• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The shepherd and his hut
 Little Elsie
 The thunder-storm
 The patient sufferer
 The shepherd's sickness - His daughter's...
 The final scene
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: Blind girl of the moor
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001721/00001
 Material Information
Title: Blind girl of the moor
Series Title: Blind girl of the moor
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Bunbury, Selina
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001721
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA1822
ltuf - ALG2553
oclc - 45253455
alephbibnum - 002222316

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The shepherd and his hut
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Little Elsie
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The thunder-storm
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The patient sufferer
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The shepherd's sickness - His daughter's care
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The final scene
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Advertising
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Back Cover
        Page 49
    Spine
        Page 50
Full Text







BLIND GIRL OF THE MOOR,




A SHEPHERD'S CHILD.





IX SHALL GATWUR THI LAMBS WITH HI ABM, AND CARRY
THIM IN HIS WOM.-ISA. IL, 11.




IRVlsBD BY D. P. KIDDIR.





Nct-u-ork:
PUBLISHED BY LANE & SCOTT,
IIe ess1 swelr-mo~toon wmon or .na assmeasse lseslsee
no "a s*AT-AI4CIa UNION OFN TIlO 0 l3TUO IIA
ao MULvIIT-YrTWr.
10 &ONOKN, I .0.
1NC.














CONTENTS.



EAPTIEx ?Am;
L Ta. SHEFEBED AND HIS lir 7
IL LiTxz K .u .. 12
IlL Tax TauNDua-Sroxu .1
IV. Tts PATIANT uirrux ..
V. Tar Saurnuow Sicaum-Uhs DIve-
rare CARS . .
VL TEu FINAL SoaN W







THB

BLIND GIRL OF THE MOOB%
A SHEPHERD'S CHILD.


CHAPTER L
THE SHEPHERD AND'HIS HUT.
SCOTLAND i a beautiful coum y,
and very beautiful was the apot
where stood the poor hut of the p)a
shepherd, Sandie Leslie. :.
Above it rose the hig mohI
where the eagle dwelt from
he guarded his lambs; and be E
and around it, were pretty dell*sd
little glens filled with the y~ b
boom,m and the red-berietd moalm
Js, and the white-teawmmod .




W amfj M*bjjA %ia" Vr salM MUUB,
And a little waterfall came down in
one straight, pure stream, and swelled
up a pool which the drooping birch
amb*e alder overshadowed; and the
waters flowed out from it again in a
bright stream, very narrow, and bor-
dered with such clear green banks,
that it looked*ite a diamond in an
emerald
The hut was all lonely, for it was
*gh to the mountains and rocks
where the shepbded watched his
-k ; but by degr the high
Sloped down and the trees
away, and the noise of the
toentst were heard no
l an, nd the shadowy stbeanm
, LMs le: then there was a bright
WiOle" brae;"the green groiied
b i att a distance orewd oa .
' Irthe ye llow bhtMsMe r*




A mPlUOID' OUIL. I
broom; and then there ws a morn
where the pink and purple bad
spread its carpet of bloesoms; and a
the end of this moor there were mar
small houses of the poor, who wer
not so very poor, nor so much aMiW
ed, as Sandie Leslie.
Sandie Lesie had not bean always
so poor, neither had he. aaam y
afflicted: he had been Vu 'Ig
He had been appy wbao JlI"
and hardy, 40 leaped fioMi4tL
rock, from crag to cag.,
mountain wind, an.
driving snow. He Whad ,bW
when he came back at
and gloom, or in the
em when the shadow wm
pAfow his dear young
oeat AWo the door et*hat
L- J*uIk w






the sweet smile of welcome that
beamed Aem her eyes would light
him the quicker to his home of love
mad peace.
But just twelve months, only for
twelve months, did those bright eyes
look out from his hut door to meet
his coming; just in twelve months
his yang wife died, and left him a
little helpmes infant girL
Sweet, darling h e Ilsie! Her
hther got a poo woman to nurse
when she was brought
6 knm, a wee, wee thing, just
weep about, the poor young
heart was glad, and he pressed
to his breast, and knelt down
with her in his arms, and payed
el to give him grace to train up
Ate dear babe for heaven; that m*
AIb L_ Y- -. &- M-1-. l -ISMS




