '11 sing of the flowers- first
flowers of May.


1,2, &3.


The May-flower, the violet, the daf-
fodil, the tulip,
The snow-drop, the peach-blow, and
others so rare
United we 'l sing of their beauties
and fragrance,
But one with the other we will not
compare.
Bright flowers! wild flowers!
We sing of the flowers first flow.
ers of May.


SONG OF THE MAY-QUEEN.
Am-- Sweet Afto."

And now of the Queen of this May-
1. day we'll sing,
All smiling with beauty, she's love-
ly as Spring.
1*







6

Yes, brighter than sunshine, and
fairer than flowers,
Is Mary, the Queen of our holyday
hours.


S0 yes, she is lovely, we envy
now;
But the flower of her beauty
fade on her brow;
Like the crown which we gave
that withered ere noon,
Her youth and her freshness
vanish too soon.


her

will

her,

will


1 &2.


3.


SThat thought is unwelcome: it
dampens our joys -
It darkens the future our pleasure
alloys;
Let us banish reflections, like those,
far away,
And remember alone the bright hours
Sof this day.
'T is well to be cheerful 't is well
to be sad;
If we never were sorrowful, we ne'er
should be glad.
By contrast, enjoyment is given be-
low ;
Then I pray on this subject a few
thoughts bestow.
'We will, for we see now your lesson
is truth;
The old and the withered were once
fresh in youth.


2.





3









If
2. f
If


1,2, & 3.


the flower never faded, the fruit
could not grow;
youth were eternal, all joys were
below.
F


Then farewell to beauty to child-
hood farewell;
They will both quickly pass, as all
nature doth tell;
We will welcome the fruit which the
Autumn will bring;
If Winter destroys us, we '11 rise ir
the Spring.


SONG


OF THE BIRDS.


AIR "t Blue Juniatta."


Gaily and merrily
Sweet birds were singing,
1 & 2. When, at the early dawn,
S With voices gaily ringing,
We sallied forth to gather flowers.
Fresh in their beauty.
1 2, & 3. 0, 't was a happy hour,
For pleasure or for duty.


_ __









i .




'


1,2,&3. !


1.


2&3.


't 1


1, 2, & 3.


Yes, 't was a happy hour-
The birds were singing gaily;
Music, from every tree
Its notes were warbled freely.
The robin and the blue-bird sung,
While others joined the chorus;
O, how their voices rung,
In the shady groves before us.

May-day 's the day for me -
I love, I love it dearly;
We wish 't would come four times a
year,
It makes us all so cheerly.
Four times a year! 0 no, indeed!
We'd better have it daily.
A May-day all the year around!
This life would then pass gaily.


1. Gaily 't would glide along;
2. All would be pleasure;
3. Brightest flowers and sweetest songs
1,2,&3. Would be our constant treasure.
1. But no, it will not with us stay;
2. Just once a year it passes;
3. And then it tarries but a day,
1,2, &3 To cheer us lads and lasses.














,2, & 3.


Let us, then, within our hearts,
A May-day ever cherish,
Of brightest flowers and sweet
songs,
That will not fade or perish;
A May-day all the year around,
Of harmony and beauty.
Its songs and flowers are alv
found
In paths of love and duty.


Test


rays


JUBILEE.


AIR -" The morning light is breaking."


1. L


2&3.


1. -


Come now we 'I banish sorrow,
We know that all is well;
And every bright to-morrow
This welcome truth will tell.

Yes, yes, we 're fall of gladness,
We 'I drink each cup of joy;
While youth flies past, no sadness
Shall make our bliss alloy.

What care we that earth's flowers
Are emblems of our youth,
Since, on immortal bowers,
Bloom virtue, love, and truth I


_ _ __ ___







10


3



2.



1,2,&3. I


1,2, &3.


They bloom, and, bright forever,
Unchanged by frosts or time;
No blight can reach to wither,
In their immortal clime.
We '11 plant these flowers within us,
Deep in the soul's pure soil;
They'll flourish, bright and glorious,
And bless our earthly toil.
They'll bloom in all their beauty,
They 'll shed their fragrance there;
Then we 'll rejoice in duty,
And heavenly bliss will share.


Good
Good
Good
With
Good
With


night! our song is ended;
night! we'll now retire;
night! may joy be blended
every heart's desire!
night! may joy be blended
every heart's desire!












HEATHEN AND CHRISTIAN
WORSHIP.

