• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Walkowitz' 70th anniversary
 Among the pioneers
 Abraham Walkowitz: The man and...
 A general view
 Audacity and courage
 A kinship with music
 A daring artist in a tired age
 Abraham Walkowitz
 Reverence for life
 The real Walkowitz
 A perfect balance
 The first American modern
 Walkowitz and tradition
 Illustrations














Title: Art from life to life
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001389/00001
 Material Information
Title: Art from life to life
Physical Description: 8 p., 40 p. of plates : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Walkowitz, Abraham, 1880-1965
Publisher: Haldeman-Julius Publications
Place of Publication: Girard Kansas
Publication Date: c1951
 Subjects
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by A. Walkowitz ; with introductions by Lionello Venturi ... et al. ; with appreciations by Walter Pach ... et al.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00001389
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000495021
oclc - 07793960
notis - ACR3941
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Walkowitz' 70th anniversary
        Page 3
    Among the pioneers
        Page 3
    Abraham Walkowitz: The man and his art
        Page 3
        Page 4
    A general view
        Page 5
    Audacity and courage
        Page 5
    A kinship with music
        Page 5
    A daring artist in a tired age
        Page 6
    Abraham Walkowitz
        Page 6
    Reverence for life
        Page 7
    The real Walkowitz
        Page 7
    A perfect balance
        Page 7
    The first American modern
        Page 7
    Walkowitz and tradition
        Page 8
    Illustrations
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text






FROM LIFE TO LIFE
BY

SAWALKOWITZ


I,


''
.. .














FROM LIFE TO LIFE

BY


AWALKOWITZ

With Introductions By
Lionello Venturi, A. L. Chanin, Amedee J. Ozenfant, Bernard
Myers, Katherine S. Dreier, David Diamondstein (Dobson),
David Ignatoff, Carl Van Vechten
With Appreciations By
Walter Pach, Benjamin Copman, Jerome Melquist,
Clifford Williams, Jennings Toffel


HALDEMAN-JULIUS PUBLICATIONS
GIRARD, KANSAS
PRINTED IN THE V.S.A.













&


AR


Copyright, 1951,
By E. Haldeman-Julius


Pure abstract art is wholly independent of picturization in any
form or of any object. It has a universal language, and dwells in
the realm of music with an equivalent emotion. Its melody is
attuned to the receptive eye as music is to the ear.

-A. Walkowits, 1944











WALKOWITZ' 70TH ANNIVERSARY


For most of us the importance of the work of Abra-
nfn Walk,.:.iz is tiofoid:- its pioneering quality and
it i:.n;e humanity It has been noted many times
that Walko.ntz ras among the first Americans (if in-
dce. rnot the irst to adopt and utilize the language
of n...Mlorrn planting. Long before the Armory Show
he li;. alr.,aie absorbed the lesson of post-Impression-
j'r Form synthesis evolved by Cezanne and carried fur-
ther by the fauves at the beginning of our century.
Where he parted company from the majority of his
AAmerican (and French) contemporaries was in the
uL.e made of the rhythmic compositional effects of
fauvism From the very beginning 3Valkowitz used
this tre. hnique to express his great feeling for people in
the many street scenes, vacation pictures, ghetto sub-
jera. etc. that characterize his entire production.
11 the rise of the modern movement stems from a
"desAr oni the part of artists to find a new way of look-
ng at the world the fact remains that many painters
haye utilized the new approach for purely experimental
form studies. With Walkowitz this is very seldom the
.case. The many Cezannesque nude compositions arc
always filled with an emotive purpose-often rather
strong-while the various city and country subjects,
carefully constructed with regard to spatial rhythms
and integration of foreground and background pat-
* terns, create an emotional atmosphere that is inten-
tional with the painter.


In a sense, the kindly and ge lr i Walkiowltz mieht be
thought of as the Pissarro of ris ph se af the modern
development, combining the fwictlon of inspirational
teacher and pioneer with that of 2 painter able to
adapt a new form of expression to an isenilall. y hlu-
manistic purpose. Like Pissarro, the contenmporary-:
American painter has always been aware of .what was
going on in the world about him, as attested by his
series of drawings against Fascism.
In the minds of most people Walkowitz' name is in-
dissolubly associated with his hundreds of drawings of
the great Isadore Duncan. Although these are sure
among his important creations, one should not forget
the dynamic expressionism of his drawing of New York
and the poignant portrayals of Ghetto types-the
Ghetto from which Walkowitz drew so much of his
warmth and human understanding-the endless series
of little people relaxing from their daily labors but
retaining their dignity and importance as human be-
ings. At times philosophical, at times joyous and
pagan, often violently denunciatory, but always hu-
manistic in its outlook, the art of Walkowitz will always
remain as a visible symbol of our coming of age, herald-
ing our absorption of the language of modernism into-
the stream of American life.

BERNARD MYERS, 1949


AMONG THE PIONEERS


Walkowitz:
It was a real pleasure for me to look at the photo-
graphs of some of your works you plan to publish.
They sn'n~ rhat you were faithful to yourself through
the decad.-s, Irom 1905 to today. I am always moved
when I have the opportunity to go back to those fate-
ful years, between 1905 and 1920, when a new kind
of art was created in order to express the artist's
Inlmgit~riEnt by lines, forms and colors without the
help of a iice story. You participated in the first rank
A,' thr:'s pioneers who founded a new visualization,
and ol, achieved abstract values in realistic figures,
a. we.ll as concrete expressions of feeling in abstract
lines.
Your drawings of a Baby (1906), of Embrace (1907),
of Man, woman and child (1905), have a marvelous
entrc of style.


On the other hand your series From life to life (1913)
or the Dance Rhythms of the same year are excellent
examples of your ability to impress on a group of lines
a passionate life.
Also in some compositions, like Rest Day in a Park ;
(1908), The Fisherman (1910) and From the Window
(1930), you find a perfect balance between presenta-
tion and representation, between imagination and re-
ality.
Today, as in 1905, you are living in a pure, imagina-
tive world! This is the highest standard for the life
of an artist.

Lionello Venturi, 1949
Baby, page 12; Embrace, page )6; Man, Woman and Child,
page 23; Rest Day In a Park, Page 44; The Fisherman, page
37; Dance Rhythms, page 84; The Window, page 36.


ABRAHAM WALKOWITZ: THE MAN AND HIS ART


I am annoyed with the frequent comment that
"Walkie has the eyes and heart of a child," or the in-
..&-arSt lii:hir: of his name with but one phase of
his r.: r: tli.i masterly drawings of Isadora Duncan.
Et is n:.jie I: consider a creative artist a case of
.irtsted a:.'d moment. A creative artist-that is to
a..y. p' r .rn alive to himself and his environment,
A concerned a.rn recording his vision-constantly ex-
pands, aoo)rts. matures.
A .sudy of tne ar:,-minms and paintings in this book-


and in Walkowitz' earlier volumes-proves how un-
fortunate it is that so often the Duncan drawings sub-
stitute for the fuller stature of the artist. The dancer
no more made Walkowitz a draughtsman than M6nt
Sainte-Victoire, as a theme, made Cezanne a master.
The mountain and the dancer served merely as initial
stimuli for an expression of whatever in the world was
of deep value to their mind and eye. The dance draw-
ings are not primarily a storehouse of choreography,,
or a memorial, but terse, xl)ressmie nmnipulation of
'' .-


* -~"a4


*J'^KS.~ii sSV''^"











WALKOWITZ' 70TH ANNIVERSARY


For most of us the importance of the work of Abra-
nfn Walk,.:.iz is tiofoid:- its pioneering quality and
it i:.n;e humanity It has been noted many times
that Walko.ntz ras among the first Americans (if in-
dce. rnot the irst to adopt and utilize the language
of n...Mlorrn planting. Long before the Armory Show
he li;. alr.,aie absorbed the lesson of post-Impression-
j'r Form synthesis evolved by Cezanne and carried fur-
ther by the fauves at the beginning of our century.
Where he parted company from the majority of his
AAmerican (and French) contemporaries was in the
uL.e made of the rhythmic compositional effects of
fauvism From the very beginning 3Valkowitz used
this tre. hnique to express his great feeling for people in
the many street scenes, vacation pictures, ghetto sub-
jera. etc. that characterize his entire production.
11 the rise of the modern movement stems from a
"desAr oni the part of artists to find a new way of look-
ng at the world the fact remains that many painters
haye utilized the new approach for purely experimental
form studies. With Walkowitz this is very seldom the
.case. The many Cezannesque nude compositions arc
always filled with an emotive purpose-often rather
strong-while the various city and country subjects,
carefully constructed with regard to spatial rhythms
and integration of foreground and background pat-
* terns, create an emotional atmosphere that is inten-
tional with the painter.