A uroUU M


eme, and g whoe her blimed am
their was gone,--even where thee
are pleasures for evermore.
Poor Saadie Leslie had beae
lonely and sad; but he had not bam
fretted, nor even unhappy, fr he
was a Christian man; and though
he had missed his dear wife, andth
cheerful joys of his humble bas,
he knew there was love for him
heaven, and never-endinglj
And though he no longeanmm
his lowly hut at evening,
fagots were blazing "bight,
eyes and face of his happy
looked brighter and wartr;
came home to find a c6d h
and an empty home,--fee iaslme
was there to kindle his f6Wi'
him wlcome,-he found e- ft
I6We A-we he ceuld now rAiN






upon earth-in the Bible. He read
that blessed book at mor, he read
it at noon, and he read it at night
When he rose up at early dawn, it
wa his counselor; when he sat at
mid-day in the wild solitudes of his
native hills, it was his companion;
when he was alone at evening in
his lent hut, it was his comforter;
and the poor shepherd knew the
Great Shepherd's love, and felt that
hi rod and his staff they comforted


S CHAPTER IL
LITTLE ELSIE.
Axo now his little Elsie was
Itought home to his hut; and she
bore her mother's name, and had
sr mother's eyes,-4he -me ao


________ _I_ _____~




A uMru u"wI uiZJU0. LD
dark, hiny eyes, that used to look
out for his coming, and grow bnigth
when he came; and the poor ihep
herd must have loved his child for
her mother's sake alone, if she had
not been such a dear, loving, gmte
little thing, that any one mut love
her for her own. But little Elt wa
all this, and her poor father thoagt
that her young, dark, fishing ye,
like her mother's, spoke of a ami
that was good, and tender, d
loving. Then Sandie
cared for his babe bimself~a
thought that he had need of m lO-
to. help him. Every morning! .
wrapped his child in his plaidli t
ownied her out to the hillsb;al
aile thing would creep rota i8
wed,^ at he sat reading hisJ bl* i
sge i4ahes.; adabe woul dkP




UM OIML ow moo0


daisy, er a heth-blomio, ftom
n; and hold it up to his eyes, and
mae.
Then came that delightful moment
rhen her infant tongue was loosed;
ad its fist little lisping sounds were
weter to the father's ear than the
mai of dreams, or the song of
bk, or ady earthly sound to which
* had lined well pleased. And
Ma mem a time, but it was very
mon sA', when the lonely shepherd
nL&s* pleasaat employment in the
l, in teaching his little gir
"ciml the lettes of the alphabet,
dM all them al by name. Sandie
maie had no other book but the
ible; but from this he taught his
iill. all the letters; aad wben the
'it lvring happy thig, wa
'*aIjW id




A Imm, m a QOlS. 3M
the shade f a tek, oe rumny hil-
side, with her rosy arms round hi
neck, ase would look down at -the
lines l finger traced on the blem-d
book that uy open on his knee, and
repeat the words he spoke, andb
she read them herself
Thus little Eleie learned majml
many a text of holy writ; u abs
even able to read lon belWmh'r
children, whose lires are at s t
in the wild mountain, hve'lhl
ftom gormnesse, mad in hlam
teB their letters
Fw nthe sky above, a in f
euth benea, th, the*epheld M
hismanat gir how woodeIrftl h
eeks ofd ..1 "
T~hui, fro day to day,'M L;
0mmle to month and sea c
Oli W3s;MeW/Gr'er.. -




aurD era. or E MI


She dwelt among the hills, ad
glens, and braeL Her soig and
laugh were heard mincing with the
ga gling streams or echoing back
from cliff and cavern.
She was happy;-happy when
she danced with her own shadow
in.Ie san-lit glen; happy when she
snumg her garland of wild flowers
by tke shadowed stream; happy
wbn dshe chased the painted but-
i=M over the heath, and caught it,
ibthmt it not; for she was happier
Amten it flew off again; and she
*bAmght it Wred its liberty the moas,
because it had lost it fbr a moment.
kpAnd she was happy, too, Yhen
*t at her fater'z feet, and brd
him read God's holy word;. and whm