PRIESTESS. CERES.
ORACLE. MINERVA.
PoMONIA. CHRISTIAN,
Priestess. [Alone.] This condescension of the
gods is wonderful! No age before has witnessed
an event like this -no such auspicious day has
ever dawned. Unto this altar worshippers may
come, and here present their offerings to any of
the gods or goddesses, who, by their chosen ora-
cle, will speak and give the answer each shall
ask, or promise or-refuse the gift for which they
pray. Sure all should come and worship, since
the gods unite to bless.
Oracle. [Behind the altar, and concealed from
view.] Priestess, the hour for worship has ar-
rived. Listen a moment while the goddesses
address thee.
Priestess. [Bowing to the altar.] Great Oracle,
I hear thy sacred voice, and humbly bow before
the gods whose word thou givest to the world.
Oracle. Rise, Priestess, and stand beside the
altar to receive the gifts by young hands brought.
Treat all such worshippers with kindness, that
they may love to come in future years, and bring
to thee rich gifts. A worshipper of great Pomo-
nia comes with earliest flowers and fruits accept-
able. Bid her a welcome in.









[Enter Pomonia, the young worshipper.
Priestess. Advance, fair worshipper, towards
the altar. Thy flowers and fruits an offering
sweet will prove unto the gods. Give them to
me, and I will lay them for thee on this holy
altar. [Priestess takes the offering, and kneeling,
places it upon the altar; then rises and speaks.]
Thy offering is pure, and the goddess of the
fruits and flowers accepteth it. Kneel now be-
fore the altar and thy request present.
Pomonia. [Kneeling.] Goddess of fruits and
flowers My mother called me by thy name when
I was born, and gave me to thy service. Each
May Day since, I've searched for early flowers
and twined them in a wreath, and culled choicest
fruits of thy past bounty and brought them unto
thee. I come once more, great goddess,
And implore,
Thou would'st bless me more
Than e'er before.
The flowers thou gavest me last year, and made
so sweet and beautiful, winter has killed them
all. O, great Pomonia grant me this request.
Breathe on those withered stems and dying roots,
and bid them live again; and I will lay upon
this altar the first flowers they bear. O, make
my little garden once more beautiful, and lade
those fruit trees, thou hast made so large, with
golden apples, cherries, peaches, pears, and
plums. Great is Pomonia of the fruits and
flowers! great is the goddess Pomonia! [Rises
from the altar.]
Priestess. Fair worshipper, I doubt not but the
goddess smiles and blesses thee for this request.







3.

Kneel now again: bow low thy head, and hearken
to the words of the great oracle, who will inform
thee if thy prayer is heard and will be answered.
[Pomonia kneels.]
Oracle. Great is Pomonia, the goddess of the
fruits and flowers! The worshipper that bears
her name, and now is kneeling at the altar, has
been heard. The offering she brought pleases
the goddess well.
The faded flower, the withered stem,
The dying root, shall live again;
Peaches and cherries, plum and pear,
And golden apples, rich and rare,
Shall bend the boughs of fruitful trees.
Priestess.
Pomonia, deem it not in vain
You have approached this holy shrine;
Blessings shall follow in the train
Of all who to this place divine
Bring offerings lovely, rich and rare,
And bring them for the gods to share.
Arise, and stand aside, for another worshipper
approaches. [Pomonia arises, and Ceres enters.]
Fear not, sweet girl; come forward with thy
offering. The gods are smiling graciously to-
day, and happy those who come to gain their
blessing. What bear you to the altar ?
, Ceres. An offering for the goddess of the har-
vest.
Priestess. Intrust it to my care, and I will lay it
in the very arms of the goddess. [Kneels, and
places it; then rises.] It is accepted. What is
thy request ? Kneel now, and ask of Ceres what
thou wilt.







