<%BANNER%>

FGS



Summary of hydrologic conditions and effects of Walt Disney World development in the Reedy Creek Improvement District ( ...
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001266/00001
 Material Information
Title: Summary of hydrologic conditions and effects of Walt Disney World development in the Reedy Creek Improvement District ( FGS: Report of investigations 79 ) 1966-73
Series Title: ( FGS: Report of investigations 79 )
Uncontrolled: Walt Disney World development in the Reedy Creek Improvement District
Physical Description: viii, 115 p. : diagrs., maps ; 23cm.
Language: English
Creator: Putnam, A. L
Publisher: State of Florida, Division of Resource Management, Bureau of Geology
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1975
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Hydrology -- Florida -- Orange County   ( lcsh )
Hydrology -- Florida -- Osceola County   ( lcsh )
Water quality -- Florida -- Orange County   ( lcsh )
Water quality -- Florida -- Osceola County   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by A. L. Putnam.
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 115.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000149429
oclc - 02032664
notis - AAR5660
System ID: UF00001266:00001

Full Text






FLRD GEOLOSk ( IC SUfRiW


COPYRIGHT NOTICE
[year of publication as printed] Florida Geological Survey [source text]


The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of
this electronic resource on behalf of the State of Florida. The
Florida Geological Survey shall be considered the copyright holder
for the text of this publication.

Under the Statutes of the State of Florida (FS 257.05; 257.105, and
377.075), the Florida Geologic Survey (Tallahassee, FL), publisher of
the Florida Geologic Survey, as a division of state government,
makes its documents public (i.e., published) and extends to the
state's official agencies and libraries, including the University of
Florida's Smathers Libraries, rights of reproduction.

The Florida Geological Survey has made its publications available to
the University of Florida, on behalf of the State University System of
Florida, for the purpose of digitization and Internet distribution.

The Florida Geological Survey reserves all rights to its publications.
All uses, excluding those made under "fair use" provisions of U.S.
copyright legislation (U.S. Code, Title 17, Section 107), are
restricted. Contact the Florida Geological Survey for additional
information and permissions.










STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Harmon Shields, Executive Director




DIVISION OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Charles M. Sanders, Director




BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Charles W. Hendry, Jr., Chief



REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79



SUMMARY OF HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AND EFFECTS OF
WALT DISNEY WORLD DEVELOPMENT IN THE REEDY
CREEK IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT, 1966-73





By
A.L. Putnam






Prepared by
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with the
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
and the
REEDY CREEK IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT


Tallahassee, Florida


1975







DEPARTMENT
OF
NATURAL RESOURCES






REUBIN O'D. ASKEW
Governor


BRUCE A. SMATHERS
Secretary of State





PHILIP F. ASHLER
Acting Treasurer





RALPH D. TURLINGTON
Commissioner of Education


ROBERT L. SHEVIN
Attorney General





GERALD A. LEWIS
Comptroller




DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture


HARMON W. SHIELDS
Executive Director







LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL








The Honorable Reubin O'D. Askew, Chairman
Department of Natural Resources
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Governor Askew:

The Bureau of Geology, Division of Resource Management, Department of
Natural Resources, is publishing as its Report of Investigations No. 79, the
"Summary of Hydrologic Conditions and Effects of Walt Disney World
Development in the Reedy Creek Improvement District, 1966-73". This report is
the result of a cooperative program of water resource investigations between the
U.S. Geological Survey and the Reedy Creek Improvement District, initiated in
1966. The purpose of the program was to monitor the quantity and quality of
surface and ground water in and adjacent to the Reedy Creek Improvement
District as an aid in the continuing management of the water resources of this
area and in evaluating the effects of urban activities on the hydrologic system.
This first report describes the hydrologic setting and documents the interpreta-
tions of urban related changes in the area's hydrology that can be made from
existing data.
We believe this report, along with subsequent reports, will provide the data
base upon which proper water management programs can be developed to
protect the water resources of this most important area of Florida.


Sincerely,





C. W. Hendry, Jr., Chief


















































Completed manuscript received
May 7, 1975
Printed for the
Florida Department of Natural Resources
Division of Resource Management
Bureau of Geology

Tallahassee
1975




iv






CONTENTS


Page


Abstract ...................................................
Introduction ................................................
Purpose and scope ........................................


Hydrologic setting ..............
Drainage ................
Chemical quality of water .....
Geohydrology .............
Recharge and discharge areas
Development activity ........
Hydrologic-data numbering system .
Summary of hydrologic conditions ..
Rainfall and temperature .....


Ground water ............
Nonartesian aquifer .....
Floridan aquifer .......
Surface water ............
Cypress Creek ........
Bonnet Creek .........
Whittenhorse Creek .....
Davenport Creek ......
Reedy Creek .........
Lakes ..............
Runoff characteristics ..
Water Quality ............
Ground water ........
Surface water .........
Summary and conclusions ........
References ..................


.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.


..............
................
................
................


................
.. .. .. . .
................


................
................
................


................
................
................


................


r







ILLUSTRATIONS

gure Page


1. Reedy Creek Improvement District and vicinity showing location of
hydrologic data stations and configuration of the potentiometric surface in
September 1960 and May 1962. ............................... 2

2. Area of potential artesian flow for the Floridan aquifer, May 1962. ..... 8

3. Monthly rainfall and evaporation at Bay Lake and monthly runoff for
Bonnet Creek. .. ..................... ............. ... 12

4. Water levels in wells in the Reedy Creek Improvement District area and
vicinity. .............................................. 30

5. Water levels in well 822-135-1 and rainfall at the new tree farm in 1972. 32

6. Water levels in well 822-135-1 and rainfall at the new tree farm in 1973. 33

7. Daily water levels of Bay Lake and wells 825-134-2 and 825-134-3 and
rainfall at Bay Lake in 1972 .............................. 34

8. Daily water levels of Bay Lake and well 825-134-2 and rainfall at Bay Lake
in 1973. ............................................ 35

9. Water levels of Reedy Creek Improvement District area lakes .......... 42

10. Monthly mean discharge for Cypress Creek near Vineland, Florida
(2640.00), and Bonnet Creek near Vineland, Florida (2641.00). ....... 45

11. Monthly mean discharge for Whittenhorse Creek near Vineland, Florida
(2662.00), and Reedy Creek near Vineland, Florida (2663.00). ..... .. 46

12. Monthly mean discharge for Davenport Creek near Loughman, Florida
(2664.80) ...................................... .... .47

13- Hydrograph showing monthly mean discharge for Reedy Creek near
Loughman, Florida (2665.00). ............ .. .............. 48

14. Daily mean discharge for Cypress Creek near Vineland, Florida (2640.00),
and Bonnet Creek near Vineland, Florida (2641.00), October 1, 1970, to
September 30,1971 ..................................... 49

15- Daily mean discharge for Whittenhorse Creek near Vineland, Florida
(2662.00), and Reedy Creek near Vineland, Florida (2663.00), October 1,
1970 to September 30, 1971. .... .... ...................... 50

16. Hydrograph showing daily mean discharge for Davenport Creek near
Loughman, Florida (2664.80), and Reedy Creek near Loughman, Florida
(2665.00), October 1, 1970 to September 30, 1971. ................ 51

vi










17. Double-mass curve of streamflow data for Cypress Creek near Vineland,
and average of 13 other central Florida gaging stations ............. 53

18. Double-mass curve of streamflow data for Reedy Creek near Loughman,
and average of 13 other central Florida gaging stations .............. 54

19. Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from Bay Lake
shallow well ......................................... 59

20. Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from shallow wells
in Reedy Creek Improvement District .................. ....... 60

21. Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from Floridan
aquifer wells in Reedy Creek Improvement District. ................ 61

22. Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from Floridan
aquifer wells in Reedy Creek Improvement District ................. 62

23. Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from Floridan
aquifer wells in Reedy Creek Improvement District. ............... .63

24. Concentration of chemical constituents in surface waters in the Reedy
Creek Improvement District area .......................... .105

25. Concentration of chemical constituents in surface waters in the Reedy
Creek Improvement District area. .......................... 106

26. Concentration of chemical constituents in surface waters in the Reedy
Creek Improvement District area .............. ..... ...... 107

27. Concentration of chemical constituents in South Lake. ............ 108

28. Concentration of chemical constituents in surface waters in the Reedy
Creek Improvement District area ........................... 109

29. Concentration of chemical constituents in Bay Lake. ....... ....... 110

30. Concentration of chemical constituents in Bay Lake .............. 111



TABLES

Page


1. List of hydrologic data stations. ............................ 13

2. Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973 ........................................ 18

vii







3. Daily maximum altitude of water level in Bay Lake water-table aquifer well
825-134-3 in 1972. .......... ........ ................... .. 36

4. Daily minimum depth below land surface of water levels in Sewage
Treatment Plant water-table aquifer well 822-135-1 in 1972 and 1973. 37

5- Daily maximum altitude of water levels in Bay Lake, Floridan aquifer well
825-134-2in 1972 and 1973. ................................ 39

6. Daily mean altitude of Bay Lake near Vineland (2638.50) in 1972 and
1973. .............................................. 43

7. Chemical analyses of water from wells in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District. ..... .. ... ............ ..................... 57

8. Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area ..... ............ .. .... .............. .. .. 65

9. Chemical and nutrient analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek
Improvement District area. ................................ 76

10. Metals analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District
area. ....................... ........................ 85

II. Biological data for surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District
area ..................... ......................... 90

12- Insecticide analyses for surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area. ...... .......... ..................... ... 95

13. Herbicide analyses for surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area. ............................. .............. 103



CONVERSION TABLE


ENGLISH to METRIC

I acre = 0.4047 hectare
1 cubic foot per second = .0283 cubic metre per second
1 foot = .3048 metre
1 gallon = 3.785 litres
1 inch = 25.4 millimetres
1 mile = 1.609 kilometres
I million gallons per day = .0438 cubic metre per second
I square mile = 2.59 square kilometres
Temperature, degrees Fahrenheit = 5/9 (F*-32) degrees Celsius






SUMMARY OF HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AND
EFFECTS OF WALT DISNEY WORLD DEVELOPMENT IN THE
REEDY CREEK IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT, 1966-73

By Arthur L. Putnam


ABSTRACT

The Reedy Creek Improvement District (hereinafter called the RCID) is an
area of about 43 square miles (111 square kilometres) in southwest Orange aid
northwest Osceola Counties. Before development of Walt Disney World began
(mid-1967), all of this tract of land was scrubby flatlands and swamp. Walt
Disney World facilities now (1974) occupy slightly less than 10 percent of the
area. Hydrologic data are available for most of the area for the 6-year period
July 1967-June 1973, with some records starting before July 1967.
The potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer near Bay Lake has
declined 8 feet (2 metres) on the average. Seventy-five percent of the decline is
attributed to water use in the RCID; the remaining decline is attributed to
deficient rainfall since the records began in March 1966. The discharge of
streams in the RCID has apparently increased. However, the hydrologic
conditions were changing locally as the development of the area progressed.
Because of this change, the magnitude and seasonal distribution of any eventual
change in streamflow cannot be accurately appraised until additional data are
obtained after the development has stabilized. Some changes in water quality
have occurred, but none can be attributed to urbanization.

INTRODUCTION

The RCID (Reedy Creek Improvement District) is an area of about 43
square miles (111 square kilometres) in southwestern Orange and northwestern
Osceola Counties (fig. 1). Construction of Walt Disney World facilities in the
RCID and of commercial facilities on adjacent land is rapidly changing
uninhabited swamplands and scrubby flatlands to urbanized recreational land.
Increased demands on the water resources in these parts of the two counties are
commensurate with this growth, particularly since October 1971 when Walt
Disney World opened.
Many of the activities in the RCID are water-related. Canals, levees,
water-control structures, and culverts provide surface drainage. The constant-
head structures in the canals and streams automatically maintain a predeter-
mined upstream water level, to keep lowlands from being inundated during
storms and to curtail excessive drainage of the shallow aquifer during dry
periods. Bay Lake, a natural shallow depression containing an island, was
drained, cleared of organic bottom deposits, diked opposite several swamps, and
refilled with water from the Floridan aquifer. A lagoon was excavated,







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


3l" 3C"


0R0 A GE CO
OSCE OLD Co






DISTRICT BOUNDARY t /
S/
S/)/ /


+- 17,W


24


------ ------- -------- J-*-----------------' 8i 15''
P 0 L IC C 0 Im"


Figure -Reedy Creek Improvement District and vicinity showing location of
hydrologic data stations and configuration of the potentiometric
surface in September 1960 and May 1962.







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


connected to Bay Lake, and several water-course attractions were built in the
Theme Park to complete the lake complex. The aggregate area of Bay Lake, the
lagoon, and the Theme Park water course is about 650 acres (263 hectares).
The level and clarity of water in the Theme Park water courses are
maintained by water pumped into them from wells tapping the Floridan aquifer
and by diverting surface runoff away from them and substituting water from the
Theme Park water course to maintain the lake level. Water used to irrigate a golf
course, lawns and other landscaped areas essential to maintain the aesthetic value
of 2,500 acres (1,012 hectares) of modern recreational area, is also obtained
from the Floridan aquifer. The Floridan aquifer also supplies water for the daily
needs of employees, visitors and residents.

PURPOSE AND SCOPE

In 1966, the U.S. Geological Survey began a cooperative program of
water-resource investigations with the RCID. The purpose of the program is to
monitor the quantity and quality of surface and ground water in and adjacent to
the RCID as an aid in the continuing management of the RCID's water
resources, and in evaluating the effects of urban activities on the hydrologic
system.
This report summarizes hydrologic conditions in the RCID to July 1973
and presents the hydrologic data from the monitoring sites in tabular and
graphic form. The basic data presented are largely those for July 1972-June
1973, but hydrologic conditions are summarized for 1966 through June 1973.
The hydrologic setting is described, and interpretations of urban-related changes
in the area's hydrology that can be made from existing data are presented.
The report was prepared under the direct supervision of Joel O. Kimrey,
Subdistrict Chief, Winter Park, and under the general supervision of C. S.
Conover, District Chief, Tallahassee, both of the Water Resources Division, U. S.
Geological Survey.

HYDROLOGIC SETTING

The RCID is in the Osceola Plain between the Lake Wales Ridge to the
west and the Mount Dora Ridge to the east, as designated by Puri and Vernon
(1964, fig. 6). The topography within the RCID consists of relatively flat,
swampy terrain interspersed with higher areas or "islands" of greater topo-
graphic relief. Altitudes range from 65 to 105 feet (20 to 32 metres) above mean
sea level but are mostly between 75 and 95 feet (23 and 29 metres); the islands
commonly are about 100 feet (30 metres). Natural gradients are too slight to
permit rapid runoff, even after heavy rainfall. Consequently, large swamps and
marshlands abound in which stream channels are not well defined.
The climate is humid subtropical, characterized by long warm summers,







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


short mild winters, and high humidity throughout the year. Rainfall averages
about 50 inches (1270 millimetres) per year. The rainfall pattern is such that the
year can be divided into a rainy season and a long dry season. On the average,
more than half of the rain falls during June through September. The mean
annual temperature is about 720F (220C): the summer mean is about 82F
(280C); and the winter mean is about 610F (16C).
Although killing frosts do occur and are severe from the standpoint of
agriculture, the mild temperature and abundance of rainfall support lush,
subtropical growth in several different environments. Within the RCID, there are
two predominant environments and two lesser environments. The two predomi-
nant environments, swamp forest and prairies, cover the majority of the RCID
and are interspersed with the two lesser environments, cypress heads and pine
islands.
Swamp forest with a dense understory and comprised of such species as
swamp maple, water oak, live oak, bay and cypress, covers the largest part of the
RCID. Topographic relief within the forest is such that some low areas are
inundated during most of the year, whereas other higher areas are seldom
inundated.
Prairies or savannahs cover most of the RCID not occupied by swamp
forest. The prairies support mixed grasses and palmetto, with few trees. Some
may be inundated for months, whereas others may be seldom inundated,
depending on their altitude, which may be only a few inches or as much as
several feet above the surrounding forest. Mixed grasses are characteristic of the
lower prairies, whereas palmetto is characteristic of the higher prairies.
Circular or elliptical cypress heads, dome-shaped in profile, are scattered
throughout the RCID. Because these heads remain inundated much of the year,
few trees other than cypress grow in them. Pines predominate where localized
islands of low relief provide sufficient drainage, enough soil depth, and
protection from inundation.

DRAINAGE

The RCID is in the Reedy Creek drainage basin which is tributary to the
Kissimmee River (beyond map area) in the south. Major tributaries to Reedy
Creek are Whittenhorse, Davenport, and Bonnet Creeks. Cypress Creek is
tributary to Bonnet Creek. (See fig. 1 for locations).
Low undulating hills and flat, wide swampy valleys are characteristic
features of the Reedy Creek basin. The various lakes and swamps retain large
quantities of water, overflowing across wide, shallow marshes during the
normally wet summer months and other periods of heavy rainfall. The flatness
of the swampy valleys, the mantle of relatively permeable sands, the underlying
soluble rock, and the lush growth of vegetation play important roles in inhibiting
surface flow.







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


The subsurface drainage of the RCID is generally poor. Heavy rainfall
recharges the surficial sands to full capacity and causes water to stand over a
large part of the RCID. Owing to the almost complete lack of well-defined
tributary stream channels in these swamps and marshlands, surplus water
remains in the basin for long periods before finding its way to the creeks that
drain to the south. In the ridges that form the eastern and western boundaries of
the basin, ground-water levels fluctuate through a greater range than in the
RCID. This wider range of fluctuation indicates better subsurface drainage in the
water-table aquifer outside the RCID than in the RCID.
Lichtler, Anderson and Joyner (1968, p. 32) estimated that about 70
percent of the rain that falls on Orange County returns to the atmosphere by
evaporation and transpiration. In the RCID these losses to the atmosphere may
be greater than 70 percent because of the high proportion of land area that is
perennially wet. Thus, as Langbein (Parker, Ferguson, Love and others 1955, p.
513) states, "The atmosphere is by far the most effective agent of land drainage,
disposing of several times as much as the waterway systems."
Since 1967, the drainage within the RCID has been altered. Canals, dikes,
and automatic flow-control structures now replace the previous ill-defined
swampy stream valleys. This somewhat reduces detention and shortens the time
within which seasonal surface storage is high. However, the drainage is still
characterized by its relatively slow runoff rate and high proportion of surface
storage. The evaporation from surface-water bodies in the RCID is nearly equal
to the average annual rainfall (Visher and Hughes, 1969). Thus, evaporation and
transpiration are still the most effective agents of land drainage.

CHEMICAL QUALITY OF WATER

The chemical characteristics of water are determined by both natural
processes and human activities. Most of the dissolved solids in water are derived
from earth materials as the water passes over and through them. Much of the
organic content is derived from decayed vegetation on the surface. Man adds
both mineral and organic constituents, primarily as waste products dissipated
into the atmosphere and hydrosphere. Carbon dioxide, dissolved from the
atmosphere or decaying organic material on the earth's surface, reacts with the
water to form a weak carbonic acid. The acid increases the ability of water to
dissolve inorganic materials, especially the limestones that underlie the RCID.
The longer that water is in contact with soluble materials, the more highly
mineralized it becomes. Even though the movement of surface water in the
RCID is slow, it is far more rapid than that of ground water. Consequently, the
time of contact with soils and rocks is much shorter for surface water than for
ground water. Hence, surface water generally contains less than 90 mg/1
(milligrams per litre) of dissolved solids and ground water generally more than
90 mg/1. Surface water is usually higher in color (generally greater than 100







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


color units) than ground water (generally less than 30 color units) because
surface water dissolves some of the living and decaying organic materials that it
contacts, while the soil tends to remove color from any surface water percolating
through it to recharge the aquifer.

GEOHYDROLOGY

The uppermost ground-water aquifer in the RCID is the nonartesian or
water-table aquifer. This aquifer consists of fine-to coarse-grained quartz sands,
with interbedded clays whose extent and distribution are not well defined. It
extends from the land surface to a depth of about 50 feet (15 metres). Water
from this aquifer is generally soft, low in mineral content, slightly corrosive, and
often high in color and iron. Water in the nonartesian aquifer is more highly
mineralized in areas where the artesian pressure (potentiometric) surface of a
deeper aquifer is above the water table and the confining layer is permeable
enough so that water can move upward from the deeper aquifer to the
nonartesian aquifer. Most recharge to the water-table aquifer is by direct
downward infiltration of rainfall or of water stored on the land surface. The
aquifer will yield small quantities of water to wells.
Underlying the nonartesian aquifer is the Hawthorn Formation of Miocene
age, a sequence of limestone and marl, fine-to coarse-grained sand, and very fine
micaceous clayey sand with some fine-grained black phosphatic material. In the
RCID, this formation is generally 40 to 90 feet (12 to 27 metres) thick and
generally acts as a confining bed for the underlying Floridan aquifer. The
permeability of this formation varies throughout the RCID, providing varying
degrees of hydraulic contact between the Floridan aquifer and the shallower
aquifers.
Artesian conditions occur where the water in an aquifer is confined, so
that water levels in the aquifer are not free to rise and fall with changes in
pressure in the aquifer. The water level in a tightly cased well that penetrates an
artesian aquifer will stand above the point at which the aquifer was first
penetrated. The level at which the water stands in the well is a point on the
potentiometric surface of the aquifer tapped by that well.
Secondary artesian aquifers (consisting primarily of thin limestone lenses
or sand and shell zones) occur above or within the Hawthorn Formation. These
secondary artesian aquifers are confined by overlying less permeable material
and may locally yield moderate to large quantities of water to wells. The quality
of water in the secondary artesian aquifer is controlled by the relation of the
potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer to the water table. Where the
potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer is below the water table, some
downward leakage or recharge occurs and the quality of the water in the
secondary artesian aquifer will more closely resemble that of water in the
nonartesian aquifer than that of water in the Floridan aquifer. Where the







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer is above the water table, some
water from the Floridan aquifer leaks or discharges upward and water in the
secondary artesian aquifer tends to be similar to water in the Floridan aquifer.
The principal aquifer in the RCID is the Floridan aquifer, which underlies
all of Florida. In general, this aquifer consists of about 2,000 feet (610 metres)
of limestone and dolomite or dolomitic limestone of Eocene age. In some parts
of the RCID, basal limestones in the Hawthorn Formation are in hydraulic
contact with the Eocene limestones and are included in the Floridan aquifer.
The aquifer not only stores enormous quantities of water, but it transmits water
so efficiently that large diameter wells may yield several thousand gallons of
water per minute. Water from this aquifer is a calcium bicarbonate type, low in
color, moderately hard to very hard, and relatively high in dissolved-mineral
content.
The Floridan aquifer can accept recharge only when the potentiometric
surface of the nonartesian or water-table aquifer is higher than the potentio-
metric surface of the Floridan aquifer. However, the rate at which recharge will
occur depends upon the thickness and permeability of the materials (confining
beds) that separate the nonartesian and the Floridan aquifer and the hydraulic
gradient through these materials. Where the potentiometric surface of the
Floridan aquifer is near or above the land surface, there is little or no head
difference to induce water to move downward to the Floridan. In addition,
upward leakage from the Floridan aquifer may occur in these areas, thus, adding
water to the nonartesian aquifer and reducing its ability to capture surface
water.

RECHARGE AND DISCHARGE AREAS

The part of the RCID where the potentiometric surface of the Floridan
aquifer was above land surface in May 1962 is shown on figure 2. The
potentiometric surface for May 1962 was used for portrayal because this was a
period of low water conditions that occurred prior to the development of Walt
Disney World, and it gives a basis for future comparisons of the extent and
distribution of the area for potential discharge from the Floridan aquifer. The
extent and distribution of this area varies with the fluctuation of the
potentiometric surface, the potential discharge area being more extensive during
periods when the potentiometric surface is high than during periods when it is
low. The effect of urbanization on the potential discharge and recharge areas can
be evaluated in relation to a condition prior to development by comparing a
low-water condition after development, with the potentiometric surface for May
1962.
As indicated by figure 2, the potentiometric surface of the Floridan
aquifer was above land surface in the broad valleys of Reedy and Bonnet Creeks,
which constitute most of the RCID. The area is generally swampy and is one in







8 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 2-Area of potential artesian flow for the Floridan aquifer, May 1962.







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


which the base flow of the streams and water from the nonartesian aquifer have
chemical characteristics similar to those of water from the Floridan aquifer.
The most favorable recharge areas for the Floridan aquifer are west, north,
and east of the RCID, in the Cypress and Whittenhorse Creek basins and in the
higher part of Davenport Creek basin. In these areas the potentiometric surface
is always well below land surface, and the small amount of surface runoff seems
to indicate that recharge, to at least the shallow aquifer, is appreciable.

DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITY

Ground water and surface water in the RCID are so closely associated that
any change, whether natural or imposed by man, may affect the entire
hydrologic system. Several alterations in the physiography resulting from the
development of Walt Disney World affect the water resources of the RCID and
merit discussion here.
Construction of buildings, streets, and other impervious surfaces prevents
infiltration of rainfall into the ground and causes water to run off rapidly. A
system of canals has been constructed to protect the RCID from floods resulting
from a 50-year frequency rainfall. This system consists of 44 miles (71
kilometres) of well entrenched canals and 19 miles (31 kilometres) of dikes
constructed in low-lying lands to control inflow from parts of the drainage basin
lying upstream and outside the RCID. These dikes direct the inflow into the
canals where gated structures or spillways control the quantity of flow at points
of entrance to the RCID. This drainage system was designed to protect lowlands
from inundation during storms and to curtail excessive drainage of the shallow
aquifer during dry periods. These facilities have provided adequate surface and
subsurface drainage to thus far permit development of approximately 9,800
acres (3,960 hectares).
The modification of the 450-acre (182-hectare) Bay Lake began in
December 1968. A dike constructed around the lake prevents inflow of colored
swamp water. The lake was drained and kept dry until September 1970 by
pumping seepage water out of the depression into Bonnet Creek through a gated
spillway at the southeast part of the lake. While the bottom was dry, organic
bottom sediments were removed to expose a relatively clean sand bottom. A
connecting 175-acre (71-hectare) lagoon was excavated to the southwest of Bay
Lake along with several water-course attractions in the Theme Park just north of
the lagoon. A gated outlet structure or spillway was installed at the northwest
part of the lagoon. From September 1970 to June 1971, the completed
lake-lagoon complex was filled with water from wells in the Floridan aquifer.
Since June 1971, the complex has been maintained at the design level of 94.5
feet (28.8 metres) by rainfall and water pumped from the Floridan aquifer to
maintain the quality of the Theme Park water attractions.
Test boring indicates the absence of a definitive confining unit for the







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Floridan aquifer in the Bay Lake-lagoon area; so, water may be interchanged
between the aquifer and lake. During the drawdown of Bay Lake and the
excavation of the lagoon, about 2 cubic feet per second (0.06 cubic metre per
second) of ground-water discharge was observed in a boil that formed on the
west side of the lake. The quality of the water from this boil indicated that it
comes from the Floridan aquifer. The potential for interchange of water
between the lake system and the aquifer is currently (1974) being further
investigated.
About 63 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) (0.28 cubic metre per second)
of water is required in the RCID. About 4.9 Mgal/d (0.18 cubic metre per
second) is required for a potable supply. The remaining 2.3 Mgal/d (0.1 cubic
metre per second) is used for quality control of the Theme Park water-course
attractions. After passing through the water course, this water is used to
maintain the quality and level of water of the lake and lagoon.
The location of six Floridan-aquifer wells, and the distribution of pumpage
from these wells to provide the above water requirements, affect the potential
for loss of water from the lake-lagoon to the aquifer and ultimately affect the
amount of water required to maintain the lake-lagoon. Two wells about 0.8 mile
(13 kilometres) northwest of the north shore of Bay Lake provide about 85
percent of the potable water, and three wells-3.3, 4.4, and 5.1 miles (5.3, 7.1,
and 82 kilometres) southeast of the north shore of Bay Lake-furnish the
remaining 15 percent of the potable water. One well about 0.25 mile (0.40
kilometre) north of the north shore of Bay Lake provides the water for the
lake-lagoon and Theme Park water attractions. The distribution of wells is thus
such that most of the ground-water withdrawals, and the resulting decline of
potentiometric levels, occur near Bay Lake.
Waste water receives partial-tertiary treatment at the sewage treatment
plant in the RCID and is then stored in a holding pond until used for irrigation
of the tree farm about 4 miles (6 kilometres) southwest of Bay Lake.

HYDROLOGIC-DATA NUMBERING SYSTEM

The observation wells cited in this report are assigned identification
numbers based on the latitude and the longitude of the well location. By
describing a well site to the nearest second of latitude and longitude, its location
is defined to within a one-second quadrangle, which is approximately 100 feet
(30.5 metres) square. For example, a well located at 28025'28" north latitude
and 81034'09" west longitude would be numbered 282528N0813409.1. The .1
at the end of this number is called the sequential number and indicates this well
was the first well to be inventoried within the 100-foot square quadrangle. For
convenience and rapid recognition, this number has been shortened to the last
digit of the degree and the two digits of the minutes for both latitude and
longitude. There is, in addition, another sequential number. This sequential







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


number indicates this was the first well inventoried within a 1-minute quadrangle.
The shortened form of the example well then becomes 825-134-1.
For surface-water data, the identification numbers are assigned in
ascending order in a downstream direction along the main stream. Gaps are left
in the numbers to allow for new stations that may be established; hence, the
numbers are not consecutive. The numbers for surface-water stations used in this
report are 6-digit identification numbers such as "2663.00". Latitude and
longitude for surface-water stations are given as additional identification data.
Water-quality data are assigned identification numbers corresponding to
the source of water. For quality data of ground water, the identification number
is the same as that described above for wells. Similarly, the identification
number for quality data of surface water is the same as described above for
surface-water stations.
Weather stations in this report have not been assigned identification
numbers. Identity is established by means of a structure or landmark at the
point of collection. For example, the weather station at Bay Lake is identified as
Bay Lake West Shore Weather Station. Latitude and longitude are given for
further location.
Locations of collection sites of data used in this report are shown in figure
1. Table 1 lists all the sites by map reference number shown on figure 1. Table 1
also gives the U. S. Geological Survey site number, name, location, latitude, and
longitude, period of record, and type of data collected for each site.

SUMMARY OF HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS

In the RCID, the distribution of monthly runoff during the year
corresponds in a general way to the distribution of rainfall, but both streamflow
and rainfall are more variable and intermittent than evaporation (fig. 3). Thus,
evaporation affects the RCID's water resources more during a short-record
period (less than .10 years) of lower-than-average rainfall than during a
long-record period (greater than 20 years) representing average conditions.
Keeping this in mind, considerable judgment is required to determine the extent
to which short-record hydrologic data represent long-record average conditions.
Because the data network for the study area was established in May 1966, the
data shown in figure 3 represent trends for a short-record of hydrologic
conditions. The data also represent a time when the hydrologic conditions were
changing locally as a result of successive stages of development in the RCID. The
effects of such development are not readily distinguishable against a background
of natural, high variations in hydrologic conditions.

RAINFALL AND TEMPERATURE

Rainfall during January 1967-June 1973 in the RCID was below long-term







I
-I
a
re


Figure 3-Monthly rainfall and evaporation at Bay Lake and monthly runoff for
Bonnet Creek.


w

c C3
I
.j





Table l.--List of hydrologic data stations.

U.S.
Map Geological Period Type
reference Survey Name and location. Latitude and longitude of of
number number record data


2640.00 Cypress Creek at
Vineland, Florida

2662.00 Whittenhorse Creek nr.
Vineland, Florida

2663.00 Reedy Creek nr.
Vineland, Florida

2641.00 Bonnet Creek nr.
Vineland, Florida

2664.80 Davenport Creek nr.
Loughman, Florida

2665.00 Reedy Creek nr.>
Loughman, Florida


2662.91 Lateral 405 above S-405A
nr. Doctor Phillips, Fla.

2662.92 Lateral 405 below S-405A
nr. Doctor Phillips, Fla.

2638.64 Lake Mabel nr.
Doctor Phillips, Fla.

2638.50 Bay Lake nr.
Vineland, Florida


28023'25"
81031111"

28023'05"
81037'00"1

28"19'57"
81034'48"

28019'58"
8131'20"

28016'15"
81035'28"

28"15'48"
81032'12"


28025137"
81"36'19"

28025'37"
81036'19"

28025'11"
81032'58"

28025'28"
81034'09"


1945 to
current year

1966 to
current year

1966 to
current year

1966 to
current year

1969 to
current year

1939 59
1968 to
current year


Streamflow


Streamflow


Streamflow 0


Streamflow


Streamflow


Streamflow Z


Water
quality


1969 72 Water
quality

1969, 71 Water
quality

1966 71 Water
quality








Table 1,--List of hydrologic data stations (continued).

U.S.
Map Geological Period Type
reference Survey Name and location Latitude and longitude of of
number number record data


11 2638.52 Bay Lake Outlet below
S-105A nr. Vineland, Fla.

12 2638.69 South Lake Outlet above
S-15 nr. Vineland, Fla.

13 2638.70 South Lake Outlet below
S-15 nr. Vineland, Fla.

14 2660.25 Reedy Creek above S-46
nr. Vineland, Fla.

15 2660.26 Reedy Creek below S-46
nr, Vineland, Fla.

16 2662.94 Lateral 405 below S-405
nr. Vineland, Fla.

17 2640.00 Cypress Creek at
Vineland, Fla.

18 2662.00 Whittenhorse Creek
nr. Vineland, Fla.

19 Lake Buena Vista


20 2662.95 Lateral 410 at S-410


2824'45"
81"33'30"

28*24'45"
81032'17"

28029'26"
8132'17"

2824'14"
8136'42"

2824'14"
8136'42"


1968 to
current year

1968 to
current year

1970, 71


1970 72


1968 71


Water
quality

Water
quality

Water
quality

Water
quality

Water
quality


1971 72 Water
quality


,28023'25"
81"31'11"

28023'05"
81037'00"


1963 to
current year

S1966 to
current year


1971


Water
quality

Water
quality

Water
quality

Water
quality




Table l.--List of hydrologic data stations (continued).

U.S.
Map Geological Period Type
reference Survey Name and location Latitude and longitude of of
number number record data


2662.96 Lateral 410 below S-410


2663.00 Reedy Creek near
Vineland, Florida

2641.00 Bonnet Creek near
Vineland, Florida

2664.80 Davenport Creek near
Loughman, Florida

2665.00 Reedy Creek near
Loughman, Florida


825-134-4 Floridan aquifer well
at RCID Tree Farm

825-135-3 Shallow well at RCID
Tree Farm

825-134-12 Floridan aquifer RCID
Well No. 8

825-134-2 Floridan aquifer well
at Bay Lake

825-134-3 Shallow well at
Bay Lake


1971


22


23


24


25



26


27


28


1962 to
current year

1963 to
current year

1965 to
current year

1959, 1965,
1968 to
current year


Water
quality

Water
quality

Water
quality

Water
quality

Water
quality


2819'57"
81034'48"

28019'58"
81031'20"

28016'15"
8135'28"

28"15'48"
81032112"


28025'50"
81034'46"

28025'32"
81035'04"

28025'29"
81034'30"

28025'28"
81034'09"

28*25'28"
81034'09"


1968


1970


1966 to
current year

1966 to
current year


Water
quality

Water
quality

Water level
and quality

Water level
and quality


1967 68 Water
quality








Table l,-ULtit of hydrologic data stations (continued),


map Geological Period Type
reference Survey Name and location Latitude and longitude of of
number number record data


31 825-134-5 Shallow well, Reedy
Creek Improvement Diet.

32 823-131-7 Floridan aquifer well
RCID Well No. 5

33 822-135-1 Shallow vell at RCID
Sewage Treatment Plant

34 815-134-2 Shallow well near
Loughman, Florida

35 Bay Lake North Shore
Weather Station




36 Bay Lake West Shore
Weather Station


28'25'16"
81"34'25"

28'23'48"
81031'31"

28022'10"
81"35'26"

28015'32"
81*34'50"

28'25'28"
81'34'09"




2825'13"
8134'25"


1968


Water
quality


1970 72 Water
quality


1971


Water level
and quality


Water level
and quality

1966 70 Rainfall,
evaporation,
wind speed,
relative humidity,
temperature

1969 to Rainfall,
current year evaporation,
wind speed,
relative humidity,
temperature


- 8-405 Rainfall 1970 to
current year


RCID Gate No. 1 Rainfall


RCID New Tree Farm
Rainfall

RCID Gate No. 3
Rainfall


28'33'54"
81031'45"

28"22'10"
81035'26"

28019'59"
8134'12"


1969 72 Rainfall


1972 to
current year

1969 to
current year'


Rainfall


Rainfall


Rainfall







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


average. The annual rainfall at Bay Lake, 1967-72, averaged 47.15 inches (1200
millimetres), or 5.53 inches (140 millimetres) less than the 60-year average
measured by the National Weather Service at Windermere, Florida, about 5.6
miles (9.0 kilometres) north of Bay Lake. The deficit at Bay Lake was maximum
in 1968, 12.47 inches (317 millimetres) below the 60-year average at
Windermere. In only one year, 1969, was the rainfall at Bay Lake above the
60-year average at Windermere, and then only by 2.70 inches (68 millimetres).
The total rainfall at Bay Lake for 1967-72 was 282.88 inches (7185 millimetres),
while the total at Windermere was 299.17 inches (7599 millimetres). While the
6-year average at Windermere was 49.70 inches (1262 millimetres) or 2.98 (76
millimetres) below the 60-year average.
The average temperature for the RCID (measured at Bay Lake), 1967-72,
was 71.10F (21.70C). This was 1.30F (0.70C) below the long-term average for
Kissimmee No. 2 National Weather Service Station, about 13 miles (21
kilometres) southeast of Bay Lake. At Bay Lake, the maximum average-monthly
temperature was 840F (28.90C), during September of 1971 and 1972. The
average-monthly temperature was least, 540F (12.20C) in February 1968. The
maximum temperature was 1010F (38.3C) on July 28, 1968, and the minimum
temperature was 240F (-4.4C) on January 10, 1970.
Weather observations made in the District from July 1972 through June
1973 are presented in table 2.

GROUND WATER

NONARTESIAN AQUIFER

The 7-year trend of ground-water levels in the RCID area is shown in
figure 4 by graphs of the month-end water level. The water level in Bay Lake
shallow well, 825-134-3 a well tapping the nonartesian aquifer declined
about 3 feet (0.9 metre) between 1966 and about mid-1970. Shallow wells,
822-138-2 about 6 miles (10 kilometres) southwest of Bay Lake and 815-134-2
about 12 miles (19 kilometres) south of Bay Lake, show a pattern in water-level
fluctuation between 1966 and mid-1970 similar to that of Bay Lake shallow
well. However, water levels in wells 822-138-2 and 815-134-2 recovered in late
1969 and early 1970 to levels slightly higher than they were in 1966, whereas in
late 1969 the water level in Bay Lake shallow well, 825-134-3, remained about
1.5 feet (0.4 metre) below its 1966 level. This apparent discrepancy in
water-level fluctuation for wells 822-138-2 and 815-134-2, as compared to Bay
Lake shallow well, is explained as follows: water levels in wells 822-138-2 and
815-134-2 are not known to be affected by pumpage or drainage; so, their
fluctuations during 1969-70 related directly to rainfall. However, water levels in
Bay Lake shallow well were kept lower from December 1968 to May 1971 by
drainage and reclamation of Bay Lake. Since May 1971, the water level in Bay






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973.
Tree Gate 45
Bay Lake (West Shore) S-405
Air Relative
Temperature Humidity 5 I V -.

Time 4. 4 t e
Day of Max. Min. Max. Miu. 0 e 0 s
Obs. F OF X 0 1 3 0
"Ob. c 4 2 r N P. W
1 1500 6.3 +.08 22NW -
2 1140 6.7 .51 10SW -
3 0930 98 72 100 35 .12 1.4 .18 32W .07 .09 ,13
4 0900 94 70 100 41 0 5.2 .09 10SE Q 0 _0.
5 0950 92 71 100 56 .26 0 .24 18SE 0 .10 0
6 1545 92 69 100 40 1.30 4.7 .22 36W 1.09 1.25 2.11
7 0930 90 68 100 50 .08 4.4 .26 18NE 1.73 0 .56
8 0950 88 70 100 62 0 6.6 .26 22NE 0 0
9 0950 89 70 100 54 .22 16.5 .23 25NE 0 .12* .15
10 1025 86 70 100 82 .12 15.0 .20 17NE .13 0 0
11 0900 90 70 100 54 0 8.9 .21 10W 0 0 0
12 1245 93 72 100 45 0 3.9 .10 10NW 0 0 0
13 0916 93 70 100 52 3.13 0.5 .24 28NE 1.97 1.51 3.47
14 0910 88 70 100 73 0 1.6 .77 16E 0 0 0
15 0900 92 72 100 53 .05 0 .16 24NE 0 .28 .23
16 0930 88 72 100 74 0 3.5 .11 21E 0 0 0
17 0915 88 74 100 82 .85 21.5 .32 18E .55 .44 .90
18 0850 86 73 100 70 .20 6.3 .36 20NE .10 1 .05 .43
19 1045 85 72 100 91 .05 13.9 +.12 22E .13 .08 .05
20 0922 87 72 100 72 .08 20.0 .44 25E 0 0 0
21 0930 88 72 100 77 .04 33.7 .23 21E .14 0 .17
2 1000 90 72 100 58 0 26.5 .26 12E 0 0 0
23 0835 91 70 100 51 0 17.4 .34 17NE .13 0 .09
24 1330 93 71 100 44 0 8.7 .24 10E 0 0 0
25 1015 92 73 100 52 0 1.5 .20 14W 0 0 0
26 0911 90 72 100 56 0 2.8 .22 20W 0 0 0
27 0850 96 73 100 50 0 4.5 .17 7S 0 0 0
28 0930 96 72 100 42 0 1.6 .20 8S 0 0 0
29 1205 94 73 100 43 0 2.0 .19 10SE 0 0 0
30 1730 92 72 100 52 0 3.2 .32 16E 0 0 0
31 0930 90 70 100 62 1.02 2.6 +,12 24E .90 .57 .75
Total 2631 2067 2900 1673 7.52 251.4 6.95 6.94 4.49 9.04
Aver.I 90.7 71.3 100 57.7 8.1 10.22
REMARKS *-estimate


Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.






REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Bay Lake (West Shore)ee te S-405
Air Relative g
Temperature Humidity | l
S as s
Time :,. .4 > Xr 4 ,
Day of Max. Min. Max. Min. u' | U U'- u
Obs. OF OF 7% % W 4 C6

1 0950 92 72 100 53 0 7.6 +.23 2(0 0 0 .02
2 1735 94 74 100 32 0 6.8 .34 6E 0 0 0
3 0945 94 70 100 35 0 2.5 .36 10NW 0 0 0
4 0910 97 73 100 41 0 6.1 +.01 17NE 0 0 0
5 0815 96 74 100 48 0 4.7 .26 14E .55 .95 .57
6 0900 83 75 100 63 .52 5.8 .06 23W 0 0 .04
7 0915 93 74 100 82 .11 0 .22 20W 0 .05 .06
8 1745 92 73 100 88 .26 11.0 .42 29E .26 .27 .30
9 0830 93 70 100 92 3.75 4.9 .12 26NE 1.76 .60 1.93
10 1300 93 71 100 60 0 1.8 .20* 14E 0 0 0
11 1040 96 75 100 100 0 0 .17 20E 0 0 0
12 1000 92 72 100 100 0 0.3 +.26 19W 0 0 0
13 0830 92 71 100 100 0 8.1 .14 11N 0 0 0
14 1337 94 73 100 88 .07 10.4 .44 22E 0 .55 0
15 1220 94 74 100 91 0 7.0 .25* 28E .70 .40 .16
16 0835 92 73 100 93 .20 3.3 .32 12E* .75 .77 .17
17 1320 92 72 100 90 0 5.9 .15 27E .55 0 .46
18 0945 92 72 100 58 0 1.9 .15 16E 0 0 0
19 0845 91 71 100 80 1.40 0 +.01 12NW 2.15i .42 1.88
20 94 70 100 76 0 0.1 .24 24NW 0 0 0
21 0935 89 71 100 52 1.45 0.1 .16 1914 .52 1.45
99 0840 88 70 100 50 0 0.4 .32 12SE 0 0
2 1705 80 71 100 92 .90 1.2 .05 10SE 1.19 -
24 0910 85 70 100 63 .43 0 .02 25W .52 .88 -
25 0840 86 70 100 56 0 1.2 .07 8E 0 -
26 0930 77 71 100 100 .50 0.1 .12 9NW .30 .26 -
27 0930 88 69 100 45 0 0.1 .04 18E 0 .11 -
28 0905 93 77 100 43 0 0.3 .12 17NE .62 0 0
29 1600 93 74 100 48 .10 1.4 .23 12SE .08 0
30 1630 91 74 100 46 .05 1.0 .15 29E .0 0
31 1030 90 75 100 52 .09 0.7 .09 16W 0 .05
Total 2816 2241 3100 2117 9.83 94.7 5.24 8.16 7.05 7.09
Aver. 90.8 72.3 100 68.3 3.0 .17 ** *
REMARKS *.estimate


**-missing record may affect monthly total


Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.


REMARKS **High evaporation ma
y be due to repperature build-up within th
e


tank when the water level is allowed to drop below recommended levels.


Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.


Bay Lake (West Shore) ee Io S-405
Air Relative
Temperature Humidity
U 2 .ei as -A a>

Day of Max. Min. Max. Min. 5e U .2 8"
P. CJ P% 0" P.
Obs. "F "F A % S

1 1630 89 73 100 48 0 0 .11 12NE 0 0 0
2 0905 91 73 100 40 0 0.1 .08 11NE 0 0 0
3 0840 94 70 100 18 0 0 .09 10E 0 0 0
4 0915 96 72 100 30 0 0 .33 14SE 0 0 0
5 0845 96 75 100 26 0 0 .22 10E 0 0 0
6 0910 96 73 100 32 0 0 .14 12NE 0 0 0
7 0915 92 74 100 46 0 0.4 .35 12NE 0 0 0
8 0845 89 72 100 32 0 0.3 .19 13NW 0 0 0
9 94 69 100 26 0 10.5 .16 10NE 0 0 0
10 0905 92 73 100 38 0 4.1 .38 17NE 0 0 0
11 0910 88 74 100 56 .03 18.2 .08 24NE .05 .57 0
12 !0930 95 73 100 32 0 20.0 .16 12E .07 .03 0
13 1330 96 73 100 30 0 9.1 .25 20E 0 0 0
14 0915 96 75 100 26 0 7.2 .68 15NE 0 0 0
15 0905 98 74 100 24 0 3.7 .21 10E 0 0 0
16 0910 98 76 100 24 0 1.5 .18 16E 0 0 0
17 10910 98 74 100 25 0 6.7 .22 14E 0 0 0
18 j0930 97 74 100 32 0 6.0 .23 4NE 0 I 0 0
19 0910 97 75 100 29 0 4.5 .21 14N 0 0 0
20 0830 96 74 100 34 0 7.9 .31 16NE 0 0 0
1j 92 70 100 36 .05 15.3 .07 14NE 0 .06 0
7 '1105 90 66 100 28 0 7.2 .22 12NW 0 0 0
2 10855 93 66 100 25 0 11.5 .11 13E 0 0 0
24 10830 94 69 100 31 .02 9.1 .22 17SE 0 .02 0
25 1330 97 76 100 40 .14 13.9 .13 16SE 0 0 0
26 1025 97 77 100 44 0 3.2 .12 16NE 0 0 0
S0910 98 75 100 38 0 3.2 .10 18NE 0 0 0
28 0o900 96 74 100 36 0 13.0 .29 16NE 0 0 0
29 0900 96 75 100 38 0 13.5 .14 16NE 0 0 0
30 0910 92 75 100 40 0 3.4 .09 26NW 0 0 .15
31
Total 2833 2189 3000 1004 .24 193.5 6.07 .12 .68 .15
Aver.j 94.4 73.0 100 33.5 6.4 .22






REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Bay Lake (West Shore) ee te -405
Air Relative
S Temperature Humidity aa .- .
U W, X 3 0es W C6 r: E A
0ao Osi a| i a s
0 Time 96 4. .0
Day of Max. Min. Max. Mia. 8 .
Obs. OF OF 7. % a W k

1 88 72 100 57 .95 4 9SW .25 .10 .54
2 1030 94 72 100 52 .52 13.9 .58 24N 1.95 1.73 1.65
3 0907 86 73 100 85 0 1.2 .23 12N 0 0 0
4 0910 87 73 100 79 0 0 .10 12WE 0 0 0
5 0900 87 72 100 72 0 0 .09 16NW 0 0 0
6 1140 85 68 100 51 0 4.4 .16 18W 0 0 0
7 0910 82 62 100 46 0 19.8 .17 17W 0 0 0
8 0945 84 61 100 34 0 27.7 .20 9,W 0 0 0
9 0855 86 59 100 22 0 12.3 .07 SN 8 0 0 0
10 0900 88 64 100 47 0 4.4 .22 26NE 0 0 0
11 0915 83 70 100 61 0 27.2 .15 22NE 0 0 .10
12 0905 86 68 100 38 0 32.3 .17 18NE 0 0 0
13 0845 88 66 100 34 0 22.7 .17 10NE 0 0 0
14 0915 88 62 100 28 0 10.9 .19 6E 0 0 0
15 0945 88 63 100 38 0 3.6 .05 12W8 0 0 0
16 0905 87 662 100 40 0 7.5 .22 6NW 0 0 0
17 0930 88 67 100 34 0 3.7 .14 8W 0 0 0
18 0900 90 65 100 35 0 4.4 .13 10NE 0 0 0
19 0905 90 66 100 31 0 1.8 .05 8N 0 0 0
20 1030 72 66 100 82 0 16.2 .20 20N .03 .05 .03
21 0920 84 62 100 31 10 18.9 .13 21E 0 0 0
2 0850 82 64 100 48 0 19.0 .15 18E 0 0 0
23 0920 86 62 100 35 0 12.4 .12 10E 0 0 0
24 0915 86 62 100 33 0 2.4 .14 8E 0 0 0
25 1020 85 64 100 40 0 1.0 .10 10W 0 0 0
26 0920 86 66 100 40 0 1.3 .17 8E 0 0 0
27 1015 85 69 100 50 0 0.8 .07 14SEi 0 0 0
28 0938 81 69 100 83 .84 0.6 .11 32W .45 .48 .55
29 0905 78 62 100 49 0 1.2 .06 _8W 0 0 0
30 0920 86 60 100 50 0 0 .12 13NE 0 0 0
31 1025 86 66 100 50 0 0 .07 11NE 0 0 0
Total 2652 2041 3100 1475 2.38 271.( 4.53 2.68 2.36 2.87
Aver. 85.5 65.8 100 47.6 8.7 .15


REMARKS 4-Total for the period in next value.


Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight,

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Bay Lake (West Shore)e Gat S-405
Air Relative
temperature Humidity 1 a
.S. 0


Obs. *T *F t X r d 5

1 0910 84 66 100 50 0 0 .14 18E 0 0 0
2 0925 88 63 100 40 0 0 .14 12E 0 0 0
3 1130 88 68 100 53 0 0 .08 7E 0 0 0
4 0930 87 68 100 45 0 0 .11 11N 0 .07 0
5 0900 85 68 100 63 0 0 .07 12NE 0 0 0
6 0955 82 70 100 78 .52 0 .09 15N .13 0 0
7 0925 84 71 100 64 0 0.1 .06 12NE 0 0 0
8 0930 77 57 100 36 0 0 .05 14W 0 0
9 1030 81 51 100 32 0 0.4 .11* 9E 0 0 0
10 0910 82 59 100 58 0 0 .11 10NW 0 0 0
11 0835 86 65 100 42 0 0 .04 8W 0 0 0
12 1545 84 65 100 60 .57 1.3 .13 20NE .06 0 .08
13 0930 86 69 100 61 0 0.7 .02 20E 0 0 0
14 1525 83 70 100 60 .49 0.8 .13 10SE .25 .38 .33
15 0920 71 52 100 44 0 0.6 .09 12W 0 0
16 0940 75 50 100 46 0 1.7 .10 13SW 0 0
17 0934 67 49 100 44 0 1.6 .08* 8W 0 0
18 0840 74 44 100 48 0 3.9 .08 10E 0 0
19 1000 74 58 100 88 .33 2.4 .01 14SE .30 .30 .32
20 71 53 100 00 0 6SW 0 0 0
21 1245 64 48 100 44 0 3.5 .09 12NW 0 0 0
1 61 47 100 48 0 ** .13 12NW 0 0 0
23 0915 58 44 100 69 0 .05 12W 0 0 0
24 0930 65 48 100 78 0 8N 0 0 0
25 0900 73 59 100 87 26W 1.04 .98 1.27
26 1010 .12 0 23SW .07 .13
27 1545 0 .02 8E 0 0 0
28 1100 75 64 100 80 .26 .04 10SE .26 .23 .28
29 0950 78 64 100 70 .50 .01 9E .61 .25 .57
30 1540 71 57 100 92 .14 .12 22SW .16 .42 .29
31
Total 2154 1673 2800 1680 4.26 17.0 1.99 2.81 2.70 3.27
Aver. 76 59 100 60 .8 .09
REMARKS *- estimated
** equipment malfunction

4V-Total for the period in next value.
Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.








REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Bay Lake (West Shore) ree ae S-405
Air Relative
Temperature Humidity 0g o o
aS amS 0.0 P5 S S S

Day of Max. Min.. Max. Min. p a ug ug u '-'
Obs. F F 7. % S a p a
*4 N CJ 0411 -u s a 4 e p
1 0925 68 40 100 39 0 +.28 22W 0 0 0
2 0830 71 41 100 54 0 .01 8NE 0 0 0
3 0850 73 53 100 69 0 .13 8NW 0 0 0
4 1320 79 58 100 65 0 .02 6NW 0 0 0
5 0917 76 61 100 82 0 .08 18E 0 0 0
6 1445 84 64 100 60 0 .05 12SE 0 0
7 0907 80 64 100 69 0 .02 8N 0 0
8 0950 82 65 100 56 0 .04 12E 0 0
9 1405 82 63 100 58 0 .09 10E 0 0
10 0900 0 .04 6E 0 0
11 0940 84 68 100 50 0 .05. 14E 0 0 0
12 0905 85 64 100 54 0 .09 14E 0 0 0
13 0926 87 66 100 56 0 .01 10E 0 0 0
14 0905 85 68 100 65 0 .03 12SE 0 0 0
15 0855 85 73 100 61 .32 .13 13NW .35 .20 .25
16 73 43 100 24 .05 32NW .05 0
17 0830 53 38 93 42 0 .14 22N 0 0
18 1300 73 45 100 46 0 .09 16NE 0 0 0
19 1015 74 54 100 61 0 0.1 .03 17E 0 0 0
20 1605 80 56 100 44 0 0 .03 5SE 0 0 0
21 0935 77 63 100 93 1.75 0.1 .03 25SW 1.50 1.45 1.76
22 0930 79 65 100 41 .10 0 .06 14SW .15 .09
23 0911 70 50 100 48 0 0.5 .03 17W 0 0
24 0830 71 47 100 43 0 .08 12W 0 0
25 63 48 100 54 .08 1.3 22W .12 .12
26 1025 60 50 100 73 0 0.8 17NW 0 0 0
27 0915 57 39 100 58 0 0.7 20NW 0 0 0
28 0950 65 36 100 31 0 0.2 8N 0 0 0
29 0931 72 40 100 56 0 0.1 18-E 0 0 0
30 080 76 50 100 61 0 0 .30 18E 0 0 0
31 0845 76 58 100 73 0 0 +.18 15-E 0 0 0
Total 2240 160 2993 1686 2.30 3.8* 1.56 1.85 1.97 2.22
Aver. 74 54 100 56 .05
REMARKS *-lov total due to malfunction of equipment.

t-probable maximum. 8 hrs. during a.m. equipment malfunction (out of ink)


4-total for the period in next value.


Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Bay Lake (West Shore) e S-405
Air Relative
emperature Humidity o g g

5 09- 0 ~ .05 7- 01 40 0
Time 0r
Day of Max. Min. Max. MiO. 1 C 0 Sr U 0
Ob. OF "F %. % S g g^ l
1 1000 81 61 100 72 0 0 t.03 7-SE 0 0
2 0915 81 61 100 80 0 0 8-E 0 0 0
3 82 62 100 88 0 0 .16 13-E 0 0 0
4 0945 80 63 100 94 0 0 .05 7-SW 0 0 0
5 0950 80 62 100 85 0 .2 .03 6-NW 0 0 0
6 0830 79 59 100 90 0 0 .03 10-W 0 0
7 0845 74 61 100 92 0 1.1 .06 5W 0 0
8 1400 83 55 100 97 0 2.4 .07 *16-W 0 0
9 0930 55 44 100 100 0 6.1 .07 14NW 0 0 0
10 0830 55 45 100 100 .75 .1 0 17NW .57 .70 .75

12 0930 49 43 100 1700 03 20W .52 .52 .35
13 0845 53 34 100 45 0 1.4 .11 15NW 0 0 0
14 1025 59 32 100 30 0 .9 .02 12jNW 0 0 0
15 0915 66 I 34 100 66 0 .8 .07 15W 0 0 0


17 0 0935 71 49 100 72 0 .1 .08 18E 0 0 0
18 1010 79 53 100 68 0 0 .06 10E 0 0 0
19 0920 78 54 100 62 0 0 .07 19W 0 0 0
20 0925 71 47 100 38 0 7.2 .09 5E 0 0 0
21 0850 74 51 100 65 0 0 .08 19SE 0 0 0
22 1430 72 64 100 100 .67 .1 .03 15-SE .65 1.02 .75
2 1735 60 52 100 100 1.45 .1 .08 11NW 1.67 1.131 1.30
24 0925 68 53 100 52 0 0 .01 4NW 0
25 0935 68 47 100 66 0 0 .05 0
26 1010 75 55 100 69 .15 0 .04 *19SE t.15 t.15 .15
27 0950 76 60 100 53 0 .1 .10 7NW t0 to .02
28 72 54 100 100 .50 0 .05 22SW t.50 t.50 .55
29 1300 54 36 100 71 0 2.9 .16 30W 0 0 0
30 1620 58 32 100 37 0 2.2 .12 10NW 0 0 0
31 1015 70 39 100 59 0 0 .01 0 0 0
Total 2145 1550 100 2314 4.76 28.1 1.831 4.871 4.92t 4.77
Aver1. 1 69 50 100 74 1 9 .051
REMARKS *-Max. recorded (supply roll exhausted evening 1-f7.73).

t-Estimated.
2 135 6 52 00 10 1.5 .


I-Missing days, J-Total for the period in next value.


Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.








REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Bay Lake (West Shore) ee ae S-405
Air Relative
Temperature Humidity o aa o

.0 41 5 0. 8 .4 AiS .
ru Time 5- : > S
Day of Max. Min. Max. MiU. U- g g s g-
Obs. F F 7. 7. S .
____ 1 ____ 04 _u N a 0 a
1 1000 72 57 100 100 .05 0 .05 21SE .07 0 .05
2 1020 79 56 100 100 .45 0 1 18SW .37 .75 .37
3 0920 62 48 100 40 0 .8 .23 29W 0 0 0
4 0855 66 42 100 42 0 5.5 .27 15NW 0 0 0
5 0930 73 48 100 42 0 .2 .17 6SE 0 0 -
6 73 44 100 51 0 .5 .05 8W 0 0
7 1020 74 47 100 61 0 2.4 .01 9NW 0 0
8 0940 76 50 100 42 0 2.0 .15 11SW 0 0 -
9 0935 77 56 100 69 1.30 2.8 .10 16SE 1.63 1.33 1.40e
10 0840 65 35 100 72 .03 9.5 .83 32W .03 .02 -
11 0850 50 35 100 54 0 25.2 .11 21NW 0 0 -
12 0950 64 36 100 58 0 22.5 .09 11N 0 0
13 0925 70 45 100 73 0 4.6 .13 21E 0 0 0
14 0942 78 55 100 64 0 7.1 .03 22SE 0 0 0
15 0915 73 50 100 45 .15 1.9 .16 15W .15 .18 .15
16 0940 58 42 100 36 0 32.1 .14 16W 0 0 0
17 0920 54 36 94 46 0 34.4 .15 15N 0 0 0
18 0850 52 42 100 96 .25 24.9 .12 8NW .30 .34 .28
19 0900 63 49 100 86 .03 6.5 0 12NW .02 .04 .03
20 0909 64 45 100 34 0 18.7 .10 20NW 0 0 0
21 0910 64 43 100 42 0 34.0 .16 13W 0 0 0
22 1740 66 40 100 25 0 24.0 .16 0 0 0
S 0925 64 44 100 34 0 2.5 .14 5W 0 0 0
24 0950 72 40 100 41 0 .7 11E 0 0 0
25 0945 76 52 100 60 0 2.8 .15 15SE 0 0 0
26 0935 78 54 100 43 0 .3 .07 10SW 0 0 0
27 0935 72 52 100 48 0 12.1 .14 16NW 0 0 0
28 0935 71 49 100 55 0 1.7 .25 19NE 0 0 0
29
30
31
Total 1906 1292 2794 1559 2.26 309.7 3.93 2.57 2.66 2.28
Aver. 68 46 100 55 11.1 .14
REMARKS *-Missing days.

e-Estimated

'-Total for the period in next value.
Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
.... Tree Gate -405
Bay Lake (West Shore) t S-405
Air Relative
temperature Humidity ,% V

^** SS5 5 415 41
Time s' g 5 41.1 S 5-
Day of Max. Min. Max. Mio. o -
Obs. "F *F % 7. 0 i o

1 1015 74 48 100 52 0 11.9 0.30 24NE 0 0 0
2 80 53 100 44 0 4 18SE 0 0 0
3 1045 82 56 100 44 0 2.0 10SE 0 0 0
4 0825 82 57 100 53 0 .5 .07 15E 0 0 0
5 1000 83 59 100 56 0 1.9 .09 9SE 0 0 0
6 1005 86 64 100 55 0 .4 .12 15SE 0 0 0
7 1000 85 66 100 57 0 1.3 .16 14NE 0 0 0
8 0930 84 67 100 57 0 2.2 .05 18NE 0 0 0
9 0945 75 65 100 84 .40 3.3 .24 15SW .40 .41 .36
10 0850 84 63 100 65 0 .9 .09 14SE 0 0 0
11 1833 84 66 100 59 0 .2 0 19SE 0 0 0
12 1155 86 68 100 53 0 .1 4 10SW 0 0 0
13 1005 88 66 100 60 0 1.6 .21 10E 0 0 0
14 0902 89 69 100 61 0 .8 .15 12SE 0 0 0
15 0930 88 71 100 60 0 .2 .14 14SE 0 0 0
16 1000 90 70 100 55 0 .2 .16 19SE 0 0 0
17 0906 75 53 100 47 .20 18.4 .26 31NW .25 .25 .24
18 0930 74 46 100 32 0 43.4 .14 22NW 0 0 0
19 0938 80 48 100 36 0 19.0 .26 13NW 0 0 0
20 0940 81 57 100 48 .17 4.1 .18 12SE .11 .12 .15
21 1315 82 58 100 44 0 13.4 .07 20SW 0 0 0
S 1040 75 51 100 46 0 33.8 .25 13E 0 0 0
S 1035 78 50 100 47 0 7.4 .18 14NE 0 0 0
24 0900 74 51 100 67 0 10.1 .17 22E 0 0 0
25 0915 73 64 100 99 2.98 37.8 34SE 2.82 1.52 2.75
26 78 63 100 50 .03 57.6 26W .15 0 .30
27 1615 74 55 100 56 0 14NW 0 0 0
28 1000 78 57 100 64 0 1.3 .55 19E 0 0 0
29 1140 68 64 100 100 .95 .26 32E .35 .36 .53
30 0930 81 66 100 86 0 .25 15SE 0 0 0
31 0900 84 68 100 76 0 14.4 16SE 0 0 0
Total 2495 1859 3100 1813 4.73 288.2 4.35 4.08 2.66 4.33
Aver. 80.5 60.0 100 58.5 9.3 .14
REMARKS e -estimated

S-total for the period in next value.


Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columms are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Bay Lake (West Shore) eGate S-405
Air Relative
Temperature Humidity 0


1 0925 80 60 100 58 0.I 0.1 0.13 19SE 0.18 0.17 0.09
-A 4 0 .. ..
Te1 9 1.8 21SE .05 .04 .05





4 1145 82 67 100 95 .16 4.2 145E .35 .52 .18
S 0925 8 60 100 5 0.10 0.1 0.13 19E 0 0.17 0.09
2 0905 89 59 100 42 0 6.2 .08 31E .95 .48 .92
3 1020 92 72 100 72 .04 1.8 .06 21SE .05 .04 .05
S 1145 8 6 100 95 .16 14SE .35 .52 .18
5 1010 79 59 100 46 0 17.0 .38 11W 0 0 0
1 0945 87 60 100 58 0 17.3 .25 12NE 0 0 0
7 0905 95 71 100 60 1.22 2.7 .10 31SE .95 .48 .92
8 1000 84 64 100 58 0 1.8 18SW .05 .04 .05
9 1035 86 61 100 62 0 16.3 .64 12W 0 0 0
10 1700 73 54 100 50 0 15.3 .75 22W 0 0 0
16 091330 75 51 100 38 0 22.1 5 2NW 0 0 0
12 1612 83 49 100 36 0 13.5 .33 8NE 0 0 0
18 1005 88 64 100 42 0 1.9 .0 13NW 0 0 0
19 0940 89 60 100 43 0 7.0 .36 20E 0 0 0
1 10950 83 66 100 65 0 15.3 .23 23E 0 0 0
16 10900 83 64 100 57 0 20.1 .15 23E 0 0 0
17 4110 84 64 100 61 0 18.4 .22 23E 0 0 0
18 1005 88 64 100 59 0 16.0 .47 126E 0 0 0
19 0958 88 65 100 64 0 13.2 .13 16E 0 0 0
20 1030 92 66 100 68 0 3.0 .11 22NE 0 0 0
5 01445 87 71 100 64 0 21.1 .18 24E 0 0 0
26 0840 91 67 100 60 0 8.0 28SE 0 0 0
17 1415 94 65 100 57 0 19.2 .47 15SE 0 0 0
24 1050 92 66 100 58 0 1.0 .22 10SE 0 0 0
25 0845 92 73 100 56 0 .3 L 12SW 0 0 0
26 0930 94 72 100 66 .47 2.0 .32 29SE .42 .68 .45
27 0935 90 67 100 54 0 6.7 .09 25SW 0 0 0
28 0900 81 61 100 40 0 55.4 .15 19W 0 0 0
29 1730 88 56 100 37 0 26.8 0 15E 0 0 0
30 1002 84 58 100 70 0 2.9 .04 24E 0 0 0
31
Total 1.99 414.0 5.19 2.00 1.93 1.74
Aver. 86.6 65.0 13.8 .17
R1ARKS Total for the period in next value.




Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" colnms are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement District.







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Tree Gate
Bay Lake (West Shore) 1 S-405
Air Relative
emperature Humidity 0 V a
'1 ___ 00 ~0 0s a 1. 14 4j 4444

Dav of Max. Min. Max. Miu. u r. D U 4 U 0-
Obs. F 'F %7. 7. L W

1 0937 82 62 100 78 0 7.9 0.20 20E 0 0 0
2 1105 86 63 100 84 0 1.0 .24 15E 0 0 0
3 1055 88 65 100 54 0 12.0 .23 11BW 0 0 0
S 0906 85 63 100 57 0 3.7 .16 1'6E 0 0 0
5 0905 84 60 100 36 0 8.8 .37 15E 0 0 0
6 87 57 100 43 0 o 4 16E O 0 0
7 0853 86 67 100 70 0 13.2 .35 21E 0 0 0
8 0850 87 68 100 70 .10 6.5 .26 18SE 0 .15
9 1055 80 71 100 100 1.32 .6 .17 29W 1.2e 1.28 1.10
10 0858 89 71 100 57 0 2.7 0 14W 0 0
11 1030 94 66 100 49 0 9.9 .16 9W 0 0
12 095 5 67 100 48 0 1.3 .29 10SW 0 0
13 0844 93 69 100 57 0 4.3 .25 12S .60 1.39 .20
1l 1430 85 69 100 72 0 5.2 .30 10E 0 0 0
15 0918 89 : 68 100 60 0 3.9 13W 0 0 0
16 1030 77 5 59 100 53 .05 26.3 .24 26NE .02 0 .05
17 1630 82 53 100 52 0 21.5 .23 12 0 0 0
18 1142 87 61 100 57 0 9.1 .25 13W 0 0 0
19 o 0'2 89 64 100 49 0 5.4 .19 10 W 0 0 0
20 0930 88 63 100 45 0 7.4 .291 13SW 0 0 0
1435 2i 67 100 43 0 19.8 .46 11W 0 0 .04
S 1015! 93 61 100 45 0 7.7 .26 10W .10 0 0
21 1545 94 68 100 49 0 11.6 .23 11W 0 0 0
24 1515 92 69 100 62 .25 7.8 .08 22W 0 0 .07
25 0900 84 70 100 90 1.14 10.7 .16 27NW .68 .15 .39
26 0845 94 72 100 56 0 8.8 .21 11S 0 0 .07
27 0900 97 91 100 53 0 2.6 .27 21S 0 0 0
28 1835 96 75 100 .48 0 14.1 .26 20SE .25 0 0
29 1000 96 75 100 50 0 1.1 .30 17E 0 0 0
30 1540 90 70 100 82 2.33 11.5 .28 33NW .41 .21 .54
31 1000 93 68 100 64 .10 4.3 .26 22SW .25 .05 .29
Total 5.29 250.7 6.95 3.51* 3.08 2.90
Aver. 91.8 66.8 100 59.1 8.1 .22
REMARKS e estimated

*- missing days


'-total for the period in next value.


Data in the "w'nd mvememt" ad "pan evaporatith" c~mof s are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the bermvtion. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at idndiaigt.

Provided im cooperation with the Reedy Creek Impro~vamnt District.







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 2.--Reedy Creek Improvement District weather observations for July 1972
through June 1973--continued.
Bay Lake (Vest Shore) Tree S-405
Air Relative
temperature Humidity 5 *o 1 1 a a o
~ ua Z4 4 $.0 .0 A a a Ua
1 10 9 7 1 6 0 3.0 .36 2N 0 o0 0






3 2000 89 69 100 76 .04 4.9 .08 25E .03 .14 .10
Thme p' i: r > _
Day of Max. Min. Max. IIv. U .0 o g 0 0 u0'
obs. %F *F 7. 7. N .t a $ $4
I 0 V4 P4p Z Pa P 0 P.
1 1030 92 70 100 66 0 3.0 .36 25N 0 0 0
2 1700 91 70 100 60 .23 6.0 .35 21E .07 0 .02
3 2000 89 69 100 76 .04 4.9 .08 25E .03 .14 .10
4 1530 93 71 100 66 0 2.9 .23 20E 0 0 0
5 1525 96 74 100 62 0 5.7 .28 20E .10 0 0
6 0915 96 73 100 55 0 3.8 .24 17NE .09 0 0
7 1110 93 69 100 56 0 3.6 .24 16NE 0 0 0
8 0920 89 72 100 84 .22 10.0 .19 31SE .17 .18 .31
9 0905 93 72 100 66 0 .4 .10 14E 0 0 0
10 1010 96 74 100 63 0 .3 .19 21E 0 0 0
11 0950 93 74 100 71 0 .4 .27 14E .40 0 .2e
12 1330 95 75 100 59 0 .8 .13 11E .25 0 .1e
13 1030 96 73 100 57 1.80 2.2 .24 49E 1.85 .62 1.8e
14 0937 95 74 100 63 0 .2 .39 20W 0 0 0
15 0920 96 73 100 56 .40 5.2 .20 22W 0 .15 .2e
16 0830 90 74 100 78 .25 4.0 .26 15W 0 0 .le
17 0934 93 74 100 66 0 2.6 .20 15S .02 0 0e
18 0920 91 76 100 68 0 7.9 .31 14W 0 0 .19
19 1420 89 69 100 82 .66 8.1 .21 35W 1.60 .97 1.80
20 0923 91 69 100 71 0 2.6 .13 19SE 0 0 0
21 0857 86 72 100 80 .73 .2 .06 19E .91 .45 .73
7 0815 85 73 100 84 .57 1.3 .26 22E 1.39 .27 .95
2 0850 88 71 100 72 .02 .5 .10 13W 0 0 0
24 0905 87 72 100 65 0 2.0 .16 9NW 0 0 0
25 0820 89 70 100 66 0 1.7 .16 7E 0 0 0
26 1111 93 72 100 51 .07 1.1 ( 17W .05 .03 .06
27 1000 91 71 100 59 0 4.4 .42 6SE 0 0 0

28 0830 93 72 100 58 0 .6 .11 145W 0 0 0
29 0830 94 73 100 57 0 5.0 .25 10SW 0 0 0
30 0925 98 72 100 53 1.00 5.0 .25 20N .25 1.65 .15
31 -
Total 2761 2163 3000 1970 5.99 96.4 6.37 7.18 4.46 6.71*
Aver. 92.0 72.1 100 65.7 3.2 .21
REMAXKS e estimated

missing days


S- total for the period in next value.


Data in the "wind movement" and "pan evaporation" columns are for the 24 hours
ending at the time of the observation. All other data are for the 24 hours
ending at midnight.

Provided in cooperation with the Reedy Creek Improvement Disttict.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 4-Water levels in wells in the Reedy Creek Improvement District area and
vicinity.