A sUAsPUsi amuOW I
he spoke to her hor f ed di-ti
another, and of the blessed. i-th
whom ahe had loved and tiestt
mad through faith in whom we amt
obtainn remiimon of o iaus, and ll
Father benaits of his pason. A-d
ihe was happy, evening and mumg
Lag, when abe knelt at her fatr'
knee, and prayed God to give il
lay by day her daily bread; to flu
gve her her sins; to deMlAe -r
from evil, and suffer her Mnt d
led into temptation. ..
Little Elie loved all tho gai<
all things seemed to love BA '
to fear her not In the imosy>IL
where the ancient trse al sgolP
their knotted roots, among immm
amacovered rock, he made:
dhnober of state in the tIdra r
taw beah; and when Al .a




Lt TRE BLIUD GIML OF TRH XOO,
ham like a airy queen, inging, or
Wling to hersdl the iug-dove over
sr hkd only worked its ruffled
hoat the faster, and seemed to coo,
amd to coo, with more tenderness
md joy, as her fond admiring eyes
asked up to his.
The wild rabbits raised up their
ng ears, and looked at her with
hair round fill eyes, and then ca-
pled boat, as if to make the child
at, and clap her hands; but they
lid not fly from her.
L, Uh timid linnet never ceased its
Im. (kough the slight blosoma of
lMth o-arn bough it mat on fell on
hw eild's head, like specks of mow
am its darkness, as she at on the
pen heath beside it, ringing her
nreelace of flowers a berries; and
It bokler robin made khr tap ha





wo S- wleit perehed o her ha
or etangled its little feet in her hair
All the wild, sweet things of her na
tive glen knew Elsi, and feared her
not; for she was as one of them -
she lived among them, and loved
them; and I do believe the brown
busy bees, humming in the flowwm
she gathered, if they had a
would not have stung little Bide
She had no other playimte imid
except her father, she had asitgd
else to love. But how she did h
him! Her whole little k j
was hio and he ie~lidriil*
never had,a daughter a ma re
loving father. s
Thus passed seven yearn ovqr I
yeang head; and in col, lawnM
and now, or in the pleasat -ums r
time in her father's power hb, -r




1 SLIM 1BL MOff T 1


the shadowy stream; helping him to
gather his flocks on the mountain
de, preparing with her little hand
his fugal meal, or sitting in make-
believe grandeur in her hollow
beech,--these years were one sea.
sn of joy to her; for the heart make
happiness in every time and place,
and every season is good when the
beot i glad
lam! alas! who could have though
aa dark veil was to fall over tha
happ ohild! and that God'4
i ut llwise pYoritence
Steah her young, joyous spi
i, that

aVa P .diof amsorIwheAteP




A 9109 19m1. ct


CHAPTER III.
THE THUNDEI-STORM.
IT was a bright, warm summer'
day. Hill and valley, rock and streak
were bright, and glittering in the sn-
beams.
The shepherd was with his A-mL
on the mountain, and Elae, wo
had learned to mew, was woMag
away, mitting in her fairy AmWr
within the old bewch-twre. -r
denly the sky gre~r dark; t the
der rolled in the soduti- i A M
.nuMimrsawn and the led kf o'g
swhed hirL The sthar O^M
of his child, and Bateaed 49
wtrd the dell. A tenibl". 6rd
"Hapin, ^Sa ao aSOl pal t
fCa san laBd hnn --- a mrIe l




r Trn aLnoID onS orW TR MOOR,
orrible ight! When he came in
iew of tat dell, there was the old
follow beech split entirely open by
hat lighting flash;-its rent trunk
till standing, but each severed part
ping from each other
A cry of hmor burst from the
bpherd's heart; but the next ilant
hat heart uttered a deep thanks-
OMng; for there he saw the figure
Sbis child standing upright in the
irvidkd trunk of her beech-tree. It
ommed only as if the roof of her
hky palace had been opened, but
-I she ha been uninqure-. He
wa n:--he saw her hands wing
aMl a slight strange motion, as if
hoping in the air. He called, "El-
i, my child! come, corner' He
-ms no answer, aand w~h hee a
Mr, the tald's Bps Wse Nbrif