4

Ceres. [Kneeling.]
"0 thou, the goddess of the rustling corn,
Thou to whom reapers sing, and on the lawn
Pile up their baskets with the full-eared wheat,
While maidens come, with little dancing feet,
And bring thee poppies, weaving thee a crown
Of simple beauty, bending their heads down
To garland thy full baskets"--hear me now,
While on my bended knees I pay to thee my vow.
Hear and accept the offering I have brought,
And crown with plenty a poor orphan's cot.
0, gracious Ceres! want is at our door;
Our food is gone, and hunger presses sore;
O, give us corn, drive famine far away;
And make my mother smile upon a happier day,
Ere she shall die and leave four orphans here,
To brave the storms of time, its tempests drear,
With not one friend their fainting souls to cheer.
Goddess of bounty Ceres, great and good,
Grant me this boon! 0 give, O give us food!
[Rises.]
Priestess. Fair worshipper, thy petition is most
worthy, and speaks for thee a soul all filled with
love for thy dear parent near the gates of death.
Such souls the gods will bless. Bend now the
knee once more, and listen to that voice which
for the gods doth speak. [Ceres kneels.]
Oracle.
Ceres, great goddess, at the orphan's door
Will scatter corn, a free and bounteous store;
Famine and want, she' 11 drive them far away,
And make the widow smile upon a happier day.
Priestess. Arise, and stand aside, while yet
another worshipper draws near. [She arises.]
Your prayer is heard, and great the promise









the oracle has given. Let thy young heart re-
joice. [Enter Minerva.] Come to the altar, lovely
child: the gods will surely smile upon thy inno-
cence and beauty. The goddesses are fond of
beauty.
Minerva. I adore that goddess who can look
through tattered garments and a homely form,
to see and love the beauties of the mind. I bear
her name, and come to ask if at this altar I can
worship her. Art thou the priestess of Minerva ?
Priestess. I am. Minerva, with the gods and
other goddesses, has joined to spread her arms
upon this altar, and receive each offering which
her votaries bring. What bear you as a gift to her ?
Minerva. The fruits of industry. A few choice
articles these hands have wrought for her.
Priestess. The goddess smiles, and waits to
receive them. 'T is my sacred trust to lay them
in her arms. [Priestess takes the offering, and
kneeling, lays it upon the altar.] Thy offering is
rich and acceptable. Bow quickly now, and ask
for all thou wilt ere this propitious moment pass.
Minerva. [Kneeling.] Goddess of wisdom, pa-
tron of industry and art! Thou hast my feeble
hands, my weary feet, my fainting life sustained
till now. Thou art a fountain, a deep fountain
of wisdom, and from that fountain I would drink
in draughts so full and free, my soul would say,
Enough. O, gracious goddess, grant me this
request :-
Let there a stream of knowledge flow into my
youthful mind,
Till all that now I wish to know I shall within
me find.
1*








6

Give me a will to labor on, and bless my daily toil,
Till in the light of wisdom's noon-day sun
I shall sit down content, and rest on earthly soil.
Priestess. Arise, blest worshipper of great Mi-
nerva! Thy prayer, like those who stand beside
thee, [young Ceres and Pomonia,] is great and
good. Few ask for blessings such as you have
craved, and few receive such answers from the
gods as thy two sister worshippers have heard.
Kneel now once more, and thou shalt hear the
oracle declare Minerva's will concerning thee.
Oracle. Minerva is great among the goddesses!
Her father is the mighty Jove; and from his
forehead into life she sprung, all clad in shining
armor, and adorned with wisdom far surpassing
all the gods. [Enter Christian, and kneels, with
her back towards the altar; her hands clasped,
and her head bowed in silence.] She loveth in-
dustry, and from her shall flow out a stream of
knowledge unto all who diligently seek her
treasures. She giveth to her worshippers most
liberally; and she who at her altar bends shall
see a noon-day sun, shall find within her own
soul all she shall wish to find, and of a stream
shall drink until she says, I have my fill.
Christian. [ She prays, and all eyes are turned
towards her in astonishment.] 0 Thou, who art
the Christian's God, to thee I bow. Thy temple
is all space. Thine altar may be found in every
place where needy children feel their wants and
bend in prayer. God, thou art God alone. All
other gods are false, and destitute of power or
love. Thou art our Father, God. Thou didst
create us. Thou dost keep our lives, and grant
us every blessing. Thou odny hearest prayer.