In a sense, the kindly and ge lr i Walkiowltz mieht be
thought of as the Pissarro of ris ph se af the modern
development, combining the fwictlon of inspirational
teacher and pioneer with that of 2 painter able to
adapt a new form of expression to an isenilall. y hlu-
manistic purpose. Like Pissarro, the contenmporary-:
American painter has always been aware of .what was
going on in the world about him, as attested by his
series of drawings against Fascism.
In the minds of most people Walkowitz' name is in-
dissolubly associated with his hundreds of drawings of
the great Isadore Duncan. Although these are sure
among his important creations, one should not forget
the dynamic expressionism of his drawing of New York
and the poignant portrayals of Ghetto types-the
Ghetto from which Walkowitz drew so much of his
warmth and human understanding-the endless series
of little people relaxing from their daily labors but
retaining their dignity and importance as human be-
ings. At times philosophical, at times joyous and
pagan, often violently denunciatory, but always hu-
manistic in its outlook, the art of Walkowitz will always
remain as a visible symbol of our coming of age, herald-
ing our absorption of the language of modernism into-
the stream of American life.

BERNARD MYERS, 1949


AMONG THE PIONEERS


Walkowitz:
It was a real pleasure for me to look at the photo-
graphs of some of your works you plan to publish.
They sn'n~ rhat you were faithful to yourself through
the decad.-s, Irom 1905 to today. I am always moved
when I have the opportunity to go back to those fate-
ful years, between 1905 and 1920, when a new kind
of art was created in order to express the artist's
Inlmgit~riEnt by lines, forms and colors without the
help of a iice story. You participated in the first rank
A,' thr:'s pioneers who founded a new visualization,
and ol, achieved abstract values in realistic figures,
a. we.ll as concrete expressions of feeling in abstract
lines.
Your drawings of a Baby (1906), of Embrace (1907),
of Man, woman and child (1905), have a marvelous
entrc of style.


On the other hand your series From life to life (1913)
or the Dance Rhythms of the same year are excellent
examples of your ability to impress on a group of lines
a passionate life.
Also in some compositions, like Rest Day in a Park ;
(1908), The Fisherman (1910) and From the Window
(1930), you find a perfect balance between presenta-
tion and representation, between imagination and re-
ality.
Today, as in 1905, you are living in a pure, imagina-
tive world! This is the highest standard for the life
of an artist.

Lionello Venturi, 1949
Baby, page 12; Embrace, page )6; Man, Woman and Child,
page 23; Rest Day In a Park, Page 44; The Fisherman, page
37; Dance Rhythms, page 84; The Window, page 36.


ABRAHAM WALKOWITZ: THE MAN AND HIS ART


I am annoyed with the frequent comment that
"Walkie has the eyes and heart of a child," or the in-
..&-arSt lii:hir: of his name with but one phase of
his r.: r: tli.i masterly drawings of Isadora Duncan.
Et is n:.jie I: consider a creative artist a case of
.irtsted a:.'d moment. A creative artist-that is to
a..y. p' r .rn alive to himself and his environment,
A concerned a.rn recording his vision-constantly ex-
pands, aoo)rts. matures.
A .sudy of tne ar:,-minms and paintings in this book-


and in Walkowitz' earlier volumes-proves how un-
fortunate it is that so often the Duncan drawings sub-
stitute for the fuller stature of the artist. The dancer
no more made Walkowitz a draughtsman than M6nt
Sainte-Victoire, as a theme, made Cezanne a master.
The mountain and the dancer served merely as initial
stimuli for an expression of whatever in the world was
of deep value to their mind and eye. The dance draw-
ings are not primarily a storehouse of choreography,,
or a memorial, but terse, xl)ressmie nmnipulation of
'' .-


* -~"a4


*J'^KS.~ii sSV''^"











WALKOWITZ' 70TH ANNIVERSARY


For most of us the importance of the work of Abra-
nfn Walk,.:.iz is tiofoid:- its pioneering quality and
it i:.n;e humanity It has been noted many times
that Walko.ntz ras among the first Americans (if in-
dce. rnot the irst to adopt and utilize the language
of n...Mlorrn planting. Long before the Armory Show
he li;. alr.,aie absorbed the lesson of post-Impression-
j'r Form synthesis evolved by Cezanne and carried fur-
ther by the fauves at the beginning of our century.
Where he parted company from the majority of his
AAmerican (and French) contemporaries was in the
uL.e made of the rhythmic compositional effects of
fauvism From the very beginning 3Valkowitz used
this tre. hnique to express his great feeling for people in
the many street scenes, vacation pictures, ghetto sub-
jera. etc. that characterize his entire production.
11 the rise of the modern movement stems from a
"desAr oni the part of artists to find a new way of look-
ng at the world the fact remains that many painters
haye utilized the new approach for purely experimental
form studies. With Walkowitz this is very seldom the
.case. The many Cezannesque nude compositions arc
always filled with an emotive purpose-often rather
strong-while the various city and country subjects,
carefully constructed with regard to spatial rhythms
and integration of foreground and background pat-
* terns, create an emotional atmosphere that is inten-
tional with the painter.


In a sense, the kindly and ge lr i Walkiowltz mieht be
thought of as the Pissarro of ris ph se af the modern
development, combining the fwictlon of inspirational
teacher and pioneer with that of 2 painter able to
adapt a new form of expression to an isenilall. y hlu-
manistic purpose. Like Pissarro, the contenmporary-:
American painter has always been aware of .what was
going on in the world about him, as attested by his
series of drawings against Fascism.
In the minds of most people Walkowitz' name is in-
dissolubly associated with his hundreds of drawings of
the great Isadore Duncan. Although these are sure
among his important creations, one should not forget
the dynamic expressionism of his drawing of New York
and the poignant portrayals of Ghetto types-the
Ghetto from which Walkowitz drew so much of his
warmth and human understanding-the endless series
of little people relaxing from their daily labors but
retaining their dignity and importance as human be-
ings. At times philosophical, at times joyous and
pagan, often violently denunciatory, but always hu-
manistic in its outlook, the art of Walkowitz will always
remain as a visible symbol of our coming of age, herald-
ing our absorption of the language of modernism into-
the stream of American life.

BERNARD MYERS, 1949


AMONG THE PIONEERS


Walkowitz:
It was a real pleasure for me to look at the photo-
graphs of some of your works you plan to publish.
They sn'n~ rhat you were faithful to yourself through
the decad.-s, Irom 1905 to today. I am always moved
when I have the opportunity to go back to those fate-
ful years, between 1905 and 1920, when a new kind
of art was created in order to express the artist's
Inlmgit~riEnt by lines, forms and colors without the
help of a iice story. You participated in the first rank
A,' thr:'s pioneers who founded a new visualization,
and ol, achieved abstract values in realistic figures,
a. we.ll as concrete expressions of feeling in abstract
lines.
Your drawings of a Baby (1906), of Embrace (1907),
of Man, woman and child (1905), have a marvelous
entrc of style.


On the other hand your series From life to life (1913)
or the Dance Rhythms of the same year are excellent
examples of your ability to impress on a group of lines
a passionate life.
Also in some compositions, like Rest Day in a Park ;
(1908), The Fisherman (1910) and From the Window
(1930), you find a perfect balance between presenta-
tion and representation, between imagination and re-
ality.
Today, as in 1905, you are living in a pure, imagina-
tive world! This is the highest standard for the life
of an artist.

Lionello Venturi, 1949
Baby, page 12; Embrace, page )6; Man, Woman and Child,
page 23; Rest Day In a Park, Page 44; The Fisherman, page
37; Dance Rhythms, page 84; The Window, page 36.