A samnu mm C own. g
quick, but no words eame fo
them; and her face was pele, ad
very full of terror. Not a hair of her
head was singed, and her eyes wee
turned toward him. As he came
near, the wavy motion in her huam
was quicker, and she-found a Toi
for words, and cried, "Father, hlte
it is night, night! all in a moa-t
It is dark--o dark! Where are ye,
father ?"
The father snatched his OchUl t
his breast and looked in her sp
They were just the same a- mv
as dark, as shiny; bitthbi#r**w
gone;-ahe w him not The,'l
knew in a moment that hia.ct h
blind for ever! aJ
The eyes he had bhew Cadti
perhaps. too promaud C4 t:.u
again speak to him as he oam ii






to think they did: for what we call
expremion, which makes eyes beau.
tiful, blind eyes cannot have. Poor
little Elaie; sad seemed her lot! but
the child was sooner reconciled to it
than her poor father could be. She
id weep and wail, to be sure, and
st let made sore lamentation; but
sae she was quiet, calm, and con-
ted, as a young bird that had been
taken from its home in the leafy trees
ad Abe air, and inclosed in a little
Syirypion; where, after it hasflapped
jl aelme wing and beat its poor
-et in vali, it lamr to st still, or to
hop abrot or y as far a it can; and
-aied in the nnahine and air that t
ispermitted to enjoy, and sing as nb
i d weetly as if liberty and na-




A wsePmsmS oMLs. U

CHAPTER IV.
THE PATIENT BUIPPERI
So did sweet little Ekie's heart
cit itself to her circumstanes, and
ing in its dark prison. And it was
ot nature alone, but, surely, it w
we grace of God in her yo0 ung d
iat caused her still to be halpy i
er blindness. From a child "sh W-
nown the Holy Scriptures, whik
re able to make us wise unton sva-
on, through faith in COhit Ji-
lut when she was blind, anado79
sad them no more, "- baq-l "e
uink that she had not loved bto ad
amn enough, when she seol hm
one so; and that she had lomaid
ib and valley, and suaPl% iM
ade, aad streams and lbk, il
ba aen tternie, and a h--pial






omner mngs, more man me gooa
God who made them all. And now
she could see them no more, though
she could hear them around her;
but He who made them was still
the same to her as ever; and the
blesed words she had learned from
his word were in her memory,
and his Spirit gave to her young
beat grace and peace, and hope
eof gory.
Eie was quieted, calm;--not so
nsy, certainly; and her sweet ftee
rer afker was paler, but it beamed
ith peace and love.
Not thus was the poor shepherd,
Sandie Leslie; he could not bo"
without repining; he could not utte
tat prayer, which few human heat
man ibathe, "Not my will be done."
Hew aflieted very soe: his child


SIY m Iltaim l 4tU





could not se hrtasm; but It
time, an oft she stole r~ little
hods to his cheek* rad felt they
were wet
The shepherd now took his ehid
wilh him daily to the mountains
He feared to let her be a modent
from his eight Continually did b
say to himself; "If some mnaJki,
should befall the child, it will bing
me down with sorrow to the grave."
Poor Sendie Leslie! he was mnek
to be pitied, and needed consolamtin;
but there was no one to oonsel idh
but God, for he would nout tart
grief and complaints to his mi*&
child. And God's ways as nm a
ou way, nor his thoughts asmr
thought He does not iafm wi
gly, nor grieve the childmimn
men; and, doubdess, he hkMi.a




3M BLs UmJ GAUL or T9r MOOR,
was4set for Sandie Lesli and tried
him here upon earth, that he might
be made pae like silver in the fr-
nace of affliction, and rendered meet
for the joys of heaven.
When we, impatient mortals, try
to do good to our fellow-creatures,
and dp not at once succeed, we are
otean tempted to give them up; to
ay we have done all we can, and
must now leave them to take their own
way, and suffer its consequences.
Our heavenly Father does not
deal so with his ereatres: he fol.
ros them with blessing, or he fol.
lows them with chaisment, until
he makes them what he would have
thm to be. And it is only when
they continue to rebel more and
mor, and to harden their hearts
ag>irt his fear, that be leaves tbhe