Lake shallow well is affected by maintaining Bay Lake at a near constant level.
When Bay Lake was refilled between September 1970 and June 1971, the
water level of Bay Lake shallow well rose about 1 foot (0.3 metre), a rise not in
evidence in the other shallow wells. Bay Lake is now maintained at 94.5 feet






REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


(28.8 metres) above mean sea level, and the nonartesian-aquifer water level near
the lake is now high and rather constant when compared to its previous
fluctuations.
Daily water-level fluctuations for two nonartesian aquifer wells in the
RCID are shown in figures 5, 6, and 7, and tables 3 and 4. Levels in both wells
respond immediately to rainfall. The broad, rounded peaks in the hydrographs
for the new tree farm shallow well, 822-135-1, indicate a more sluggish response
to rainfall and ground-water discharge in that area than in the area represented
by Bay Lake shallow well, 825-134-3.

FLORIDAN AQUIFER

The natural hydraulic gradient of the Floridan aquifer is such that the
general movement of water in the aquifer under the RCID is from west to east.
This hydraulic gradient and the attendant movement of water in the aquifer
under the RCID are chiefly controlled by the inflow of ground water from the
west and southwest, the high average annual recharge in the area to the east and
northeast of the RCID, and the variations in recharge, discharge, and aquifer
transmissivity within the RCID.
The general 7-year fluctuation trend of the water levels in the RCID
vicinity is shown in figure 4 by the hydrographs for wells 825-134-2, 822-138-1,
and 815-134-1. Between 1966 and mid-1970, the patterns of water-level
fluctuation in the three Floridan-aquifer wells were very similar to each other
and to those in shallow wells 825-134-3, 822-138-2, and 815-134-2. From
mid-1970 through mid-1973, levels in the Bay Lake deep well, 825-134-2, show
pronounced peaks and troughs caused by pumping from the Floridan aquifer.
Including the effects of both rainfall and pumping, the level in the Bay Lake
deep well, 825-134-2, declined a total of approximately 8 feet (2.4 metres) from
1966 through 1970. During this same period, levels in Floridan-aquifer wells
822-138-1 about 6 miles (10 kilometres) southwest of Bay Lake, and 815-134-1
about 12 miles (19 kilometres) south of Bay Lake, declined about 2 feet (0.6
metre) and 1 foot (0.3 metre), respectively. Levels in these two wells (822-138-1
and 815-134-1) are not known to be affected by any pumping, so their
water-level decline is attributed to deficient rainfall over the period. Thus, the
decline of 8 feet (2.4 metres) for Bay Lake deep well minus the decline of 2 feet
(0.6 metre) for deficient rainfall equals a decline of 6 feet (2 metres) in the level
of Bay Lake deep well, 825-134-2, is attributed to water use in the RCID. This
pumping from the Floridan aquifer has kept the potentiometric surface at Bay
Lake below the water table most of the time since mid-1970. Records show no
measureable effects of that pumping on the levels of Floridan-aquifer wells in
areas outside the RCID.
Daily water levels in Bay Lake deep well, 825-134-2, are shown in figure 8
and table 5.














.1 _..... 1\ l\ \ l\\^


3 WELL 822-135-1
WATER-TABLE AQUIFER HURRICANE AGNES
3 --- -------- ------- -------- ------- --------


-4




2
NEW TREE FARM RAINGAGE


HURRIlCANE AGNES



0 _______ __MAY zmzi

I JAU____ __FBUYM__ C 1____ L.Ii i 71. 2 I SEll PTEBE OC ... N IVM
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
1972


Figure 5-Water levels in well 822-135-1 and rainfall at the new tree farm in 1972.


-he
.05




Si.o







0







-2





-3
-J
z 2
-J



-3



Cz


Figure 6-Water levels in well 822-135-1 and rainfall at the new tree farm in 1973.


L 1.00
-_80
NEW TREE FARM, RAINGAGE -60

-40

20

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE
1973





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 7-Daily water levels of Bay Lake and wells 825-134-2 and 825-134-3 and
rainfall at Bay Lake in 1972.






SURFACE WATER

CYPRESS CREEK

Cypress Creek at Vineland, Florida (2640.00), drains 30.3 square miles
(785 square kilometres) to the northeast of the RCID. The annual streamflow
for the basin averaged 3.68 inches (9.35 centimetres) and ranged from 0.08 inch





REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


3 ] -80
BAY LAKE RAINGAGE 60
-40
-20
o III R I ... I M i ,J Nll 0
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE
1973


Figure 8-Daily water levels of Bay Lake and well 825-134-2 and rainfall at Bay
Lake in 1973.


(0.20 centimetre) in 1956 to 18.26 inches (46.38 centimetres) in 1960. During
the 26 complete years of record, flow ceased at least 1 day in each of 19 years.
The longest period of no flow was 175 days in 1968.

BONNET CREEK

Bonnet Creek near Vineland, Florida (2641.00), drains 56.1 square miles
(145 square kilometres) including the 30.3 square miles (78.5 square kilometres)
of Cypress Creek at Vineland, Florida (2640.00). The average yearly flow from
the basin is estimated to be 8.0 inches (20 centimetres) per year. Prorating this
flow between the 30.3 square miles (78.5 square kilometres) of the Cypress







6 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 3.--Daily maximum altitude of water level in Bay Lake water-table aquifer
well 825-134-3 in 1972.


DAY


JAN FEB

92.45 92.99
92.46 92.99
92.44 93.12
92.46 93.09
92.45 92.85

92.43 92.79
92.41 92.81
92.39192.79
92.40 93.19
92.40 93.14

92.40 92.97
92.41 92.88
92.40 92.82
92.41192.72
92.51 92.71

92.49 93.16
92.43193.13
92.44192.96
92.45192.84
92.44 92.78

92.44 92.73
92.48 92.71
92.45 92.70
92.43 92.68
92.46 92.65

92.56 92.62
92.56 92.61
92.53192.61
92.50 92.60
92.49

92.70


MAR API


92.58
92.58
92.67
92.53
92.52

92.49
92.50
92.55
92.55
92.51

92.47
92.47
92.47
92.45
92.45

92.49
92.48
92.47
92.44
92.42

92.43
92.47
92.43
92.39
92.39

92.37
92.37
92.38
92.38
92.43

93.22


92.97
92.77
92.68
92.65
92.64

92.65
92.63
92.58
92.53
92.53

92.50
92.50
92.47
92.46
92.41

92.40
92.39
92.35
92.33
92.33

92.31
92.29
92.30
92.36
92.32

92.25
92.21
92.20
92.38
92.78


MAY J1
92.58 9
92.52 9
92.55 9
92.48 9
92.45 9

92.42 9
92.40 9
92.45 9
92.40 9
92.50 9

92.45 9
92.42 9
92.40
92.39
92.35

92.39
92.40
92.42
92.40
92.42

92.46
92.42
92.38
92.36
92.34

92.30
92.27
92.59
92.60
92.50

92.48


UNE iJLLY AUC SEPT OCT NOV DEC


2.43
2.45
'2.40
2.37
2.34

2.30
2:28
2.23
2.20
,2.18

>2.75
2.67
92.51
)2.49
92.46

92.42
92.40
94.02
94.25
93.76

93.41
93.13
93.41
93.22
93.12


93.01
92.87
92.82
92.75
92.71


92.68
92.64
92.61
92.60
92.58

92.63
92.80

Reco
means
six-


order d:
uremenl
0eek i


sconti
:s will
Iterval


nued.
conti
s.


Perioc
iue at


Creek basin, for which the long-term gaged flow is 3.68 inches (9.35
centimetres), and the remaining 25.8 square miles (66.8 square kilometres) of
the western part of the basin gives an average flow of 13.1 inches (33.3
centimetres) from the western part, of which about 15 square miles (38.8 square
kilometres) is within the RCID. During the 5 years of complete record, October
1, 1966, to September 30, 1971, flow ceased at least 1 day in both 1967 and
1968. The longest period of no flow was 28 days in 1967.







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 4.--Daily minimum depth below land surface of water levels in Sewage
Treatment Plant water-table aquifer well 822-135-1 in 1972 and
1973. 1972
DAYJAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC
1 ...EI


3.69
3.70

3.71
3.72
3.75
3.77
3.80

3.82
3.83
3.83
3.83
3.84

3.85
3.86
3.87
3.87
3.88

3.21


3.07
3.05
3.05
3.05
3.06

3.08
3.10
3.12
3.15
3.20

3.22
3.25
3.26
3.30
3.32

3.35
3.38
3.40
3.44
3.46

3.49
3.51
3.55
3.53
3.52

3.52
3.54
3.56
3.60
3.37


I I i I I


I


3.26
3.24
3.23
3.23
3.24

3.26
3.29
3.31
3.34
3.37

3.37
3.36
3.36
3.35
3.36

3.39
3.42
3.44
3.44
3.42

3.21
3.15
3.12
3.13
3.14

3.17
3.20
3.23
3.05
2.81

2.79


2.79
2.79
2.80
2.84
2.88

2.91
2.95
2.99
3.02
3.06

3.10
3.00*
2.85*
2.73*
2.72
2.72
2.72
2.74
1.41
.38
.50

.85
1.00
.24
.57
.80

.93
1.11
1.23
1.33
1.41


1.50
1.57
1.63
1.66
1.71

1.08
.36
.33
.74
.84

.91
1.02
.17
.17
.48

.52
.32
0.32
.63
.68

.85
.94
1.08
1.13
1.30

1.38
1.47
1.55
1.60
1.67

1.69


1.23
1.33
1.48
1.60
1.49

1.35
1.42
1.57
.73
.66

.85
1.03
1.22
1.33
1.37

.84
.52
.44
.33
.30

.05
.05
.07
.07
.10

.12
.12
.45
.47
.50

.83


.96
1.07
1.20
1.21
1.40

1.47
1.55
1.63
1.68
1.74

1.80.
1.82
1.83
1.87
1.88

1.90
1.94
1.97
1.99
2.01

2.02
2.02
2.02
2.02
2.02

2.02
2.02
2.02
2.02
2.02


2.02
1.55
1.30
1.37
1.40

1.46
1.55
1.68
1.78
1.75

1.75
1.78
1.84
1.89
1.96

1.99
2.00
2.03
2.05
2.06

2.08
2.10
2.12
2.13
2.15

2.17
2.18
2.20
2.22
2.24

2.25


* estimate


WHITTENHORSE CREEK


Whittenhorse Creek near Vineland, Florida (2662.00), drains 12.4 square
miles (32.1 kilometres) to the west of the RCID. The average yearly flow from
the basin is estimated to be 8 inches (20 centimetres). Flow ceased for more





2.28
2.30
2.31
2.33
2.35

2.36
2.36
2.36
2.36
2.37

2.41
2.43
2.45
2.42
2.42

2.48
2.51
2.53
2.54
2.51

2.51
2.52
2.56
2.59
2.52

2.05
2.05
2.04
1.97
1.55


1.55
1.62
1.70
1.77
1.83

1.88
1.93
1.98
2.02
2.05

2.08
2.13
2.15
2.18
2.20

2.23
2.26
2.28
2.30
2.32

2.07
1.30
1.32
1.46
1.52

1.58
1.68
1.77
1.85
1.88

1.90







S BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 4.--Daily minimum depth below land surface of water levels in Sewage
Treatment Plant water-table aquifer well 822-135-1 in 1972 and


DAi AN

1 1.95
2 1.99
3 1.99
4 1.99
5 1.99

6 2.03
7 2.06
8 2.08
9 2.10
10 2.11

11 1.65
12 1.03
13 1.03
14 1.19
15 1.32

16 1.40
17 1.52
18 1.58
19 1.62
20 1.67

21 1.73
22 1.25
23 .47
24 .47
25 .72

26 .82
27 .68
28 .37
29 .38
30 .80

31 1.03


1973--continued.


W, ,- ~


AR APR {


-i --I


FEB

1.00 1
.62 1
.59 1
1.00 1
1.21 1

1.27 1
1.33 2
1.39 2
.40 1
.30 1

.72 1
1.01 1
1.10 2
1.18 2
1.04 2

1.22 2
1.37 2
1.21 2
1.20 2
1.29 2

1.50
1.57 2
1.62
1.68
1.73

1.81
1.80
1.85


1973


MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC


.88
.88
.88
.90
.93

.98
.00
.02
.86
.85

.89
.98
.04
.07
.09

.09
.07
1.09
.12
.12

!.12
'.12
.12
2.12
.77

.64
.95
1.13
.80
.80

1.03


1.08
1.17
1.31
.98
1.02

1.24
1.31
.59
.89
1.15

1.34
1.45
1.50
1.51
1.61

1.67
1.67
1.71
1.77
1.81

1.86
1.91
1.93
1.95
1.98

1.92
1.90
1.95
2.05
2.10


than I month in each of 5 complete
flow was 235 days in 1968.


years of record. The longest period of no


DAVENPORT CREEK

Davenport Creek near Loughman, Florida (2664.80), drains approximately
23 square miles (59.6 square kilometres) southwest of the RCID. The average
yearly flow from the basin is estimated to be 10.7 inches (27.2 centimetres).
Flow has been continuous since collection or record began in January 1969. The
minimum daily flow was 1.9 cubic feet per second (0.05 cubic metre per second)
in July 1969.


2.11
2.13
2.15
2.22
2.24

2.29
2.35
2.37
2.08
2.06

2.08
2.14
2.10
2.07
2.11

2.13
2.14
2.16
2.19
2.25

2.24
2.39
2.42
2.43
2.30

2.29
2.32
2.43
2.51
2.46

2.45


2.44
2.46
2.52
2.58
2.60

2.63
2.66
2.68
2.72
2.75

2.79
2.80
2.28
2.12
2.13

2.19
2.27
2.32
1.82
1.82

1.58
1.59







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79 39


Table 5.--Daily maximum altitude of water levels in Bay Lake, Floridan
aquifer well 825-134-2 in 1972 and 1973.
1972

DAY JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC
1 89.38 90.37 88.05 90.25 89.41 89.62 90.62 90.18 91.27 85.32 89.98 91.20
2 89.65 90.54 89.79 90.44 89.50 90.04 90.57 90.30 91.30 84.70 90.46 91.32
3 89.74 90.63 90.17 90.57 89.40 90.68 90.59 89.77 91.36 85.25 90.65 91.43
4 89.70 90.65 90.42 90.47 89.41 89.76 90.55 &9.97 91.27 85.20 90.78 91.49
5 89.75 90.74 90.46 90.20 89.33 89.63 90.60 90.02 91.21 84.60 91.03 91.48

6 89.72 90.92 90.55 90.19 89.25 88.19 90.55 90.14 91.33 84.22 91.03 91.47
7 89.65 91.09 88.42 90.24 89.27 88.95 90.03 90.16 91.23 83.72 90.77 91.51
8 89.72 91.38 87.64 90.23 89.23 89.10 90.23 90.06 91.11 83.53 90.71 91.60
9 89.77 91.27 89.10 89.94 89.28 89.07 90.26 91.21 91.05 83.61 90.86 91.63
10 89.87 91.11 89.66 90.06 89.05 88.97 90.41 91.72 91.08 83.84. 90.79 91.73

11 89.81 91.15 90.00 90.10 89.07 89.03 90.44 90.36 91.10 84.12 90.81 91.75
12 87.49 91.22 90.29 90.11 88.93 89.19 90.46 90.42 91.07 83.91 88.93 91.74
13 86.75 91.31 90.46 90.05 88.97 89.18 90.48 90.47 90.92 83.79 90.26 90.70
14 86.40 91.27 89.06 89.92 89.00 89.16 90.57 90.49 90.94 83.84 90,95 90.13
15 86.27 91.27 89.71 89.71 89.11 89.12 90.82 90.50 90.75 83.76 91.17 90.68

16 86.15 91.22 89.73 89.64 89.22 89.06 90.70 90.44 90.80 83.68 91.30 90.88
17 86.25 91.36 89.53 89.73 89.49 89.08 90.93 90.50 90.81 84.43 91.53 90.18
18 86.17 91.37 89.62 89.47 89.96 89.50 90.78 90.52 90.82 85.88 90.76 90.81
19 86.02 91.35 89.71 89.15 90.13 89.78 90.78 90.58 90.68 85.83 91.20 90.98
20 85.67 91.29 89.77 88.98 90.08 89.97 90.97 90.62 90.56 86.97 91.27 91.00
91.28
21 85.94 91.31 89.72 88.91 90.12 90.14 90.85 90.72 90.63 86.34 91.11 91.28
22 86.40 91.31 89.80 88.81 90.36 90.15 90.86 90.82 90.10 86.24 91.24 91.43
23 86.66 91.27 90.32 88.90 90.31 90.30 90.88 90.86 89.52 86.17 88.83 91.30
24 88.11 91.12 90.27 88.97 90.25 90.53 90.90 90.93 88.68 85.84 88.22 91.19
25 88.96 90.97 90.27 89.13 90.13 90.62 90.83 91.01 88.84 88.68 88.27 91.34

26 89.48 90.88 90.37 89.05 89.50 90.89 90.72 91.08 88.52 89.39 89.10 91.45
27 89.82 90.82 90.49 89.18 89.29 90.65 90.68 91.20 88.39 89.94 90.27 91.32
28 89.92 90.82 90.29 88.90 89.38 90.63 90.61 91.16 89.39 90.41 90.66 91.05
29 89.98 88.87 89.77 88.77 89.54 90.62 90.41 91.14 89.53 90.72 90.88 91.12
30 90.31 89.97 89.26 89.65 90.62 90.43 91.12 87.79 90.96 91.06 91.23

31 90.34 90.18 89.67 90.31 91.36 88.77 91.32












REEDY CREEK


Reedy Creek near Vineland, Florida (2663.00), drains approximately 75
square miles (194 square kilometres) including the 12.4 square miles (32.1
square kilometres) drained by Whittenhorse Creek. Another 44 square miles
(114 square kilometres) drained by Reedy Creek near Vineland (2663.00) lies
outside the RCID to the west and in the headwaters of Reedy Creek near Reedy
Lake. Average yearly streamflow from the entire basin above the gaging station







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 5.--Daily maximum altitude of water levels in Bay Lake, Floridan
aquifer well 825-134-2 in 1972 and 1973--continued.
1973
DAY JAN FEB I MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC


I


91.32
91.33
91.14
90.97
91.08

91.22
91.26
91.32
91.11
91.38

91.62
91.77
91.68
91.72
91.58

91.58
91.52
91.56
91.66
91.64

91.71
91.67
91.83
91.92
91.98

92.25
92.40
92.16
92.29
92.05

92.07


92.15
92.23
92.29
92.25
92.27

92.25
92.25
92.30
92.41
92.47

92.22
92.34
92.49
92.54
92.40

92.35
92.30
92.33
92.38
92.32

92.28
92.25
:92.20
92.19
92.18

92.30
92.23
92.44


92.30
91.11
90.88
91.23
92.04

91.68
91.95
91.65
91.73
91.60

91.65
91.75
91.63
91.60
90.65

91.02
91.19
91.47
90.95
91.16

90.98
91.13
90.49
90.65
88.65

90.28
91.04
90.92
90.93
91.52

91.24


91.70
91.63
91.75
91.16
91.77

90.50
89.99
90.73
91.26
90.92

90.82
91.12
90.83
90.88
91.03

90.79
90.66
90.65
90.52
90.31

90.12
90.25
90.73
90.25
89.67

89.42
89.41
89.42
89.53
89.60


is estimated to be 8.0 inches (20 centimetres). During the 5 complete years of
record, the flow ceased at least 1 day in both 1967 and 1968. The longest period
of no flow was 84 days in 1967.
Reedy Creek near Loughman, Florida (2665.00), drains an indeterminate
area including the 75 square miles (194 square kilometres) above Reedy Creek
near Vineland (2663.00), 23 square miles (59.6 square kilometres) above
Davenport Creek near Loughman (2664.00), and an undetermined part of Reedy


89.57
90.18
90.30
89.70
90.10

90.19
90.11
90.41
90.06
90.52

90.49
90.79
90.83
90.85
90.76

90.40
90.67
90.36
90.52
90.57

90.48
90.22
90.04
89.73
88.31

89.00
89.67
88.33
88.37
89.04

89.56


88.33
88.85
88.81
89.27
89.42

89.48
89.38
89.85
89.88
89.30

89.38
89.41
89.60
89.43
89.39

88.94
88.97
89.52
89.49
89.66

89.26
89.62
89.77
89.65
89.63






REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Creek Swamp into which Bonnet Creek drains. Since October 1939, the drainage
area of Reedy Creek near Loughman (2665.00) has been reported to be as much
as 194 square miles (502 square kilometres). Presently (1974), the drainage area
is reported as 110 square miles (285 square kilometres), approximately,
including part of the watershed in Reedy Creek Swamp, which is indeterminate.
Since 1951, flow past the gaging station (2665.00) near Loughman has been
reported as affected by several canals above the station, which divert an
undetermined amount of water into the Shingle Creek basin east of the RCID.
Since May 1970, the flow has been regulated by dikes, culverts and automatic
control structures in the RCID.
During the 19 complete years of record prior to October 1959, the average
yearly flow past Reedy Creek Near Loughman (2665.00) was 5.81 inches (14.76
centimetres). Since July 1968, the average yearly flow has been 10.7 inches
(27.2 centimetres). Prior to October 1959, the minimum daily flow for Reedy
Creek near Loughman was 2.4 cfs (0.07 cubic metre per second). However, since
August 1968, the flow ceased for 28 days in 1970 and 97 days in 1972.

LAKES

Water-surface altitudes for lakes in the vicinity of the RCID are shown by
figure 9. Lake Butler at Windermere shows a slight declining trend, about 1 foot
(0.3 metre), since 1960. However, 1960, the first year of record, was the wettest
in central Florida. Lake Bryan shows no general trend, but its pattern of
fluctuation is similar to that of Lake Butler over the same 12-year period to
1971.
Before December 1968 when draining of Bay Lake was started, fluctua-
tions in stage appear to have been similar to those of Lake Butler. Draining the
lake required 1 year to accomplish, December 1968 to December 1969. The lake
was kept dry until September 1970 after which it was refilled by rainfall
augmented with water pumped from the Floridan aquifer. Since mid-1971, the
level of the lake has been maintained between 94 and 95 feet (28.6 and 29.0
metres) above mean sea level by rainfall and pumped ground water. The daily
mean altitude of Bay Lake during 1972 and 1973 is shown in table 6.
Between July 1966 and December 1968, prior to dewatering, the water
level of Bay Lake ranged between 92.6 to 95.3 feet (28.2 to 29.0 metres) above
mean sea level. During this time, the potentiometric surface of the Floridan
aquifer varied from about 1.7 feet (0.5 metre) above the lake surface to about
1.7 feet (0.5 metre) below the lake surface, and the water table near the lake
varied from about 1 foot (0.3 metre) above to 0.3 foot (0.1 metre) below the
lake level. Generally, both the potentiometric surface and the water table at
wells near the lake were simultaneously above or below the lake level. Thus,
water tended to move into the lake from both aquifers or out of the lake to both
aquifers.







42 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

102
31
LAKE BUTLER



0 --30

98_ ___ ___ ___



96
9 6 ----- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---_---_--
-31
10C1
DATA PRIOR TO SEPTEMBER 1969
FURNISHED BY ORANGE COUNTY LAKE BRYAN
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS

r 30


97


S I

STA D LAKE MABEL 9

n w
4 _
.BAY LAKE
2 w

Jj 90 2





U


IJ w
I a -- -- --- -- -- __ __ ___ _
Rg OE RIIt FBILK


Figure 9-Water-levels of Reedy Creek Improvement District area lakes.







REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 6.--Daily mean altitude of Bay Lake near Vineland (2638.50) in 1972
and 1973.
1972
DAY JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT I OCT NOV DEC


94.36
94.36
94.36
94.36
94.25

94.19
94.12
94.10
94.07
93.98

93.97
93.99
94.03
94.07
94.12

94.15
94.17
94.18
94.22
94.26

94.30
94.34
94.38
94.41
94.42

94.43
94.46
94.46
94.46
94.46

94.49


94.54
94.60
94.62
94.52
94.45

94.45
94.45
94.45
94.47
94.42

94.41
94.41
94.41
94.40
94.40

94.44
94.46
94.43
94.43
94.36

94.31
94.30
94.30
94.30
94.30

94.32
94.32
94.33
94.35


94.38
94.42
94.43
94.43
94.42

94.41
94.43
94.46
94.50
94.49

94.48
94.47
94.46
94.49
94.49

94.49
94.49
94.49
94.49
94.47

94.47
94.49
94.49
94.46
94.45

94.44
94.43
94.42
94.43
94.44

94.54


94.61
94.58
94.57
94.56
94.56

94.57
94.57
94.56
94.55
94.54

94.52
94.51
94.51
94.50
94.50

94.50
94.49
94.46
94.45
94.45

94.45
94.44
94.44
94.45
94.44

94.43
94.39
94.38
94.37
94.47


94.50
94.50
94.51
94.52
94.51

94.50
94.49
94.50
94.51
94.53

94.55
94.55
94.54
94.55
94.56

94.59
94.59
94.60
94.59
94.57

94.60
94.57
94.54
94.53
94.51

94.48
94.46
94.47
94.54
94.55

94.55


94.55 94.54
94.54 94.53
94.53 94.52
94.52:. 94.51
94.50 94.50

94.50 94.54
94.49 94.60
94.48 94.59
94.45 94.58
94.44 94.59

94.46 94.58
94.53 94.57
94.55 94.63
94.54 94.69
94.54 94.55

94.51 94.52
94.50 94.54
94.60 94.57
94.90 94.57
94.75 94.56

94.69 94.55
94.65 94.55
94.70 94.54
94.68 94.54
94.66 94.53

94.64 94.52
94.60 94.50
94.60 94.50
94.57 94.49
94.55 94.48

94.47


94.53
94.53
94.52
94.52
94.51

94.52
94.54
94.53
94.61
94.75

94.70
94.66
94.63
94.61
94.60

94.59
94.58
94.60
94.59
94.57

94.67
94.67
94.65
94.67
94.66

94.64
94.64
94.62
94.62
94.62

94.61


94.60
94.58
94.57
94.51
94.48

94.48
94.48
94.46
94.45
94.45

94.44
94.43
94.43
94.43
94.43

94.43
94.42
94.41
94.41
94.40

94.39
94.38
94.37
94.36
94.36

94.36
94.36
94.36
94.35
94.35


The level of Bay Lake has been continuously higher than the water table
near the lake and the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer since April
1971. The water levels in Floridan-aquifer wells near the lake have varied from
about 0.3 foot (0.1 metre) below to 11 feet (3.4 metres) below the lake level,
and the levels in water-table wells near the lake varied from about 0.3 foot (0.1
metre) below to 2.2 feet (0.7 metre) below the lake level. Thus, water now tends
to move out of the lake to both aquifers continuously.


1 1 1


94.38
94.40
94.45
94.43
94.42

94.40
94.37
94.34
94.31
94.30

94.26
94.24
94.23
94.22
94.20

94.19
94.18
94.16
94.18
94.20

94.20
94.21
94.23
94.25
94.27

94.26
94.25
94.27
94.29
94.28

94.28


94.27
94.25
94.24
94.23
94.22

94.22
94.22
94.21
94.19
94.17

94.17
94.18
94.23
94.25
94.25

94.22
94.20
94.17
94.16
94.18

94.15
94.14
94.12
94.11
94.16

94.29
94.29
94.28
94.31
94.37


94.37
94.35
94.35
94.34
94.34

94.34
94.33
94.32
94.32
94.31

94.30
94.29
94.28
94.27
94.29

94.30
94.25
94.22
94.22
94.22

94.28
94.40
94.40
94.39
94.39

94.38
94.37
94.36
94.36
94.36

94.36








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 6.--Daily mean altitude of Bay Lake near
and 1973--continued.
1973


DAY I


MAR APR


JAN FEB

94.36 94.49
94.37 94.50
94.37 94.50
94.38 94.49
94.38 94.48

94.38 94.46
94.38 94.45
94.38 94.44
94.36194.45
94.361 94.55

94.41194.50
94.47 94.46
94.45 94.45
94.43194.45
94.42 94.46

94.41 94.45
94.40 94.42
94.39!94.41
94.39 94.42
94.38 94.41

94.37 94.40
94.40 94.39
94.50 94.37
94.54 94.35
94.53 94.34

94.52 94.33
94.53 94.32
94.55 94.30
94.56
94.511

94.50


94.30
94.30
94.29
94.29
94.29

94.28
94.27
94.25
94.25
94.26

94.26
94.26
94.25
94.25
94.24

94.23
94.22
94.18
94.16
94.15

94.14
94.12
94.10
94.09
94.16

94.50
94.47
94.45
94.46
94.50

94.50


MAY JUNE


94.50
94.50
94.50
94.50
94.50

94.49
94.50
94.55
94.54
94.52

94.49
94.46
94.45
94.44
94.43

94.41
94.40
94.39
94.38
94.37

94.36
94.35
94.33
94.32
94.30

94.30
94.33
94.30
94.26
94.25


94.24
94.22
94.21
94.20
94.19

94.17
94.15
94.14
94.20
94.25

94.25
94.24
94.23
94.22
94.21
94.19
94.19
94.16
94.14
94.13
94.12

94.10
94.09
94.07
94.06
94.12

94.18
94.17
94.15
94.14
94.20

94.30


JULY


Vineland (2638.50) in 1972


SEPT


OCT NOV DEC


RUNOFF CHARACTERISTICS


Figures 10 through 16 show hydrographs of discharge for streams in the
Reedy Creek basin. Streamflow during the 6 water years October 1, 1965,
through September 30, 1971, was 57 percent of average in the basin, based on
26 years of record (1945-71) for Cypress Creek at Vineland (2640.00). During
the 6-year period, the annual average discharge at Cypress Creek at Vineland


94.30
94.30
94.30
94.29
94.28

94.27
94.25
94.24
94.24
94.23

94.22
94.20
94.25
94.34
94.33

94.35
94.36
94.35
94.37
94.38

94.39
94.43
94.46
94.45
94.44
















90 --
I




00 I
9o II



I II
60- ------t---+----- U

7 II I
0 1 1 I II I O
II I I II I
I ii 1

II I II I
50- i -

S III I I


0 ---- -- -- --+- I---i---- II
I0I I I I I Il I l I I
20 __--------4--H-4I-- .

II
1 96 II 19 72



1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973
Figure 10-Monthly mean discharge for Cypress Creek near Vineland (2640.00),
and Bonnet Creek near Vineland (2641.00).






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


130



I
120-

II
110 4---


II
I II



90
!t !1 0
II II

o h i
II I
II II I L
.i I I-
II 7 I -- --2 "'s

(L- I 1 REEDY CREEK
I I II NEAR VINELAND D
0 -i 11 I 11 0
0II I II
II I I II I I II
I I I I I I II
50
I II II I I II
I I II 1 I 0 I II I I
I III I I II II cE



30 J --------
I i WHITTENHORSE
II II I II I CREEK
I I I I I I I I NEAR VINELAND
20 __ 11 |I I UI i i I n ___
20
II II I ..
it I .. a i
I II I $ 1 I 1 I I


--O -J Zi-----o
0 0

1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973
Figure I 1-Monthly mean discharge for Whittenhorse Creek near Vineland
(2662.00), and Reedy Creek near Vineland (2663.00).






REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79 47

70 -2




60

0
z

o 50

40

Q-~



O D




10
S10 1 1






Figure 12-onthly mean discharge for Davenport Creek near Loughman
()
U o
= 30 -n












0 -0



1969 1970 1971 1972
Figure 12-Monthly mean discharge for Davenport Creek near Loughman
(2664.80).












qOU



400



350



300 -









I00








50
0 1949 950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 --- --957 1958 1959





1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959


-1-4- ----




M-








196 1969 1970 1971 197 1973

1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


Figure 13-Monthly mean discharge for Reedy Creek near Loughman (2665.00).


9 C
8



*7 u,

I-
w
6 a




4
CI



















16

14









VINELAN 4











0_1970 1_ -



s- I,


OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUST SEPTEMBER


Figure 14-Daily mean discharge for Cypress Creek near Vineland (2640.00), and
Bonnet Creek near Vineland (2641.00), October 1, 1970 to September
30, 1971.


06S






0.4


-03 .


-I
-0.2 S

o.i


.0

















--I--- C-- ----- ---- ---- ---- ----- ---- --N --- --- I




III
II J] ----- --- -- -- .---- ----- -...... ----- ----- -- ---- ---- --- B --- 14

"It
!11 ------ ..-._-..... .---- r ~ i


71. -

SWHITTIENOR CREEK NEAR \ 4
S \ VINELAND




--- 1 ,- -
g o





REEDY CREEK NEAR
SI r VINELAND
10




0 OCTOBER I NOVEMBER I DECEMBER JANUARY I FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE AUGUST SCP
197 1971


Figure 15-Daily mean discharge for Whittenhorse Creek near Vineland
(2662.00), and Reedy Creek near Vineland (2663.00), October 1,
1970 to September 30, 1971.


-04



-02I



-01 i
.Dl













360 so

340 46
A -42
320 -------

300

200------ --
280 .... __1

260 ----
240 26
DAVENPORT CREEK NEAR
220 OUO2MAN
1220a e I I -----nd------ yCeLOUOMeaN --------ma-n (6.I O te 17






140
120 2----"-i

101

:0

REEDY CREEK NEAR
40 \ --_ ... HMAN
40 \.S, --- ---- --------- -;s- "LOaHA -- ----- -- -"------ t---- ------



0 OCTOBER I NOVEMBER OIECEMBERR JANUARY URY MARCH PRIL MA JUNE JULY AUIOUST SEPTEMBER


Figure 16-Daily mean discharge for Davenport Creek near Loughman (2664.80),
and Reedy Creek near Loughman (2665.00), October 1, 1970 to
September 30, 1971.


-1.4
1.4




-1,0


-06
- 0.
-0,6







-0.1

-0
*






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


(2640.00) varied from 9 to 130 percent of the 26-year average. The average
discharges for water years 1966-71 were 119, 58, 9, 15, 130, and 11 percent of
average, respectively. The Cypress Creek basin may not be representative of the
vicinity of the RCID for all comparison purposes because of very low runoff and
intermittent flow. However, it demonstrates the short-term variability in the
distribution of surface water and emphasizes that parts of larger drainage basins
can be non-contributing at times and, thus, produce marked differences in
runoff characteristics from site to site within the RCID.
The annual runoff data for Cypress Creek at Vineland (2640.00) were
statistically analyzed to determine any change in the runoff pattern for streams
tributary to the RCID. Thirteen streamflow stations in central Florida were used
to determine the regional cumulative runoff pattern for central Florida. A
double-mass curve of the streamflow data is presented in figure 17.
The flow of Cypress Creek is influenced by the relationship between the
potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer and the lake level in the Butler
Chain of lakes, lakes that form the headwaters of Cypress Creek. During normal
to drier-than-normal years, very little outflow occurs from the Butler Chain
because the amount of inflow (including rain) to the Chain is largely offset by
evaporation and leakage from the lakes to the Floridan aquifer under a normal
head difference of 10 to 16 feet. In wet years, the potentiometric surface of the
Floridan aquifer rises more than do the lake levels, thereby reducing the amount
of head difference and decreasing the amount of downward leakage. Evaporation
is about the same for wet and dry years. Therefore, in wet years outflow
increases sharply because of the increase in inflow (including rain) and the
decrease in leakage to the Floridan aquifer. This pronounced variation in
outflow between wet and dry years is shown in figure 17 which also shows that
no demonstrable change in the surface-water relations has taken place during the
period of analysis.
The interrupted record for Reedy Creek near Loughman (2665.00) was
analyzed in a similar manner to determine whether there was any change in the
runoff pattern for the RCID. A double-mass curve of the streamflow data for
1946-58 and 1969-72 at Reedy Creek near Loughman (2665.00) is presented in
figure 18. The regional data are the same as used in figure 17. The 1969 to 1972
data when accumulated without regard for the missing period, 1959-68, indicate
an apparent change in slope between 1958 and 1969. Several more years of
records are probably necessary to determine the significance of and degree of the
change in the slope.
The change in the slope of the curve in figure 18 indicates an increase in
runoff for the Reedy Creek basin. However, the length of record reflecting the
change is not great enough to attribute a permanent increase in runoff to
urbanization in the RCID. Several factors that may have contributed to the
increase in runoff are either nonrecurring or were not uniformly effective during
the period of data involved. For instance, the draining of Bay Lake was a








CUMULATIVE RUNOFF FOR 13 STATIONS, CENTIMETRES
100 200 300 400 500 600


700 800


60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 240 260 280 2
CUMULATIVE RUNOFF FOR 13 STATIONS, INCHES

Figure 17-Double-mass curve o' streamflow data for Cypress Creek near
Vineland, and average of 13 other central Florida gaging stations.


900


w
U.
w
uJ
(0
u,






'IL

2



U
Of;






0:








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY



CUMULATIVE RUNOFF FOR 13 STATIONS, CENTIMETRES


100
I I


200 300 400 500
1 I I I I I I


600
I I


1972.
1971- _
120,

1970 -0
110


o00o ________/ ____
1969- 0 1

90

1958
80__


sfl-


-1955


150





100

1950



S- 50

1946


-


0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200
CUMULATIVE RUNOFF FOR 13 STATIONS, INCHES


220 240 260


Figure 18-Double-mass curve of streamflow data for Reedy Creek near
Loughman, and average of 13 other central Florida gaging stations.



nonrecurring factor that added flow to Reedy Creek at Loughman (2665.00)

from July 1969 to March 1970. Although the volume of additional water can be
easily determined, the routing downstream and disposition of that water in time

and space were obscured by some of the following factors:


The progressive canalization and improvement of stream

channels had a variable effect, sometimes curtailing and other times

contributing flow, depending on the phase of construction. Gated

control structures in the drainage system regulated natural flow and

had a variable effect on streamflow from wet to dry conditions.

Surface water naturally moved through Reedy Creek Swamp to both


a,
(0
z


LU
0




0
ul
cr


-300




w
250 -
w

200
l-



w
U.




a-
u
(n
Q;
Q-


i ,


C 60


050
z

40
t-

< 30


3 20


LL
LL

0




I.-
Z


Q


-J

0






REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Reedy Creek and Shingle Creek to the east of the RCID. Now, dikes,
canals, and constant head structures in the channels may have
altered the movement of surface water through Reedy Creek
Swamp. Continuing construction of roads, parking lots and buildings
progressively altered surface-runoff patterns. Based on data from
available aquifer tests and logs of exploratory drilling, even the
pumpage from the Floridan aquifer to refill the lake-lagoon, which
began in September 1970, had a localized, nonrecurring, initial
effect on the relation between ground water and surface water.

Both Bonnet Creek near Vineland (2641.00) and Reedy Creek near
Vineland (2663.00) show increases in mean monthly flow in dry seasons since
1969 as compared to 1966-68 (figures 10 and 11). Part of the increased low flow
in Bonnet Creek is attributed to water drained from Bay Lake in 1969, and to
Floridan aquifer water that eventually is used to maintain the level of Bay Lake.
The flow in Reedy Creek near Vineland (2663.00) is also affected by the
pumping, because Bay Lake is connected to the lagoon excavated west of the
lake and because the Theme Park water courses are constructed to permit
diversions of pumped ground water to the east-west canal, which is tributary to
Reedy Creek. During the dry seasons since 1970, the water level in the lake and
lagoon has been higher than the water table was under natural conditions, thus
maintaining seepage into the creeks. The water pumped from deep wells, which
eventually goes to maintain Bay Lake-Lagoon-Theme Park water courses, is
"new" water which should partly increase flows in the streams, because seepage
from the lake back to the aquifer may be less than seepage from the lake into
the creeks. Eventually, the pumpage from the aquifer, seepage to the aquifer,
and seepage to stream channels should stabilize. Also, the several check or
constant-head gates in both creeks have maintained water levels upstream from
such control gates at about swamp levels, and evapotranspiration has probably
increased. However, along the stream channels, the deeper canals are now more
completely entrenched into the water-table aquifer than they were previously as
natural streams. This canalization offers an increase in seepage in some reaches.
As a result of all these factors, the minimum flows in the downstream part of the
RCID have remained above 5 cubic feet per second (0.1 cubic metre per second)
as compared to no flow on many days prior to development. Part of the
increased minimum flows may be accounted for by the more uniformly
distributed rainfall in 1969-71 as compared to 1966-68. However, the records
for Whittenhorse Creek near Vineland (2662.00) and Cypress Creek at Vineland
(2640.00) do not confirm that the distribution of rainfall accounted for the
increase in low flow. The definite increase in minimum flow for both Bonnet
Creek near Vineland (2641.00) and Reedy Creek near Vineland (2663.00)
indicates that developments have changed the low-flow conditions in the lower
reaches of the RCID, at least during 1970-72.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


As the pumpage, recharge to the aquifer, and seepage to stream channels
stabilize, the eventual increase in streamflow during the dry seasons will
probably diminish from that noted for 1970-72. Only the water introduced from
Floridan aquifer wells, less than 3.5 cubic feet per second (0.10 cubic metre per
second), to maintain Bay Lake, Lagoon, and Theme Park water courses, and the
water from rainfall less evapotranspiration impounded by constant head
structures in the streams, will then be available to increase streamflow during dry
seasons.

WATER QUALITY

GROUND WATER

Chemical analyses for 9 wells, 5 tapping the nonartesian or water-table
aquifer and 4 tapping the Floridan aquifer, in the RCID and vicinity are available
for interpretation of quality of ground water in the area. These analyses are
tabulated in table 7.
Water from four of the five wells in the nonartesian aquifer is a calcium
bicarbonate water. The fifth well, 825-134-3, on the north shore of Bay Lake,
yields a sodium chloride water. These water compositions are illustrated in
figures 19 and 20. The concentration of sodium chloride in well 825-134-3 has
increased in recent years, as illustrated in figure 19. The dissolved-solids
concentration in the water from this well may be building up partly as a result of
the near constant surface elevation maintained in Bay Lake. Under predevelop-
ment conditions, the water level in the nonartesian aquifer near the lake was
higher than the lake level, and the aquifer tended to flush to the lake when the
lake level was low. Now, after development, the lake level is always higher than
the water level in the nonartesian aquifer; so, water moves only from the lake to
the aquifer. This results in a higher, almost constant, water table near the lake
and creates evapotranspiration conditions suitable for minimal concentrating of
the mineral content of the water in the nonartesian aquifer near the lake.
The primary source of sodium chloride is probably tied up on the lake
bottom in a reported cloud of flocculated materials that include the residual
impurities from chemicals used to reduce the turbidity of the lake water during
the refilling operation. Also, both the Floridan-aquifer water and rainfall contain
sodium chloride in low concentrations. These low concentrations, the cloud of
flocculated materials, and the previously mentioned relation between lake and
aquifer water levels create the conditions suitable for the increase of the
sodium-chloride concentrations. Presently (1974), the concentrations found in
the water-table aquifer are well within acceptable levels.
The chemical analyses of water from the Floridan aquifer are shown in
figures 21 through 23. These figures show that all of the wells contain a calcium
bicarbonate water having nearly identical chemical characteristics.






Table 7.--Chemical analyses of water from wells in the Reedy Creek Improvement District (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pH, and specific conductance).

Hardness -
S! as CaCO3 W C
UP0 3 U E C '0 O-Ui
44) C) U) rw 3
r 1 o eq r 0. i W t o 0 Mi 0 OO
Q W 0 C 0 0 0 r4 o 0.l' 4 .4 4 tN u^4
oo P.. U MI oaUS .
___ ___ __ vS U '-d ~


815-134-2


4-29-71

822-135

4-27-71

823-131

6-26-70
6-6-72

825-134

3-16-66
9-1-67
5-17-68
7-22-69
5-31-72

825-134

3-16-66
9-1-67
5-17-68
7-22-69
5-31-72


Ihalldw well near Loug man,


34 3.4 -

-1 shallow


7.7

1' nrir


. ... .


4.2
8.9

Plorit


9.7
8.5
8.7
9.4
8.6

Shalli


Florida


wel. at Sewage Treatment


an anit


0.03


an ea


0.13
.00
.26



iw wel


23
22

lifer


well dt Bay


5.2
4.4
4.7
4.5
4.4


av Lake.


4.8
7.7
9.4
11
32


0.4

RCIT


0.5
.5

Lake


0.4
1.3
1.1
1.0
1.2

ID


105 22

Plant. RCID


44



89
88

RCII


4.0
3.6



1.6
2.4
.2
.0
2.8



0.8
2.0
2.2
.0
24


10



4.5



3.1
5.0



4.0
3.8
4.5
4.0
4.5



8.5
14
17
20
42


0.1 0.0


10I

10






5




0 Z
5 0
5
10 0


-3


0.35
.03
1.6


- --





. v --


--


lr 7


-


wpll1 n. 5.


.1 0.0
.1 .0











Table 7,-.Chemical analyses of water from wells in the Reedy Creek Improvement District (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pll, and specific conductance)--continued,


C-

..-. ,- Q.

t o V V
M 0 0 r
z. W M


0
4.1 ,.
'Ur

y3o


trae fari. RCTh


2,7 0.5
2.7 .4
2.6 .4
2,5 .4




7.2 0.5


o. RC]


2.7


2.5


0.4


CID

0.4


134 0.4





95 3.2


0
V

r-.
4,


3.8
5.0
6.5
5.5



10





3.8





5.5


0.2
.0
.1
.0




0.2


0.2 0.2





0.0 0.0


Ia r dm s s
aa M'

3


4J
U I
u
"1.4
UCl V


05o
u^u


165
168
170
161




240





160





161


7.6
7.9
7.5
7.4



6.4





7.7





7.4


0
10
5
5



40








--


5


u




1. U U(
H 0 to
V)

t-1 l/lnr r- *


tlorJdan an


U


9.5
8.8
9.6
9.0

hall


L.4
04'-
JU
4.4 C-a
fl O
a >-
CS*


825-13464


8-23-67
3-19-68
5-20-68
11-7-68

825-134

4-11-68


825-1341.12


6-26-70


825-13513


11-7-68


0.01
.12
.09
,07

wel .


ifar Le11


23
25
24
24

RCID


40 2.4


uitfei wel


Floriddan a


9.2 0.02


1 N


5.2


ree FV


well at '1


9.0 0.07


.. ... r.... .


iP


I I i, i


- -r I I r --r- r r r


. ... ,- . . a ,


I -. .


I I


.uif i wel1 IN


6. .. ... "








REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
825-134-3 BAY LAKE SHALLOW WELL (5-31-72)


825-134-3 BAY LAKE








825-134-3 BAY LAKE







825-134-3 BAY LAKE







825-134-3 BAY LAKE










Cal I I I-i -



IZn I I 1 I I I I


1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 02
CATIONS, MILLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE


SHALLOW WELL (7-22-69)








SHALLOW WELL (5-17-68)







SHALLOW WELL (9-1-67)







SHALLOW WELL (3-16-66)


I I I i I I I HCO

I I i I I k I iSO4

I I I I I I I INN 3
I I I I I I


O 02 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6
ANIONS, MILLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE


Figure 19-Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from Bay
Lake shallow well.


-I-


. I I '








60 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


815-134-2 LOUGHMAN SHALLOW WELL (4-29-71)





822-135-1 SEWAGE PLANT SHALLOW WELL (4-27-71)





825-134-5 SHALLOW WELL AFTER 9 HOURS PUMPING AT 1.5 G. P M.





825-135-3 TREE FARM SHALLOW WELL (11-7-68)






C I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IHCl

Nso,
Znl I I--II-- -- | I-- I-- I-- I I -- I -- I -- I -- I -- I I -- I -- -I -I IN03
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I l l l I I I
22 2.0 1.8 6 1.4 1.2 1.0 08 06 04 02 0 Q2 04 0.6 0.8 ID 1.2 14 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2
CATIONS. MILLIEQUIVALENTS ANIONS, MILLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE PER LITRE
Figure 20-Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from shallow
wells in Reedy Creek Improvement District.


A comparison of figures 19 and 20 with figures 21, 22, and 23 reveals that
with the exception of the shallow well at Bay Lake, 825-134-3, water from wells
in the nonartesian aquifer is chemically similar to water from the Floridan
aquifer. That is, both the Floridan aquifer and the nonartesian aquifer wells
(except Bay Lake shallow well) yield calcium bicarbonate type water. However,
Floridan aquifer water is generally higher in dissolved solids than nonartesian
aquifer water. This tends to confirm that the materials between the water table
and the Floridan aquifer are not totally effective as confining beds. Upward
leakage influences the chemical characteristics of the nonartesian aquifer water
where the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer is higher than the water
level in the nonartesian aquifer, and very little or no recharge to the Floridan
aquifer takes place in the area.








REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO..79


I I I I


825-134-2 BAY LAKE


825-134-2 BAY LAKE


I I I I I


I I I


DEEP WELL (5-31-72)


DEEP WELL (7-22-69)


NafKj IJ

Cal I

Mgl !S II 104

nl I I I I I I I I I I IN03
In I I I I I INo


1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 04 0.2
CATIONS, MILLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE


0 0.2 0.4 0.6


0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6


ANIONS, MILLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE


Figure 21-Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from Floridan
aquifer wells in Reedy Creek Improvement District.


I I I I


I I I I


825-134-12 RCID *t8 JDEEP WELL (6-26-70)








823-131-7 RCID -*5 DEEP WELL (6-26-70)


F __ ....................


. ..I i I i


I I I







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


825-134-4 TREE FARM


825-134-4 TREE FARM


I I I I I I I I
DEEP WELL (8-23-67)







DEEP WELL (5-20-68)


825-134-4 TREE FARM DEEP WELL (3-19-68)


Can I I I I I
Ca l I I I I I


I~ I I I I I
I I I I I I
mg!


1 I1
I I


\ II

I I
I I


I I I I I I I IdI

IIHC03


I I I I I I I 1S04

I I I I I I I INO5


16 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 0.2 04 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6


CATIONS, MiLLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE


ANIONS, MILLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE


Figure 22-Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from Floridan
aquifer wells in Reedy Creek Improvement District.


"-' L I | |









REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


823-131-7 RCID # 5


824-134-11 THRU 14 TUNNEL


824-134-15 THRU 18 TUNNEL


I I I I I I I
DEEP WELL (6-6-72)







RELIEF DEEP WELLS (12-23-70)


RELIEF DEEP WELL (12-23-70)


SPRING NEAR DRILL HOLE -#232 (2-7-69)
...............


Cal I I I I I I I I I I IHCO3

Mg! 1S04

Zn I I I f 1 IN03-I--$--I0


1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 04 0.2
CATIONS, MILLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE


0 0.2 04 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6
ANIONS, MILLIEQUIVALENTS
PER LITRE


Figure 23-Concentration of chemical constituents in ground water from Floridan
aquifer wells in Reedy Creek Improvement District.


f
__ w


.. .. I I | I I I I


m I I I I I I I Ir-i







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


SURFACE WATER

Results of chemical, nutrient, metals, biological, insecticide, and herbicide
analyses of surface waters in the area are given in tables 8 through 13. No
deteriorating effect of water quality from the influence of development in the
RCID is indicated.
By changing several of the parameters tabulated in table 8 to millequiva-
lents per litre and plotting the irregular polygonal patterns presented in figures
24 through 30, the differences and similarities of the water composition become
apparent. These chemical characteristics separate the surface waters in the RCID
into two broad groups, those similar to water from the nonartesian aquifer and
those similar to water from the Floridan aquifer.
The waters of South Lake, Cypress Creek, Whittenhorse Creek, Reedy
Creek above Structure 46, and Lateral 405 above Structure 405A, are similar to
the water from the nonartesian aquifer represented by the shallow well at Bay
Lake (825-134-3) before 1970. This comparison, along with the low streamflow
and prolonged periods of no flow, confirms that where the potentiometric
surface of the Floridan aquifer is as low or lower than the water level in the
nonartesian aquifer in these basins, the Floridan aquifer contributes little or no
water by upward leakage to the nonartesian aquifer. In fact, this comparison
adds validity to the discussion that some recharge to the Floridan aquifer
probably occurs in the areas draining to these water bodies.
The waters of Lateral 405 below Structure 405A, Lateral 405 below
Structure 405, Reedy Creek below Structure 46, Reedy Creek near Vineland,
Davenport Creek near Loughman, and Reedy Creek near Loughman are similar
to the water from the Floridan aquifer. This comparison along with the higher
and less intermittent streamflow confirms that at best the area delineated in
figure 2 provides little or no recharge for the Floridan aquifer and that upward
leakage is great enough to influence the chemical quality of the surface waters.
Figures 29 and 30 show the change in the chemical characteristics of water
from Bay Lake for May 1966 to June 1972. Prior to draining the lake, the water
was predominately a sodium chloride type, grossly similar to the nonartesian
aquifer represented by Bay Lake shallow well. Prior to drainage, the water table
at the lake was above the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer part of
the time and some recharge to the Floridan aquifer probably occurred in the Bay
Lake area. Since May 1970, water from Bay Lake has been predominately a
calcium bicarbonate type, grossly similar in quality to the water of the Floridan
aquifer, because water from that aquifer was used to help refill the lake and has
since been used to help stabilize the stage of the lake. The potentiometric
surface is now (1974) lower than the water table and the lake level, and, thus,
some recharge to the Floridan aquifer continues in the Bay Lake area. However,
some of this recharge is the water pumped to the lake from the Floridan aquifer.
The formation of springs during the excavation of the lagoon and the now






Table 8.--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pH, and specific conductance).

Hardness
a as CaC03

? U
0 P4 r. ) -lM 0 '- 14
W W u U N W to W --% wo QT 4 S S P CO on 0O o
SM 1. P,4 go a( "U4 u V "o u 1 U 0 U 0u 41) a c (A u


Bay Laki near Vineland Flor da (2638.5))
Mar. 24, 1966 -- -- -- -- 25 -- 3.1 100 38 -- 5.1 200
May 18, 1966 30 2.3 0.41 1.5 1.9 8.9 1.4 -- 6.8 16 .2 .3 41 12 10 80 4.8 180
July 6, 1966 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 0 -- 4.4 --
Aug. 31, 1966 30 5.1 .36 5.6 1.7 9.6 1.2 -- 10 15 .1 .1 57 21 8 85 6.2 200
May 18, 1967 -- -- -- -- -- -- 26 -- 0 51 -- 12 132 3.3 100
May 23, 1967 26 2.7 .15 2.0 1.9 10 1.8 -- 6.4 19 .2 1.0 89 13 11 92 5.1 200
June 23, 1967 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 5.4 95
Mar. 19, 1968 -- 2.9 .28 3.2 2.9 11 1.5 -- 13 19 .1 6.0 96 20 14 102 6.0 55
Apr. 9, 1968 3.5 .10 3.2 2.4 11 1.6 -- 12 19 .2 1.7 70 18 14 110 5.1 50
May 7, 1968 25 5.1 .07 3.6 2.5 12 1.4 2 14 20 .2 1.9 92 20 18 110 5.0 15
Oct. 25, 1968 27 8.6 .05 8.6 3.1 11 1.7 -- 17 20 .3 0 114 34 31 110 5.1 50 >
Feb. 5, 1969 18. -- 21 21 1.0 32 120 5.2 30
Mar. 27, 1969 18.( 26 16 1.5 34 120 5.3 40
Apr. 30, 1969 27 -- -- -- 26 17 -- 1.4 -- 40 -- 120 5.1 10
June 16, 1969 36 -- -- -- -- -- 33 18 -- 1.9 -- 40 154 5.1 20 z
July 22, 1969 36 18 .02 11 5.4 12 2.5 -- 44 18 .1 2.5 148 50 49 185 4.7 20
Dec. 3, 1970 19 4.3 -- 17 5.0 4.6 1.0 57 17 8 .2 0 90 63 17 152 7.8 10
May 18, 1971 28.! 1.9 -- 18 5.9 4.6 .7 66 10 12 .2 .4 98 70 16 170 7.8 10

Bay Lake Outlet b low i-105A near linelnd, Florida (263 .52)
Oct. 24, 1968 24 20 .2 20 4.6 25 8.5 60 39 26 .3 3.0 233 69 20 272 6.7 100
Feb. 3, 1969 19 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 20 21 -- 1.0 -- 32 119 5.2 30
Mar. 26, 1969 16 -- 15 22 1.2 21 110 5.4 40
Apr. 28, 1969 24 -- -- -- -- --25 16 --1.1 36 120 6.0 5
June 8, 1969 27 -- -- ---
June 17, 1969 33 -- -- -- 20 20 --1.2 -- 33 131 5.3 20 0%
July 18, 1969 33 15 .08 6.9 3.1 15 1.5 8 22 22 .2 .7 100 30 24 130 5.1 30 Ln








Table 8,--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Ieedy Creek Improvement District area (resultB
in milligrams per liter except for color, phl, and specific conductance)--continued,

...Ilardnoss
re as CaCO3 u'
o 8 P4 ~, r o O

4, ".0 '0 n ui r- U
74 En go oP o4
Q H W^ Ze d z now ,r, U
ia ~N O I UhUh 0


Rav Lakd Outlleat! bilow .lO15A Inar


May 21, 1970
May 6, 1971
June 1, 1972


29
30.0
31.0


13
2.6
2.9


aL ke Madel War D


Mar. 27, 1969
May 6, 1971

South

Oct. 24, 1968
Jan. 31, 1969
Mar. 27, 1969
Apr. 28, 1969
June 18, 1969
July 16, 1969
May 19, 1970
Aug. 27, 1970
Dec. 2, 1970
Mar. 1, 1971
May 3, 1971
Aug. 19, 1971
Nov. 23, 1971
Feb. 9, 1972
May 8, 1972
Aug. 17, 1972


T.dira F


1.2

f.leat-


5.6




4.7
1.6
2.3
2.8
2.9
2.5
2.3
3.2
3.7
3.3
3.2


victor


.07
-**



.07
--
.07
.03
.05
.02
.03
.04
.06
.03
.03


6.0
14
17

Phill:


2--
2.1

S-1 q


3.5
3.8
4.9

.as. F


2.5

nar


4.0 3.7




4.1 3.9
3.0 3.3
2.9 3.1
3.1 3.4
3.5 3.7
4.0 4.7
4.0 4.2
3.5 4.0
3.7 4.1
4.1 4.5
4.8 4.2


TinelJnd. loridl (2631.52)


21
5.7
4.7

aridi


8.9


8.5




9.6
8.4
-- -
8.3

9.2
7.6
8.4
9.4
9.4
9.5


2.3




2.5
1.8

2.0

2.3
2.3
2.5
2.8
2.0
2.7


-- -
45
60

8. 64)


0

n"4 A


46
15
13



10
16

(2631


17
23
26
13
25
19
21
2.0 20
2.0 19
1.0 23
2.0 27
2.0 26
2.0 28
2.0 25
1.0 28
1.0 30


14
9
8.8



14
15

1.69)


Continued


0.2




0
.2

.2

.1
0
.2
.1
.1
.1


1.1
0
0



.1
0



5.4
.4
.5
.1
0
.1
.7
0
0
0
0
0
.2
.1
0
0


117
85
102




52



90




74
88
66
60
60
74
70
75
86
91
88


158
140
159



87
102



110
120
110
92
124
133
104
103
109
115
130
120
115
119
125
130


6,3
7.1
7.7



4.6
4.5



4.7
5.0
4.6
4.9
5.4
5.2
4.9
5.1
5.2
5.1
5.2
5.0
5.0
5.0
6.0
5.1


65
10



10 0
0



50
20


---~ ------- ---r--- --------~ -~ -----~-I-~---- --~~----~-- -~----------r ----_----r ----------------r


..... ..... 1 .. .... ...... ............ ...... .........


(263


r


I A I &A :- .1. X


aborv






Table 8.--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pH, and specific conductance)--continued.

Hardness
S C as CaCO3

-W (d P U.r 0


South lake )utlet beloo S-13 near Vineaand) alorda (26.70
May 21, 1970 24. 6.2 3.5 2.1 7.8 1.2 -- 13 0 87 54 85o 4.9 40
May 3, U 19N 71 24. 5.9 4.2 4.7 9.1 1.9 0 33 0 3 0 152 4.3 0
P 1 0* C01U r U V z3 -W U U3 B 0O 0 UOf4O a2O IC G1 4CJ U
*H Cu -' aW o 04 W *o1 0 -,4 -' r H r '4 r-4O CA 0i Ori

South ake utle below S-15 near Vine and. lorida (2638.70)

May 21, 1970 24.! 6.2 3.5 2.1 7.8 1.2 -- 13 13 .1 0 87 54 54 85 4.9 40
May 3, 1971 24.C 5.9 4.2 4.7 9.1 1.9 0 33 18 .1 0 97 30 30 152 4.3 0

Cypress Creak at Vinelind. Florida (2640.00)

-July 24, 1963 8.1 0.47 -- 7.1 0.4 1.6 7.8 0.1 0.2 -- 18 18 58 4.4 450
May 20, 1966 12 .38 0.9 1.6 6.1 0 0 12 .4 .9 34 8 8 82 4.0 400
May 8, 1967 27 14 .16 6.5 7.4 12 .7 4 45 17 .2 2.4 108 46 43 180 4.9 140
Oct. 24, 1968 22 14 .26 2.0 2.7 6.6 .9 0 4.0 14 .5 .6 46 16 16 74 4.5 320
Feb. 3, 1969 16 -- -- -- -- -- 1.2 14 -- 0 18 78 4.4 240
Mar. 25, 1969 21 -- .8 17 --0 13 75 4.4 240
Apr. 24, 1969 22 -- -- .9 -- -- --
June 12, 1969 26 -- -- .8 14 .1 28 82 5.7 320
July 7, 1969 28 16 .47 35 2.3 3.1 3.8 98 4.6 14 .4 .1 128 97 17 202 7.3 400
May 18, 1970 27 10 .42 1.9 2.7 9.7 1.9 0 .8 22 .2 .7 50 16 16 102 4.4 400
Aug. 27, 1970 26 3.7 .37 1.4 1.9 -- -- 0 .8 15 -- 0 12 12 76 4.5 400
Dec. 2, 1970 20 17 .27 1.4 2.3 7.2 .8 0 1.8 16 .3 0 47 13 13 82 4.5 200
Mar. 1, 1971 24 16 .23 1.8 2.8 -- -- 0 9.5 16 0 104 4.3 200
Aug. 18, 1971 26.( 8.4 .46 2.2 2.0 5.5 .2 0 1.2 8.8 .3 0 149 14 14 69 4.5 560
Nov. 11, 1971 21.( 20 .42 3.1 1.9 6.3 .2 0 1.2 12 .3 0 146 16 16 75 4.1 420
Feb. 9., 1972 12 .25 1.7 2.0 6.2 1.8 0 13 11 .2 0 120 12 12 77 4.3 320
Aug. 16, 1972 24.C 20 .71 3.2 2.0 6.8 .2 0 4.8 18 .4 0 172 16 16 102 3.9 400
Feb. 22, 1973 10.5 13 .17 1.4 1.9 6.2 .8 0 4.0 13 .4 0 139 11 11 110 3.7 400








Table 8,--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement Dietrict area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pl and specific conductance)-continued,
o eeIlaridnH o
c S ,0 a as CaCU3








July 24, 1963 -- 0 0.42 4.0 1.7 9.0 0.4 0 6.8 13 0.3 0 35 17 17 62 4.5 400
ay 8, 1967 27 9.0 .01 21 4.6 3.0 .7 86 2.4 5.0 .2 1.5 90 72 1 161 7.1 10

Apr. 9, 1968 -- 11 .24 13 3.4 6.3 .5 44 .8 13 .2 3.5 74 46 10 163 6.9 280
May 1, 1968 .2 0 14 1400





Oct. 23, 1968 24 13 .27 7.6 1.9 6.8 .9 12 6.0 13 .3 .6 56 27 17 73 6.1 200
Feb. 4, 1969 16-- ------ -- 1516 --.1-- 80 190 7.2 70

Apr. 29, 1969 24-- ---------- --- 1712 -- .1 30 100 6.1 120
June 23, 1969 27 -- -- ---- -- 14 10 -- .3 -- 45 112 6.8 60
July 15, 1969 30 10 1 3.9 5. 1 11 7 .2 7 5 4 127 7.0 50



Oct. 23, 1969 27 -- -- ,--- .. -- .
May 20, 1970 26 9.7 .10 10 3.7 8.3 1.3 37 13 11 .3 .7 76 40 10 121 7.6 50
Apr. 30, 1971 25. 6.9 -- 14 3.5 4.4 1.0 38 4.6 8.0 .1 0 85 50 10 127 6.7 50
Aug. 18, 1971 28 9.4 .51 6.5 3.4 5.1 1.2 12 1 8.0 .2 0 17 30 20 7 6 .1 320





Nov. 22, 1971 16. .2 11 4.4 6.3 1.3 29 17 11 .2 .7 10574 46 1022 135 6.5 2160

Feb. 8, 1972 -- 7.3 .11 9.6 3.5 5.8 1.0 23 14 11 .1 .6 94 39 20 112 6.7 80
May 8, 1972 21 8. .21 12 3.8 1.5 .8 38 1 10 .2 20 99 46 15 103 7.7 90
Feb 4, 1969 16 15 16 -- 80 190 7.2 70




Aug. 16, 1972 28 8.2 .13 9.2 7. 1. 0 18 39 1 6.2 200
Apr. 29, 1969 24 17 12 5.0 .1. 9 0 72 1 100 6.1 120




Nov. 16, 1972 20 8.0 .29 14 3.9 5.3 .9 49 11 7 .2 70 51 11 123 7. 120
Feb. 22, 1973 14 9.7 .28 1 3. 6. 1 2 28 11 6. 320
May 20, 1970 26 9.7 .10710 3.7 8.3 1.3 37 13 11 .3 .7 76 40 10 121 7.6 50
Apr. 30, 1971 25. 6.9 14 3.5 44 1.0 38 4.6 8.0 .1 0 85 50 10 127 6.7 50
Aug. 18, 1971 28. 9.4 .51 6.5 3.4 5.1 1.2 12 19 8.0 .2 .0 137 30 20 87 6.1 320
Nov. 22, 1971 169 ( 7.8 .2 11 4.4 6.3 1.3 29 17 11 .2 .7 105 46 22 135 6.5 160
Feb. 8, 1972 2 7.3 .11 9.6 35 5.8 1.0 23 14 11 .1 .6 94 39 20 112 6.7 s0
May 8, 1972 23.! 8.6 .19 12 3.8 1.5 1. 38 13 10 .2 0 99 46 15 123 7.7 90
Aug. 16, 1972 28.( 8.2 .13 9.2 3.8 75. 1.2 20 18 14 .2 .1 87 39 22 120 6.6 200
Nov. 16, 1972 20.: 8.0 .29 14 3.9 5.3 .9 49 12 10 .2 0 98 51 11 135 7.7 120
Feb. 22, 1973 14.( 9.7 .28 10 3.9 6.4 1.0 16 18 12 .4 .9 127 41 28 121 6.6 320'





Table 8.--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pH, and specific conductance)--continued.

Hardness
C)C S as CaC03
0 .q 4 3 a i.-'M 0
W U e% B u EQl to E ." l B P4 M *MqIU I {j
"4 0 ., r. 0 'z) -H Mo M 6 M Ll a 1-i 0 M M 0 c0 i o
"-4 W c.-4 U ra 'C) W U %_ U M U O I (n U r 0 V4 C) U
4 M 0 r = % -' r- *4 H e t O H rO-4- 0Q WO -H
u n my U g ui -v u p a rt z Wa ue


May 28,
Apr. 19,
June 1,


Reedy Czeek above S-46 near Vineland. FlIorida (266C.25)

1970 28.5 1.8 2.9 1.2 4.5 0.4 -- 0.8
1971 25.0 2.6 -- --
1972 27.5. .5 -- 4.0 2.1 5.3 .6 16 2.2


Reedy Cr.ek )elow S-46 near Minelard, Florida (266C.26)


Nov. 7, 1968
Jan. 31, 1969
Mar. 26, 1969
Apr. 29, 1969
June 17, 1969
July 17, 1969
May 28, 1970
Apr. 29, 1971


9.1
-,
-

m m
7.0
4.9
6.8


Whittenh>ree Cre l


May 20, 1966
May 8, 1967 28
May 1, 1968 25
Oct. 23, 1968 23
Feb. 3, 1969 18


0.6
7.5
4.5
2.6


0.07
I
,


.03
.07
I


16
-
-


7.9
8.6
--


14




4.7
4.9
-


8
--



.6
.6


near Vinel
land lorida (2662.000


0.45
.61
.17
.65
--


6.1
9.4
12
6.1


0.3
9.7
6.1
.6
-


2.4
0
.2
.4
.8


5.1

6.8




7.5
17
17
17
12
9.8
7.5





12'
22
24
14
18


5.1
9.0
6.6




0.7
.1
0
0
.1
2.2
2.0
0




0.7
4.8
7.2
.4
0


53

51




114

--


55
81





27
127
87
30


46
66
75




174
88
84
84
73
79
76
94




63
309
162
74
81


6.5

6.9




6.8
5.8
4.7
4.6
6.0
7.2
7.1





4.6
6.5
6.0
4.5
4.6


60
--
45




50
240
24
320
160
80











Table 8,--Cliintcal analyses of surface waters in the Ready Creeak Improvement District area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pll, and specific conductance).-continued,
Ilardncoss
W as CaC03 Q
B- ^ 5 C' U W 4 -HMO~ 0
a PO 0U
4S 'm o
OL Uo r. z. M L2 0 J P-4 P410 00 I U
P- 0ro -H 0 -4 -^ 41 Ba 4 (AO O- 0-UCS WW
CA 0 0 0 P-4 0 .14


Whittenh

Mar. 24, 1969
Apr. 24, 1969
June 17, 1969
July 16, 1969
May 25, 1970
Aug. 31, 1970
Dec. 2, 1970
Mar. 1, 1971
Aug. 18, 1971
Feb. 8, 1972
Aug. 16, 1972
Feb. 21, 1973


orsel Cree near| Vine and, Vlorica (2662.00)


20
21
27
29
26.5
27.0
17.5
26.5
25.0

24.5
11.0


Lateral 405 bove IS-405A near Doctcr Ph11ipsl, Flosida (2662.9)


26
25.5


27.0
27.0


--
--

1.9
1.7
3.8
.8
.8
3.1
4.6
3.2
5.7


0.24
.18


.41


- -

4.4
4.7
3,1
4.0
4.1
5.0
4.9
4.0
4.0


* *
--

6.7
1.9

.5

.3
.4
.4
.1


(Cont

.4

0
0
8.9
.8
4.6
0

5.2
.4
7.6


inued)


Apr. 30, 1969
May 26, 1970
May 3, 1971
Nov. 22, 1971
Aug. 17, 1972


26
1.3
1.6
4.3
2.6


1.4
11

34
30


58

69
103
88
73
83
85
80
80
75
84




105
108
125
196
150


4,5

4.8
5.6
5.0
4.4
5.1
4.7
4.5
4.5
4.3
4.3




6.1
4.3
4.2
4.4
4.4


130
280
--
400
240





Table 8.--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pH, and specific conductance)--continued.

Hardness -
) as CaC03 U
440 0 W -
o.34 5 o e a 1 s w 0
4.) d a 4
4) UU W z 1U
WU. e U_ N P4 tiii o o 14 4Ws- y0 0 r-4 = V0- *J Z 0 nucc~ Li
"i p C:M o- U3 ZB (d o CL a H 4 0 r W 1 0 4 i l"0
%.0 0 V0
L1 P P)1 OV) FA P4 zvh u
E-4 yv % U ) z ( i S O


Lateral

Oct. 24, 1968
Jan. 31, 1969
Mar. 25, 1969
Apr. 30, 1969
June 19, 1969
July 18, 1969
May 26, 1970
Aug. 27, 1970
Dec. 2, 1970
Mar. 1,.1971
May 3, 1971
Aug. 19, 1971
Nov. 23, 1971
Feb. 9, 1972
May 8,. 1972
Nov. 16, 1972
Feb. 22, 1973


Lateral 405


Nov. 23, 1971
Aug. 19, 1971
Feb. 9, 1972
May 8, 1972


Apr.


