• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The picture alphabet






Title: A B C Picture Book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001677/00001
 Material Information
Title: A B C Picture Book
Series Title: A B C Picture Book
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C.
Publisher: Clark, Austin and Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1850
 Notes
General Note: Theodore Thinker was Francis C. Woodworth's pseudonym
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001677
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA1724
ltuf - ALJ0507
oclc - 45178481
alephbibnum - 002239969

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The picture alphabet
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
Full Text


THE

A C

PICTU BO



54 4)Ithare 4)liieir.

NEW YORK:
IPUMMLIE MIEM 3BY OILi lKq. aV F s @@
205 BROADWAY.
1850.





















Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1850,
BY CLARK, AUSTIN, & CO.,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the
SSouthern District of New York.







THE PICTURE ALPHABET.


I AM going to make a little book for
little folks. Look here, John, Henry,
Sarah, Anna,-no matter what your
names are,-look here. I have got some
pretty pictures made for each one of the
letters of the alphabet; and I will tell
you something about all these pictures,
if you will listen to me. Let me see.
Would you like rhymes ? "Yes," some
of you say, "I like them very much."
Well, then, I will give you some rhymes.
"But I would rather have something
else," half a dozen of the littLeVfoys ,C4
girls tell me. Very well, I will mafe





6 THIE PICTURE ALPHABET.

the rhymes; and I will make something
else, too. I will give you a I picture for
every letter; and when you see the pic-
ture, you will think of the letter which
stands for it. I will put two lines of
poetry under the picture, and these two
lines will tell a little about the kind of
animal which you will see in the picture.
Then, if the poetry is not enough, I will
tell you more about the animal in prose.
How will that do, little friends ? I want
to make just such a book as you will all
like. I love little boys and girls. I
love to talk to them. I love to write
for them. But I should not like to tell
them any thing, if they did not like to
hear it. No, indeed.











44m


A stands for an Ape, who,
as every one knows,
Will cut up his capers
S wherever he goes.




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 9


THE APE.

I went to see an ape the other
day. He looked so much like
a little boy, that you would
almost think he was a boy, at
first. The man who had the
ape, dressed him up in a frock,
and put a little hat on his head.
Did you ever see an ape ? It
makes me laugh now, only to




10 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.
think how this fellow looked,
and what tricks he played. He
carried a little gun, like a soldier.
Once he pointed it at some one
in the room, just as if he was
going to shoot him. But the
ape could not have shot any-
body, if he had tried, because
his gun was not made like the
guns you have seen the soldiers
have. It was nothing more than
a stick, made so as to look like





THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 11
a gun. They called the name
of this ape Jack; and when
anybody spoke his name, he
knew what it meant. If his
master-said, "Jack, come here,"
he ran up to his master in a
minute. The funniest thing I
saw Jack do, was to shave him-
self. He went through with
all the motions, just as a man
would, only he had a dull razor,
which did not cut any. I have





12 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

heard of an ape, though, who
got a sharp razor to shave him-
self with, and instead of cutting
off his beard, he cut his throat,
and killed himself. See what
he got by his mischief. Apes
and monkeys, as well as boys
and girls, find that mischief is
bad business.




13


B stands for a Bullfinch:
pray, how can you sing
So sweetly, shut up in a
cage, poor thing!


'e ^idtme llplah'5




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 15


THE BULLFINCH...

What a pretty bird this is!
SJust look at him! Dear little
fellow! Hear him sing. JI
ish I could sing so. I won-
Sder if he is happy there, shut
u: p in a cage. I tell you what
it is, little friend. I oiw :t
Shear birds sing, as well s any-
t body, I am sure. But it always
?.. ' ...




16 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.
makes me feel bad, to see
them shut up in a small cage,
so that they cannot get out.
I had one once. Poor fellow!
He used to sing all day long,
as if he was happy; and it may
be he was happy. But I never
shall forget how hard he used
to try to get out of his cage,
when it was hanging out of
doors, in the summer, as soon
as another bird flew near him.




THE PICTURE ALPHABET., 1T

Then he would stop singing,
and would not sing again for
a great while. I made up my
mind, that if my bird died, I
P would never have another in
a cage. He did die. One
morning I went to the cage to
Sfeed him, ard he was dead. t I
;have never had a bird since,
; a.nd I never mean to have one.
it is enough for me to hear
them sing in the woods and in
2




18 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.
the orchard. Dear little crea-
tures! I should be sorry to
hear that any of my young
friends were so naughty as to
hurt one of them. You will
not hurt them,,will you ? And
you will not take away their
pretty little eggs, I know you
will not. Be kind to the birds,
dear child; and then they will
love you, and sing for you.













whose note ou can hear,
As you walk in the woods, ,
in the spring of the year,
I i




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 21


THE CUCKOO.