ABRAHAM WALKOWITZ: THE MAN AND HIS ART


I am annoyed with the frequent comment that
"Walkie has the eyes and heart of a child," or the in-
..&-arSt lii:hir: of his name with but one phase of
his r.: r: tli.i masterly drawings of Isadora Duncan.
Et is n:.jie I: consider a creative artist a case of
.irtsted a:.'d moment. A creative artist-that is to
a..y. p' r .rn alive to himself and his environment,
A concerned a.rn recording his vision-constantly ex-
pands, aoo)rts. matures.
A .sudy of tne ar:,-minms and paintings in this book-


and in Walkowitz' earlier volumes-proves how un-
fortunate it is that so often the Duncan drawings sub-
stitute for the fuller stature of the artist. The dancer
no more made Walkowitz a draughtsman than M6nt
Sainte-Victoire, as a theme, made Cezanne a master.
The mountain and the dancer served merely as initial
stimuli for an expression of whatever in the world was
of deep value to their mind and eye. The dance draw-
ings are not primarily a storehouse of choreography,,
or a memorial, but terse, xl)ressmie nmnipulation of
'' .-


* -~"a4


*J'^KS.~ii sSV''^"





line which poTtra4s movement and gesture caught o:
the wing.
In the sequence of growth, the dance drawings were
foreshadowed In much earlier work: in theigrace and
anJmarton of the nudes, the serene drawing of the
embrace page 16), the essential, delicate lines which
capture ine posture of the sleeping baby (page 12i.
SThe deepening growth is again evident when we c:-nm-
pare the frieze-like designs of Loungers in Ruteers
Square (page 31), with the climatic series of the artirLt'
beloved New York. He is not the only painter to become
enchanted with this Goliath of cities, but certainly a l-
most the only one to portray, not the documentary
aspects tf slum or park, but the city's endless point a id
counterpoint, its aloofness and also intimacy with the
city's inhabitants. In turn, these pictures expand later
into the whirling themes of creation (page 20). H1ri
color reinforces movement in infinite space. The pre-
lude to these concepts is embodied in the stark, sinl Ie-
line semi-abstractions, in which the heart of a theme
is revealed, stripped of all but the most pertinent pr- -
terns. From the earliest to the most recent drawiugs
and paintings, they forcefully summarize Walkoil?'
design to create a series he aptly characterizes as
"From Life to Life."
This book, however, is only a shadowy fragment o a
long lifetime of complex work, since reproductlin;n
brutally dissolve the living vitality and warmth of
originals. The originals glow with richly varied lines,
with sensitive color fused with light and line and
space. In the originals we glimpse the universal poetry
of the humble, the casual; the dreamers in a long-
gone park, the astounding facade of skyscrapers which
do not always dominateand stifle the stroller. It is not
a mechanized world we see in his work, but a human
spirit which survives mechanization.
In these reproductions-and in a vast body of work-
Walkowitz pours out in profusion the equivalent of his
alert experiences in our world. He is resilient, he as-
saults and assails the chaotic visual splendor which
defines our reality. His prolific output is not merely
.stereotyped repetitions of formulas, but experiments in
forms we call "modern." Almost a half century ago
Walkowitzi had already begun to pioneer in a search
for new freedom in light and color. Stieglitz' "291"
Gallery, that incubator of fresh talent, and the epochal
Armory Exhibition of 1913 knew him as a full-fledged
participant. Ironically, contemporary expressions in
paint have all but rushed past his trail-blazing. Too
often ignored, to the discerning mind his work con-
tinues to remain a record of searching, inventive, per-
sonal forms.
One reason for this temporary neglect can be iso-
lated in the general inclination to glance briefly, rather
than see profoundly. We read as we run. The fantas-
tic or enormous may stop us abruptly, but we are so
conditioned that we rarely respond to the warm, the
gentle, the soft, quiet voice. We usually ignore the
small drawings which may contain gigantic implica-
tions. Walkowitz' drawings or paintings are not as
strident as a poster, but speak more commandingly
than the largest neon burst against the sky.
his work, like all true art, is individual and original
-not, of course, the impossible originality of the com-
pletely novel. Walkowitz has drawn nourishment and
reinforced his expression from many sources of struc-
ture, of pattern, of geometric form. To these aspects
he adds his own delicacy, his own poetry, his delight in
a pattern or in a corridor of space. His work as a


whole stands defiantly apart from thetnere Journall;m-
of so much of American Art. It Is not only America
which has moved him, but a spiritual pensiveness of.:
Ils thlldro-d in Ri.isa, andt the eligiolus warmth ant'
mysticism of his father'a reliEon. These are not neces--
.arily aoLpJrate e:pmenrs. The "West' and the "EasV(.
j., In Lu isl work to atu. .'r- fortrs hich range from.
the lyri:.., to [lie acoranie "'o th- poeaerlilly ex-
prcnise.
t% t,) TllchEs rli.i Dock. enant : W'hitnian I1 nlj
Lor',,.- ti Graq.;, "roucne; a man" miitl.li .i rIms'
ch-iirene,. tili boat. tn-i r.:Fpe L5 mideirl.' eridilr In
(lie reproc~ictr in: ol this boors. i 1.11, the pulgalilll.
irio.:. nri:., fo~.,;: creast-d airi Ihe tree, slini.;t .um-
le: s.not I .El nt O: brush. li:.,k r, Ih:- calm .rrEistd
.riv.ni r.. .: strliiers in t park. eox re'sed with luml-
:.i'.v, rs. ... in-'ngr color or the iletrick ana elegate
nr.:svtmnr, of rn, irmper ous IsatDljrJ. the lliix a.ll
r:i i:i, i: T.im- Sqii.ar:: o:r ire in.g!-. irnci te line, ten *:
n,'.n..,',r [tuay th.e. a, 0i you .'vii share a non ex-
perinice- which itilites 31t a~ an equivalent, to llle.
Ydu a III .;!.arc a.c reconLtruCeI th- e.ited pereeptiions
or a rr ',rv wh ni.'e qui'rlv but -rta:pl. tnrru;h or'J
iwo-d and atnli. reactloir '.rc made clejr to all ho
caii un-ler-rra 'rigl. al i'iia e iort-i l art
Tin: painitnw. drawings snd writer colors are the
uoner-ce ,:.os-ts r hilc redlei tlie hear. aina oreatlh
*if oa ni Trievr -.cv tre astiliti-is) or i1n: locurnie of
a mind through life. The man himself, small, ruday.
and silver-haired, sits in his studio surrounded b. lictr-
ally hundreds of his creations. He moves among the
paintings with the compassionate affection of a lover.
Gesturing, twinkling, talking, he points to a passage in
oil or the tense single line of a drawing. His talk
scurries from the dramatic beauty of today's New York.
reminiscence of pioneer days in our century's art.
scathing indictments of the commercialization of tal-
leries today, to dance and music. Consistently the t tik
returns to music. Walkowitz was once a violinist, and
musical idoms come inevitably to his mind. And on
needs the musical phrases to hint, in cold words, nme
warmth and delicacy of his work.
". when a great master, Heifetz, plays a concert
on the violin," he says, "from his fingers comes a force,
the force of genius. When the same concerto is played
by an ordinary violinist in an orchestra, it is empty, I
is not the same. And so with art. The touch of
artist remains on the paper. It re-creates the warmth
the artist gave to it-cosmic warmth. If you must ex-
plain in words what people do not grasp-this will
not register-"
Cosmic terms, terms that extend immeasurably in
time and space, are joined with musical fragments in
his animated talk. You look again at his lifetime of
work, and you sense that many are not merely. local
descriptions. The cosmic breath and boast of V.Whitman
hovers over the work in his musty studio tinliersal
emotion haunts his compositions. "What d.oes this. or
any of my drawings mean? It has thousand-, of mean-
ings, it's above one meaning. Just as those ivhc. listen
to a symphony find different meanings in themnielcle."
Walkowitz once poetically defined art by saying;
"Art is only through feeling so alive and sensitive that
the picture is as the breath out of the mouth, but com-
ing from the heart: a distillation upon painting-
ground, from compassion, absorption, exhalation-a
phonographic record in color, line and tone--or else
there is no art."
Or else there is no art. Without vision, poetry, sen-






"ativt~, ttlmere ak n ; and art is not the depletion of
an actual object, the mere contours defining the phys:-
cal, but the inner tbounaleec areas of heart. and mind.
Later, leahing the studio, you Iry to organize and de-
line your reactions. It Isn't eas. v.lth words Looking
over the fragmenu jotric dorn m the note b ,ol:., you
hope that phrase. unadorned and unretouched, might
unite to capt ure Walkowitz' elusive quality.
Isadora-feet on ground, head in cloud-"
Two lovers in line-quivers--"
".. Hairbreadth Balance-one line on top and
another-"
". Italian water colors, 1914-pastoral sentiments
-via irdn economy of means-"


". '117-symphonic summations-abstraer-tlnkle
o[ blues, yellows-llashes of scarlet-Chinese breadth
and preclion of Ilne-titanic rnjelty of city scenes-"
";.. ark .sene-Like master nolinist-viorates with
life-life above all-'
"...1918-h'uma.n rhythms-perpetuas movement m-
terwoven."
"Watercoloaur;" he says "nmust breathe It must be
open and breathlinE-Lherv.1ie it, chokes-"
Words are not, pantlngi. bur they can speak upon a
painter. And perhaps, caught in this web of words, is
something of the intangible quality of Walkowitz as
painter and man, man and painter; both are one
A. L. OHALN, 1949.


A GENERAL VIEW


Abraham Walkowitz, having published some of his
studies of Isadora Duncan (in all conscience he could
scarcely be expected to publish them all), his New York
sketches, and a Demonstration of Objective, Abstract,
and Non-objective Art, has at last taken it into his
head to give us a more general view of his life and art.
This later book, while it shows quite clearly his in-


debtedness to Cezanne, maps out his own career and
the end he has set himself with his portraits, his
groups, woodlarid scenes, water scenes, abstract draw-
ings, and linear sketches-in fact, it is a complete ex-
position of the man himself and the artist.