Lateral 10
27, 1971 30


>elow

7.9


23

22
11
5.5
14
12
10
12
10
8.2
1.8
3.5
5.7


below

8.5
9.5
5.0
1.8

at S-4
2.0


S-405

0.38
-- *

.24

.23

.64
.48
.20
.22
.20
.19
.20
.17
.86
.36


S-405

.15
.15
.10
.13

10 (2


Sneai

7.0


2.8

4.6
4.0
3.'3
9.0
13
10
12
10

20
4.8
3.8


near

19
18
18
17


Doctor Phi


4.2


2.3

3.5
3.3
2.2
3.6
4.0
3.6
4.5
5.0
4.5
4.4
3.9
5.0


Vinel

6.5
3.9
4.2
4.0


11


13
--
12
1.1

8.7

9.0
7.5
7.4
6.0
10
11
9.2


nd, F

6.5
5.7.
5.2
7.3


llips

3.2


1.9

2.6
1.9

1.9

1.5
3.0
2.0
1.8
1.7
2.3
1.9


lord

1.9
2.6
1.5
1.3


Flor


ida (2662.9)


.8
5.4
13
6.8
21
.8
14
14
14
16
16
15
15
8
20


(26 2.94)


21
24
1.6
19
16
19
15
17
15
13
14
14
15
10
16
27
24




14
11
10
14


0.6
0
0
.8
.8
7.5
.4
0
.7
1.2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0




0
.1
.3


174


75

118

156
111
120
115
155
141
119
131
199
194




195
129
115
123


128
105
87
107
110
131
110
91
116
147
130
192
203
175
181
135
171




197
162
154
148


5.7
4.4
4.5
4.5
5.0
4.7

4.7
7.0
6.4
6.8
6.7
6.6
6.7
7.4
4.2
3.9




7.0
6.5
6.5
7.5


320
360
320
130
80
80

480.
60
80
160
100
200
60
80
640
400







Table 8,--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Ready Creek Improvement District area resulta
in milligrams per liter except for color, pH, and specific conductance).-continued,

Hardness
as CaCO3 ,

8 9 B W 41 HU U
_U a 7 4j~ to W V 0 4 ML 4


Lateral 410 3elow S-410 (266d.96)

Apr. 27, 1971 -- 7.3 -- 10 2.4 4.5 1.0 28 1.2 9.5 .2 0 76 35 12 92 6.9 110

Reedy Cek ear inelad, Forida (266.00)

Aug. 21, 1962 27 -- 7.1 1.9 32 -- 48 22 117 6.5 400
July 24, 1963 24 6.9 .39 6.4 2.9 6.3 .1 2 4.0 12 .2 0 40 28 26 77 6.0 570
May 3, 1965 20 -- 75 --
May 20, 1966 6.5 .20 4.7 1.6 5.6 .1 6 3.0 11 .3 .5 37 18 13 59 5.3 400
May 8, 1967 27 1.3 .17 5.7 1.7 5.9 .1 7 4.4 12 .3 1.6 38 21 16 78 5.3 240
Apr. 9, 1968 6.5 .15 6.1 2.6 7.7 .9 4 4.4 16 .3 .7 47 22 3 90 5.3 320
May 1, 1968 28 2.1 .08 3.6 2.0 4.4 .9 0 15 6.8 .2 1.0 36 17 17 70 5.0 60
Oct. 23, 1968 23 7.0 .24 6.0 1.9 5.2 .2 2 .4 13 .6 .5 36 23 22 67 4.9 400
Feb. 4, 1969 14 -- -- -- -- -- -- .8 14 --0 16 58 5.3 280
Mar. 25, 1969 21 -- --4 12 --0 --16 55 4.9 400
Apr. 21, 1969 20 8.2 .31 3.4 1.4 6.0 .4 4 0 12 .3 .1 34 15 11 58 4.9 400
Apr. 24, 1969 22 -- -- -- 0 -
June 16, 1969 26 -- -- -- 0 13 .2 10 59 5.1 320
July 15, 1969 25 10 .18 4.0 1.6 5.1 .1 6 0 11 .1 2.0 37 17 12 60 6.2 300
Oct. 23, 1969 25 -- .
May 20, 1970 24 10 .10 8.9 2.8 6.2 1.1 24 0 10 .2 .7 34 14 85 6.8
Aug. 27, 1970 27 12 .22 7.5 2.4 -- -- 23 .8 9.8 .3 29 10 83 6.5 240
Dec. 2, 1970 20 11 .18 9.1 4.4 22 .9 20 18 41 .3 0 120 30 13 210 7.0 120
Mar. 1, 1971 24 10 8.8 2.8 -- 19 20 11 .8 -- 94 7.0 160
May 3, 1971 23.5 7.8 .08 9.8 3.4 4.7 .8 30 8.0 9.5 .2 .2 59 39 14 100 6.5 200
Aug. 18, 1971 25.512 .30 8.6 2.8 6.6 .6 40 2.4 10 .2 1.4 144 33 0 90 6.1 400





Table 8.--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pH, and specific conductance)--continued.

Hardness I
c as CaCO3 W
4. 0 S U9' 3 A
Reedy C d, Fra 3
Nov. 22, 1971 13 3 00
tAug. 1 1972 W N 8. W i2 7 1 Q 4.1 18 .o 4 M W0 400








Nov. 15, 1972 13 37 200
Feb. 21, 1973 PC 5. 2 r8.8 30 W 1 1 1 -1 0 P4 W 11 320
May 5, 1973 1. 2 *-U12 3C 1 32 .4 C '10 2 0.4 10 4 20 15 6I 240
5P4 0W r40 U o ao Uc C4 en w L; *
r4Q 0 4 %- -oj 4 ,
U4 C Ln 4C z M P U Sr

Reedy Ceek ear nlad, Florida (266.00) (Cont nued)

Nov. 22, 1971 16. 9.7 .24 13 3.7 8.1 1.8 34 10 18 .2 .3 130 48 1 158 6.3 100
Feb. 8, 1972 10 .23 11 3.1 9 1.5 20 8.8 16 .2 .4 142 41 24 120 6.2 280
May 9, 1972 2.4 9.2 .21 11 3 15 3.9 29 7.2 28 .4 .4 141 40 17 155 7.1 180 0
Aug. 16, 1972 24. 9.1 .33 8.6 2.6 7.6 1.5 10 13 18 .4 .4 157 32 24 95 6.0 400
Nov. 15, 1972 21. 11 .19 13 3.7 9.9 2.3 36 12 20 .3 1.5 143 48 18 150 7.6 200
Feb. 21, 1973 1. 5.5 .21 8.8 3.0 8.9 1.4 14 15 .4 .9 140 38 27 112 6.4 3200
May 5, 1973 19.0 8.1 .25 12 3.8 13 3.6 32 10 22 .4 1.8 150 46 20 150 6.8 240

Davenport Creek near Lcughma Flo:id-a 2664.80)

May 4, 1965 21 0.06 -15 -- -1 11 -- 120 -
Apr. 9, 1968 7.5 .0 15 4.2 4.0 0.7 8.0 8.7 01 4.3 93 55 16 131 6.9 100
Apr. 30, 1968 23 6.9 2.7 16 4.2 4.3 1.0 9.6 10 .2 4.5 94 58 18 140 6.7 20 Z
Oct. 23, 1968 22 10 13 3.1 5.3 .8 6.0 14 .7 1.3 175 46 24 88 6.4 400
Feb. 4, 1969 14 -- 1.2 12 -- 1.0 -- 39 89 6.6 200
M1ar. 24, 1969 20 -- -- .8 12 0 -- 32 73 6.2 200.
Apr. 29, 1969 24 -- -- -- -- -- 1.6 15 1.5 -- 43 87 6.4 200
June 18, 1969 26 .04 ---- ---- -- 9.8 7.0 -- 3.1 -- 55 -- 126 6.9 50
July 15, 1969 25 6.7 16 4.0 3.7 1.2 -- 7.9 7.5 0 3.0 86 57 14 .132 7.2 40
May 25, 1970 25.C 7.2 0 16 4.2 3.9 1.4 -- 17 8.0 .2 2.5 112 58 27 134 7.7 50
Aug. 31, 1970 25.5 8.2 0 10 2.6 -- -- 20 .8 10 .9 141 36 19 79 6,4 400
Dec. 2, 1970 19.5 8.6 .14 14 3.9 4.1 1.0 44 5.4 9.1 .4 2.8 97 51 15 119 7.5 100
Mar. 1, 1971 24.0 7.0 .04 12 3.3 -- -- 32 1.6 10 -- 2.2 99 44 18 105 7.3 160
May 3, 1971 21. 4.8 .16 15 5.1 3.7 1.1 45 11 9.5 .1 3.9 86 59 22 140 7.0 40
Aug. 18, 1971 '25.5 7.8 17 4.7 4.8 .6 38 22 11 .2 1.5 148 62 31 160 6.9 200








Table 8,--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Ready Creek Improvement District area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pl, and specific conductance)--continued,


Ila rdi
S1 4 1 1 6 a('O16
ay 9 1972 22 5.8 .02 16 4. 4. .9 48 24 9.5 .2 3.0 92 59 19 128 78 35
Nov. 15 1972 20 6.6 .09 15 4 4. 1.4 47 9.6 39 112 56 17 140 7.4 14
eb. 21 1973 11. 7.1 .21 13 3 4. .5 22 11 13 .5 1.3 159 47 0 102 6.6 400
cMay 4, 1965 O -- '-. -.. .. 0 -
(e10 i 'Y, 4 (A r-1 U :3 4J (A U = 3 U


Davenport Cr ek near Loaghmar, Floiida (2664,.0)

Nov. 22, 1971 16.0 8.9 .12 15 3.3 4.8 1.3 43 15 11 .2 4.2 106 46 11 145 6.4 160
Feb. 8, 1972 -- 9.7 .23 16 4.2 6.1 .9 31 15 1 .4 1.5 162 58 32 132 6.7 320
May 9, 1972 22 5.8 .02 16 4.5 4.3 .9 48 24 9.5 .2 3.0 92 59 19 128 7.8 35
Aug. 16, 1972 24,0 8.2 .19 19 4.8 5.5 1.0 40 23 12 .4 .1 151 67 38 160 7.3 200
Nov. 15, 1972 20.5 6.6 .09 15 4.4 4.5 1.4 47 9.6 11 .1 3.9 112 56 17 140 74 14
Feb. 21, 1973 11.0 7.1 .21 13 3.4 4.4 5 22 11 13 .5 1.3 159 47 0 102 6.6 400

Reedy Creek iear loughman, Florida (2665.00) 0

Nov. 13, 1959 21 4.6 0.18 5.0 0.5 4.2 0.6 0.8 10 0.1 1.1 76 14 4 49 6.0 80
May 4, 1965 20 -- -- 11 -- --
Apr. 9, 1968 6.2 .09 14 4.2 5.3 1.0 -- 12 10 .3 2.8 98 52 20 129 6.7 120
Apr. 30, 1968 23 5.9 .03 16 4.5 4.5 .9 16 9.0 .2 2.5 94 58 18 143 6.6 20
Oct. 23, 1968 24 10 .28 11 2.9 5.1 1 .6 .6 158 40 22 87 6.3 400
Feb. 5, 1969 11.5 76 1 1-- 8 5- 1- 3- 1.6 13 1.9 30 1 78 6.7 200
Mar. 24, 1969 19 -- 34 7. -- 9 14 11 2 0 --47 28 26 65 6.0 320
Apr. 21, 1969 21 6.2 .22 8.6 2.2 5.5 2.2 0 13 .4 .5 117 31 16 82 6.2 320
Apr. 24, 1969 19 -- -- -- .2 -
June 11, 1969 26 -- -- -- --- -- -- 4.8 10 -- .7 -- 33 -- 86 6.3 220
July 15, 1969 27 9.3 .15 11 3.2 4.5 1.41 6.4 10 .1 2.6 95 41 18 110 6.9 80
May 25, 1970 23 11 -- 11 2.7 4.4 1.5 -- 12 7.9 .2 .1 115 39 22 94 6.5 240
Aug. 18, 1971 24.5 6.7 .42 10 3.1 4.8 1.2 29 1.2 16 .2 0 122 38 14 102 6.1 400
Nov. 22, 1971 16.0 7.6 .21 12 3.8 5.9 1.4 36 8.8 12 .2 1.8 116 45 16 138 5.8 200
Feb. 8, 1972 -- 10 .23 11 3.4 7.3 1.2 19 10 16 .2 .4 147 42 26 112 6.2 280
Aug. 16, 1972 23.0 8.8 .37 11 2.8 6.7 1.3 16 14 16 .4 .1 158 39 26 99 6.2 400
Nov. 15, 1972 21.0 8.8 .15 14 4.2 7.3 2.1 36 14 15 .2 3.8 125 52 23 150 7.1 160
Feb. 21, 1973 10.5 4.2 .22 12 3.0 6.8 1.0 20 14 14 .4 4.0 112 42 26 106 6.4 320
May 2, 1973 19.0 7.2 .17 13 4.1 10 2.7 33 16 19 .4 2.2 146 49 22 105 6.7 200





Table 8.--Chemical analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District area (results
in milligrams per liter except for color, pH, and specific conductance)--continued.

Hardness
1 I as CaCO3 W


East-1

Feb. 5, 1969

Lake ]

May 18, 1971


Little


May 18, 1971


120



30


S30
20



z








Table 9,--Chemical and nutrient analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District
area (results in milligrams per liter except for pll and turbidity),



a Nutrientsa






H 19
JAI


3-24-66
5-18-66
7-6-66
8-31-66
5-18-67
5-23-67
3-19-68
4-9-68
5-7-68
10-5-68
2-5-69
3-27-69
4-30-69
6-16-69
7-22-69
12-3-70
5-18-71



10-24-68
2-3-69
3-26-69
4-28-69
6-17-69
7-18-69
5-21-70
5-6-71
6-1-72


Bay La
5.1
4.8
4.4
6.2
3.3
5.1
6.0
5.1
5.0
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.1
5.1
4.7
7.8
7.8

3ay La
6.7
5.2
5.4
6.0
5.3
5.1
6.3
7.1
7.7


e neai









2.0







47
54

e Out]
49





7

37
49
**
**



























49 ,


vineLf
0




0
3
8
4
2






1
57
66

at belc
60





8

45
60


do, Fa
--
-- -



14.5


--
5

-lO
--
--
--
--
--







r S-105


:iaa
14
--

















0
--







-






0













0
0
nea
0-
0-
--

--
--











--
--

--
--


2638.S



..

..
,,.















41


Vinel,
..
..
..
u.

















2-
26
..
..
--







41

Vinela

--
--






26
--


,,
.,m







..
m.
nd I,
..















22
..
..
..
..
..
...

, Fl

..
..
..
--
--
35

nd F


-









*
6.
..
4.
..
..
..
..

..
..
..






6

rida
--
--






4
--


1800
1220
2420
4550
2000
1300
10
2.0

2638.5
28
2440
750
5000
1340
1150

55
2


3.1
.3
.01
.1
0
1.0
6.0
1.7
1.9
0
1.0
1.5
1.4
1.9
2.5
0
.4


2)
3.0
1.0
1.2
1.1
1.2
.7
1.1
0
0


-I -











.01
.08
.04
.02
.02
.02
0



0
.03
.27
.21
.08
.03
.51
.12
.01


.17
.14
.07
.10
.01



0.25
0
.03
.19
.26
.07
.66
.06
.02
.01

0.25

.03
.19
.26


--

*-










.72
.84
1.0
.87
.38
.28



0.86
.26
.78
2.2
.80
.93
.34






:.61
,.41
.61
..41


1.48
1.30
1.54
1.50
.57
.38



1.73
.50
1.16
2.66
1.30
1.15
1.26
.70
.43
1.30
1.54
1.50
.57


7.5
.08
.17








.02
.02
.09


.02
.02



0.01
.04
.04
.02.





.02


*

2.3

.21
.10
.09

.06

.05
.11
.15
.06
.07
.05
.05



0.02
.08
.07
.05
.04
.07
.14
.18
.04


--

.75

.07
.03
.03

.02

.02
.04
.05
.02
.02
.02
.02



0.01
.03
.02
.02
.01
.02
.05
.06
.01





Table 9.--Chemical and nutrient analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District
area (results in milligrams per liter except for pH and turbidity)--continued.


Nutrients

W U,, >. i,-,,,
-: / : 0. ,, 0 "j W- "
W .' U c j UC"U .,q E9 0 H F 60 cis 0.a

r. H .,4 -,
;N U = 0 .


10-24-68
1-31-69
3-27-69
4-28-69
6-18-69
7-16-69
5-19-70
8-27-70
12-2-70
3-1-71
5-3-71
8-19-71
11-23-71
2-9-72
5-8-72
8-17-72



7-24-63
5-20-66
5-8-67
10-24-68
2-3-69
3-25-69
4-24-69
6-12-69


louth Lake Ou:let ab6ve S-1 near Vinelaid, Flo'ida (


4.7
5.0
4.6
4.9
5.4
5.2
4.9
5.1
5.2
5.1
5.2
5.0
5.0
5.0
6.0
5.1

!ypres

4.4
4.0
4.9
4.5
4.4
4.4

5.7


2




2

2
2
1
2
2
2
1.6
1.0
1.0

Creek


2




2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
1

at Vin

*--

4
0
""


island,


0


0

0
0
0

.5
0

Plorid



0
--
--
--
**


4
2
3
3
3
3
2
0

(2640
--




---
---






3


3
3
3
1
0

00)
..
--
















00)


1638.61

69
5.8
40
16
25
31
11
7.8
10
8.0
15
9.0
20
15
15
6.0


1.3
2.6
5.4
1.3
12


5.4
.4
.5
.1
0
.1
.7
0
0
0
0
0


0.2
.9
2.4
.6
0
0
.9
.1


0.03
.01
.00
.00
.01
.00
.03
.02
.05
.02
.02

.04
.04
.03
.16






.01
.04
.04
.01
.06


0.02

.02
.05
.00
.11
.70
.07
.06
.02
.55
.12
.03
.04
.06
.06






.09

.10
.07
.08


0.38

.43
.71
.05
.50
.61
.12
.09
.09
.28

.59
.16
.35
.44






1.0

.46
1.1
.91


1.62

.56
.77
.05
.61
1.32
.18
.15
.11
.71
- -
.67
.90
.40
.54


0.03
.06
.03
.03

.01
.07
.04
0
.01
.03
.02
.06
.05
.06
.06






.01
.02
.02
.02


0.04
.09
.04
.04
.01
.03
.11
.06
.03
.05
.04
.06
.13
.09
.08
.06





.95
.02
.06
.02
.03
.04


0.01
.03
.01
.01
.01
.01
.04
.02
.01
.02
.01
.02
.04
.03
.02
.02





0.31
.01
.02
.01
.01
.01







Table 9,-Ctiemlcal and nutrient analyses of surface waters In the Reedy Creek Improvement District
area (results in milligrams per liter except for pil and turbldtty)--contlnued,


N Nutrlants

ill 11 Iliil
~~10 8 -~ '. -.-~ 4 ~ '
Oj U9
91 qj'H o 0 N -

i~ 0 ~ ~ 4 OZ4 o.'.- e
____4 ___ 0 ~ I ~ j
n 9 E E 1 rlh~ 119 0p
e~At


7-7-69
5-18-70
8-27-70
12-2-70
3-1-71
8-18-71
11-22-71
2-9-72
8-16-72
2-22-73



7-24-63
5-20-66
5-8-67
4-9-68
5-1-68
10-23-68
2-4-69
3-25-69
4-29-69
6-23-69
7-15-69
5-20-70
4-30-71
8-18-71
11-22-71


yprese

7.3
4.4
4.5
4.5
4.3
4.5
4.1
4.3
3.9
3.7

onnet

4.5
4.0
7.1
6.9
6.5
6.1
7.2
6.2
6.1
6.8
7.0
7.6
6.7
6.1
6.5


Creek

80

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Creek






1




38


10
24
2/*


: Vin land,

98
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


loritd

0


0
-


0
0
0
0
0
0
0


ear Vireland, Flori4a


(2640 00) (C ntinu
*


40
36
69
53
40
66
46

(264:














48
15
--
--
--
--
--






15


36
34
67
48
39
63
43

.00)






- m







44
9
..=
-9
--





9


d)

36
12
.8
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.0








520
620
75
820
500
1150


180
45


.04
.04
.06
.07
.05
.11
.07
.04
.06
.04








.01
.03
.03
.34
.05
.01
.02

.34
.06


.44
.09
.10
.08
.05
.19
.05
.06
.64
.02








.09

.08
.15
.06
,CO

.00
.05

.43
.07


1.2
.86
.32
.44
.39
4.5
1.2
.64
1.7
1.0





*


.90
-
.79
2.0
.34
.27
.51
- -
1.6
.62


-- *



1.11

.86
2.24
.47
.32
.71

2.04
.85


.08
.14
.22
.06
.10
.08
.03
.05
.06





*--
..,

.03
.02
.02
.03


.07

.10
.10


.06
.07
.14
.27
.04
.08
,10
.06
.06
.08





0.26

.22
.04
.05
.06
.06
.03
.04
.08

.24
.15


.02
.02
.04
.09
.01
.03
.03
.02
.02
.02





0.08

.07
.01
.02
.02
.02
.01
.01
.03

.08
.05





Table 9.--Chemical and nutrient analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Imprcvement District
area (results in milligrams per liter except for pH and turbidity)--continued.


-) Nutrients


S1Q
( Oa 0) rd b
Cd r f ~ rd 44 0 Ha
to0 b W C d W U -W -W a $4 -H tovrP
to -k -H __ a __ -H -W 00 P4 .40
.14 r F 1 Uz5 Z41
z v~


Dnnet Creek


reek

36



13


2-8-72
5-8-72
8-16-72
11-16-72
2-22-73



11-7-68
1-31-69
5-28-70
4-29-71
6-1-72



11-7-68
1-31-69
3-26-69
4-29-69
6-17-69
7-17-69
5-28-70
4-29-71


ear Vireland,


love

44



16

low

44




20


S-46


near


Floric

11
10
0
0
0

Vinell





0


a (2641

14
17
30
18
30

nd, Fli


00) (qontint


9
8
24
8
25

rida (


ed)

61
100
6
10
30


660.24)


S-16 near Vinel nd, Fc rida (2660.2)

S -- 440
-- -- -- 23
200
-- 5.2
-- -- 25
0 2 2

4.


0
.1
0
.9



.7
.1
5.1
9.0
6.6



0.7
.1
0
0
.1
2.2
2.0
0


.12
.14
.05
.23
.09




.03
.07
.08
.04




.03
.09
.05
.03
.00
.05
.04


.18
.13
.12
.05
.05



.07

.05
.09
.05



.07
-
.11
.04
.06
.20
.60
.05


.02
-.75
.98
.28
.68



.75

.66
1.4
.87



.75

.12
.916
.61
.84
.59
.11


.33
.89
1.11
.40
.95

9'



1.87
3.53
2.41





.23
1.01
.69
1.49
1.52
.16


.20
.31
.07
.07
.22



.14
.17
.04
.06
.04



.14
.17
.14
.16

.02
.07
.08


.22
.31
.08
.14
.24



.15
.20
.09
.08
.06



.15
.20
.38
.21
.11
.04
.14
.17


.07
.10
.03
.04
.08



0.05
.06
.03
.03
.02



0.05
.06
.12
.07
.04
.01
.04
.06


reek bi

36




16
-



--
-


u.

eedy (

6.8
-
6.5

6.9

sedy C

6.8
5.8
4.7
4.6
6.0
7.2
7.1
--







Table 9,--Chemical and nutrient analyse of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District
area (results in milligrams per liter except for pll and turbidlty)--continued.


SNutrients
LiU I bl
421 0P

4j gg :z
13C- a


5-20-66
5-8-67
5-1-68
10-23-68
2-3-69
3-24-69
4-24-69
6-17-69
7-16-69
5-25-70
8-31-70
12-2-70
3-1-71
8-18-71
2-8-72
8-16-72
2-21-73



4-30-69
5-26-70
5-3-71
11-22-71
8-17-72


hitter

4.6
6.5
6.0
4.5
4.6
4.5

4.8
5.6
5.0
4.4
5.1
4.7
4.5
4.5
4.3
4.3

ateral

6.1
4.3
4.2
4.4
4.4


iorse I




0






0


2
0
0
0
--






-




0


405

9


0
0


reek no

0
120
38
0
--
--'


10
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0


ar Vinsland,


love S-405A nedr


0








0
,-












0



0


0
0


Floridi












51
46
70
42
29
42

or Phi
--
--
--
--
--
--
--


(2662.100)


--





48
45
66
40
24
39

lips, I


loridd


3.8
3.4
5.4
1.2
4.0
28
12
1.9

1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0

(266;


0.7
4.8
7.2
.4
0
0
0
.1
.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

.91)

0.2
0
0
0
0


.00
.05
.04
.01
.04
.04
.03
.05

.07
.08
.03
.07
.04



0.02
.05
.12
.03
.06


--


.09

.06
.10
.26
.63
.62
.17

.08
.19
.04
.08
.06




0.02
.12

.08


.92

.91
1.3
1.3
1.8
.99
.60

.62
.26
.64
1.4
1.2




1.2
.21

1.6


1.08

.97
1.38
1.54
2.32
1.48
.75

.70
.43
.68
1.48
1.26




1.23
.34

1.68


.01
.01
.03
.02


.28
.16

.06
.09
.02
.06
.06




0.04
.20

.07


3.6
.35
.02
.04
.05
.03
.06
.26
.32
.16

.06
.09
.06
.13
.08



0.22
.07
.27

.08


1.17
.11
.01
.01
.02
.01
.02
.08
.10
.05

.02
.03
.02
.04
.02



0.07
.02
.09

.02






Table 9.--Chemical and nutrient analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District
area (results in milligrams per liter except for pH and turbidity)--continued.


a Nutrients
0 >1
1-> 00 -o -- --- -- -- i -- | -- -
.00 a W o : U 9

S. -.-5 ~ I -W "5
C0 0-j 0 0U-_ NO 4J 0 _|&c t^
.,.4.J c~ L~ 8, 0 *. 3 H J ~ .. 0~ 304 .0- .6 9
00 U W 0r .0 W 0 -W
r4 r 4 N
j 0~~ Z0~- -4 oc ea 0.%.o
C U( on zg h


10-24-68
1-31-69
3-25-69
4-30-69
6-19-69
7-18-69
5-26-70
8-27-70
12-2-70
3-1-71
5-3-71
8-19-71
11-23-71
2-9-72
5-8-72
11-16-72
2-22-73

L

11-23-71
8-19-71
2-9-72
5-8-72


teral

5.7
4.4
4.5
4.5
5.0
4.7

4.7
7.0
6.4
6.8
6.7
6.6
6.7
7.4
4.2
3.9

ateral

7.0
6.5
6.5
7.5


405 be

10


5

0

0
18
24
24
48
54
56
49
0
0

405 be

54

46
39


low S-405A nea Doct~or Phillips, florid:


low

66
55
56
48


S-405 neai


0

0


0
0
0
29
33
33
30
0
0

Vine:

33

28
24


40
30
30
39
26
31
32
55
48

and, F:

25

26
23


-- -




35
22
S23
26
12
14
13
48
46

orida I

13

15
9


8
7
13
14
17
19
7
2

2662.!