A smwramm cR O N
to follow their own way, and to be
filled with their own devices. Bad
is then their state; for they nevw
know that he health the broken-
hearted; that he woundeth, and his
hands make whole; and that by
sorrow of countenance the heart is
made better.
Poor Sandie Leslie had mourned
deeply for the los of his sweet Eides
sight; and, perhaps, he could not Te.
sign himself quite to the will of God,
when he found he raust always ho
into these dear eyes, and see no beam
of joy, and tenderness and gtal
love, answering his gaze.
Bat the poor shepherd wa to tim
that morrow was good for his sol, and
that by much affletion he w to ea
ter the kingdom of God.




S S a?" MM .%. *A A


CHAPTER V.
T SIHIPIIHERD'8 8IOKNBSI--HIS DAUGM-
TER'S CARE
ABOUT one year after that sad
thunder storm, Sandie began to feel
te effects of what he had suffered
the winter before, when he was
caught in a snow storm on the
mountain, and nearly lost his life.
He was saved; but the cold had
penetrated.his bones: and, about a
year after his child's misfortunes, he
mt the use of his liumb and was
me after unable to ise up from
his bed.
And now what was the poor shep-
head to do? No longer could he
tend his flocks on the mountainM
and earn wherewithal to give himi
self and his child their daily bread.






What cld he do? Ah! that i a
painful, very painful question to a
when we can do nothing! Sandi
Leslie was bedridden, and his child
was blind; yet there was one thing
the poor shepherd could do; and
what was that? He could trust i
God. It was to this he was brought
at last; and his will was resigned,
and his faith was strengthened.
While he prayed, Give us this day
our daily bread," he learned to be.
lieve that he should have it, and'i
received it
The ravens brought Enkh his
bread and meat in the desert; but it
was a dove, one peaceful, sof, md
gentle as a dove, that daily braoght
the helpless man his daily Wem-)-
it wasElete, his blid i ri. d
SFamiliar had das bhe widiW,




S mt WJ 9um maU. oW XU MOOn,
the wild, fair neighborho-a.dnad
her father's hut; and in her blindness
the picture was so impressed upon
her mind, that it seemed a if that
mind led her, and guided her to all
her old haunts, without a danger,
mad almost without arrenor. She
knew every glen, and every hill, and
every shady dell, and could stop at
the root of the old beech-tree that
wa scathed by the lightning that
had struck out the light of her young
epes She could find her way to
the green edge of the shadowy
stream, and her hand would light on
the frt pale prim oae of the spring
that in her childish love she ued to
kneel down and kiss
Ibe ooud do all this, and do it for
her own silent joy-a joy no @ateV
emuld itenneddie with, fr gaM




A aRIEUFmma VOUU.D w
could understand the blind .gi's
joy. But now she joyed in that
sweet, strange liberty of sightle
rambling, not for herself or for hae
own little pleasure; but she joyed
that she could speed away over the
wide, healthy moor, that lay beyamd
their hills and dells, and claim from
the dwellers in the hamlet beyond
the boon they willingly bestowed;
the daily bread contributed by one
and another, which Providence apr
pointed to sustain the dsephbe
and his child until the body AumM
go where high and lqWspel
gether, aad the spirit enter vik
rich and poor are unknown tes^
but all who are rich in faith, am
heirs of the kingdom, pou-e-i-
ihritance,--llness of joy, old
plpares for evermore.
a




NLAM O or om 111


And now the blind eild of Hie
moor was known as she had neres
been known before. She was known
by that name too; and the poor
people, who saw and.bliesed her,
loved to watch her as she came
along like some light thing floating
oR the air; her hands waving slightly
with that peculiar motion which they
had taken the first moment she
mined the light of day, and which
walking she always mechanically
ad. It seemed as if like little
PaH~a, they beat beek the awir
trough which she moved, so quick-
l that you could not believe the
child was blind, if it were not that
her dnrk as her floating hair,
Always the one look; and that
the would stop, and turn her bJi
mad listen, when no other et heas