The Cuckoo is a little bird
that lives in the woods. The
further he gets away from the
places where there are men,
and women, and children, the
better he seems to like it. He
is not much of a singer. He
says, koo, koo, koo; and that is
about all he does say. af'




22 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

he first begins to sing, he sings
his koo, koo, very slowly; but
pretty soon he sings a little
faster, then a little faster than
that, and by and by his song
is fast enough for anybody.
The reason he is called a cuc-
koo, is because he makes a noise
that sounds something like this
word. The cuckoo is a thief.
When I tell you that, you may
like him :or not, just as you




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 23
please. For my part, I do not
like him half as well as I do
some of the birds that live with
him in the woods, just because
he steals from other birds. He
goes to a nest when the birds
are away, and picks a hole in
the eggs, and eats them. He
ought to be ashamed of himself
--don't you think so? It may
be he does not know any better,
though; and if he does not know




24 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

any better, then we ought not
to blame him. You are not to
blame for doing any thing, if
you do not know any better.
But when you do know bet-
ter-when your mother tells
you that you must not do any
thing-then you are to blame
if you do it; then you are
wicked.




25


D stands for the Dog; and
he's nobody's fool,
Although he has never been
sent to school.


(CrI*4f e 4lbaet




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 27


THE DOG.

You have heard a great many
stories about dogs. Do you
want to hear one more? Well,
I will tell you one-only one
now. A great way off, there
is a place where it is very cold
indeed-a great deal colder
.than !' ere you live. In
that p a here was onI:, a




28 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

large dog, who used to look all
round the woods, to see if he
could not find somebody that
had got lost in the snow, and
was almost frozen to death.
'One day he found a little boy,
about five years old, almost
covered up with snow. Poor
boy! He had got lost, and he
could. ot tell where to go. He
was so cold that he had lain
down to die. Well, thisgood.





THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 29

dog came up to him, as he
lay there; and the little boy
warmed himself with the shag-
gy coat of the dog, until he
could get up. Then the dog
tried to get the boy on his
back. The boy did not know
what to make of that, at first.
But by and by, when he knew
what the dog wanted of him,
he got upon his back, and held
close to his long hair, "iA
'- ^ 1....,




30 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.
the dog carried him off to the
house where his master lived.
The good folks in the house
brought the little boy to the
fire, and he got warm in a few
minutes. Then they got him
some nice bread and milk for
his supper, and by and by be
Sent to' bed. The next day
he' went home. If it had not
been for this large dog, th..
little boy would have died. .




31


E stands for the Eagle, who
soars in the air:
If he should get hungry, the
hens must take care.


Ir ir n t Slplnbtt.




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 33

THE EAGLE.

There are a great manyJ.
kinds of the eagle. Some kihdsg.
of eagles live on the animals,.
hey can find in the woo nd
some of then live on fil It
i a pretty sight to see the eaglk ,
catch a-tish. He flies aloi~o
close: y over the water, until he
s seie fish swimming below;




34 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.
and then he darts down, almost
as quick as a flash of lightning,
and catches the poor fish. I
once saw one of these birds fly-
ing away from the river where
I was sailing in a boat, and I
thought he was carrying some-
thing rather too heavy for him.
I looked again, and found out
that the bird had a great eel,
which he was trying to carry
off to his nest. The eel did not




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. t 35
4 like to ride in that style, tnd so
he was twisting about in a:
sorts of ways, trying to get
clear of the eagle. Eels are
very slippery fish, as you know;
and the eagle had as much as
he could do hold the uneasy
fellow. -a while, when
the bird ha got a great wayr.
of I saw the eel drop, and fall
to the ground. But the eagle
Ie:w down, and caught it again.




36 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.
Some eagles catch hens and -
geese and rabbits, instead of fish.
Once there was an eagle that
caught a weasel -a w away
with him; but the weasel bit y
the eagle's neck so hard that
he was glad. to' let go of him.
Poor eagle! he bled to death.
in a little while after he h
dropped the weasel. ,

Z-A .^ \:










__





F stands for the Fox: you
may know by his eye,
SSo sharp and so keen, that
She's cunning and sly.




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 39


THE FOX,
--4#-- --------
Yes, the fox is sly, very sly.
He loves to eat a goose or a
chicken for dinner; and so,
when he thinks nobody will see
him, he steals softly into the
farm-yard, where he takes one
of these fowls, and runs off with
it. But the fox gets punished
for catching hens and geese,





40 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

sometimes. The dog finds out
where he has gone: he runs
after him, and catches him.
Then the poor fox has to die.
Dogs love to kill foxes as well
as foxes love to kill hens; and
if a dog can ever get hold of a
fox, he is sure to bite him so
hard that he will die.