12

11
14
--
--
--
-- 2
--
--


(2662

35
400
5.5
1240
1640
120

3.4
110
110
50
10
50
20
15
1.0
2.C

4)

40

40
15


0.6
0
0
.8
.8
7.5
.4
0
.7
1.2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0



0
.1
.3
0


0.00
.11
.04
.04
.02
.10
.15
.10
.28
.05
.10
.03
.06
.03
.03
.08
.05



0.04

.06
.03


0.15

.11
.46
.28
.18
.12
.18
.19
.04
.13
.15
.09
.06
1.4
.17
.02



0.09

.15
.10


0.98

1.2
1.1
.89
1.1
.15
.63
.50
.37
1.5
2.2
.40
1.1
.07
2.1
1.1



1.1

2.2
.68


1.23

1.30
1.65
1.29
2.96
.38
.80
.89
.69
1.63
2.32
.49
1.16
1.17
2.26
1.13



1.18

2.40
.77


0.27
.31
.04


.06


.07
.10

.18
.12
.08
.12
.18
.09



0.09
,.
.13
.08


0.45
.47
.06
.24
.06
.06
.49
.17
.13
.16
.36
.44
.22
.20
.43
.19
.11



0.20

.22
.17


0.15
.15
.02
.08
.02
.02
.16
.06
.04
.05
.12
.14
.07
.06
.14
.06
.04



0.06

.07
.06







Table 9.--Chemical and nutrient analyase of surface vaters in the Reedy Craek Improvement District
area resultss in milligrams per liter except for p1H and turbldty)--continued,


N a 1 Nutrients



-4__ -4 H rj 1-41X 0 .
0 4


4-27-71



8-21-62
7-24-63
5-20-66
5-8-67
4-9-68
5-1,68
10-23-68
2-4-69
3-25-69
4-21-69
4-24-69
6-16-69
7-15-69
5-20-70
8-27-70
12-2-70
3-1-71
5-3-71
8-18-71


literal 410 bdlow S-410 (266P


sedy Creek near

6.5 --
6.0 -o
5.3 --
5.3 --
5.3 --
5.0 --
4.9 2
5.3
4.9 --
4.9 3

5.1 --
6.2 5
6.8 --
6.5 19
7.0 16.
7.0 16
6.5 25
6.1 32


28

Vint

32
2
6
7
4
0
2


4


6
24
23
20
19
30
40


.96)

0


land, F.orid4 (2663.00)


3
5
0
..
--
--
--

..

-
--
-
--
--


4.0









3.8
40
35

21
90
40

120
58
70
80
4.0


0
.5
1.6
.7
1.0
.5
0
0
.1
0
.2
2.0
.7
.3
0
.8
.2
1.4


0.05










.02
.03
.06

.02
.05
.03
.02
.04
.16
.06
.15


0.04









.10

.06

.18
.14
.24
.02
.10
.15
.1
-
-

.10
-


1.7









.9

1.3

1.6
1.0
1.1
1.2
.5
.3
.3
17













.7
1.6


1.75






1.10

.68
-m








.48
1.17





1.49
1.99


0.10









.03
.02
.04
.04
.02

.15
.14
.15
.12
.10

.15


0.12






0.15

.06
.03
.06
.05

.04
.10
.16
.16
.19
.17
.13
.37
.17


0.04






0.05

.02
.01
.02
.02

.01
.03
.05
--



.05
.06
.06
.04
.12
.06





Table 9.--Chemical and nutrient analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement District
area (results in milligrams per liter except for pH and turbidity)--continued.


SNutrients



o 8 o _IW ,_ / _-
W g M0 X 0J C 0
__ __ ___ ___ __ rd ____e dr(


11-22-71
2-8-72
5-9-72
8-16-72
11-15-72
2-21-73
5-2-73


4-9-68
4-30-68
10-23-68
2-4-69
3-24-69
4-29-69
6-18-69
7-15-69
5-25-70
8-31-70
12-2-70
3-1-71
5-3-71
8-18-71
11-22-71


Leedy

6.3
6.2
7.1
6.0
7.6
6.4
6.8

avenp

6.9
6.7
6.4
6.6
6.2
6.4
6.9
7.2
7.7
6.4
7.5
7.3
7.0
6.9
6.4


reek ni

29
16
24
8
30
11
26

rt Cre


r Vin

34
20
29
10
36
15
32


,land, I


lorid

17
9.9
14
0
0
0
0


(2663

29
40
27
50
28
35
30


00)

23
35
20
4
17
31
25


nearnLoughm n, Flbrida (t664.80


Intinued)


6
5
7
46
11
4
5








-- -





8
5
7
5
7
--
--
--
--
--








7


10
3.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
5.0





4.7
2.1
3.6
16
12
1.8
4.5
1.3
2.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
110


0.3
.4
.4
.4
1.5
.9
1.8



4.3
4.5
1.3
1.0
0
1.5
3.1
3.0
2.5
.9
2.8
2.2
3.9
1.5
4.2


0.06
.05
.04
.07
.03
.06
.06





.00
.03
.03
.03
.01
.04
.01
.07
.07
.06
.02
.05
.21


0.04
.11
.12
.09
.09
.09
.06





.06

.01
.06
.00
.00
.07
.11
.08
.05
.06
.16
.16


1.1
.45
1.4
1.4
.83
1.3
.84





1.1

1.0
.87
.23
.17
.88
.69
.29
.37
.38
1.4
6.5


1.22
.64
1.60
1.58
1.26
1.56
1.31





1.44
*--
1.02
1.26
.93
.86
1.50
1.00
1.00
.92
1.31
1.88
7.64


0.36
.17
2.2
.52
.89
.40
1.2





.04
.06
.07
.09


.07
.17
.05
.08
.05
.09
.57


0.46
.22
2.3
.67
.95
.40
1.5




.22
.08
.12
.10
.09
.12
.10
.08
.17
.08
.11
.09
.12
.46


0.15
.07
.75
.22
.31
.13
.50




0.07
.03
.04
.03
.03
.04
.03
.03
.06
.03
.04
.03
.04
.15








Table 9'-Chemaical and nutrient analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvemaent District
area (results in milligrams per liter except for p~l and turbidity)--continued,


N Nutrients
H 8 -H- --- -
u1 Ej 1, a^~ dS
a5 U a4 to 000 0 4) H)~
V4 M V _M 0 "41w
IWO 2 1 -
_ % _0I
100 M j8 U3 wow -
S0 w 0 0%.


2-8-72
5-9-72
8-16-72
11-15-72
2-21-73



11-13-59
4-9-68
4-30-68
10-23-68
2-5-69
3-24-69
4-21-69
4-24-69
6-11-69
7-15-69
5-25-70
8-18-71
11-22-71
2-8-72
5-9-72
8-16-72
11-15-72
2-21-73
5-2-73


avenpc

6.7
7.8
7.3
7.4
6.6

eedy (

6.0
6.7
6.6
6.3
6.7
6.0
6.2

6.3
6.9
6.5
6.1
5.8
6.2
7.3
6.2
7.1
6.4
6.7


rt Crei

25
39
33
39
15

reek ni




18


15


23

24
18
16
33
1.3
30
16
27


k near

31
48
40
47
22

tar Loul


40
49
22


18


28

29
36
19
40
16
36
20
30


Loughman, Fli


Sloridi


irida (;

43
15
42
20
45

(2665.












50
26
40
28
54
23
36
27


664.80)

38
3
36
10
41

00)












42
17
35
14
6
13
30
22


(Coni

5
12
6
10
4















9
5
14
48
10
6
5
-
-
-
-
--
-










5


inued)

3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
4.0






5.6
16
17

910
45
30
25
10
20
4.0
4.0
7.0
2.0
5.0
9.0


1.5
3.0
.1
3.9
1.3



1.1
2.8
2.5
.6
.9
0
.5
.2
.7
2.6
.1
0
1.8
.4
0
.1
3.8
4.0
2.2


.03
.02
.04
.02
.05



*-


0.00
.05
.05

.02
.04
.03
.04
.08
.06
.04
.03
.07
.02
.04
.05


.04
.02
.06
.06
.06






0.08

.11

.11
.16
.22
.62
.22
.05
.05
.37
.12
.08
.09
.09


1.0
1.3
1.4
.44
1.1



-


0.96

1.3

.93
.85
.69
.30
7.1
1.1
2.2
1.1
2.5
.72
.98
.89


1.38
2.00
1.48
1.38
1.46






1.16

1.40

1.07
1.14
1.46
.82
7.30
1.56
2.34
1.40
2.64
1.64
1.96
1.47


.03
.11
.08
.07
.07






0.02
.07
.17
.02
.03
_M
.14
.36
.12
.13
.07
.61
.28
.49
.17
.67


.10
.12
.09
.12
.08





0.03
.06
.09
.20

.07
.10
.15
.39
.21
.22
.10
.80
.30
.55
.20
.67


.03
.04
.03
.04
.02





0.01
.02
.03
.06

.02
.03
.05
.13
.07
.07
.03
.26
.10
.18
.06
.22









REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79


Table 10.--Metals analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area (results in milligrams per liter).

I I .-" "

u5 O >- % 5
0 0 4 L C Q

(O .r1 E v 0 t C J f
o 0-l o I-0 H 0 Cf 5 .U 0 5-
) < U g < 9) 0 .o 4
0- : uNE


Bay Lake near Vi

May 18, 1966
Aug. 31, 1966
May 23, 1967
Mar. 19, 1968
Apr. 9, 1968
May 7, 1968
Oct. 25, 1968
Jul. 22, 1969
Dec. 3, 1970
May 18, 1971

Bay Lake Outlet

Oct. 24, 1968
Jul. 18, 1969
May 21, 1970
Jun. 1, 1972


nela










.12


below


South Lake Outl4t ab


Oct. 24, 1968
Jul. 6, 1969
Aug. 27, 1970
Dec. 2, 1970
Mar. 1, 1971
May 3, 1971
Aug. 19, 1971
Nov. 23, 1971
Feb. 9, 1972
May 8, 1972
Aug. 17, 1972

Cypress Creek at

Jul. 24, 1963
May 20, 1966
May 8, 1967
Oct. 24, 1968
Jul. 7, 1969


0.4C
.03




.1C


nd, FI










.01


S-l







--e S-
---t
----



















.01
.00
.00
m--













.00
.00
.00
.04
.02
.01


orida

0.41
.36
.15
.28
.10
.07
.05
.02


(2638.50)


--
--0
--
--
.02


.00


.00


.14


.00
.01


.00


.02


.004


15A ndar Viielandl Flofida (2638.$2)


0.20
.08
.19


-15 ndar Vii


0.07
.07
.07
.03
.05
.02
.03
.04
.06
.03
.03


.02
.02
.01
.03
.03
.02
.03
.02
.03


Vinjelandl Flo ida (:


0.47
.38
.16
.26
.47


.00
--


.18

Leland








.06
=--




.05
.00
.08

640.01



.00


Flo*ida (2638.69)


.01
.03
.02
.01
.00
.00
.01
.00


.00
.00
.00
.01
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00


.01
.04
.03
.02
.02
.03
.05
.01
.02


.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.002
.000
.003
.001







86 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

Table 10.--Metals analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area (results in milligrams per liter)--continued.





C) 14 C
E L. C: b W
0 < c) 4 ^ J ^ C N

Cypress Creek at Vine and, Florida (2140.00 -- ont'.

May 18, 1970 -- -- .42 -- --- -
Aug. 27, 1970 -- .01 .37 .01 -- .01 .00 .01 .010 .0002
Dec. 2, 1970 -- -- .27 .01 -- .03 .00 .01 .000
Mar. 1, 1971 .24 .00 .23 .01 -- .03 .00 .02 .000
Aug. 18, 1971 -- .00 .46 .02 .05 .00 .00 .07 .002
Nov. 22, 1971 .00 .42 .02 -- .001 .00 .08 .003
Feb. 9, 1972 .0C .05 .25 .02 .06 .01 .00 .08 .001
Aug. 16, 1972 .01 .71 .01 .06 .03 .00 .04 .006
Feb. 22, 1973 .00 .17 .01 .04 .01 .00 .01 .002 -

Bonnet Creek near Vin eland Flo ida ( 641.0))

Jul. 24, 1963 -- 0.42 -- -- .. .
May 20, 1966 .39 -- ---- -- --
May 8, 1967 -- .01 ----- --
Apr. 9, 1968 .24 ---- --
May 1, 1968 -- .25 .00 .08 -- -
Oct. 23, 1968 -- .27 -- -- --
Jul. 15, 1969 -- .06 -- --- -- ..
May 20, 1970 -- .10 ---- --
Aug. 18, 1971 .02 .51 .02 .09 .00 .00 .08 .002 -
Nov. 22, 1971 .00 .20 .01 -- .002 .00 .01 .002
Feb. 8, 1972 -- .03 .11 .00 .10 .03 .00 .04 .00
May 8, 1972 .20 .04 .19 .00 .13 .01 .00 .00 .002 -
Aug. 16, 1972 .00 .13 .01 .10 -- .00 .04 .004 -
Nov. 16, 1972 .01 .29 .00 .10 .01 .00 .01 .002
Feb. 22, 1973 .00 .28 .01 .06 .01 .00 .03 .001 -

Reedy Creek belos S-46 nea Vineland, Florida (2(60.2()

Nov. 7, 1968 -- 0.07 -- -- -
Jul. 17, 1969 -- .03 ---- --
May 28, 1970 .07 -- --- --

'hittenhorse Creek near Vi elani, Flo ida (:662. 0)

May 20, 1966 -- 0.45 -- -- --
May 8, 1967 -- .61 .00 .00 -
May 1, 1968 -- .17 .00 .00 -- -
Oct. 23, 1968 -- .65 -- -- -- --








REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79 87

Table 10.--Metals analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area (results in milligrams per liter)--continued.


4 C to

Whit e Cr r Viea F a -I ) --


Jul. 16, 1969 R ... .781 ,q




Dec. 2, 1970 -- .00 .26 .01 -- .03 .01 .09 .000 --
1 < 4-a C E 6
Mar. 1, 1971 .19 .00 19 --.05 .00 .04 .002 --
Aug. 18, 1971 -- .01 .32 .02 .04 .01 .00 .07 .004 --

Whittenhorse Creek neir Virelanc, Florida (2662.00) cont d.

Jul. 16, 1969 .78
Aug. 31, 1970 .00 .40 .01 .02 .00 .02 .020 .0009
Dec. 2, 1970 .00 .26 .01 .03 .01 .09 .000 -
Mar. 1, 1971 .19 .00 .19 .01 -4 .05 .00 .04 .002
Aug. 18, 1971 -- .01 .32 .02 .04 .01 .00 .07 .004 -
Feb. 8, 1972 .04 .18 .01 .04 .00 .00 .05 .002
Aug. 16, 1972 .01 .39 .01 .08 .03 .00 .05 .009
Feb. 21, 1973 -- .01 .19 .01 .10 .01 .00 .04 .014 -

Lateral 405 above S-405A near Dcctor Phillips, F oridz (266 .91)

Apr. 30, 1969 0.24 ----- --
May 26, 1970 -- .18 -- --
Dec. 2, 1970 -- .01 .48 .01 -- .04 .00 .05 .00
Aug. 17, 1972 -- .01 .41 .02 .08 .02 .00 .04 .008 -

Lateral 405 beloa S-405A near D ctor Ihilli s, F orid. (26 2.92)

Oct. 24, 1968 -- -- 0.38 -- --- -
Apr. 30, 1969 -- .24 --
Jul. 18, 1969 -- .23 --
Aug. 27, 1970 .00 .64 .00 -- .02 .00 .37 .00
Dec. 2, 1970 .01 .48 .01 .00 .04 .00 .05 .00
Mar. 1, 1971 0.33 .00 .20 .01 -- .03 .00 .05 .002
May 3, 1971 .00 .22 .01 .00 .00 .04 .000
Aug. 19, 1971 .02 .20 .03 .08 .00 .00 .05 .001 -
Nov. 23, 1971 .00 .19 .01 .01 .00 .04 .001 -
Feb. 9, 1972 .03 .20 .02 .10 .01 .00 .05 .001 -
May 8, 1972 .00 .03 .17 .01 .19 .02 .00 .02 .004 -
Nov. 16, 1972 .01 .86 .03 .20 .02 .00 .02 .014
Feb. 22, 1973 .00 .36 .01 .03 .01 .00 .01 .003

Lateral 405 belom S-45 ne r Vi eland Flor da ( 662. 4)

Nov. 23, 1971 0.00 0.15 0.01 -- .01 0.00 0.01 0.001 -
Aug. 19, 1971 .02 .15 .01 .11 .00 .00 .02 .005
Feb. 9, 1972 .04 .10 .00 .11 .01 .00 .04 .000 -
May 8, 1972 0.0 .02 .13 .01 .17 .02 .00 .01 .002








88 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 10--Metals analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area (results in milligrams per liter)--continued.

"- I I :


c 3 .I 0' 0 U
O-4 E C I E a 0


zCC


Reedy Creek near

Jul. 24, 1963
May 20, 1966
May 8, 1967
Apr. 9, 1968
May 1, 1968
Oct. 23, 1968
Apr. 21, 1969
Jul. 15, 1969
May 20, 1970
Aug. 27, 1970
Dec. 2, 1970
Mar. 1, 1971
May 3, 1971
Aug. 18, 1971
Nov. 22, 1971
Feb. 8, 1972
May 9, 1972
Aug.16, 1972
Nov. 15, 1972
Feb. 21, 1973
May 2, 1973

Davenport Creek r

Apr. 9, 1968
Apr. 30, 1968
Oct. 23, 1968
Jul. 15, 1969
Aug. 31, 1970
Dec. 2, 1970
Mar. 1, 1971
May 3, 1971
Aug. 18, 1971
Nov. 22, 1971
Feb. 28, 1972
May 9, 1972
Aug. 16, 1972
Nov. 15, 1972
Feb. 21, 1973


Vin land, Florida (2*63.00


"I
--I











.351

,I


.10






ear
S--

















0.14




SOC


.01
.01
.00
.01
.01
.00
.04
.01
.01
.00
.00
.01

Loughi





.00
.01
.00
.01
.02
.01
.03
.02
.00
.02
.03


0.39
.20
.17
.15
.08
.24
.31
.18
.16
.22
.18
.17
.08
.30
.24
.23
.21
.33
.19
.21
.25

ian,

0.06
.03
2.7
.04
.39
.12
.14
.04
.16
.12
.23
.02
.19
.09
.21


.00




.00
.00
.00
.01
.01
.01


--


.00






-- .16
--


.01
-- !






.03
.03
.01
.02
.01


01O .08 .01


.01
.01
.01
.01
.00


.10
.10
.10
.04
.08


.02
.02
.01
.01
.01


lorid* (2664.80)


.00

.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.02
.01
.01
.01


.00






.08

.09
.01
.11
.20
.04


.01
.03
.03
.01
.01
.01
.01
.01
.02
.01
.01


.00
.01
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00








.00
.02
.00
.00
.01
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00


.04
.04
.09
.11
.04
.02
.05
.05
.05
.02
.08
.02








.02
.03
.02
.05
.03
.04
.06
.02
.02
.02
.03


-- -


m--




.000
.000
.000
.010
.001
.002
.000
.004
.008
.003
.003
.004








.000
.000
.000
.001
.000
.002
.000
.001
.006
.007
.001


--

1-
--
--
--
0005









REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 79 89


Table 10.--Metals analyses of surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area (results in milligrams per liter)--continued.












Nov. 13, 1959 .-. .-- .18 .-- .--..-.-- -.
Apr. 9, 1968 .. .. .09 .. .. .. ..- .. .. .




Jul. 15, 1969 .. .. .15 .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
A 8 1 U .








4JFeb. 8, 1972 -- .04 .23 .01 .0 00 .00 .05 .001 --
0 <- 0 S 0 C: u i f
0 -4 0 P co P P a) 0 )



Reedy Creek near Lougan, Flor- .01 a (265.08 .03 .00 .04 .018 --

Nov. 13, 1959 -- .01 .15 .0 .0 --
Apr. 9, 1968 .09 -- -- --
Apr. 30, 1968 -- -- .03
Oct. 23, 1968 -- .28
Apr. 21, 1969 -- -- .22
Jul. 15, 1969 .15 -- -- --
Aug. 18, 1971 -- .01 .42 .01 .08 .01 .00 .04 .005
Nov. 22, 1971 -- .00 .21 .00 .001 .00 .03 .016
Feb. 8, 1972 -- .04 .23 .01 .10 .00 .00 .05 .001
Aug. 16, 1972 -- .01 .37 .01 .08 .03 .00 .04 .018

Feb. 21, 1973 -- .01 .22 .00 .06 .01 .00 .07 .011 --
May 2, 1973 -- .01 .17 .00 .10 .01 .00 .01 .006 --









90 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

Table ll.--Biological data for surface waters in the Reedy Creek Improvement
District area.

Water Biochemical Total Dissolved Specific
tem- Oxygen Coliform Oxygen Conductance
Date Time pH per- demand (col/100 ml) (mg/1) (micromhos
ature (mg/1) 250C)

Ba Lake iear Vi eland, 'lorida (2638. 50)
5-23-67 -- 5.1 26 -- 7.5 92
5-7-68 -- 5.0 25 -- 5.8 110
10-25-68 1315 5.1 27 -- 10 110
2-5-69 1230 5.2 18.5 -- -- 10.5 120
4-30-69 1445 5.1 27 -- 6.8 120
7-22-69 1300 4.7 36 -- 6.4 185

So th Lak Outlet above ;-15 near Vin and, Florida (2638.69)
10-24-68 1500 4.7 25.0 -- 8.8 110
1-31-69 0930 5.0 18.0 -- 10 120
4-28-69 1100 4.9 25.0 -- 7.2 92
7-18-69 0940 -- 30.0 -- 7.2 --
8-20-69 1230 -- 32.5 -- -- 6.1 --
8-27-70 1145 4.8 31.0 1.3 150 6.3 105
12-2-70 1150 4.7 22.0 .2 12 8.0 109
3-1-71 1140 5.2 24.5 .4 50 6.9 112
5-3-71 1145 5.0 26.0 .6 25 7.2 122
8-19-71 0850 5.1 28.0 1.6 600 6.7 140
11-23-71 1040 5.0 19.0 .7 110 9.2 115
2-9-72 0830 5.0 -- 1.1 250 -- 119
5-8-72 0700 6.0 22.0 .2 100 8.0 125
8-17-72 0945 5.1 28.0 .6 10 7.0 130

Cyres Creek at Vinelan Florida (26 0.00)
5-8-67 -- 4.9 27 -- 3.6 180
10-24-68 0930 4.5 22 -- 4.8 74
2-3-69 0840 4.4 16 -- -- 7.5 78
3-25-69 -- 4.4 -- 0.7 1,000 -- 75
7-18-69 0925 28 -- -- 2.7 --
9-11-69 1030 %.2 24 .1 3,500 4.2 74
11-24-69 1000 4.1 15 .6 500 4.2 60
2-25-70 1030 3.4 12.5 .4 120 4.9 78
5-20-70 0915 4.5 20.5 .1 1,700 3.4 105
8-27-70 1240 4.2 26.5 1.1 320 5.5 88
12-2-70 1315 4.3 20.0 .2 1,400 5.7 82
3-1-71 1215 4.2 24.0 .4 700 4.7 103
8-18-71 1245 4.5 26.0 .3 1,650 5.9 82
11-22-71 1230 4.1 21.0 .8 2,200 5.3 75
2-8-72 1100 4.3 -- .9 2,100 -- 77
8-16-72 1005 3.9 24.0 1.0 490 3.3 102
2-22-73 0950 3.7 10.5 1.4 200 9.7 110