CARL VAN VECHTEN, May 1, 1949, New York


AUDACITY AND COURAGE


Dear Walkowitz:
As a whole your entire work is a mirror of the evo-
lution of the art in this country since pioneering times:
at the beginning of the century. Who is the most crea-
* tive artist, the one who always repeats himself or the
one continually evolving? It is funny to observe that
generally the critics and the public consider the most
* original the artists who repeat themselves with a terri-
fying obstinacy. You are not one of those artists who
in their youth fished at random for a painting and one
day had a lucky strike, and continued to repeat all
their life that painting with the monotony of a press
printing perpetually the same post card for a half a
century or more, even when the press began to dis-
integrate.
In the course of those decades, from your studios,


came some typical works of your successive preoccu-
pations which, if you would have standardized and
repeated them a thousand or two thousand times in
forty years, would have bestowed upon you the cele-
brity and success of a standard patented brand of
cigarettes, soap, or laxative.
The public very rarely recognizes those who are doing
nothing to please it. But concessions, compromise, is
the best procedure to miss the door of art history.
After all, integrity is the fundamental condition for
survival of a work of art and of the author's name.
You are one of the half dozen of integral artists
who started, with audacity and indomitable courage
and virtually no support, the foundations of American
modern art.
AMEDEE J. OZENFANT, 1949.


A KINSHIP WITH MUSIC


It seems as if we, as a nation, were becoming more
and more conscious that there are problems in the
realm of art beyond those of technique, which formerly
was of primary interest to the average American. A
consciousness is beginning to be awakened that there
are deeper problems which are related to art and
which, if approached and solved, makes one painting
contain art, while another one, even though brilliant
in technique, has no relation to it. The urge to paint
must be motivated through the love and devotion of the
creative problems and not through the vanity of self-
expression or the egotistical desire to have one's name
mentioned in the arts. Art is an all-absorbing and
demanding mistress. If the world were less confused
S there would be a clearer understanding of these dif-
ferent approaches and one would rejoice whenever one
came across an artist full of imagination and sensitive
to the new forms and rhythms which were being born.
Walkowitz belongs to those whose love and under-
staudlng of music found its way into his plastic forms
in psaning and drawing and brought the two arts


closer together. Few people realize how each age has its
own expression, which is the expression of those times,
and is given voice, shape and form through those art-
ists, who, being sensitive to the period in which they
live, express it. So it was that Kandinsky in Europe
felt this close harmony between the art of music and
that of painting and in his book, The Art of Spiritual
Harmony, gave voice in words as well to that closeness
of the two arts which Walkowitz expressed here in
America. It was the logical further development of
Whistler's desire to free people from the sole idea of
representation in art, which caused him to give to his
paintings titles of a musical character.. It is also inter-
esting to note that Kandinsky and Walkowitz, who
carried this relationship between these two arts fur-
ther, should both have been Russians with a Siberian
background.
If it had not been for Walkowitz' deep understanding
of abstract rhythm as related to music, which he ex-
pressed in thousands of his drawings along these ab-
stract musical lines, he could never have interpreted






"ativt~, ttlmere ak n ; and art is not the depletion of
an actual object, the mere contours defining the phys:-
cal, but the inner tbounaleec areas of heart. and mind.
Later, leahing the studio, you Iry to organize and de-
line your reactions. It Isn't eas. v.lth words Looking
over the fragmenu jotric dorn m the note b ,ol:., you
hope that phrase. unadorned and unretouched, might
unite to capt ure Walkowitz' elusive quality.
Isadora-feet on ground, head in cloud-"
Two lovers in line-quivers--"
".. Hairbreadth Balance-one line on top and
another-"
". Italian water colors, 1914-pastoral sentiments
-via irdn economy of means-"


". '117-symphonic summations-abstraer-tlnkle
o[ blues, yellows-llashes of scarlet-Chinese breadth
and preclion of Ilne-titanic rnjelty of city scenes-"
";.. ark .sene-Like master nolinist-viorates with
life-life above all-'
"...1918-h'uma.n rhythms-perpetuas movement m-
terwoven."
"Watercoloaur;" he says "nmust breathe It must be
open and breathlinE-Lherv.1ie it, chokes-"
Words are not, pantlngi. bur they can speak upon a
painter. And perhaps, caught in this web of words, is
something of the intangible quality of Walkowitz as
painter and man, man and painter; both are one
A. L. OHALN, 1949.


A GENERAL VIEW


Abraham Walkowitz, having published some of his
studies of Isadora Duncan (in all conscience he could
scarcely be expected to publish them all), his New York
sketches, and a Demonstration of Objective, Abstract,
and Non-objective Art, has at last taken it into his
head to give us a more general view of his life and art.
This later book, while it shows quite clearly his in-


debtedness to Cezanne, maps out his own career and
the end he has set himself with his portraits, his
groups, woodlarid scenes, water scenes, abstract draw-
ings, and linear sketches-in fact, it is a complete ex-
position of the man himself and the artist.

CARL VAN VECHTEN, May 1, 1949, New York


AUDACITY AND COURAGE


Dear Walkowitz:
As a whole your entire work is a mirror of the evo-
lution of the art in this country since pioneering times:
at the beginning of the century. Who is the most crea-
* tive artist, the one who always repeats himself or the
one continually evolving? It is funny to observe that
generally the critics and the public consider the most
* original the artists who repeat themselves with a terri-
fying obstinacy. You are not one of those artists who
in their youth fished at random for a painting and one
day had a lucky strike, and continued to repeat all
their life that painting with the monotony of a press
printing perpetually the same post card for a half a
century or more, even when the press began to dis-
integrate.
In the course of those decades, from your studios,


came some typical works of your successive preoccu-
pations which, if you would have standardized and
repeated them a thousand or two thousand times in
forty years, would have bestowed upon you the cele-
brity and success of a standard patented brand of
cigarettes, soap, or laxative.
The public very rarely recognizes those who are doing
nothing to please it. But concessions, compromise, is
the best procedure to miss the door of art history.
After all, integrity is the fundamental condition for
survival of a work of art and of the author's name.
You are one of the half dozen of integral artists
who started, with audacity and indomitable courage
and virtually no support, the foundations of American
modern art.
AMEDEE J. OZENFANT, 1949.


A KINSHIP WITH MUSIC


It seems as if we, as a nation, were becoming more
and more conscious that there are problems in the
realm of art beyond those of technique, which formerly
was of primary interest to the average American. A
consciousness is beginning to be awakened that there
are deeper problems which are related to art and
which, if approached and solved, makes one painting
contain art, while another one, even though brilliant
in technique, has no relation to it. The urge to paint
must be motivated through the love and devotion of the
creative problems and not through the vanity of self-
expression or the egotistical desire to have one's name
mentioned in the arts. Art is an all-absorbing and
demanding mistress. If the world were less confused
S there would be a clearer understanding of these dif-
ferent approaches and one would rejoice whenever one
came across an artist full of imagination and sensitive
to the new forms and rhythms which were being born.
Walkowitz belongs to those whose love and under-
staudlng of music found its way into his plastic forms
in psaning and drawing and brought the two arts


closer together. Few people realize how each age has its
own expression, which is the expression of those times,
and is given voice, shape and form through those art-
ists, who, being sensitive to the period in which they
live, express it. So it was that Kandinsky in Europe
felt this close harmony between the art of music and
that of painting and in his book, The Art of Spiritual
Harmony, gave voice in words as well to that closeness
of the two arts which Walkowitz expressed here in
America. It was the logical further development of
Whistler's desire to free people from the sole idea of
representation in art, which caused him to give to his
paintings titles of a musical character.. It is also inter-
esting to note that Kandinsky and Walkowitz, who
carried this relationship between these two arts fur-
ther, should both have been Russians with a Siberian
background.
If it had not been for Walkowitz' deep understanding
of abstract rhythm as related to music, which he ex-
pressed in thousands of his drawings along these ab-
stract musical lines, he could never have interpreted






"ativt~, ttlmere ak n ; and art is not the depletion of
an actual object, the mere contours defining the phys:-
cal, but the inner tbounaleec areas of heart. and mind.
Later, leahing the studio, you Iry to organize and de-
line your reactions. It Isn't eas. v.lth words Looking
over the fragmenu jotric dorn m the note b ,ol:., you
hope that phrase. unadorned and unretouched, might
unite to capt ure Walkowitz' elusive quality.
Isadora-feet on ground, head in cloud-"
Two lovers in line-quivers--"
".. Hairbreadth Balance-one line on top and
another-"
". Italian water colors, 1914-pastoral sentiments
-via irdn economy of means-"


". '117-symphonic summations-abstraer-tlnkle
o[ blues, yellows-llashes of scarlet-Chinese breadth
and preclion of Ilne-titanic rnjelty of city scenes-"
";.. ark .sene-Like master nolinist-viorates with
life-life above all-'
"...1918-h'uma.n rhythms-perpetuas movement m-
terwoven."
"Watercoloaur;" he says "nmust breathe It must be
open and breathlinE-Lherv.1ie it, chokes-"
Words are not, pantlngi. bur they can speak upon a
painter. And perhaps, caught in this web of words, is
something of the intangible quality of Walkowitz as
painter and man, man and painter; both are one
A. L. OHALN, 1949.