A eORPSno'S OnsR,. M
a sound: fbr the losw of one seam
had quickened another; andthesomd
of a gugling brook, of which no other
ear could hear a tinkle, would gude
Elsie on her way along.
Blessed is charity; and blessed is
that principle of our nature which
endears to us the sorrowing or suf
fering one to whom we mini
ter.
The poor loved the blind gil
of the moor, to whom they ga
of their tAtle substance; and, q
how she loved the father to whom
she carried it! BHw vain
words be to paint the dleepP
lvoe, that dwelt iao hWftye
heart! ^r
-When he had cared for hl
MInot know bow much dm li-
tr Ather: but now. that dss M





16 THE BLIND GIBL OF THL MOOB,
or him, ministered to him, felt he
vas dependent on her,--truly her
'love was wonderful, passing the
ove of woman."


CHAPTER VI
THE FINAL SCENE.

THUs months fled away; ay years
assed away: for, for two years was
he poor shepherd there in his lonely
nt, dependent on the charity of his
Neighbors, and on the care and love
f his blind girl But peace was
is; a peaoe the world gives not,
nd cannot take away. His quiet
ieart communed with its God upon
is bed, and was still. From the
ook of life he read to his sights
child the words of hope, and peaY




A BNPBHRD'1 CHILD. 98
and comfort; and there, in that solil
tary hut, had they the means of
grace; and over their poverty, dark-
ness, and sickness, were shed the
hopes of glory.
One day young Elsie was goii
forth on her daily mission. Happy
for her, her eyes were sightless, and
she saw not that from day to day hot
father waxed weaker and weaker,
and his features grew more sallow
and sunken. She was i of her
activity, because she could display
them to him; and she loved to show
him that his blind girl was yet swit
of foot as the young roe, and lgM
and active as the fawn oi the-hik
Her little hands daily milked a s
petted goats that gave them-. "
and few seeing eyes guide l
owners'to more work than the '






child performed. So she would come
dancing into the hut, with her light
basket of provisions on her head, or
slung round her neck on her shoul-
ders, and leap at once on her knees
on the side of his bedstead, and put
down her hands, and then her lips,
as if she could feel, though she could
not see, the smile of love and wel-
come that dwelt on the face beneath
them.
This morning, when she was
going out, she came as usual to bid
her father good-by. Sandie Leslie
pat forth his arms, and took his
child within them, and kissed her
lips and cheeks, and forehead, and
eyes. Then he laid his hands on
her head, and prayed; and wh-
he ended, and said in a low, home
voice, "Father of mercies, God of




NIarmamw'W maiaWf W
ll consolation, bless my dLildf
Elsi felt their, was something a
emn in the moment,md she ki-d
ier father, and said, "I will notSata
ong, father."
So she went away lightly over dt
noor, and her speed brought bMk
ier lightness of heart, and she onLe
thought how soon she should be
ack, and how happy she should leb
Eer father had more appetite the Aw
ast days than he had had for manmt
md the blind girl, s she ped,*W
the mooc was gladde&4 blVy wiM
oftaking back some little thifg t
would please him, for a kind..g j
kh, 16&A rwm.-- 4 iA t M amb*






!met there the minister, who
ked long to her, and promised the
Kt day to ride over the moor, and
ne to the shepherd's hut
'his circumstance, and some
ers, delayed Elsie's return longer
mn she had expected: but full of
--for the minister had sent her
her a little money, and many kind
rds-she flitted over the moor,
th waving hands, a low song, and
Leart as gay as the lark that rose
from the heather, singing, singing
dearer, and sweeter, and gayer,
it rose up in the blue air toward
iven.
She reached the hut, and she
wbed one instant at the door, and
d, "Am I late, father? Have yeo
Rted for me, father?" No answer
me, and she sprung over the floor,
$