Lord, hear me now; and may 1 teach these
youthful minds, by heathen worship blinded, to
bring the offering thou dost love, and lay it on the
altar of the living God Lord, give me strength
and wisdom, all I need, and may thy truth pre-
vail! Lord, thou art God alone, and to thy name
be praise, hence, evermore. Amen.
[Christian rises.]
Priestess. Worshipper, whyturn you thus away
and kneel not at this altar, where all the gods
unite to meet and bless their votaries?
Christian. Because my God is not among the
gods of whom you speak.
Priestess. Who is thy God?
Christian. My God is God of all the gods.
Before them all, above them all, greater than all.
Not Jove, or Saturn, but Jehovah; God omnipo-
tent; the Kingof all kings; the Lord of all
lords. He made the world, the sun, the moon,
the stars. He is my Father. He is thine, false
-priestess. He is yours, deluded worshippers of
senseless beings you call gods.
Priestess. 'T is false! 't is false! The gods
we worship are not senseless gods. In them
is all the power which ever was, or is, or is
to be.
Christian. What is the oracle which answers
for your gods?
Priestess. A great and mighty spirit, pure as
light.
Christian. Priestess, it is not so. That oracle
is mortal, like yourself. Like yourself, false and
full of lies. [Draws the curtain aside, and exposes
the oracle.] Look, priestess! see thy spirit," pure
as light." Look, poor deluded worshippers, and









see our oracle covered with shame and silent in
con usion.
Worshippers. [All speaking.] Priestess, what
meaneth this ?
Priestess. I own my guilt. I have deceived
you. This oracle knows nothing of the gods.
Christian. Nor do the gods you worship know
this oracle. There is no God save one, and that
the God I worship and the God I serve.
Worshippers. [All speak.] Teach us to know
thy God, that we may learn to worship him, and
be no more deceived.
Christian. Kneel, then, with me around this
altar, while I by prayer shall dedicate the same
to the one God. Kneel with us, priestess; and
you, pretended oracle, kneel here before the living
God; and I will ask of him a pardon for your
sins, and light to guide you in the ways of truth.
[All kneel, and Christian prays.] 0 God, thou
God of gods, and Father of us all, we bow to
dedicate this altar to thy holy service. Purify
it, we pray thee, and accept it in the name of
Jesus, thine own Son. Forgive the sins of all
now bowed before thee, and give to all the light
of gospel truth. Lord, teach these worshippers
to worship thee. Teach them thy love, thy
power, thy truth; and may all heathen wor-
shippers soon bow before the God who hears and
answers prayer. God, thou art God alone.
Help me to teach these worshippers this truth,
and thine shall be the praise forevermore.
Amen.
Worshippers [&A speak.] Amen
Priestess and Oracle [ Speak together.] Amen,
and Amen!











J. M. USHER'S

PFUT,(DADHCHS oDI YBf TOU.I



I.-THE GOSPEL TEACHER, AND SAB-
BATH SCHOOL CONTRIBUTOR.
This is a semi-monthly journal, devoted to the Sab.
bath School-to the wants of the teacher and scholar-
to the instruction and growth of the young mind in
Christian truth. It is edited by Rev. J. G. ADAMS.
The parent, guardian, teacher and child, may find in ii
much which will instruct and encourage them.
Terms, $ 1.00 a year, payable in advance.
II-THE SABBATH SCHOOL ANNUAL foi
1846. Edited by MRS. M. H. AiAMs.
This work is prepared for the young-for the chil
dren in our Sabbath Schools, and in our homes. It is
a beautiful gift book for a Christmas, New Year, o1
Birth-day. Its articles were all written expressly for
it by some of our best writers for youth. It needs
only to be examined to be appreciated.
III.-THE SABBATH SCHOOL TEACHER'S
CLASS BOOK.
A new and useful aid to the Teacher in keeping a
record of the condition of his class.







IV.-SABBATH SCHOOL CARDS.
These contain Hymns for small children, to be com
mitted to memory.
V.-THE SUNDAY SCHOOL EXHIBITION
Containing the Exercises of a Sabbath School Ex-
hibition; in which are some pieces of special interest
to the young.
VI.-GIFT FROM JULIA;
A beautiful book for juvenile readers.
VI.-0OUR LITTLE BOY'S BOOK.
VIII.-OUR LITTLE GIRL'S BOOK.
IX.-LITTLE HYMNS AND PICTURES, FOR
LITTLE READERS. Paper covers.
X.-A LITTLE PRESENT, FOR LITTLE
CHILDREN. Paper covers.
XI.-STORIES ABOUT THE COLD WATER
ARMY, FOR BOYS AND GIRLS. Paper covers.
XI.-NOT RICH, BUT GENEROUS.
XIII.-SABBATH SCHOOL TRACTS;
For Parents, Teachers and Children. For Sabbath
School Exhibitions.
XIV.-THE DESCENT OF THE BEATI-
TUDES-BY Rzv. D. K. LEE.
XV.-SUNDAY SCHOOL ORATORIO-Br L.
J. FLETCHER.


























































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