A GENERAL VIEW


Abraham Walkowitz, having published some of his
studies of Isadora Duncan (in all conscience he could
scarcely be expected to publish them all), his New York
sketches, and a Demonstration of Objective, Abstract,
and Non-objective Art, has at last taken it into his
head to give us a more general view of his life and art.
This later book, while it shows quite clearly his in-


debtedness to Cezanne, maps out his own career and
the end he has set himself with his portraits, his
groups, woodlarid scenes, water scenes, abstract draw-
ings, and linear sketches-in fact, it is a complete ex-
position of the man himself and the artist.

CARL VAN VECHTEN, May 1, 1949, New York


AUDACITY AND COURAGE


Dear Walkowitz:
As a whole your entire work is a mirror of the evo-
lution of the art in this country since pioneering times:
at the beginning of the century. Who is the most crea-
* tive artist, the one who always repeats himself or the
one continually evolving? It is funny to observe that
generally the critics and the public consider the most
* original the artists who repeat themselves with a terri-
fying obstinacy. You are not one of those artists who
in their youth fished at random for a painting and one
day had a lucky strike, and continued to repeat all
their life that painting with the monotony of a press
printing perpetually the same post card for a half a
century or more, even when the press began to dis-
integrate.
In the course of those decades, from your studios,


came some typical works of your successive preoccu-
pations which, if you would have standardized and
repeated them a thousand or two thousand times in
forty years, would have bestowed upon you the cele-
brity and success of a standard patented brand of
cigarettes, soap, or laxative.
The public very rarely recognizes those who are doing
nothing to please it. But concessions, compromise, is
the best procedure to miss the door of art history.
After all, integrity is the fundamental condition for
survival of a work of art and of the author's name.
You are one of the half dozen of integral artists
who started, with audacity and indomitable courage
and virtually no support, the foundations of American
modern art.
AMEDEE J. OZENFANT, 1949.


A KINSHIP WITH MUSIC


It seems as if we, as a nation, were becoming more
and more conscious that there are problems in the
realm of art beyond those of technique, which formerly
was of primary interest to the average American. A
consciousness is beginning to be awakened that there
are deeper problems which are related to art and
which, if approached and solved, makes one painting
contain art, while another one, even though brilliant
in technique, has no relation to it. The urge to paint
must be motivated through the love and devotion of the
creative problems and not through the vanity of self-
expression or the egotistical desire to have one's name
mentioned in the arts. Art is an all-absorbing and
demanding mistress. If the world were less confused
S there would be a clearer understanding of these dif-
ferent approaches and one would rejoice whenever one
came across an artist full of imagination and sensitive
to the new forms and rhythms which were being born.
Walkowitz belongs to those whose love and under-
staudlng of music found its way into his plastic forms
in psaning and drawing and brought the two arts


closer together. Few people realize how each age has its
own expression, which is the expression of those times,
and is given voice, shape and form through those art-
ists, who, being sensitive to the period in which they
live, express it. So it was that Kandinsky in Europe
felt this close harmony between the art of music and
that of painting and in his book, The Art of Spiritual
Harmony, gave voice in words as well to that closeness
of the two arts which Walkowitz expressed here in
America. It was the logical further development of
Whistler's desire to free people from the sole idea of
representation in art, which caused him to give to his
paintings titles of a musical character.. It is also inter-
esting to note that Kandinsky and Walkowitz, who
carried this relationship between these two arts fur-
ther, should both have been Russians with a Siberian
background.
If it had not been for Walkowitz' deep understanding
of abstract rhythm as related to music, which he ex-
pressed in thousands of his drawings along these ab-
stract musical lines, he could never have interpreted






the unfailing grace and classical beauty of Isadora's
dance. -It was a remarkable tribute which one artist
paid another and it cannot today be esrnmated what
this record will mean to future generations. Some mly-
seum should set aside a small room,' devoted only to the
water colors and drawings Walkowitz made of Isadora's


art.,with'a -.'iles of his abstract rhvthinlcal pan-and-
ink anic waFn drawings rauinbng as ar accompnpntment
underneath nme classiesa grace and beauty cf his in-
rerprjtal r n or I~idora's dance.

KATHERINE S. DaEIER; New York, 1946.


A DARING ARTIST IN A TIRED AGE


If anyone were to ask me what I think of this age, I
would without hesitation Say that this is the Tired Age.
In truth, this is the age of the tired artist, the tired
citizen and even the tired observer.
Little indeed of play, and much, to much of work
.. fie upon it. .
It is therefore refreshing indeed to see, out 'of the
labyrinth of toil and turmoil, the emergence of an oc-
casional artist. He comes to us unaffected; and the
record he writes with his deft pen and brush, is not al-
ways a pretty record; for this is not a pretty period in
human history. There are crosscurrents and conflicts
and a muddled mirage of bad thinking and worse liv-
ing. Yet out of it all, the artist draws and records
something vital and enduring.
Future generations may look back to the art of our
time and come upon the works of Abraham Walkowitz.
They will look at his superb drawings and marvel at
the lightning speed of the artist's facile pen, the
rhythm of his powerful portrayal of the motions of a
dancer like Isadora Duncan.
If Walkowitz had done nothing else but those Dun-


can studies, his contribution to the art of our time
would have given him a prominent place in the his-
tory of art. What Albrecht Durer did in his day, Wal-
kowitz has done in our day. And if his output does
not quite contain the power of his predecessor, one
must not forget that this is not an age of giants; rather
is it a tired age, when even the artist must toilat some
menial task in order to be able to live and paint.
Walkowitz leans towards radicalism in most of his
other works. He observes the great masses of human-
ity and records their lives. One sees them through his
prolific output of countless drawings and water colors
and inwardly concludes that here is an artist of im-
portance whom the world must some day get to know.
What distinguishes Walkowitz from the general run
of Les Artistes D'Ajourd Hul, is the fact that he is dar-
ing and revolutionary, yet not too far removed from
the people and the life of our time. Thus, the best
compliment one can pay him is to encourage him to
be Walkowitz.

DAVID DIAMONDSTEIN ("Dobson"), 1946


ABRAHAM WALKOWITZ


And for the speechless ones, who will speak?
God will speak for the speechless ones!
Abraham Walkowitz speaks, but the words he utters
are the words of one suddenly thrown into a strange
world, a world that functions with words.
Walkowitz' media of expression are the tender, grace-
ful, and lofty lines. He has a delicate instrument which
speaks miraculously and enchantingly without the use
of words. On it he can sing of joy, of sorrow, of labor,
and of the beauty of woman's body that can, with
countless movements, dance so beautifully. On this in-
strument, he can so nobly reflect also on human rela-
tions, of the grandeur of family affiliation, of love, of
priceless devotion, and of his great love for his very
instrument that speaks so eloquently.
Take, for instance, his panel, "Rest Day in a Park"
(page 44). What a wealth of color and form! What a
fine exhibition of tender relationship between man and
man, fraternized with trees, rocks, water, grass! His
human touch, is that of an artist who produces life, in
equivalents.
As another instance, I would cite "The Kiss" (1906),
the first drawing in his book. It is a purely Hellenic
and earthy drawing: A youth holds a maiden. But to
this primitive sex urge, Walkowitz adds his inherent
family kinship. It no more is merely Hellenic; it car-
ries the bridal concept of love as though the male
would not only kiss but, at the same time, say fervently,
*religiously, "Thou art my bethrothed, my beloved, my
bride."
II
In 1905, Walkowltz left for Paris, where he lived for
three years among people who-radiated God's gift with