41


j 4idur tI lphahid.








G stands for a Goldfinch,
a beautiful bird:
In the orchards of England
-his music is heard.





THE PICTURE ALPHABET.


THE GOLDFINC H


The goldfinch is a pretty
bird, and a fine singer, too.
Sometimes he is so tame that
he will eat out of your hand,
if you will let him. When he
gets out of his cage he loves to
play with the children, and he
will fly upon their shoulders,
and chase them around the


43




44 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

room. You can teach him to
do a great many funny things,
if you try. I have seen one of
them with a harness on, drawing
a wagon, just like a horse; and
another that would ride all
around the room, on the back
of a tame robin.















H stands for Hyena, an ill-
natured beast;
SA carcass all putrid affords
him a feast.




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 47


THE HYENA.

Oh, what a cross animal this
is! He acts as if he wanted
to be biting somebody all the
time. He never seems to be
good-natured. But some boys
I have seen, often act very much
like the hyena. They are as
cross as he is, and they act as
if they would like to bite some-




48 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

body, too. I hope you are not
one of those boys; are you?
If I thought you was, I am
sure I could not love you. I
could love a hyena almost as
well as I could love you, if you
were cross, and spoke croli
words to your brother or sister,
or anybody else.




.49











I stands for the Ibex, a kind
of a goat,
With a pair of long horns, !
and a shaggy coat.
7 ,_.+,. I -, +--, W C ~VV~ V _.;.




' 51


je ^ifutm 3lpljabd.


J stands for the Jaguar:
'tis all the same,
If you call him a Panther;
an easier name.


-\v




t 53

| ai irtallptinh



- M




Stands for the,-creature
we call Kangaroo:
A very odd name-he's i
K an odd fellow, too. 4
^^ j^-^rzr-^.-.--^rt--Ui.^^fi.^^iT. ^jL-.^^r'i.j*~-








S. --ir





L stands for the Lapwing:
Syou see how he looks;
And can learn all about him,
by reading your books.





THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 57


THE LAPWING.

One of these little birds once
lived in a garden. He got to
be very tame, and came to the
door of the house. A little
girl-I think her name was
Sarah-heard him every morn-
ing, saying, pewit, pewit ; and
she thought that the meaning
of pewit was, "Let me in." So




58 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

she opened the door, and sure
enough he flew in. By and
by, he went out again; but
when he wanted to come back
he would say pewit, and little
Sarah would let him in. When
the weather was cold, the bird
came in every day, and staid
near the fire a long time, it was
so cold and stormy out of doors.
Sarah was a very good girl, to
take such good care of the bird.















M stands for the Marmot:
he's tamed with ease;
SAnd people can teach him
to dance, if they please.




61

I ljt virtuee 5lljnM ]








N stands for the Nightingale:
list to his lay--
He sings in the evening, as
well as the day.
f~L6LL-c~~~~L~P~ Z ~ .... t GL-C-L~J_,-


0







1 t itrt It









not fond of the light:
He sleeps in the day-time,
and hoots in the night.
]~ --_^- 11




a65o












S beast of prey:
I think I shall try to keep
out of his way.




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 67


THE PANTHER.

I said that I thought I should
try to keep out of his way: I
think you had better keep out
of his way, too. His teeth aie
very sharp, and so are his dIaws.
But panthers do not live any-,
where near you; Ikguess. They
live a great way off, where
there are not many people and




68 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.
not many houses. There they
carry off sheep and calves, and
eat them. Sometimes, when
they are very hungry, they will
come near the house; and they
would carry off the little chil-
dren, if the men did not look
out, and take care of the chil-
dren. How thankful we ought
to be to our heavenly Father,
that there are no panthers, nor
tigers, nor lions where we live.




THE PICTURE ALPHABET. 69
God is very good to us. I
want you to think of this every
day. He is very good indeed:
he takes care of us: he gives
us all the nice things we have:
he does not let any wild beast
come where we are, and hurt
us. When we lie down on
our beds at night, he lets us
sleep safely. Last night you
slept soundly and sweetly, be-
cause God watched over you,




70 THE PICTURE ALPHABET.

and kept you. Dear little boy,
dear little girl, God is so good
to you, that you ought to love
him more than you do your
father and mother.




71


* it llinbt







SQ stands for the Quail: 'tis
his note that you hear-
.Jore wheat! more wheat!
in the Fall of the year.

4




73









SR stands for the gay and
Sthe playful Racoon:
He plays like a monkey,
S--f'like a buffoon.













' 70

S stands for the Stag: though
he runs pretty fast, 4
I fear that the hunters will
catch him at last. i




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs