Book about animals

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Material Information

Title:
Book about animals
Physical Description:
16 p. : ill. ; 11 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Merrill, Rufus, 1803-1891 ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Rufus Merrill
Place of Publication:
Concord N.H
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Opossums -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Elephants -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1850   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Chapbooks -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1850
Genre:
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Chapbooks   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New Hampshire -- Concord

Notes

General Note:
Title vignette.
General Note:
Illustrated pink paper cover with advertisements on back.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002251175
oclc - 05965023
notis - ALK2938
System ID:
UF00001660:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Full Text




BOOK


AN. IM A LS.


CONCORD, N. H.
RUFUS MERRILL.
1850.
A










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ABOUT ANIMALS..








TH4E ILEPHANTj
Is the biggest of all land ani-
mals. He is more than five
times as big as an ox. But heis
a harmless creatures for all that
When he is wild, and lives in the
woods, he will run away, if you
attempt to go near him. When
he is tame, he will take a piece
of cake out of your pocket, and
let you ride upon his back.


















Oran Otan*
Ourang 'Outauge


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THE Ourang Outang is a spe-
cies of the ape; it has long arms
and hands, with very long fin-
gers. It is much larger than the
ape, and some have been found
about six feet high,.when stand-
ing erect. It is capable of walk-
ing nearly erect; but the usual
gait on the ground is like a crip-
ple who supports hinrself on his
hands, and draws his body for-
ward. Its home, like the mon-
key family, seems to. be on the
trees. The hair is of a brownish
red color, and covers his back,
arms, legs, and the outside of his
hands and feet. The face has
no hair except whiskers on its
side. He inhabits Milacca, Co-
chin China, and particularly the
island of Borneo. '





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7


THE Opossum is an American
animal, having a head like the
fox, and large eyes. The head
is mostly white, and the body is
covered with long black-and-
white hairs. He climbs up trees
with great facility, hides himself
in the leaves to catch birds, or
hangs himself by the tail from a
branch. It seeks its food in the
pight, and lives on fruit, insects,
and birds' eggs. Its teeth are
fifty in number. The most re-
markable circumstance in the
natural history of this animal is
the pouch which is formed under
the belly of the female, in which
it carries, its young ones when
they are small. If the little crea-
tures are frightened when absent
from their mother, they scamper
to this asylum as soon'as possible.








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9

THE COMMON ANTELOPE.
OF this numerous tribe of ani-
mals, there is perhaps no species
so truly elegant in its appearance
as this, and although it is one of
the most common, yet its habits
are but little known. It is very
numerous in all the northern parts
of Africa. In size, it is rather
smaller than the fallow deer. Its
color is a dusky brown, mixed
with red; the tail is short; the
horns, which are about sixteen
inches long, are black, distinctly
annulated almost to the top, and
have three curves. The brachia,
or sides of the lyre, were fre-
quently made of these horns, as
appears from ancient gems. The
female is destitute of horns, and
has a white stripe on the flanks.














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11


THE RABBIT.
TIE Rabbit is a very pretty
animal, and loves to livA about
the house and barn, in aYlate of
friendship with all around it. It
has no defence, but to run away;
and so harmless and innocent is
it, that nobody can have the
heart to do it injury. It feeds
upon clover, apples, and other
fruits, and will often sit for hours
in some snug covered place,
quietly chewing its cud, with the
greatest satisfaction. There is
another kind of rabbit, which
runs wild in the woods and fields.
He is remarkably swift of foot,
and no dog can overtake him in
a race, but a grey-hound, His
fur is very soft, and is used in
making coarse hats.












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13

THE MUSK DEER
THESE animals are found in the
Alpine mountains of Asia and
Sibera. Their' favorite haunts
are the tops of mountains covered
with pine, whei'f they delight to
wander in places the most diffi-
cult of access. They are hunted
for the sake of their well-known
perfume, which is contained in
an oval bag about the size of a
small hen's egg, hanging from
the abdomen. This receptacle
is found constantly filled with
a soft, unctuous, brownish sub-
stance, of the most powerful and
penetrating scent, and which is
the perfume in its natural state.
When close, and in large quanti-
ties, the smell is very powerful
and injurious.










5'





15


THE POLAR BEAR.
THE Polar Bear is distinguished
for his tremendous ferocity. They
are very numerous in the polar
seas. There it is seen not only
on land and fixed ice, but on
floating ice several leagues out at
sea. At sea, the food of this an-
imal is fish, seals, and the car-
cases of whales; on land, it preys
upon deer and other animals, and
will, like the Black Bear, eat
many kinds of berries. In win-
ter, it beds itself deeply under the
slow or eminences of ice, and
awaits, in a torpid state, the re-
turn of the sun.
The Black Bear lives in the *
woods of the United States, and
is not as large as the Polar or
Brown Bear, but lives very much
like the Polar bear.

















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