• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 The little ship
 The little girl and the shell
 Robert and John
 The frosty morning
 Susan's white rabbit
 The pet robin
 Back Cover






Title: Child's new story book, or, Tales and dialogues for little folks
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001662/00001
 Material Information
Title: Child's new story book, or, Tales and dialogues for little folks
Alternate Title: Tales and dialogues for little folks
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Babcock, Sidney, 1797?-1884 ( Publisher )
Publisher: Published by S. Babcock
Place of Publication: New Haven
Publication Date: 1849
 Subjects
Subject: Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Chapbooks -- 1849   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1849   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1849   ( rbbin )
Children's stories -- 1849   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1849
Genre: Chapbooks   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Connecticut -- New Haven
 Notes
General Note: Date on cover, 1850.
General Note: Cover in blue paper with illustrations; publisher's advertisements on back.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001662
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002251199
oclc - 14637950
notis - ALK2963

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    The little ship
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The little girl and the shell
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Robert and John
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The frosty morning
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Susan's white rabbit
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The pet robin
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text


I







J U CHILD'S


NEW STORY BOOK;
OR
TALES AND DIALOGUES

FOR LITTLE FOLKS.









I'll watch thy dawn of joys, and mould
Thy little hearts to duty,-
I'll teach thee truths as I behold
Thy faculties, like flowers, unfold
In intellectual beauty.


NEW HAVEN.
PUBLISHED BY S. BABCOCK.

1849.




































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U lILD'S

NEW sTORY BOOK.



T.TE LIftLE SHIP.
Ihal made a nice little ship, of.
cork, and am 'going to let it sail in
this great basin of water. Now let
us fancy this water to be the North-
Pacific Ocean, and those small pieces
of -cork on the side of the basin, to
be the Friendly Islands, and this little
man standing on the deck of the ship,
to be the famous navigator, Captain
Cook, going to find them."
"Do you know that the Fri.ndly
Islands were raised by corals ?"
I suppose itley were."
Do yohitKnow where Captain
Cook was bin?" .
e was born at Marton, a vil-
lage in the North Riding of York-
shire, in England."





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.qIt L''S NEW STORY BOOK. 5
THE LITTLE GIRL AND
t. TPE- SHULL.
SWhen .Ient to visit a friend, the
other. dji;y 'saw a little girl with
wh4,. I' ucha pleased, 'sat
on a. Aeii It 'by the fi sWabaiTid
shla, ld in her hand a '(tty white
seahel,, faintly tinted With pink,
which She kept placing against her
ear; anid all the white a settled calm
rested upon her face' and she seemed
as-if she were listening'to the holy
tones of some loved voice; then
taking it away from her ear, she
would gaze upon iNwith a look of
deep fondness and pensive delight.
At last I said,
What are you doing, my dear?"
"I afflistening to the whisper."
What whiper ?" I asked.
"The whisper of the sea," she said.
My uncle Aent me'this shell, and a
letter in*bich he said, If I placed
it against ny ear I should hear the
whisper of the sea;' and he also said,
he would soon come to us, and bring
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6 CHILD'S NEW Si#
me a great many pret n;
mamra saimd, hen we.ea
w t of the shell, .
it Henry's p*
it' veryreci& d
I!db ebetet


O6 In-1 NW JO0
One. fin .y orni", Robert
and John e e d'tj-ai~nama
to go to s~tht So SAoy.pgp eir
caps, and i 9kag k eirTaam-
ma, were'sboon on the- wy Now,
first they ha to pa thr~unh a
pleasant lane~'v ith tall elg'. tees on
one side, and a hawthorA hedge on
the other; thep acroza two fields;
then througi-a churcYtard fnd then
up a little .grove, at ie-.endf which
was the schoolhouse. B.Btihbey bad
not gone moter than-ialf the way
down the lane,-when"' J6 began to
loiter behind, to gather wvIS owners,
and to pick up smooth little pebbles
which had been washed ,clean by the


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8 CHILD'S NEW SVi' ,OO|. .
rain, while Iobert wanted t
ing his book. jt lastt,'
after his brother, s84 1d.kioas4 e
what is the use, _o ito Cc0hool
this iMnmorning; 'ti.. play. traitit-
"^No s;lejie Robert, tX 'lpind
ta& pliaire, rfor which I knOw I
niaust. Bf'4i .4f'.tr hours "
"'Noriseie: about'.that, said -4ihn;
"I will eqjby el.f wtle I can."
I "And so wjill ,," repliea Robert;
"and I shalll-.est enjoy -myself by
keeping a good conscience, and so I
will go to school." ,
"Very well, Robert, then tellthe
master t-lt I am ill and cannot
come," said John. .
"I shall do no such thing, John,"
replied Robert; I shall simply tell
the 'truth, if -anm askcd why you are
not with me." .
Then I say you are very unkind,
Robert," said Jfphi.
"You will not go with me, tlpen ?"
asked Robert, with a tear -n his?
sweet blue eye -
/------- \ *' /'' "^





CHILSD 8NEW STORY BOOK. 9
sbI shl'go up into this tree," said
Mn; "and eogood morning to you."
SPoor Robert gave one long look
at his brother heaved a deep. sigh,
and went on liis way. And naughty
[John sat in the tree and watched
Shim, after he ha'.. crsddthe stile,
walk along the smdot.h broad, path-
way that led through the field, then
enter the churlch-yard, and stoop to
read a verse on a tomb-stone; then
take out his "kerchief, wipe a tear
from his eye, look upward to the
cloudless heaven, and then he was
gone. And John sat still in the tree,
and he said to himself, "Oh that
I were as good as my brother; but
I will go down and follow him."
So he ent down froMi the tree,
leapt over the stile, r.ahc along the
fields, and-did not stay to gather one
cowslip, though each one made him
a golden bow as he.ppassed. And
when he went into the school-room,
though he was only five minutes
later than his brother, he told his








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CHILD'S NEW STORY BOOK. 11
-4 astler the whole truth, and how
iaughty he would have been had it
not' been fot- .kind little thought,
which came into ~1 mind, and bade
him try to be: ,god as his brother..

THE FRP O Y N QRNING.
',! this clear:.fts ty rning!
it mnies ine feel all Kife alg lee. I
declare I have. been ruling about
the garden ~l I am all of a glow;
and there you sit by the. fire, Emma,
looirrg quite dull. Come with me,
and I will show you how the little
pond is frozen over."
"No,-it is so cold, I do not like
to go."
"Oh! put on your bonnet, and tie
your shawl round your neck, and, be-
lieve me, you will be' warm enough."
"No, I will npt go, and so you
need not teaze me any more."
"O will go. with you, brother
Edwin; I am not cold."
"Yes, do, there's a dear little Ellen,
and I will show you the long icicles





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CHILD'S NEW S.O6RY. BOOK.


13


,which hang on the fr6nt of the ar-
bor; and let its just run to the'field,
as I wait you t.tEi-4.- hoar frost on
the grass,, and p c-ra: crispunder
your feet.. .s1itJlt Jovely morn-
ing, sister lia' -l~
"-It is indeed raitber,."

SUSA.N'S H-TE. RAtI BIT.
Oh!-f Mary, I h'ave got psuh a dani
ling w.ite .rabbit as I think you never
saw. 1do believe it is the sweetest
little rabbit in the world; for I only
had it given to me this morning, and
yet it wil eat closer from nmy hand,
and let me stroke it, or do any thing
I please. 'And James. says that he
will make a litle house for.it, which
cousin Henry will paint very nice.
And ppap says, that I -must call my
little pet, Snowtdrop, because he is as
white as the drifted snow; and mam-
ma says, that its two little bright
eyes are like rubies. Do you not
think, Mary, as I do, that it is the
sweetest little rabbit in the world?


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CHILD'S NEW STORYFBOO0K.


TIlE PET ROIlN.
My brother Fre erick hasa robin,
and he calls him~'a. dear little pet, he
sings so sweetly, o3h! you cannot
thirk how we)l1b, 'knows Freddy.
You should .ne -hitin.early in the
morning, when ie t come down
stairs, or at anyVaimS when we come
in from,a walkih.ow he runs to one
corner of his . and hen FJred wvhiie and says,
" MIF eauty my finr fellow !" he
stands up so straight, to listen to his
kini little masters. voice, and then
begins jumping and hoppig from
one end of the cage to the other, just
as I have seen happy little children
jump and hop about in their sports.
Sometime ago he was ill, and we
were sadly afraid he would die; he
used to sit from day to day, with
ruffled feathers and drooping wings;
his food was left untasted, and his
pleasant voice was seldom heard;
but in two or three weeks he began
to grow better, and to eat his food as
S -


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15





16 CHILD'S NEW STORY BOOK.
usual, and to pick amongst the green
grass of the little sod we had placed
in his cage. Oh, how happy we all
were then, especially Frederick, who
took care of him, and watched over
him with the greatest love and ten-
derness. Indeed, he was well repaid
for his care and anxiety, when his
little pet once more began to jump
about as blithely as ever.
And now, you see, he is quite
well, and we treasure his little songs
more than ever we did before, for
we never knew how sweet they were
until we.were deprived of them."
And thus it is, death children, with
many blessings we possess; they be-
come so common to us, that we cease
to be thankful for them, and know
not their value until they are taken
away. We forget who is the Au-
thor and Giver of all good; we for-
get that it is through the mercy and
loving kindness of GOD, that we re-
ceive food and clothing, and every
blessing we possess.
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