the so-called speechless language. There, he strength-
ened himself in his medium, returned to this country in
1908 and became one of the first artists who dared to
bring new forms and art conceptions to this country.
His exhibition in the basement of the Julius Haas Gal-
lery in 1908 was the cause for much discussion, anger,
and laughter. After this, Alfred Stieglitz, who also re-
turned from Europe, befriended him and made the
almost speechless, ridiculed Walkowitz his first dis-
covery.
The speechless Walkowitz and the inspired, rather
talkative Stieglitz were drawn to one another. Stieg-
litz exhibited Walkowitz' work, together with the works
of recognized European artists. America laughed at all
of them, but in a group it Was easier to endure. Wal-
kowitz helped draw other young, then unknown, Amer-
ican artists to Stieglitz' Gallery. He also did all kinds
of preparatory work for Stieglitz, even helped him in
planning, framing, and hanging each new exhibition.
Stieglitz said, and Walkowitz believed, that the work of
the artists he exhibited would only be appreciated
properly by the public when high prices were placed on
their, work. Walkowitz followed this doctrine with ex-
traordinary zeal, not because of the monetary compen-
sation that high prices would bring, not even for the
respect this gospel promised, but merely because it was
extremely hard for him to part with any of his work.
Had Walkowitz not built such a fence between him-
self and the art lovers and collectors, his work would
then have reached countless homes, -hereov eitabiSn-
ing a better understanding for himirli. Hi rri-.it%
efforts would have become part of inelr e"perl:,.'.:
People, in due time, would have learned from him
that a figure in movement can be Justly represented






the unfailing grace and classical beauty of Isadora's
dance. -It was a remarkable tribute which one artist
paid another and it cannot today be esrnmated what
this record will mean to future generations. Some mly-
seum should set aside a small room,' devoted only to the
water colors and drawings Walkowitz made of Isadora's


art.,with'a -.'iles of his abstract rhvthinlcal pan-and-
ink anic waFn drawings rauinbng as ar accompnpntment
underneath nme classiesa grace and beauty cf his in-
rerprjtal r n or I~idora's dance.

KATHERINE S. DaEIER; New York, 1946.


A DARING ARTIST IN A TIRED AGE


If anyone were to ask me what I think of this age, I
would without hesitation Say that this is the Tired Age.
In truth, this is the age of the tired artist, the tired
citizen and even the tired observer.
Little indeed of play, and much, to much of work
.. fie upon it. .
It is therefore refreshing indeed to see, out 'of the
labyrinth of toil and turmoil, the emergence of an oc-
casional artist. He comes to us unaffected; and the
record he writes with his deft pen and brush, is not al-
ways a pretty record; for this is not a pretty period in
human history. There are crosscurrents and conflicts
and a muddled mirage of bad thinking and worse liv-
ing. Yet out of it all, the artist draws and records
something vital and enduring.
Future generations may look back to the art of our
time and come upon the works of Abraham Walkowitz.
They will look at his superb drawings and marvel at
the lightning speed of the artist's facile pen, the
rhythm of his powerful portrayal of the motions of a
dancer like Isadora Duncan.
If Walkowitz had done nothing else but those Dun-


can studies, his contribution to the art of our time
would have given him a prominent place in the his-
tory of art. What Albrecht Durer did in his day, Wal-
kowitz has done in our day. And if his output does
not quite contain the power of his predecessor, one
must not forget that this is not an age of giants; rather
is it a tired age, when even the artist must toilat some
menial task in order to be able to live and paint.
Walkowitz leans towards radicalism in most of his
other works. He observes the great masses of human-
ity and records their lives. One sees them through his
prolific output of countless drawings and water colors
and inwardly concludes that here is an artist of im-
portance whom the world must some day get to know.
What distinguishes Walkowitz from the general run
of Les Artistes D'Ajourd Hul, is the fact that he is dar-
ing and revolutionary, yet not too far removed from
the people and the life of our time. Thus, the best
compliment one can pay him is to encourage him to
be Walkowitz.

DAVID DIAMONDSTEIN ("Dobson"), 1946


ABRAHAM WALKOWITZ


And for the speechless ones, who will speak?
God will speak for the speechless ones!
Abraham Walkowitz speaks, but the words he utters
are the words of one suddenly thrown into a strange
world, a world that functions with words.
Walkowitz' media of expression are the tender, grace-
ful, and lofty lines. He has a delicate instrument which
speaks miraculously and enchantingly without the use
of words. On it he can sing of joy, of sorrow, of labor,
and of the beauty of woman's body that can, with
countless movements, dance so beautifully. On this in-
strument, he can so nobly reflect also on human rela-
tions, of the grandeur of family affiliation, of love, of
priceless devotion, and of his great love for his very
instrument that speaks so eloquently.
Take, for instance, his panel, "Rest Day in a Park"
(page 44). What a wealth of color and form! What a
fine exhibition of tender relationship between man and
man, fraternized with trees, rocks, water, grass! His
human touch, is that of an artist who produces life, in
equivalents.
As another instance, I would cite "The Kiss" (1906),
the first drawing in his book. It is a purely Hellenic
and earthy drawing: A youth holds a maiden. But to
this primitive sex urge, Walkowitz adds his inherent
family kinship. It no more is merely Hellenic; it car-
ries the bridal concept of love as though the male
would not only kiss but, at the same time, say fervently,
*religiously, "Thou art my bethrothed, my beloved, my
bride."
II
In 1905, Walkowltz left for Paris, where he lived for
three years among people who-radiated God's gift with


the so-called speechless language. There, he strength-
ened himself in his medium, returned to this country in
1908 and became one of the first artists who dared to
bring new forms and art conceptions to this country.
His exhibition in the basement of the Julius Haas Gal-
lery in 1908 was the cause for much discussion, anger,
and laughter. After this, Alfred Stieglitz, who also re-
turned from Europe, befriended him and made the
almost speechless, ridiculed Walkowitz his first dis-
covery.
The speechless Walkowitz and the inspired, rather
talkative Stieglitz were drawn to one another. Stieg-
litz exhibited Walkowitz' work, together with the works
of recognized European artists. America laughed at all
of them, but in a group it Was easier to endure. Wal-
kowitz helped draw other young, then unknown, Amer-
ican artists to Stieglitz' Gallery. He also did all kinds
of preparatory work for Stieglitz, even helped him in
planning, framing, and hanging each new exhibition.
Stieglitz said, and Walkowitz believed, that the work of
the artists he exhibited would only be appreciated
properly by the public when high prices were placed on
their, work. Walkowitz followed this doctrine with ex-
traordinary zeal, not because of the monetary compen-
sation that high prices would bring, not even for the
respect this gospel promised, but merely because it was
extremely hard for him to part with any of his work.
Had Walkowitz not built such a fence between him-
self and the art lovers and collectors, his work would
then have reached countless homes, -hereov eitabiSn-
ing a better understanding for himirli. Hi rri-.it%
efforts would have become part of inelr e"perl:,.'.:
People, in due time, would have learned from him
that a figure in movement can be Justly represented





When tL.nmtlhirg countless details: that the e)is, for
instance, of a dancing figure, if lull', drawn, would
itrd to detracTl from the orcr-all movement. They
a.nuld hive learned that his abstract dra3.ings are not
S n:ere :; nisees play. but roeai of constructive and ably
S controlled rhythms, of mysticism, of a masterly sense
for dividing space and making it live, of the delicacy
of his stroke, of his tenderness and force in the draw-
ings From Life to Life.
III
S Walkowitz, realizing the havoc created by himself,
S and in an effort to correct it, started to offer as gifts
S his creations with which, until now, he would not part.
So you'will find beautiful collections of his work given
by him to the Newark Museum, Brooklyn Museum,
New York Public Library, etc.
IV
The short, round and fair-faced Walkowitz is now
70 years old. His hair is gray. He knew sweat, toil and
failure but still his figure retains the elasticity of a
born fighter. His lips maintain a lovely, human smile;


his gray cies still berm with a penetriling and JoyfuJ
spark In praclical bife, he misled sonfdthing. But what
dces It mal,ter? Is it not all Ingrained in his'nousands
of arainrgs, monotypes, water colors, anri painlitns'
Valk.oa tz is a ni0ool or the artist with hi> trils and
tribulatiorn HiLs lovc [for creaMtIViness nii h,.nest dev.-
tiorn to ire arr wa s nlailfested not r.nl\ in Ill- work
but also Ii e.ery woairiht nle enirerpri.e Ir.r the promo-
tion of art. In thl, C.'Inuli, He wae one of the sponsors
of man:. cullct\- i exhllt-i...n7 of rnCuierrI art- The
Armory Show," "The Independence," "The Cr'raine
Art Centers," etc. You can find Walkowitz at every new
art exhibition. He has a good word for the creations
of every artist but until this day, when Walkowitz
speaks, his words are the words of one whose language
is not the spoken word.
Who will speak for Walkowitz?
For the timid souls, for the speechless ones, who
will speak-God?
Who will bring their ship into the harbor?

DAVID IGNATOFF, 1949.


REVERENCE FOR LIFE


,opr.-.iatflon of Miss Clifford Williams after a visit to the
Valb-uiz Ehibbiblon at 291, Dec. 13, 1913.
Th-us exhibit has given me great pleasure. Has form
evr r oe-ri more greatly loved--the big content of line
m.re _-lsitively, tenderly felt? Who other has sung
over mnd over the line of lips? Sung hummingly in
'.ryinr rhythm till one faints with the sharp beauty
of i The soft, mighty contours of life-giving hu-


manity, one feels. Reverent seems the soul toward life.
Over and over the eye touches sensitively in short-
spanned, pulsating, rhythm the bending curves of
earth and woman and man. Touches with reverent
finger, he, and is gone-to come back once more and
touch again-

Miss CLIFFORD WiLLIAMS, 1913


THE REAL WALKOWITZ


Iin the best work of Walkowitz we have what is
cilo:-e. ra a pure well of water.. Clear and fresh and
unaaulterated. A singing kind of painting. Melody. It
is ar. distilled from reality, and so a kind of essence
or re-iUy. In his best work there is not a false note.
It is lucid and transparent. The real Walkowitz is


there in his sweet and charming and fresh water colors,
in his drawings of the dancing figures and in his
tender heads. This quality of his work is rare in any
age and almost nonexistent in this.

JENNINGS' TOFFEL


A PERFECT BALANCE


W ikowliz:
SA thing of beauty is a joy forever; it shall never
pass in r.) nothingness." That things pass into nothing-
ne.s alter fifty years is sufficiently proven in life--
ourselves, thanks to Providence, present a good ex-
amnp?. out that a creation shall prove itself "A thing
of beaury" after fifty years of existence, is a rare oc-


currency. This reflection is prompted by your water
colors, paintings and drawings. They are things arrest-
ed in their prime bloom, which bear the stamp of being
neither too weak nor too strong, but having that per-
fect balance of spiritual existence which Keats had in
mind when he wrote his famous lines.
BENJAMIN KOPMAN, 1946.


THE FIRST AMERICAN MODERN


II one wants to know why Walkowitz was the first
Anierrcan to establish himself over here as a Modern,
he nru only ta: consult the best creations of his art.
They inirp3ar the redolence of a pine tree upon paper,
or corn'.unuicate a ripple of joy at a dance of the
fauns They extend a bouquet of delicate tints to the
spring. or soar off on some airy excursion above the
roof-tops and fringes of trees.


Such unpremeditated moments, it is clear, called for
freshness of rendering. Hence the early affiliation of
Walkowitz to the Moderns. Hence, too, one trusts, a
further accession of admirers until he gets that greater
public which shortly should be his.


JEROME MELLQUIST, 1948.





When tL.nmtlhirg countless details: that the e)is, for
instance, of a dancing figure, if lull', drawn, would
itrd to detracTl from the orcr-all movement. They
a.nuld hive learned that his abstract dra3.ings are not
S n:ere :; nisees play. but roeai of constructive and ably
S controlled rhythms, of mysticism, of a masterly sense
for dividing space and making it live, of the delicacy
of his stroke, of his tenderness and force in the draw-
ings From Life to Life.
III
S Walkowitz, realizing the havoc created by himself,
S and in an effort to correct it, started to offer as gifts
S his creations with which, until now, he would not part.
So you'will find beautiful collections of his work given
by him to the Newark Museum, Brooklyn Museum,
New York Public Library, etc.
IV
The short, round and fair-faced Walkowitz is now
70 years old. His hair is gray. He knew sweat, toil and
failure but still his figure retains the elasticity of a
born fighter. His lips maintain a lovely, human smile;


his gray cies still berm with a penetriling and JoyfuJ
spark In praclical bife, he misled sonfdthing. But what
dces It mal,ter? Is it not all Ingrained in his'nousands
of arainrgs, monotypes, water colors, anri painlitns'
Valk.oa tz is a ni0ool or the artist with hi> trils and
tribulatiorn HiLs lovc [for creaMtIViness nii h,.nest dev.-
tiorn to ire arr wa s nlailfested not r.nl\ in Ill- work
but also Ii e.ery woairiht nle enirerpri.e Ir.r the promo-
tion of art. In thl, C.'Inuli, He wae one of the sponsors
of man:. cullct\- i exhllt-i...n7 of rnCuierrI art- The
Armory Show," "The Independence," "The Cr'raine
Art Centers," etc. You can find Walkowitz at every new
art exhibition. He has a good word for the creations
of every artist but until this day, when Walkowitz
speaks, his words are the words of one whose language
is not the spoken word.
Who will speak for Walkowitz?
For the timid souls, for the speechless ones, who
will speak-God?
Who will bring their ship into the harbor?

DAVID IGNATOFF, 1949.


REVERENCE FOR LIFE


,opr.-.iatflon of Miss Clifford Williams after a visit to the
Valb-uiz Ehibbiblon at 291, Dec. 13, 1913.
Th-us exhibit has given me great pleasure. Has form
evr r oe-ri more greatly loved--the big content of line
m.re _-lsitively, tenderly felt? Who other has sung
over mnd over the line of lips? Sung hummingly in
'.ryinr rhythm till one faints with the sharp beauty
of i The soft, mighty contours of life-giving hu-


manity, one feels. Reverent seems the soul toward life.
Over and over the eye touches sensitively in short-
spanned, pulsating, rhythm the bending curves of
earth and woman and man. Touches with reverent
finger, he, and is gone-to come back once more and
touch again-

Miss CLIFFORD WiLLIAMS, 1913


THE REAL WALKOWITZ


Iin the best work of Walkowitz we have what is
cilo:-e. ra a pure well of water.. Clear and fresh and
unaaulterated. A singing kind of painting. Melody. It
is ar. distilled from reality, and so a kind of essence
or re-iUy. In his best work there is not a false note.
It is lucid and transparent. The real Walkowitz is


there in his sweet and charming and fresh water colors,
in his drawings of the dancing figures and in his
tender heads. This quality of his work is rare in any
age and almost nonexistent in this.

JENNINGS' TOFFEL


A PERFECT BALANCE


W ikowliz:
SA thing of beauty is a joy forever; it shall never
pass in r.) nothingness." That things pass into nothing-
ne.s alter fifty years is sufficiently proven in life--
ourselves, thanks to Providence, present a good ex-
amnp?. out that a creation shall prove itself "A thing
of beaury" after fifty years of existence, is a rare oc-


currency. This reflection is prompted by your water
colors, paintings and drawings. They are things arrest-
ed in their prime bloom, which bear the stamp of being
neither too weak nor too strong, but having that per-
fect balance of spiritual existence which Keats had in
mind when he wrote his famous lines.
BENJAMIN KOPMAN, 1946.


THE FIRST AMERICAN MODERN


II one wants to know why Walkowitz was the first
Anierrcan to establish himself over here as a Modern,
he nru only ta: consult the best creations of his art.
They inirp3ar the redolence of a pine tree upon paper,
or corn'.unuicate a ripple of joy at a dance of the
fauns They extend a bouquet of delicate tints to the
spring. or soar off on some airy excursion above the
roof-tops and fringes of trees.


Such unpremeditated moments, it is clear, called for
freshness of rendering. Hence the early affiliation of
Walkowitz to the Moderns. Hence, too, one trusts, a
further accession of admirers until he gets that greater
public which shortly should be his.


JEROME MELLQUIST, 1948.





When tL.nmtlhirg countless details: that the e)is, for
instance, of a dancing figure, if lull', drawn, would
itrd to detracTl from the orcr-all movement. They
a.nuld hive learned that his abstract dra3.ings are not
S n:ere :; nisees play. but roeai of constructive and ably
S controlled rhythms, of mysticism, of a masterly sense
for dividing space and making it live, of the delicacy
of his stroke, of his tenderness and force in the draw-
ings From Life to Life.
III
S Walkowitz, realizing the havoc created by himself,
S and in an effort to correct it, started to offer as gifts
S his creations with which, until now, he would not part.
So you'will find beautiful collections of his work given
by him to the Newark Museum, Brooklyn Museum,
New York Public Library, etc.
IV
The short, round and fair-faced Walkowitz is now
70 years old. His hair is gray. He knew sweat, toil and
failure but still his figure retains the elasticity of a
born fighter. His lips maintain a lovely, human smile;


his gray cies still berm with a penetriling and JoyfuJ
spark In praclical bife, he misled sonfdthing. But what
dces It mal,ter? Is it not all Ingrained in his'nousands
of arainrgs, monotypes, water colors, anri painlitns'
Valk.oa tz is a ni0ool or the artist with hi> trils and
tribulatiorn HiLs lovc [for creaMtIViness nii h,.nest dev.-
tiorn to ire arr wa s nlailfested not r.nl\ in Ill- work
but also Ii e.ery woairiht nle enirerpri.e Ir.r the promo-
tion of art. In thl, C.'Inuli, He wae one of the sponsors
of man:. cullct\- i exhllt-i...n7 of rnCuierrI art- The
Armory Show," "The Independence," "The Cr'raine
Art Centers," etc. You can find Walkowitz at every new
art exhibition. He has a good word for the creations
of every artist but until this day, when Walkowitz
speaks, his words are the words of one whose language
is not the spoken word.
Who will speak for Walkowitz?
For the timid souls, for the speechless ones, who
will speak-God?
Who will bring their ship into the harbor?

DAVID IGNATOFF, 1949.


REVERENCE FOR LIFE


,opr.-.iatflon of Miss Clifford Williams after a visit to the
Valb-uiz Ehibbiblon at 291, Dec. 13, 1913.
Th-us exhibit has given me great pleasure. Has form
evr r oe-ri more greatly loved--the big content of line
m.re _-lsitively, tenderly felt? Who other has sung
over mnd over the line of lips? Sung hummingly in
'.ryinr rhythm till one faints with the sharp beauty
of i The soft, mighty contours of life-giving hu-


manity, one feels. Reverent seems the soul toward life.
Over and over the eye touches sensitively in short-
spanned, pulsating, rhythm the bending curves of
earth and woman and man. Touches with reverent
finger, he, and is gone-to come back once more and
touch again-

Miss CLIFFORD WiLLIAMS, 1913


THE REAL WALKOWITZ


Iin the best work of Walkowitz we have what is
cilo:-e. ra a pure well of water.. Clear and fresh and
unaaulterated. A singing kind of painting. Melody. It
is ar. distilled from reality, and so a kind of essence
or re-iUy. In his best work there is not a false note.
It is lucid and transparent. The real Walkowitz is


there in his sweet and charming and fresh water colors,
in his drawings of the dancing figures and in his
tender heads. This quality of his work is rare in any
age and almost nonexistent in this.

JENNINGS' TOFFEL


A PERFECT BALANCE


W ikowliz:
SA thing of beauty is a joy forever; it shall never
pass in r.) nothingness." That things pass into nothing-
ne.s alter fifty years is sufficiently proven in life--
ourselves, thanks to Providence, present a good ex-
amnp?. out that a creation shall prove itself "A thing
of beaury" after fifty years of existence, is a rare oc-


currency. This reflection is prompted by your water
colors, paintings and drawings. They are things arrest-
ed in their prime bloom, which bear the stamp of being
neither too weak nor too strong, but having that per-
fect balance of spiritual existence which Keats had in
mind when he wrote his famous lines.
BENJAMIN KOPMAN, 1946.


THE FIRST AMERICAN MODERN


II one wants to know why Walkowitz was the first
Anierrcan to establish himself over here as a Modern,
he nru only ta: consult the best creations of his art.
They inirp3ar the redolence of a pine tree upon paper,
or corn'.unuicate a ripple of joy at a dance of the
fauns They extend a bouquet of delicate tints to the
spring. or soar off on some airy excursion above the
roof-tops and fringes of trees.


Such unpremeditated moments, it is clear, called for
freshness of rendering. Hence the early affiliation of
Walkowitz to the Moderns. Hence, too, one trusts, a
further accession of admirers until he gets that greater
public which shortly should be his.


JEROME MELLQUIST, 1948.





When tL.nmtlhirg countless details: that the e)is, for
instance, of a dancing figure, if lull', drawn, would
itrd to detracTl from the orcr-all movement. They
a.nuld hive learned that his abstract dra3.ings are not
S n:ere :; nisees play. but roeai of constructive and ably
S controlled rhythms, of mysticism, of a masterly sense
for dividing space and making it live, of the delicacy
of his stroke, of his tenderness and force in the draw-
ings From Life to Life.
III
S Walkowitz, realizing the havoc created by himself,
S and in an effort to correct it, started to offer as gifts
S his creations with which, until now, he would not part.
So you'will find beautiful collections of his work given
by him to the Newark Museum, Brooklyn Museum,
New York Public Library, etc.
IV
The short, round and fair-faced Walkowitz is now
70 years old. His hair is gray. He knew sweat, toil and
failure but still his figure retains the elasticity of a
born fighter. His lips maintain a lovely, human smile;


his gray cies still berm with a penetriling and JoyfuJ
spark In praclical bife, he misled sonfdthing. But what
dces It mal,ter? Is it not all Ingrained in his'nousands
of arainrgs, monotypes, water colors, anri painlitns'
Valk.oa tz is a ni0ool or the artist with hi> trils and
tribulatiorn HiLs lovc [for creaMtIViness nii h,.nest dev.-
tiorn to ire arr wa s nlailfested not r.nl\ in Ill- work
but also Ii e.ery woairiht nle enirerpri.e Ir.r the promo-
tion of art. In thl, C.'Inuli, He wae one of the sponsors
of man:. cullct\- i exhllt-i...n7 of rnCuierrI art- The
Armory Show," "The Independence," "The Cr'raine
Art Centers," etc. You can find Walkowitz at every new
art exhibition. He has a good word for the creations
of every artist but until this day, when Walkowitz
speaks, his words are the words of one whose language
is not the spoken word.
Who will speak for Walkowitz?
For the timid souls, for the speechless ones, who
will speak-God?
Who will bring their ship into the harbor?

DAVID IGNATOFF, 1949.


REVERENCE FOR LIFE


,opr.-.iatflon of Miss Clifford Williams after a visit to the
Valb-uiz Ehibbiblon at 291, Dec. 13, 1913.
Th-us exhibit has given me great pleasure. Has form
evr r oe-ri more greatly loved--the big content of line
m.re _-lsitively, tenderly felt? Who other has sung
over mnd over the line of lips? Sung hummingly in
'.ryinr rhythm till one faints with the sharp beauty
of i The soft, mighty contours of life-giving hu-


manity, one feels. Reverent seems the soul toward life.
Over and over the eye touches sensitively in short-
spanned, pulsating, rhythm the bending curves of
earth and woman and man. Touches with reverent
finger, he, and is gone-to come back once more and
touch again-

Miss CLIFFORD WiLLIAMS, 1913


THE REAL WALKOWITZ


Iin the best work of Walkowitz we have what is
cilo:-e. ra a pure well of water.. Clear and fresh and
unaaulterated. A singing kind of painting. Melody. It
is ar. distilled from reality, and so a kind of essence
or re-iUy. In his best work there is not a false note.
It is lucid and transparent. The real Walkowitz is


there in his sweet and charming and fresh water colors,
in his drawings of the dancing figures and in his
tender heads. This quality of his work is rare in any
age and almost nonexistent in this.

JENNINGS' TOFFEL


A PERFECT BALANCE


W ikowliz:
SA thing of beauty is a joy forever; it shall never
pass in r.) nothingness." That things pass into nothing-
ne.s alter fifty years is sufficiently proven in life--
ourselves, thanks to Providence, present a good ex-
amnp?. out that a creation shall prove itself "A thing
of beaury" after fifty years of existence, is a rare oc-


currency. This reflection is prompted by your water
colors, paintings and drawings. They are things arrest-
ed in their prime bloom, which bear the stamp of being
neither too weak nor too strong, but having that per-
fect balance of spiritual existence which Keats had in
mind when he wrote his famous lines.
BENJAMIN KOPMAN, 1946.


THE FIRST AMERICAN MODERN


II one wants to know why Walkowitz was the first
Anierrcan to establish himself over here as a Modern,
he nru only ta: consult the best creations of his art.
They inirp3ar the redolence of a pine tree upon paper,
or corn'.unuicate a ripple of joy at a dance of the
fauns They extend a bouquet of delicate tints to the
spring. or soar off on some airy excursion above the
roof-tops and fringes of trees.


Such unpremeditated moments, it is clear, called for
freshness of rendering. Hence the early affiliation of
Walkowitz to the Moderns. Hence, too, one trusts, a
further accession of admirers until he gets that greater
public which shortly should be his.


JEROME MELLQUIST, 1948.





WALK WIZ AND TRADITION


Mr. Walkowitz' art would be notable In any country
of the world roday That It .should have appeared In
AmriciA-ts, however, of especial slgnlficncee. for the
.sense of beaurt Which appears in it io unfailingly
proves, as does the art of certain earlier Amerwans.
that the tradition of the older countries is to continue
here, while the artist's grasp of the ideas peculiarly
ot our time must interest the man of a later day who


will want to know the thought and feelingg of the great
period we are uiing -In. Something of the rapid
thought-- which ,oten conceals the Intensltq of feeling
In tbe modern norld-Ls In the drawings Mlr Walko-
,vit has beel aworklng so earnestly to bring to their
present fineness; it is this, I believe, which pies to his
work so genuine and personal charm.
WALTER PAc"i 1925




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