A smUPaIR OILDnL. 41
and, bringing her feet together, jamp.
ed up, and alighted on her knees on
the bedstead. Then she pat dowa
her hands as usual on the shepherd's
face, and its coldness struck to her
heart. She bent her.A~I and they
seemed to glue themnslvew to the
marble beneatlt~ .1
The blind girl MaQed up, and fled
away, back again, over the moor. On
she went, like a snow-flake driven
by the blast; for terror, not lightness
of heart, winged her flying feet And
she entered the house where 0U
minister still remained, and shesl
down at his feet, her arms on hir
knees, and called out, "My ftht
is dead!"
ILFwras instinct taught poor 1d"
AP for she scarcely knew !Vit
death was But for m1v daivs&U




4a T B aBLOD tGI Tr X UOO,
words were the only ones she uttered.
Honor and fear appeared to suspend
grie and she shed no tear, but sat
pale and silent; only sometimes she
would start and shudder, and say,
"My father is dead!"
They did not let her go back to the
hut again. They buried the poor
shepherd, and the minister took his
child to his own house.
But kindness could not revive the
young heart that horror and grief had
rushed. The face of the blind girl
smiled again in answer to that kind-
asS, but her heart smiled no more.
Namlore did she speed over the
moor to receive the bounty of the
poor, who loved and- wondered at
hum No more did she visit theg; l
ml hilK ad del, where alla
memedi b aeim her u their ow.





SaIPBBORD' OcBI 4I
The music of the streams had last its
sweetness to her ear, and lke gay
carols of birds were as when ane
singeth songs to a heavy heart
Elsie drooped as the lily whidib
storm has crushed ere its time to
wither has come: when it folds up
its blighted chalice, and bows its
head and dies, ere the hour of the
sere and yellow leaf has come.
But sweetness and love were in
her smiles; and her words, too, gave
the good minister cause to hope that,
though her young life was, indeed, as
the Scripture saith, even as a vapor
that passeth away, it.would be drawn
up from this sin and sorrow-darkened
world, by that blessed Sun of right-
wusness which had so early risen on
4 bAul with healing ih his wings
MIL.-- .-:.I1 r-- a.2nJ 1_. P --3





S44 TI BLID GIRL OF THE MOOL.
in the quiet kirk-yard, beyond the
moor, may now be seen a long grassy
grae, and close, very close beside it,
a short green grave. The shepherd
and his child rest there together. He
is with those who through faith and
patience inherit the promises. The
blind girl of the moor, too, has gone
where "there shall be no night; and
they need no candle, neither light of
the sn, for the Lord God giveth them
light"




THE END.




I.^






MB PUNumD FmO sun
or B mT rilmzoT iba


JERUSA

ANCIENT AND I


EMBRACING THRILLING MORTI(
AND A DLgCCr.PTIO OP
MOST REMARKABLE CITY (

Tm

BOATMAN'S DA1
A WIARATITZ FOR THB LI
THL UNLKEARU




















Tis book should he in the hands of all friend
specially in the MethodLt Episcopal Churcl
Ciu is the seat of our present missionary effl
,tf r~~n










Lire ur ubIRUO
Price twenty-two ceat.

LIVES OF THE C&S
Price twety-thr cens.

LIFE OF MOHAMME
Price twenty-three cents.

THE DAWN OF MODERN CIVIL
0on,
SKETCIIE8 OF THE SOCIAL CONDITION
FROM THE TWELFH T TOT 2 JETTEST
Price twnty-four cete.

GLIMPSES OF THE DARK
MING MSITQCR OF EUROPE IN RA
Pric* twenty-four cent.

THE DEVOUT SOLD
A MEMOIR OF MAJOR-OENERAI
BY ARV. DANIL WISE





n Iwm qmr ml


IMPORTANT QUESTION
OR SUNDAY BOHOLAR&.
Price twelve cents.

RIL FOOL; OR, THE EVILS OF DECEP
A nOOK THAT ALL PLATFUL CMLIIM SHOULD I
Price farteen cents.

000 RESOLUTION.
IT CNAMLOrI' JA JMETB.
Price twelve cents.

CHILDREN'S PRAVERE
AND THE LORD'S PRATER EXPLA
Price fourteen cents.

LESSONS FROM THE BI
THAT CBILDRiUN MATY ABILY LEARR
Priee artln mtte .

80DOM AND GOMORRAHi
AX ACrOOTT or TWO WO NDERPL OIT
low- Shke Im.







University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs