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 Summary
 References
 Appendices


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1986 and 1987 Florida petroleum production and exploration
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 Material Information
Title: 1986 and 1987 Florida petroleum production and exploration
Series Title: Information circular
Physical Description: viii, 39 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lloyd, Jacqueline M
Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: Published for the Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1989
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Petroleum industry and trade -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Petroleum -- Prospecting -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references: (p. 27-28).
Statement of Responsibility: by Jacqueline M. Lloyd.
Funding: Information circular (Florida. Bureau of Geology) ;
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001523288
oclc - 22166494
notis - AHD6519
System ID: UF00001167:00001
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Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Abstract
        Page viii
    Introduction, 1966 and 1967 production
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Exploratory drilling
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 17
    Summary
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 23
    References
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Appendices
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
Full Text






FLRD GEOLIOWC( ICA SURflViEWY~


COPYRIGHT NOTICE
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The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of
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information and permissions.















STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Tom Gardner, Executive Director




DIVISION OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Jeremy A. Craft, Director




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Walter Schmidt, State Geologist



INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 106

1986 and 1987 FLORIDA PETROLEUM
PRODUCTION AND EXPLORATION



By
Jacqueline M. Lloyd



Published for the

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Tallahassee
1989










UNIVERSITY OF FLOM3JA U-U-A








DEPARTMENT
OF
NATURAL RESOURCES


3 1262 04499 3862






(.;t


( t
) j


BOB MARTINEZ
Governor


BOB BUTTERWORTH
Attorney General


GERALD LEWIS
State Comptroller


BETTY CASTOR
Commissioner of Education


DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture


TOM GARDNER
Executive Director


JIM SMITH
Secretary of State


TOM GALLAGHER
State Treasurer









LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Florida Geological Survey

Tallahassee
August 1989


Governor Bob Martinez, Chairman
Florida Department of Natural Resources
Tallahassee, Florida 32301







Dear Governor Martinez:

The Florida Geological Survey, Division of Resource Management, Department of Natural Resources,
is publishing as its Information Circular 106, 1986 and 1987 Florida Petroleum Production and Exploration.
This report, prepared by Jacqueline M. Lloyd, discusses 1986 and 1987 oil and gas production and
exploration. It includes 1986 and 1987 production and exploration tables. It also includes cumulative
production statistics. This information is useful to the oil and gas industry and to the state in planning wise
development and conservation of Florida's oil and gas resources.








Respectfully yours,


Walter Schmidt, Ph.D., P.G.
State Geologist and Chief
Florida Geological Survey
















































Printed for the
Florida Geological Survey

Tallahassee
1989

ISSN 0085-0616








iv









TABLE OF CONTENTS


Abstract .................................................................................. viii

Acknowledgem ents................................ ..................................... viii

Introduction .............................................................................. 1

1986 and 1987 Production.............................................................. 1

1986 and 1987 Onshore Drilling Activity............................................... 1

Field Development Drilling ......................................................... 1

O overview .............................................................. ............... 1

Northwest Florida Field Development Drilling .................................... 7

Bluff Springs Field Development................................................ 7

Jay Field Development .......................................................... 7

Mt. Carmel Field Development................................................. 11

Blackjack Creek Field Development.......................................... 11

McClellan Field Development................................................. 11

South Florida Field Development Drilling ....................................... 12

Corkscrew Field Development .................................................. 12

Raccoon Point Field Development............................................ 12

Exploratory Drilling.............................................................. ... 17

O overview ............................................................................ 17

Northwest Florida Exploratory Drilling........................................... 17

McClellan Field Discovery...................................................... 17

Coldwater Creek Field Discovery ............................................. 17

Other Northwest Florida Exploratory Drilling ................................. 19

South Florida Exploratory Drilling ............................................... 19








Geophysical Exploration Activity ....................................................... 20

Exploration In Federal Waters, Offshore Florida .................................... 22

Background .................................... ....................................... 22

Activity ..................................................................... . ........ 22

Policy ...................................................................... ......... 22

Sum m ary.................................................................. ............. 23

References............................................................................... 27




ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
1. South Florida oil field location map ................................................. 2
2. Stratigraphic nomenclature, Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, south
Florida .................................................................... ......... 3
3. Northwest Florida oil field location map............................................. 4
4. Stratigraphic nomenclature, Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, northwest
Florida .................................................................... ......... 5
5. Oil production decline, 1978 through 1987 ......................................... 6
6. 1986 and 1987 oil production comparison.......................................... 8
7. Bluff Springs, Coldwater Creek, McClellan, and Sweetwater Creek fields loca-
tion m ap.................................................................. .......... 9
8. Geophysical log correlation, Bluff Springs field..................................... 10
9. Mount Carmel field structure map, top of Norphlet Sandstone.................... 13
10. Blackjack Creek field structure map, top of Smackover Formation ............. 14
11. Geophysical log correlation, McClellan field...................................... 15
12. Corkscrew and Lake Trafford fields structure map, top of Sunniland Formation 16
13. Raccoon Point structure map, top of Sunniland Formation........................ 18
14. 1986 and 1987 geophysical exploration activity.................................. 21
15. Florida portion of the 1987-1992 federal Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas
leasing program ...................................................................... 24
16. Active leases and wells drilled during 1986 and 1987 in federal waters, off-
shore Florida.......................................................................... 25









TABLES
Table Page
1. Jay field and state wide production decline......................................... 6
2. Geophysical survey mileage, 1984 through 1987................................ 20


APPENDICES
Appendix Page
1. Florida oil field discovery well data................................................ 29
2. 1986, 1987 and cumulative production data........................................ 30
3. 1986 and 1987 field well statistics ................................................ 31
4. 1986 and 1987 field wells drilled .................................................... 32
5. 1986 and 1987 wildcat wells drilled................................................. 35
6. 1986 and 1987 geophysical exploration activity.................................. 37
7. 1986 and 1987 wells drilled in federal waters offshore Florida.................... 39








ABSTRACT


Florida oil production declined during 1986 and 1987. Despite this state-wide decline, production in-
creased in south Florida.
A total of 14 field development wells were drilled during 1986 and 1987. Eleven were completed as
potential producers. Three were plugged and abandoned as dry holes. The potential producers included
development wells drilled at the recently discovered McClellan and Corkscrew fields.
Successful wildcat drilling in northwest Florida led to the discoveries of McClellan and Coldwater Creek
fields. With one exception, northwest Florida exploratory drilling was targeted for the Upper Jurassic
Smackover Formation or Norphlet Sandstone. The exception was an Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa For-
mation test well. South Florida wildcats targeted the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland Formation.
Geophysical exploration concentrated in Florida's productive areas, the panhandle and south Florida.
Two new areas were explored during 1986 and 1987. These were the offshore panhandle area and the
central peninsula area.
Offshore exploratory drilling in federal waters was slow during 1986 and 1987. This period marked the
beginning of important policy-making negotiations and decisions by Florida's Governor Martinez. Negoti-
ations with the Secretary of the U. S. Department of the Interior, Donald Hodol, resulted in greater protection
for Florida's fragile coastal environments.





ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Several Florida Geological Survey staff members contributed to this report. Charles Tootle compiled oil
field data and production statistics. The Oil and Gas Section maintains files on permitted exploratory and
development drilling. Joan Ragland and Charles Tootle provided comments and assistance in using these
files. Joan Ragland tabulated and assisted with the interpretation of the geophysical exploration permit
data. Jim Jones and Ted Kiper drafted and photographed the figures. Paulette Bond, Joan Ragland, Frank
Rupert, and Tom Scott edited the manuscript and suggested improvements.
Debbie Tucker (Office of the Governor, Tallahassee, Florida) furnished copies of correspondence and
press releases covering the Governor's policies on exploration for oil and gas in federal waters off Florida.
She also provided publications and contacts within the federal Minerals Management Service (MMS) offices
where drilling data could be obtained. George Dellagiarino (MMS, Reston, Virginia) and David Cook (MMS,
Metairie, Louisiana) provided the data for drilling in federal waters off Florida.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


1986 AND 1987 FLORIDA PETROLEUM
PRODUCTION AND EXPLORATION


Jacqueline M. I


INTRODUCTION
There are two major oil producing areas in
Florida. One is the Sunniland trend in south Florida,
the other is the western panhandle area. The
Sunniland trend includes 14 oil fields; the western
panhandle area includes seven. Appendix 1 lists
the discovery well data for these fields.
The Sunniland trend production began with Flor-
ida's first oil discovery at Sunniland field in Sep-
tember, 1943. Of the 14 Sunniland trend oil fields,
10 are active, one is temporarily shut-in, and three
are plugged and abandoned. These fields are ori-
ented along a northwest-southeast trend through
Lee, Hendry, Collier, and Dade counties (Figure
1). Production is principally from rudistid reefs
found in the upper one hundred feet of the Lower
Cretaceous Sunniland Formation (Figure 2).
Production in the western panhandle began with
the discovery of Jay field in June, 1970. The seven
panhandle oil fields are located in Escambia and
Santa Rosa Counties, Florida (Figure 3). Five fields
are active, one is temporarily shut-in, and one is
plugged and abandoned. Production is from Upper
Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and
Norphlet Sandstone sands (Figure 4).


1986 AND 1987
PRODUCTION
Florida oil production began to decline In 1979
and has continued to do so since then (Table 1
and Figure 5). Total oil production for 1986 was
9,382,973 barrels, down 18 percent from 1985. Oil
production dropped another 12 percent during
1987 for a 1987 total of 8,269,632 barrels. Appen-
dix 2 lists 1986, 1987, and cumulative production
statistics for each of Florida's oil fields including
oil, gas, and water production data. Appendix 3
lists 1986 and 1987 field well statistics including
the number of production, injection, shut-in, and
temporarily abandoned wells for each field.
Although Jay field production is declining, it con-
tinues to dominate Florida oil production. The field


3y
Lloyd, P. G. #74


was discovered in 1970 and reached peak pro-
duction in 1978. It accounts for about 59 percent
of the 1986 oil production total, about 57 percent
of the1987 total, and about 71 percent of the cu-
mulative total. Table 1 lists both state wide annual
oil production and Jay field annual oil production
for 1978 through 1987. Figure 5 graphically Illus-
trates these data, clearly showing Jay field's dom-
inance in Florida oil production trends.
Figure 6 is a histogram comparing 1986 oil pro-
duction with 1987 oil production for all Florida oil
fields except Jay field. Jay field data would obscure
the information for all other fields since its produc-
tion for 1986 was six times greater than that of
West Felda field, the next most productive field in
Florida. Its 1987 production was almost five times
greater. Overall, northwest Florida production de-
creased by 28 percent from 1986 to 1987, while
south Florida production Increased by 13 percent.
The only fields in Florida which showed an increase
in production for these two years were located in
south Florida: West Felda field, Corkscrew field,
and Mid-Felda field.


1986 and 1987
ONSHORE DRILLING
ACTIVITY

Field Development Drilling
OVERVIEW
A total of 14 field development wells were drilled
during 1986 and 1987. A data summary for these
wells is given in Appendix 4. Eleven wells were
completed as successful potential producers, in-
cluding two wells each at the recently discovered
Corkscrew and McClellan fields. Three wells were
plugged and abandoned as dry holes. Unfortu-
nately, this included a second attempt to confirm
the discovery at Bluff Springs field in Escambia
County, Florida. Field development wells were also
drilled at Jay, Mt. Carmel, Blackjack Creek, and
Raccoon Point fields (Appendix 4). The following







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY










24E R26E R28E R3OE -- 32E 3iE- E
LEHIGH PARK
TOWNSEOD CANAL

MID- FELA HENRY CO.
t I [ O. SJUNOCO-FELOA
Sf CO. PALM I
WEST ELOA
ORKSCHI coO
FIELD

LAK TRBAFFO D
i i -| A- .. .. '- -- .


sUNi LANO 0 SEMINOL.E

% BEAR ISLAND. I

,P PEPPER IAMMOCKI
BAXTER ISLAND _
L BROWARO



COLLIER CO. | 0











I (4410A FORTY MdILE BEND I'
;.-^ PLA TN MONROE CO. T_
AC IV( ot FI I
10 K











^ r INAC fiVE OIL fl
S-N 10 KM fo ---- I

F 10 MO S
Fgue1 Sot ,CALo ma






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


DOLOMITE


H0 SHALE


ANHYDRITE


Figure 2. Stratigraphic nomenclature, Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, south Florida.


BROWN
DOLOMITE
ZONE


BASAL
CLASTICS


LIMESTONE


CLASTICS


III







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


EIRMANATION
& ACTIVE OIL FIELD
INACTIVE OIL FIELD




';CALt


FlI ORIDA




CAIoN


Figure 3. Northwest Florida oil field location map.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


SANDSTONE


LIMESTONE


CLASTICS


A IA
I&A A
A A


SILTSTONE


DOLOMITE


ANHYDRITE


SHALE


CONGLOMERATE


SALT


Figure 4. Stratigraphic nomenclature, Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, northwest Florida.


SYSTEM STAGE GROUPS AND FORMATIONS LITHOLOGY
LOWER
CRETACEOUS BERRIASIAN !. !!. .
COTTON VALLEY i.......
GROUP ...........
1. i 1.1.... ,*..o ..
TITHONIAN UNDIFFERENTIATED ..



UPPER HAYNESVILLE ...................... .........
KIMMERIDGIAN FORMATION :......
UPPER::::::
JURASSIC -.............................
BUCKNER AAAAAAAAAAA
BUCKNER ...........,
MEMBER AAAAAAAAAAA
LOWER (LOWER 1 ""-
KIMMERIDGIAN HAYNESVILLE .... .
FORMATION R A I

BU E SMACKOVER "
FORMATION

OXFORDIAN !II

NORPHLET SANDSTONE

JUMIDDLEC CALLOVIAN LOUANN SALT + + + + +
I-----_________1________- + + + +


M'-..


....:.


I






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Table 1. Jay Field and State Wide Production Declines.


JAY FIELD PRODUCTION


Oil Prod.,
Barrels


36,080,383
36,075,891
31,905,545
24,972,497
16,750,425
12,530,827
8,769,649
6,358,259
5,518,771
4,676,964


S) I


% Decrease
from
Previous Yr.


0.01
11.56
21.73
32.92
25.19
30.02
27.50
13.20
15.15


STATE WIDE PRODUCTION


Oil Prod.,
Barrels


% Decrease
from Previous Yr.


47,536,191
47,167,861
42,886,498
34,743,513
25,623,366
19,475,574
14,461,969
11,457,913
9,382,973
8,269,632


0.77
9.08
18.99
26.25
23.99
25.74
20.77
18.11
11.87


Joy I icki

State Wide
State Wide


U U


\1J


t-)-.


1' 1 /


1 )S


1'lMl


1)2K


1984


1985.


1986


198 /


Figure 5. Oil production decline, 1978 through 1987.


Year


1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987


---






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 108


text discusses the 1986 and 1987 field develop-
ment drilling by field. Discovery data, Initial pro-
duction, and available geologic Information Is
Included for each of these fields.



NORTHWEST FLORIDA FIELD
DEVELOPMENT DRILLING

Bluff Springs Field Development
Bluff Springs field was discovered on March 25,
1984. The discovery well, the Stone Petroleum
Corporation St. Regis Paper Company number
29-4 (permit 1125) was a rank wildcat located in
Section 29, T5N, R31W, Escambla County, ap-
proximately 10 miles west-southwest of Jay field
and approximately four miles southeast of the near-
est previously drilled wildcat, permit 1177 (Figure
7 and Appendix 1 In this report; see also Lloyd and
Applegate, 1987). This area, west and southwest
of Jay, is known to be underlain by Louann Salt
with seismic studies Indicating salt-induced fault
structures in the overlying formations (Lloyd and
Applegate, 1987).
The discovery well produced 477 barrels of oil
and 170 barrels of saltwater per day. Oil gravity
was 57.00 A.P.I.. Production is from Jurassic-age
Smackover Formation dolomites from 16,154 to
-16,161 feet mean sea level (MSL) (Figure 8).
These dolomites are dark, fine grained, microcrys-
talline and show evidence of recrystallization from
originally oolitic and possibly pelletal faces (Lloyd,
1986; Lloyd and Applegate, 1987).
The first offset, permit 1136 (Stone Petroleum
Corporation St. Regis Paper Company 29-3), ir-,
located about one-half mile northwest of the dis-
covery well (Figure 7). The Smackover Formation
was encountered at -16,171 feet MSL, structurally
17 feet lower than In the discovery well (Figure 8).
The well produced only saltwater from two thin
zones (-16,182 to -16,185 feet MSL and
-16,192 to -16,195 feet MSL; Figure 8) within
the upper Smackover. Core analysis by Location
Sample Service, Inc. (LSS), Jackson, Mississippi,
yielded mean porosity estimates for these zones
of 11.4 and 8.4 percent, respectively. LSS found a
trace of oil In one sample at -16,185 feet MSL.
This well was apparently located too low on the
structure and was plugged and abandoned as a
dry hole on July 20, 1984.


Ownership of the discovery well transferred to
Hughes Eastern Corporation in 1985. Permits were
issued to Hughes Eastern to drill two offsets, one
east and one southeast of the discovery well (per-
mits 1204 and 1205, Figure 7). Given the results
of the offset to the northwest, presumably Hughes
hoped to find the Smackover at structurally higher
positions In these new offsets. Permit 1204 was
completed in August 1986. They drilled permit 1204
and the Smackover was again found at a structur-
ally lower position (Figure 8) this time 44 feet
lower. Two zones of salt water production were
also encountered (- 16,208 to -16,211 feet MSL
and -16,215 to -16,223 feet MSL; Figure 8). LSS
core analysis yielded mean porosity estimates of
23.9 and 13.6 percent, respectively, and no Indi-
cations of oil. The third offset, permit 1205, has not
been drilled.

Jay Field Development
Jay field (Figure 3) was discovered in June,
1970, by the drilling of the Humble St. Regis num-
ber 1 (permit 417) in Section 43, T5N, R29W, Santa
Rosa County (Appendix 1). The well produced from
the Smackover Formation from -15,266 to
-15,320 feet MSL. The initial production test
yielded 1712 barrels of 50.7' A.P.I. gravity oil and
23 barrels of saltwater per day.
Jay field is located within the "Jay trend" of Es-
cambia and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida and Es-
cambia County, Alabama. The northern extension
of Jay, in Escambla County, is the Little Escambia
Creek (LEC) field. Other fields within the trend in-
clude Mt. Carmel, Coldwater Creek, and Blackjack
Creek fields in Florida and Fanny Church, Flom-
aton, and Big Escambia Creek fields in Alabama.
The fields are located along a normal fault complex
(the Foshee Fault System) which rims the Gulf
Coast to the west through Alabama, Mississippi,
Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas. Oil accumulation
at Jay is within an asymmetrically shaped anticline
with the fault complex forming the eastern barrier
to oil migration (Applegate and Lloyd, 1985).
The northern seal of Jay field is formed by a
porosity barrier in Alabama where the lithology
changes from porous dolomite to dense, micritic
limestone. The porosity at Jay field is due to do-
lomitization of the pelletal grainstones in the upper
regressive section of the Smackover Formation.
Dolomitization, fresh water leaching, and an an-
hydrite cap rock (Buckner Member of the Haynes-






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


a a f 9 W


2 4 6 8 10 12 14
3 5 7 9 11 13 15
AC1VE FLORIDA OL FiELDS EXCLUDING JAY


West Felda
Blackjack Creek
Raccoon Point
Bear Island
Lehigh Park
Sunoco Felda
Bluff Springs


Corkscrew
Mid-Felda
Townsend Canal
Sunniland
Mt. Carmel
McCllelan
Lake Trafford


Figure 6. 1986 and 1987 oil production comparison (excluding field number 1-Jay field).


1200


000-

800--

O -

400 -

200























.- -'




SDRY HOLE PLUGGED & ABANDONED
PRODUCER
0 PERMITTED LOCATION




Figure 7. Bluff Springs, Coldwater Creek, McClellan, and Sweetwater Creek fields location map
showing generalized structure, top of Smackover Formation (modified from Lloyd and
Applegate, 1987).









































Dual Induction Focused Log BHC Aeoutlllog


EE~~

.t -.
* ~ -
*1




-.. ~
-'6.285(-le.oruSL, *,- -


E-1h3'


MEAN POROSITY L ,

SMACKOVER .. .
FORMATION NeI :ALlPERo h n



Compensated Neutron Utho Density


NiL


VT


MEAN 2.**
PONOSITY


II.1 61L


.. ... .. ,
, i^ -tl 1-1r1. -i inl. i ?. "-',


Dual Inductloe-SFLIGQmma Ray


Figure 8. Geophysical log correlation, Bluff Springs field.


L~

*UCKNER ANMYDRITE
1 11.3I-619aS, r


11.
S4


13.6% 1rK a A-1I. A -


FTT~T


I


''






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


ville Formation, Figure 4) have helped form a
complex, extensive reservoir. Numerous analyses
of the Jay area Smackover, including comparisons
with modern carbonate environments, have been
made in attempts to understand this complex res-
ervoir (Ottman et al., 1973 and 1976; Sigsby, 1976,
Mancini and Benson, 1980; Lomando et al., 1981;
Vinet, 1984; Moore, 1984; Bradford, 1984; Lloyd
et al., 1986).
Despite the complexity of the Jay field Smac-
kover Formation reservoir, exploration and devel-
opment of the field has been extremely successful.
Core analyses were combined with bottom hole
pressure data, porosity log information, and other
geologic data to arrive at a highly successful res-
ervoir management program (Shirer et al., 1978;
Langston et al., 1981; Langston and Shirer, 1985).
Five new development wells were drilled at Jay
field during 1986 and 1987 (Appendix 4). All five
were successfully completed as potential produc-
ers. Only 13 dry holes have been drilled at Jay
field, compared with 119 producing wells, through
January 1988.

Mt. Carmel Field Development
Mt. Carmel field was discovered in December,
1971 by the Louisiana Land and Exploration Com-
pany (LL & E). The discovery well was the LL & E
Finley Heirs 39-3 (P-504), located about one mile
east of Jay field in Section 39, T5N, R29W, Santa
Rosa County (Figure 9). Initial production was
1,440 barrels of 470 A.P.I. gravity oil per day with
no saltwater.
It is separated from Jay by the Foshee Fault
System (Figure 9). Production is from both the
Smackover Formation and the Norphlet Sand-
stone. Dual reservoir production and complex ge-
ometry have apparently made development of this
field more difficult. As of January, 1988, three pro-
ducing wells and 10 dry holes had been drilled at
Mt. Carmel field.
Two wells were spudded duringl987. One (per-
mit 1219) was completed as a potential producer;
the other (permit 1221) was plugged and aban-
doned as a dry hole (Appendix 4). Permit 1219 was
actually a reentry of an older well that produced oil
from 1973 through 1982. The older well (permit
660) produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from
the Norphlet Sandstone before going to 100 per-
cent saltwater. At that time, the operator (Louisiana
Land and Exploration Company, LL&E) stated that


log and core analysis of the Smackover Formation
indicated "extremely low porosities and permea-
bilities." They believed that no further production
potential existed and the well was plugged and
abandoned. The reentry (permit 1219) is still con-
fidential. Information explaining why LL&E decided
that the well indeed did have production potential
has not been released. The well was completed
as a potential producer on April 22, 1988.

Blackjack Creek Field Development
The Blackjack Creek field discovery well was the
Humble Oil and Refining Co. St. Regis Paper
Company 13-3 well (permit 523) drilled in Section
13, T4N, R29W, Santa Rosa County, about eight
miles southeast of Jay field. The well was com-
pleted February 14, 1972, as a producer in the
Norphlet Sandstone from -15,965 to -15,975
MSL. Initial production was 371 barrels of 51.3
A.P.I. gravity oil and 4.5 barrels of saltwater per
day. Due to limited productivity and water produc-
tion from the Norphlet Sandstone, the well was
recompleted as a Smackover Formation producer
from -15,635 to -15,745 feet MSL. The initial
production test from the Smackover, on January
22,1975, yielded 1,428 barrels of 51.20 A.P.I. grav-
ity oil and no saltwater.
Blackjack Creek field now produces primarily
from dolomitized oolites of the Smackover For-
mation (Applegate and Lloyd, 1985). About
160,000 barrels of oil have been produced from
the Norphlet Sandstone. The remaining produc-
tion, 53,343,000 barrels through December 1987,
is from the Smackover. The trapping structure is
an anticline located on the downthrown, southwest
side of the regional Foshee Fault System (Figure
10). Similar to Jay field, Blackjack Creek has been
carefully cored and analyzed to achieve a suc-
cessful reservoir management and development
program. Through January, 1988, 20 producing
wells had been drilled at Blackjack Creek. Only five
dry holes had been drilled. This dry hole count
includes the most recent well drilled. Permit 1188
(Appendix 4) was drilled by Exxon Corporation and
was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole on
March 7, 1986.

McClellan Field Development
McClellan field was discovered on February 19,
1986 (Figure 7, Appendix 1). The discovery well,






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Exxon Corporation State of Florida number 33-1
(permit 1194, Appendices 1 and 5) is located about
3.25 miles north of the abandoned Sweetwater
Creek field in Section 33, T6N, R26W, Santa Rosa
County. McClellan field is located within the area
known to be underlain by the Louann Salt and may
have a salt-related trap structure. It is also located
within a few miles of the approximated updip limits
of the Smackover Formation (Figure 7 in this report;
see also Applegate et al., 1978; Ottman et al., 1973
and 1976), thus, the trap could be a stratigraphic
pinchout. Currently released data does not reveal
which trap mechanism produced the Smackover
reservoir for this field.
An initial flowing test of the McClellan field dis-
covery well produced 152 barrels of 410 A.P.I. grav-
ity oil per day and no saltwater. Production is from
Smackover Formation dolomites from 13,828 to
- 13,845 feet MSL (Figure 11). Core analysis of a
potential oil and gas productive zone from 13,819
to 13,845 feet MSL by Core Laboratories, Inc.
(Dallas, Texas) indicated a mean porosity of 12.3
percent. The analysis showed additional oil and
gas production potential between -13,854 and
13,863 feet MSL. Mean porosity is about 15 per-
cent for this zone. Both of the analyzed zones con-
tained dark, fine grained, micro-crystalline
dolomites with vuggy porosity.
The first offset and confirmation well was Exxon
Corporation State of Florida number 34-2 (permit
1206). It is located about one-half mile east of the
discovery well. It was tested on March 9, 1987 and
flowed 641 barrels of 43.40 A.P.I. gravity oil and 24
barrels of saltwater per day. The Smackover For-
mation was encountered at 13,788 feet MSL, 27
feet higher than in the discovery well (Figure 11).
Production is from the Smackover Formation from
13,797 to 13,847 feet MSL. Core analysis by
All Points, Inc. (Houston, Texas) yielded a mean
porosity of 11.5 percent for the productive zone.
A second offset to the discovery well, Exxon
Corporation State of Florida number 34-2 (permit
1226) was drilled approximately one-half mile north
of the discovery well (Figure 7). This well was
completed as a potential producer on November
2, 1987. Additional information on this well is still
confidential.
SOUTH FLORIDA FIELD
DEVELOPMENT DRILLING
Corkscrew Field Development
Corkscrew field was discovered on November


19, 1985 with an initial swab test of the R.K. Pe-
troleum Rex Properties number 33-2 (permit
1170, Figure 12). Corkscrew field is located about
two and one-half miles north and slightly west of
the one-well Lake Trafford field in Collier County,
Florida (Figures 1 and 12). In its initial test, the
discovery well produced 435 barrels of oil per day
(with no saltwater) from open hole in the Sunniland
at 11,547 to 11,565 feet (- 11,502 to 11,520
feet MSL). Oil gravity was 250 A.P.I.
Core analysis by Analytical Logging, Inc. (Ft.
Myers, Florida) indicated an oil producing zone
from 11,506 to -11,515 feet MSL. The zone
was described as a "fossil-hash" of dolomitic lime-
stone with an average porosity of 15.25 percent.
The first offset and confirmation well was the R.
K. Petroleum Alico, Inc. number 32-1 (permit
1199). It is located about one-third mile west of the
discovery well (Figure 12, Appendix 4). It was com-
pleted as a potential producer on May 2, 1986. The
initial production test on June 9, 1986 yielded 424
barrels of 260 A.P.I. oil per day and no saltwater.
The Sunniland was encountered at -11,489 feet
MSL; a porous zone was encountered at 11,504
feet MSL. Production is from open hole in the Sun-
niland Formation from 11,503 to -11,511 feet
MSL.
Permit 1201, the R.K. Petroleum Bernice D.
Pepper number 28-3 (Figure 12, Appendix 4) was
drilled as a north outpost to the Corkscrew discov-
ery well. Its surface location is about one-half mile
north-northeast of the discovery. The bottom hole
location is about 1000 feet west of the surface
location. Apparently, it did not encounter the ex-
pected Sunniland pay zone. It was plugged back
to -8955 feet MSL and sidetracked as permit
1201 A. The bottom hole location in the sidetracked
hole is about 800 feet west of the surface hole
location. The sidetracked well pumped 218 barrels
of oil per day (with no saltwater) from open hole in
the Sunniland Formation from -11,501 to
11,519 feet MSL. Similar to the producing zone
of the discovery well, Analytical Logging, Inc. (Ft.
Myers, Florida) described a core from this zone as
a bioclastic, fossil-hash of dolomitic limestone.

Raccoon Point Field Development
Raccoon Point field is the southeastern-most ac-
tive field in the Sunniland trend (Figure 1). The field
was discovered on June 20, 1978 (Appendix 1)
and has been rapidly developed. The discovery








INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


MOUNT CARMEL FIELD

Santa Rosa County, Florida


1229
+


632 PERMIT NUMBER V
-14770 DEPTH


PRODUCER
BOTTOM HOLE LOCATION
DRY HOLE

ABANDONED LOCATION
-.- OIL/WATER CONTACT, 1974

C. I. 100 FEET


STRUCTURE MAP TOP
OF NORPHLET SANDSTONE
(Jim Miller, 1974)

- - -* -1- .
T6N --,- --
2 0 2000 FEET
\ \ ,0 600 METERS
-14930




U 1219 66\ 1164
D -14827 01)


71640 000

27".
689 *632
-14770
T6N / \


7 39
"3-14957 ,;/

-77

4:2 39



504


^Aoo


12


Figure 9. Mount Carmel field structure map, top of Norphlet Sandstone (after Miller, 1974).





13


....- 'NTA





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Figure 10. Blackjack Creek field structure map, top of Smackover Formation (after Blackjack Creek
Geological Committee, 1974.)







SP-11941


EP-1206


:-~ Li


V
A


* (-1


- ~-~ ~ sum~ ~~-~


. : :
.' .; ....,..








4 .T.
' ,
*1.? t

4 -JC


-{-JiftT1


I^-


I .


I 7
. }. ....
-1 -". ..
.-k : "-***
i li i "::!


Vc-v- I
"""" '" cUrtvg i -}" "
7


14t00


I .....
.1..' *I;


11111:. P tHE


i. .-*s .Y.7'Ms


-. .. I ~ I Ti .I i~Pt


BUCKNER
ANHYDRITE

.-.. r


( 114


912.3%


MEAN
POROSITY


SMACKOVER
FORMATION


I I
1- ----4 -~
-~ I :::iJ


* ~
''1-'


:4eoO


Jrit~r


. Lr


'Tilt.


__ ILUy __' I*:' *:


TENSION
..... .-

N__ y 11-L


:3;.


.I
.1.


Dual Induction-SFL/Gamma Ray


Dual Induction-SFL/Gamma Ray


Figure 11. Geophysical log correlation, McClellan field.


* 4.


4..


C.
I


3-&16M SL)-


t..i40@ i'ii.1- ~ L


,V/,
XX,


I


""


t


I"",- .
! I


11.5%


w


011


P^ ;^:! i!::i ":::


... : i .. .
I: L" Q ; '


SP-
.R: : : ;
/ -4 ; .; .*

''.'JGR^ : .'





L," : '


i :: -





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


CORKSCREW AND
LAKE TRAFFORD FIELDS
COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA


STRUCTURE
TOP OF SUNNILAND


MAP
FORMATION


(CHEESMAN,1988)


- -F- -- -


2


408 PERMIT NUMBER
-11573 DEPTH
PRODUCER
BOTTOM HOLE LI
--DRY HOLE


C.I. 20 FEET
4000


1200


Figure 12. Corkscrew and Lake Trafford fields structure map, top of Sunniland Formation (M.
Cheesman, 1988, personal communication).






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


well was the Exxon Oleum Corporation number
33-4 (permit 829) drilled in Section 33, T51S,
R43E, Collier County (Appendix 1). Initial produc-
tion was from the -11,372 to -11,376 foot MSL
interval of the Sunniland Formation. The first reli-
able production test was made on June 20, 1978,
when the discovery well pumped 57 barrels of 23.30
A.P.I. gravity oil and 845 barrels of saltwater per
day.
Applegate and Lloyd (1985) published a prelim-
inary structure map of the top of the Sunniland
Formation for Raccoon Point field. Several wells
have been released from confidential status since
that time. Figure 13 is an updated structure map
for the field and indicates a dome trending north-
west-southeast. The new data provides more detail
for the top of the structure; however, the limits of
the field are still undefined.
One producing well was completed at Raccoon
Point during 1986 (permit 1190, Appendix 4). A
total of 15 producing wells have been drilled. No
dry holes have been drilled in the Raccoon Point
field area.

Exploratory Drilling
OVERVIEW
A total of 12 wildcat wells were drilled during
1986 and 1987 (Appendix 5). Nine of these were
drilled in northwest Florida; the remaining three
were drilled in south Florida. Two wells were com-
pleted as potential producers. These were the dis-
covery wells for McClellan and Coldwater Creek
fields. Both fields are located in northwest Florida
and produce from the Smackover Formation (Fig-
ures 3 and 7, Appendix 1).

NORTHWEST FLORIDA
EXPLORATORY DRILLING

McClellan Field Discovery
McClellan field was discovered on February 15,
1986 with the initial testing of the Exxon Corpo-
ration State of Florida number 33-1 (permit 1194,
Appendices 1 and 5, Figure 7). Two successful
development wells (permits 1206 and 1226, Ap-
pendix 4, Figure 7) were drilled during 1987.
McClellan field discovery and development history
is discussed in greater detail in the field develop-
ment section of this report.


Coldwater Creek Field Discovery
Coldwater Creek field was discovered on June
4, 1988. The discovery well was a reentry of a
Smackover wildcat. The original permit was issued
to Inexco Oil Company (permit 1173, Appendix 5,
Figure 7). The location is about two miles east of
the southern portion of Jay field in Section 26,
Township 5 North, Range 29 West. Inexco began
drilling in November, 1985. They drilled the well to
a total depth of -15,407 feet MSL, logged the well,
and recommended plugging and abandonment.
The top of the Smackover Formation had been
encountered at -14,969 feet MSL; the Norphlet
Sandstone at -15,331 feet MSL. Side wall core
analyses by Location Sample Service, Inc. (Jack-
son, Mississippi) indicated a potential oil productive
zone from -14,985 to -15,016 feet MSL. Mean po-
rosity of the zone was about 14.8 percent.
Analysis of the same interval by Charles Tootle
(Florida Geological Survey, unpublished data,
1986) yielded a mean porosity of about 12 percent,
an original oil in place estimate of 2,080,107 bar-
rels, and a recoverable oil estimate of 312,016 bar-
, rels. Tootle (personal communication, 1988)
' believes that there might not be enough recover-
able oil for economical production. This interpre-
tation is based on current oil prices and operating
costs (the oil contains hydrogen sulfide which
would add significantly to operating costs).
LL&E took over operations on January 10, 1986.
They considered completing the well, however,
they decided to plug and abandon it. The plugging
procedures were completed by January 18, 1986.
Another operator, Bruxoil, Inc., then took over re-
sponsibility for the well. They received a permit to
shoot a seismic line across the area (geophysical
permit G-70-86, Appendix 6). The purpose was to
determine whether to reenter the existing well or
drill at a new location. They decided not to reenter
the well and have not submitted any permit appli-
cations to drill in the vicinity.
In 1987, Red Rock Oil and Minerals Corporation,
received permit 1220 (Appendix 5 and Figure 7) to
reenter the well, believing that it did have economic
potential. They completed redrilling on May 24,
1987 and ran the first production test on June 4,
1988. Details of the test have not been released.
Production is from the zone discussed above, from
-14,985 to -15,016 feet MSL in the Smackover For-
mation. Production has been intermittent.








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


151. S
t1j2S


Figure 13. Raccoon Point field structure map, top of Sunniland Formation.


TOWARDD CO,

\DE COD.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 106


Other Northwest Florida
Exploratory Drilling
The remaining northwest Florida wildcats were
plugged and abandoned as dry holes (Appendix
5). They were Smackover Formation or Norphlet
Sandstone test wells, with one exception which
tested the Tuscaloosa Formation.
Permit 1229, the Pruet Production Company-
Champion International number 35-4, had the Up-
per Cretaceous Tuscaloosa Formation as its target.
The Pruet well is located between Jay and Mt.
Carmel fields in Santa Rosa County within the
structurally complex area associated with the
Foshee Fault System (Figure 9). Interest in the
Tuscaloosa Formation in this particular area is
probably due to the recent discovery of the Foshee
field in Escambia County, Alabama (Montgomery,
1987). The Foshee field was discovered on the
upthrown side of a normal fault associated with the
Foshee Fault System. The field produces from the
Lower Tuscaloosa. The Lower Tuscaloosa is pro-
ductive at several other fields in southwestern Al-
abama. The other fields, however, are widely
scattered and were all opened more than 30 years
ago. The Foshee field has uniquely high gravity oil
(40-42o A.P.I.) compared to other Upper Creta-
ceous fields in southwestern Alabama. Gravities
for other Upper Cretaceous field in the area range
from less than 200 to approximately 30 A.P.I.
(Montgomery, 1987; Sexton, 1986; Mancini and
Payton, 1981). Montgomery (1987) states that this
may indicate that the oil at Foshee field originated
from a deeper source and migrated along fault
planes associated with the Foshee Fault System.
Montgomery (1987) notes that this discovery set
off strong interest in the Tuscaloosa in southwest-
ern Alabama and possibly in Santa Rosa County,
Florida. The drilling of permit 1229 supports the
latter part of his statement. The location was prob-
ably chosen in the hopes of finding high gravity oil
associated with fault-plane migration as was the
case at Foshee field in Alabama. Unfortunately,
the well was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole
on January 14, 1988.

SOUTH FLORIDA
EXPLORATORY DRILLING
The Sunniland Formation is the only petroleum
producing horizon in South Florida. The Sunniland


trend oil fields produce from an area that is about
145 miles long and 12 miles wide (Figure 1 in this
report; see also Applegate and Pontigo, 1984). Bio-
clastic limestones in the upper Sunniland Forma-
tion form oil producing highs on the trend. The
highs are bioherms composed of rudistids, algal
plates, foraminifera and pelletal debris and are
quite porous and permeable. They grade laterally
into miliolid-rich, non-porous, light-colored lime-
stones (Applegate and Pontigo, 1984).
Geochemical analysis by Applegate and Pontigo
(1984) confirmed that the source for the Sunniland
trend's oil is a dark-colored micritic limestone facies
found in the lower Sunniland Formation. Their geo-
logic investigations indicate that the dark-colored
micritic faces is absent updip (to the northeast)
from the producing trend. In addition, permeability
downdip (to the southwest) appears too low for
hydrocarbon migration. They conclude that pro-
duction can be expected to occur where the porous
units are juxtaposed with the organic-rich, dark-
colored micrites. This has occurred along the "reef-
trend" (the current producing trend consisting of
rudistid-bioherm reservoirs).
Applegate and Pontigo (1984) conclude that new
Sunniland discoveries away from the currently pro-
ducing trend can be expected downdip only if new
zones of suitable porosity are found in conjunction
with the dark micrite faces. Exploration updip from
the producing trend has been sparse and unsuc-
cessful. As pointed out by Montgomery (1987), the
total area within the Sunniland trend is fairly large
(about 1,500 square miles) and well control is low.
The best overall exploration approach appears to
be identification of paleoenvironment and faces
changes within and immediately adjacent to the
productive trend (Montgomery, 1987).
Three wildcat wells were drilled in south Florida
during the 1986-1987 period (Appendix 5). All three
were plugged and abandoned as dry holes. As
expected, the Sunniland Formation was the target
for production in all three cases. Unexpected was
the location of the J. M. Huber Corporation Lykes
Brothers number 26-2 (permit 1193). This well is
located in Section 26, Township 39 South, Range
31 East, in Glades County, Florida approximately
6.6 miles northeast of the nearest Sunniland pro-
duction at the Townsend Canal field. Only two other
wells have been drilled in Glades County. Both
were drilled in the 1950's and were dry holes.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


GEOPHYSICAL
EXPLORATION
ACTIVITY

Twenty applications for geophysical permits
were received during 1986; 16 were received dur-
ing 1987. Of these 36 applications, 32 have been
permitted, three were withdrawn by the applicants,
and one is still being processed (Appendix 6). Fig-
ure 14 shows the areas covered by these permits.
Geophysical exploration during 1986 included
the first permitted offshore seismic activity in
Florida state waters. Two airgun surveys were
completed covering 2,330 miles of seismic lines off
the coast of the panhandle. Another previously
unpermitted area, in the central peninsula of
Florida, was explored in 1987. It included 124 miles
of Vibroseis survey in Citrus, Hernando, Lake,
Pasco, and Sumter Counties.
A single application was received for exploration
in the northern peninsula. Although this application
was later withdrawn by the applicant, it Indicates


continued interest in this area. The withdrawn ap-
plication included a request to conduct a Vibrosels
survey covering 100 miles in Columbia, Lafayette,
and Suwannee Counties. Previously permitted sur-
veys in 1984 and 1985 covered 100 miles of Vi-
broseis lines in Jackson, Madison, Hamilton, and
Columbia Counties.
Table 2 summarizes geophysical survey mileage
for 1984 through 1987 permits. The 1986 peak in
geophysical survey mileage is due to the inclusion
of the 2,330 miles of offshore survey. Panhandle
onshore exploration peaked in 1985 with 1,067.5
miles approved and eventually surveyed. Survey
mileage in this region was significantly lower in
1986 and 1987.
The value for completed south Florida explora-
tion during 1987 is low because several surveys
are pending for this area. An additional 370.43
miles of survey are pending from 1987 applications:
two approved permits covering 171.43 miles have
not been surveyed and an additional application
including 199 miles is still being processed.


Table 2. Geophysical Survey Mileage, 1984 through 1987.


COMPLETED GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS
1984 1985 1986 1987
Area Total Total Total Total
North Peninsula 48.00 52.00 0.00 0.00
Central Peninsula 0.00 0.00 0.00 124.00
South Florida 22.00 392.25 463.20 25.00
Panhandle Onshore 570.50 1,067.50 236.60 209.35
Panhandle Offshore 0.00 0.00 2,330.00 0.00
*Completed 640.50 1,511.75 3,029.80 358.35

PENDING GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS
South Florida 4.00 0.00 0.00 370.43
Panhandle Onshore 37.00 0.00 0.00 10.00
Panhandle Offshore 0.00 350.00 0.00 314.00
Pending 41.00 350.00 0.00 694.43


TOTALS: COMPLETED AND PENDING GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS


Completed + Pending


681.50


1,861.75


3,029.80


1,052.78


"NOTE: Mileage for a completed geophysical survey is totaled under the year that the application for a
geophysical permit was received. Actual survey may have been completed during a subsequent year.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


N


EXPLANATION L

PERMITTED AND SURVEYED

PERMITTED, NOT SURVEYED

O APPLICATION RECIEVED, NOT PERMITTED

SCALE
0 30 60 MILES
0 50 100 KILOMETERS \



STATE OF FLORIDA
1986-87 GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION







Figure 14. 1986 and 1987 geophysical exploration activity.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Overall, geophysical exploration was steady dur-
ing this period in Florida. New areas were explored
during 1986 and 1987. These were the offshore
panhandle area and the central peninsula area.
Interest in Florida's oil producing areas, the pan-
handle and south Florida, remains fairly constant.
There is also a constant interest in the northern
peninsula area (Table 2 and Figure 14 in this report;
see also Applegate and Lloyd, 1985; Lloyd and
Applegate, 1987).

EXPLORATION IN
FEDERAL WATERS,
OFFSHORE FLORIDA

Background
State ownership of the continental shelf off Flor-
ida extends three miles into the Atlantic Ocean and
about 10.5 miles (three marine leagues) into the
Gulf of Mexico. The federal government controls
resources beyond these state boundaries out to
200 miles. The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) is a
jurisdictional term that describes the offshore area
which is under control of the federal government.
"Federal waters," in this context, does not refer to
ownership, but rather to responsibility (Johnson
and Tucker, 1987).
For planning purposes, the federal government
divides the OCS into planning areas. Three plan-
ning areas surround Florida: the Eastern Planning
Area, the Straits of Florida, and the South Atlantic
Planning area (Figure 15). The planning areas are
further subdivided into "map areas" (for example,
Pensacola Area, Destin Dome Area, Desoto Can-
yon Area) and "blocks." A three-square-mile block
is the actual leasing unit used by the Department
of the Interior (Johnson and Tucker, 1987).

Activity
The first federal oil and gas lease sale off Florida
was conducted in May, 1959 off the Florida keys
in what is now the Straits of Florida Planning Area.
Ten additional OCS lease sales have occurred
since then; seven in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico
Planning Area and three in the South Atlantic Plan-
ning area. There have been no sales in the Straits
of Florida Planning Area since the 1959 sale. The
last lease sale in the South Atlantic Planning Area
off Florida was Sale 78 in July, 1983.
The two most recent lease sales off Florida were
in the Eastern Planning Area. They were Sales 79


and 94, held in January, 1984 and January, 1985,
respectively. These lease sales are discussed in
Applegate and Lloyd (1985) and Lloyd and Apple-
gate (1987). Active leases in the Eastern Planning
Area are shown on Figure 16.
Seven wells were drilled off Florida during 1986
and 1987. Appendix 7 includes data on these wells.
Four of the wells were in the Destin Dome and
Pensacola areas, where the principle drilling tar-
gets are the Smackover Formation and the Nor-
phlet Sandstone (Figure 4). Of the two Destin
Dome wells, one was plugged and abandoned and
the other temporarily abandoned. One of the Pen-
sacola area wells was simply a sidetrack hole of
the other. These were temporarily abandoned.

The remaining three wells were located in the
Charlotte Harbor, Desoto Canyon, and Florida Mid-
dle Ground areas. Cretaceous limestones and do-
lomites are the principle targets in these areas. All
three of these wells were plugged and abandoned
as dry holes.
The federal government classifies offshore well
completions as produciblee" and "other." Produ-
cible zone completions include both producing and
shut-in wells. Shut-in completions are those tem-
porarily taken out of production pending either re-
pairs or major or minor workovers. Other zone
completions include service wells and "not restor-
able" completions. Not restorable completions are
judged not capable of production and are to be
plugged and abandoned and permanently sealed
(Harris, 1988). Both Destin Dome wells were class-
ified as producible. The Charlotte Harbor, Desoto
Canyon, and Florida Middle Ground wells were dry
holes and thus are classified as not restorable. The
Pensacola area well has not been classified yet.

Policy
Recent years have been a critical period for off-
shore exploration policy decisions. The five-year
(1987-1992) Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil
and Gas Leasing Program was finalized. Governor
Martinez's negotiations with the federal govern-
ment concerning this program reflected Florida's
strong environmental policies and his belief that
"oil and gas activities must not be allowed at the
expense of our unique and sensitive resources"
(Governor Martinez, March 3, 1987 letter to Sec-
retary of the Interior, Donald Hodel).
When the five-year oil and gas leasing plan was







INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


proposed by the Secretary of the Interior Donald
Hodel, Governor Martinez expressed his concerns
to both Hodel and to President Reagan. He re-
quested that sensitive areas off Apalachicola Bay
in northwest Florida, Florida Bay and the Florida
Keys be removed from the plan. In August 1987,
the Governor filed a petition for judicial review in
federal court of the Department of the Interior's 5-
year leasing plan because these areas were not
removed (Press Release, Office of the Governor,
August 14, 1987).
In January 1988, Secretary Hodel accompanied
Governor Martinez on a snorkeling trip to the Flor-
ida Keys. The Governor was able to show Secre-
tary Hodel "exactly what it is that we in Florida are
fighting to protect." The following March, the Sec-
retary of the Interior agreed to remove 11 million
acres of sensitive habitat around Florida Bay and
the Keys from further consideration of leasing un-
der the 5-year plan (Figure 15). The Secretary fur-
ther agreed to require a one-year study before any
drilling could take place in an area of "special con-
cern" off Cape San Bias in northwest Florida (Fig-
ure 15). The study would verify that the exploration
is for gas and not oil. The Department of the Interior
would also establish an emergency response team
to deal with possible accidents. As a result of this
agreement, the petition for judicial review of the 5-
year plan was dropped (Press Release, Office of
the Governor, March 24, 1988).
In May, 1988, the Governor requested that the
federal government delay exploratory drilling for oil
and gas off southwest Florida. The request spe-
cifically referred to leases which were sold off
southwest Florida during 1984 and 1985. The
leases are located in an areas south of Naples to
just north of the Dry Tortugas, Marquesas Islands,
and the Florida Keys (south of 260 north latitude,
Figure 15). Congress had required a three-year
environmental study before exploratory drilling
would be permitted in this area. A panel of scien-
tists was assembled by Governor Martinez to re-
view the federal environmental study. The panel
concluded that the federal study was not extensive
enough to ensure protection of sensitive environ-
mental resources. Specifically, there was not
enough information to determine the potential ef-
fects of an oil spill. Subsequently, the Governor
supported and Congress imposed a one-year drill-
ing moratorium on the area south of 26 north lat-
itude (Press Releases, Office of the Governor, May
26, 1988 and June 16, 1988).


In June 1988, Hodel agreed to remove 14 million
acres in the same area (south of 260 north latitude)
from the November 1988 lease sale (Figure 15).
Martinez and Hodel appointed two task forces to
assess the environmental impact of proposed drill-
ing in previously leased areas. One task force will
assess the risk posed by oil spills and will deter-
mine the directions spilled oil would be carried by
winds and currents. The second task force will as-
sess the impact of drilling on marine and coastal
resources (Press Release, Office of the Governor,
June 16, 1988). President George Bush estab-
lished an additional federal task force to review
drilling and leasing in this area. This task force
report is due to the president in January 1990.
There will be no leasing and probably no drilling in
the area until then (Deborah Tucker, 1989, per-
sonal communication).


SUMMARY
Florida oil production continued to decline during
1986 and 1987. Jay field, as the leading producing
field for Florida, controls the rate of decline.
Although production was down for the state overall
and for northwest Florida, it increased in south
Florida. The Florida oil fields which showed an
increase in production were West Felda,
Corkscrew, and Mid-Felda fields.
Attempts to further develop the recently discov-
ered Bluff Springs field were unsuccessful. The first
two offset wells were plugged and abandoned as
dry holes. Development of McClellan field was
more successful with two offsets completed as po-
tential producers. The first offset to the Corkscrew
field discovery was completed as a potential pro-
ducer. The second offset required a sidetrack hole,
but was also eventually completed as a potential
producer.
An additional nine field development wells were
drilled at Jay, Mt. Carmel, Blackjack Creek, and
Raccoon Point fields. Seven of these were com-
pleted as potential producers and two were
plugged and abandoned as dry holes. The dry
holes were located at Mt. Carmel and Blackjack
Creek fields.
Twelve wildcat wells were drilled in Florida during
1986 and 1987. Nine were drilled in northwest
Florida and three in south Florida. Two of these
were the discovery wells for McClellan and
Coldwater Creek fields. Both fields are located in






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


well was the Exxon Oleum Corporation number
33-4 (permit 829) drilled in Section 33, T51S,
R43E, Collier County (Appendix 1). Initial produc-
tion was from the -11,372 to -11,376 foot MSL
interval of the Sunniland Formation. The first reli-
able production test was made on June 20, 1978,
when the discovery well pumped 57 barrels of 23.30
A.P.I. gravity oil and 845 barrels of saltwater per
day.
Applegate and Lloyd (1985) published a prelim-
inary structure map of the top of the Sunniland
Formation for Raccoon Point field. Several wells
have been released from confidential status since
that time. Figure 13 is an updated structure map
for the field and indicates a dome trending north-
west-southeast. The new data provides more detail
for the top of the structure; however, the limits of
the field are still undefined.
One producing well was completed at Raccoon
Point during 1986 (permit 1190, Appendix 4). A
total of 15 producing wells have been drilled. No
dry holes have been drilled in the Raccoon Point
field area.

Exploratory Drilling
OVERVIEW
A total of 12 wildcat wells were drilled during
1986 and 1987 (Appendix 5). Nine of these were
drilled in northwest Florida; the remaining three
were drilled in south Florida. Two wells were com-
pleted as potential producers. These were the dis-
covery wells for McClellan and Coldwater Creek
fields. Both fields are located in northwest Florida
and produce from the Smackover Formation (Fig-
ures 3 and 7, Appendix 1).

NORTHWEST FLORIDA
EXPLORATORY DRILLING

McClellan Field Discovery
McClellan field was discovered on February 15,
1986 with the initial testing of the Exxon Corpo-
ration State of Florida number 33-1 (permit 1194,
Appendices 1 and 5, Figure 7). Two successful
development wells (permits 1206 and 1226, Ap-
pendix 4, Figure 7) were drilled during 1987.
McClellan field discovery and development history
is discussed in greater detail in the field develop-
ment section of this report.


Coldwater Creek Field Discovery
Coldwater Creek field was discovered on June
4, 1988. The discovery well was a reentry of a
Smackover wildcat. The original permit was issued
to Inexco Oil Company (permit 1173, Appendix 5,
Figure 7). The location is about two miles east of
the southern portion of Jay field in Section 26,
Township 5 North, Range 29 West. Inexco began
drilling in November, 1985. They drilled the well to
a total depth of -15,407 feet MSL, logged the well,
and recommended plugging and abandonment.
The top of the Smackover Formation had been
encountered at -14,969 feet MSL; the Norphlet
Sandstone at -15,331 feet MSL. Side wall core
analyses by Location Sample Service, Inc. (Jack-
son, Mississippi) indicated a potential oil productive
zone from -14,985 to -15,016 feet MSL. Mean po-
rosity of the zone was about 14.8 percent.
Analysis of the same interval by Charles Tootle
(Florida Geological Survey, unpublished data,
1986) yielded a mean porosity of about 12 percent,
an original oil in place estimate of 2,080,107 bar-
rels, and a recoverable oil estimate of 312,016 bar-
, rels. Tootle (personal communication, 1988)
' believes that there might not be enough recover-
able oil for economical production. This interpre-
tation is based on current oil prices and operating
costs (the oil contains hydrogen sulfide which
would add significantly to operating costs).
LL&E took over operations on January 10, 1986.
They considered completing the well, however,
they decided to plug and abandon it. The plugging
procedures were completed by January 18, 1986.
Another operator, Bruxoil, Inc., then took over re-
sponsibility for the well. They received a permit to
shoot a seismic line across the area (geophysical
permit G-70-86, Appendix 6). The purpose was to
determine whether to reenter the existing well or
drill at a new location. They decided not to reenter
the well and have not submitted any permit appli-
cations to drill in the vicinity.
In 1987, Red Rock Oil and Minerals Corporation,
received permit 1220 (Appendix 5 and Figure 7) to
reenter the well, believing that it did have economic
potential. They completed redrilling on May 24,
1987 and ran the first production test on June 4,
1988. Details of the test have not been released.
Production is from the zone discussed above, from
-14,985 to -15,016 feet MSL in the Smackover For-
mation. Production has been intermittent.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Figure 15. Florida portion of the 1987-1992 federal Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas leasing
program (Johnson and Tucker, 1987). The areas off Florida Bay and the Florida Keys were
removed from the 5-year plan. The area south of 26 North latitude was removed from the
November 1988 lease sale.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


Figure 16. Active leases and wells drilled during 1986 and 1987 in federal waters, offshore Florida
(Slitor and Wiese, 1988).






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


northwest Florida and produce from the Smackover
Formation.
With one exception, all northwest Florida wild-
cats were targeted for the Upper Jurassic Smack-
over Formation or Norphlet Sandstone. The ex-
ception was a well drilled to test the Tuscaloosa
Formation. This interest probably results from the
recent discovery of Tuscaloosa production at
Foshee field in Escambia County, Alabama.
All three south Florida wildcats were Sunniland
Formation test wells. One well was located in
Glades County, almost seven miles northeast of
the closest Sunniland production. Applegate and
Pontigo (1984) indicate that Sunniland production
is not likely to be discovered in this area updip from
the producing trend.
Geophysical exploration in Florida's oil-produc-
ing areas, the panhandle and south Florida, re-
mained fairly constant. Two new areas were
explored during 1986 and 1987, the offshore pan-
handle area and the central peninsula area. There
was also a continued interest in the north peninsula
area.
Drilling in federal waters offshore of Florida was
slow during 1986-87. During this time, Florida's
Governor Martinez began negotiations with the
Secretary of the Interior, Donald Hodel, concerning
the Florida portion of the federal outer continental
shelf oil and gas leasing program. Strong protection
was gained for Florida's fragile coastal environ-


ments. Two large blocks of offshore territory were
removed from oil and gas leasing consideration
and a drilling moratorium was implemented
for areas previously leased offshore of southwest
Florida. The federal and state governments also
agreed to establish two task forces to study the
environmental impact of offshore drilling.
In his March 3, 1987 letter to Secretary of the
Interior Hodel, Governor Martinez states:
"Florida has in the past not objected to
oil and gas activities when assurances
were made that our sensitive marine
and coastal resources and the econom-
ics they support would not be adversely
affected. I too support strong protection
of resources vital to Florida. Oil and gas
activities must not be allowed at the ex-
pense of our unique and sensitive re-
sources."
This philosophy is consistent with the manner in
which onshore resources in the environmentally
sensitive areas of south Florida have been
developed. Detailed environmental scrutiny and
regulation have successfully accompanied oil
exploration and production along south Florida's
Sunniland trend. A continuation of this philosophy
into the future will hopefully see the discovery and
wise development of new petroleum resources,
both onshore and offshore, while protecting
Florida's other natural and sensitive environmental
resources.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


proposed by the Secretary of the Interior Donald
Hodel, Governor Martinez expressed his concerns
to both Hodel and to President Reagan. He re-
quested that sensitive areas off Apalachicola Bay
in northwest Florida, Florida Bay and the Florida
Keys be removed from the plan. In August 1987,
the Governor filed a petition for judicial review in
federal court of the Department of the Interior's 5-
year leasing plan because these areas were not
removed (Press Release, Office of the Governor,
August 14, 1987).
In January 1988, Secretary Hodel accompanied
Governor Martinez on a snorkeling trip to the Flor-
ida Keys. The Governor was able to show Secre-
tary Hodel "exactly what it is that we in Florida are
fighting to protect." The following March, the Sec-
retary of the Interior agreed to remove 11 million
acres of sensitive habitat around Florida Bay and
the Keys from further consideration of leasing un-
der the 5-year plan (Figure 15). The Secretary fur-
ther agreed to require a one-year study before any
drilling could take place in an area of "special con-
cern" off Cape San Bias in northwest Florida (Fig-
ure 15). The study would verify that the exploration
is for gas and not oil. The Department of the Interior
would also establish an emergency response team
to deal with possible accidents. As a result of this
agreement, the petition for judicial review of the 5-
year plan was dropped (Press Release, Office of
the Governor, March 24, 1988).
In May, 1988, the Governor requested that the
federal government delay exploratory drilling for oil
and gas off southwest Florida. The request spe-
cifically referred to leases which were sold off
southwest Florida during 1984 and 1985. The
leases are located in an areas south of Naples to
just north of the Dry Tortugas, Marquesas Islands,
and the Florida Keys (south of 260 north latitude,
Figure 15). Congress had required a three-year
environmental study before exploratory drilling
would be permitted in this area. A panel of scien-
tists was assembled by Governor Martinez to re-
view the federal environmental study. The panel
concluded that the federal study was not extensive
enough to ensure protection of sensitive environ-
mental resources. Specifically, there was not
enough information to determine the potential ef-
fects of an oil spill. Subsequently, the Governor
supported and Congress imposed a one-year drill-
ing moratorium on the area south of 26 north lat-
itude (Press Releases, Office of the Governor, May
26, 1988 and June 16, 1988).


In June 1988, Hodel agreed to remove 14 million
acres in the same area (south of 260 north latitude)
from the November 1988 lease sale (Figure 15).
Martinez and Hodel appointed two task forces to
assess the environmental impact of proposed drill-
ing in previously leased areas. One task force will
assess the risk posed by oil spills and will deter-
mine the directions spilled oil would be carried by
winds and currents. The second task force will as-
sess the impact of drilling on marine and coastal
resources (Press Release, Office of the Governor,
June 16, 1988). President George Bush estab-
lished an additional federal task force to review
drilling and leasing in this area. This task force
report is due to the president in January 1990.
There will be no leasing and probably no drilling in
the area until then (Deborah Tucker, 1989, per-
sonal communication).


SUMMARY
Florida oil production continued to decline during
1986 and 1987. Jay field, as the leading producing
field for Florida, controls the rate of decline.
Although production was down for the state overall
and for northwest Florida, it increased in south
Florida. The Florida oil fields which showed an
increase in production were West Felda,
Corkscrew, and Mid-Felda fields.
Attempts to further develop the recently discov-
ered Bluff Springs field were unsuccessful. The first
two offset wells were plugged and abandoned as
dry holes. Development of McClellan field was
more successful with two offsets completed as po-
tential producers. The first offset to the Corkscrew
field discovery was completed as a potential pro-
ducer. The second offset required a sidetrack hole,
but was also eventually completed as a potential
producer.
An additional nine field development wells were
drilled at Jay, Mt. Carmel, Blackjack Creek, and
Raccoon Point fields. Seven of these were com-
pleted as potential producers and two were
plugged and abandoned as dry holes. The dry
holes were located at Mt. Carmel and Blackjack
Creek fields.
Twelve wildcat wells were drilled in Florida during
1986 and 1987. Nine were drilled in northwest
Florida and three in south Florida. Two of these
were the discovery wells for McClellan and
Coldwater Creek fields. Both fields are located in






INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


REFERENCES

Applegate, A.V. and Lloyd, J.M., 1985, Summary of Florida petroleum production and exploration, onshore
and offshore, through 1984: Florida Bureau of Geology Information Circular no. 101, 69 p.

and Pontigo, F.A., Jr., 1984, Stratigraphy and oil potential of the Lower Cretaceous Sun-
niland Formation in south Florida: Florida Bureau of Geology Report of Investigation no. 89, 40 p.

Pontigo, F.A., Jr., and Rooke, J.H., 1978, Jurassic Smackover oil prospects in the
Apalachicola embayment, Oil and Gas Journal, January 23, 1978, p. 80-84.

Blackjack Creek Geological Committee, 1974, Blackjack Creek field unit, Exhibit M-1 for Florida Department
of Natural Resources Hearing No. 38.

Bradford, C.A., 1984, Transgressive-regressive carbonate faces of the Smackover Formation, Escambia
County, Alabama, in Ventress, W.P.S., Bebout, D.G., Perkins, B.F., and Moore, C.H., eds., The Jurassic
of the Gulf Rim: Proceedings of the Third Annual Research Conference, Gulf Coast Section, Society
of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Foundation, p. 27-39.

Harris, W.M., 1988, Federal Offshore Statistics: 1986; Leasing, Exploration, Production, and Revenues:
U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service, OCS Report, MMS 88-0010, 95 p.

Johnson, P.G., and Tucker, D.L., 1987, The federal Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas leasing program;
a Florida perspective: February, 1987: Office of the Governor, Office of Planning and Budgeting,
Intergovernmental Coordination Unit, 16 p.

Langston, E.P., and Shirer, J.A., 1985, Performance of the Jay-LEC field unit under mature waterflood
and early tertiary operations: Journal of Petroleum Technology, v. 37, p. 261-268.

Shirer, J.A., and Nelson, D.E., 1981, Innovative reservoir management key to highly
successful Jay-LEC waterflood: Journal of Petroleum Technology, v. 33, p. 783-791.

Lloyd, J.M., 1986, Bluff Springs field discovery renews interest in Florida's western panhandle: Oil and
Gas Journal, June 30, 1986, p. 105-108.

and Applegate, A.V., 1987, Part 1: 1985 Florida petroleum production and exploration:
Florida Bureau of Geology Information Circular No. 104, p. 1-42.

Ragland, P.C., Ragland, J.M. and Parker, W.C., 1986, Diagenesis of the Jurassic Smac-
kover Formation, Jay field, Florida (abstract): Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs,
98th Annual Meeting, Orlando, Florida, p. 645.

Lomando, A.J., Jr., Schrieber, C., and Nurmi, R.D., 1981, Sedimentation and diagenesis of Upper Smack-
over grainstone, Jay-field area, West Florida (abstract): American Association of Petroleum Geologist
Bulletin, v. 65, no. 5, p. 950.

Mancini, E.A., and Benson, D.J., 1980, Regional Stratigraphy of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates
of southwest Alabama: Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies Transactions, v. 30, p. 151-
165.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


and Payton, J.W., 1981, Petroleum geology of South Carlton Field, Lower Tuscaloosa
"Pilot Sand," Clarke and Baldwin Counties, Alabama: Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies
Transactions, v. 31, p. 139-147.
Miller, J., 1974, Mount Carmel field structure map: The Louisiana Land and Exploration Company's Report
for Florida Department of Natural Resources Hearing No. 27.

Montgomery, S., 1987, Reservoir intervals of the northeastern Gulf, Upper Cretaceous, in Exploring the
eastern Gulf: The case for expansion: Petroleum Frontiers, vol. 4, no. 2, p. 70-74.

Moore, C.H., 1984, The Upper Smackover of the Gulf Rim: depositional systems, diagenesis, porosity
evolution and hydrocarbon development, in Ventress, W. P.S., Bebout, D.G., Perkins, B.F., and Moore,
C.H., eds., The Jurassic of the Gulf Rim: Proceedings of the Third Annual Research Conference, Gulf
Coast Section, Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Foundation, p. 283-307.

Ottman, R.D., Keyes, P.L., and Ziegler, M.A., 1973, Jay field a Jurassic stratigraphic trap: Gulf Coast
Association of Geological Societies Transactions, v. 23, p. 146-157.

1976, Jay field a Jurassic stratigraphic trap, in Braunstein, J., ed., North American Oil
and Gas Fields: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Memoir 24, p. 276-286.

Sexton, T.A., ed., 1986, The petroleum industry in Alabama, 1985: Alabama State Oil and Gas Board Oil
and Gas Report 3-1, 80 p.

Shirer, T.A., Langston, E.P., and Strong, R.B., 1978, Application of field-wide conventional coring in the
Jay-Little Escambia Creek Unit: Journal of Petroleum Technology, v. 30, p. 1774-1780.

Sigsby, R.J., 1976, Paleoenvironmental analysis of the Big Escambia Creek-Jay-Blackjack Creek field
area: Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies Transactions, v. 26, p. 258-278.

Slitor, D.L. and Wiese, J.D., 1988, Gulf of Mexico Update: July 1986 April, 1988: U.S. Department of the
Interior, Minerals Management Service, OCS Information Report, MMS 88- 0038, 40 p.

Vinet, M.J., 1984, Geochemistry and origin of Smackover and Buckner dolomites (Upper Jurassic), Jay
field area, Alabama-Florida, in Ventress, W.P.S., Bebout, D.G., Perkins, B.F., and Moore, C.H., eds.,
The Jurassic of the Gulf Rim: Proceedings of the Third Annual Research Conference, Gulf Coast
Section, Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Foundation, p. 365-374.









APPENDIX 1






FLORIDA OIL FIELD DISCOVERY WELL DATA


DISCOVERY PERMIT
DATE NO.


FIELD


COUNTY


PERFORATIONS TOTAL
DRILL FLOOR OR OPEN HOLE DEPTH
(DF) ELEVATION DEPTH BELOW BELOW
FT. MSL DF. FT. DF, FT.


NAME OF PRODU-
CING FORMATION


DISCOVERY OIL GRAVITY,
STATUS DEGREES API


Sunniland
Forty Mile Bend
Sunoco Felda
West Felda
Lake Trafford
Jay
Mt. Carmel

Blackjack Creek
Bear Island
Seminole
Lehigh Park
Sweetwater Creek
Baxter Island
Mid-Felda
Raccoon Point
Pepper Hammock
Townsend Canal
Bluff Springs
Corkscrew
McClellan
Coldwater Creek


9-26-43
2-1-54
7-22-64
8-2-66
3-30-69
6-15-70
12-19-71

2-14-72
12-5-72
11-14-73
7-30-74
4-22-77
8-11-77
10-13-77
6-20-78
9-28-78
6-27-82
3-25-84
11-10-85
2-19-86
6-4-88


42
167
315
371
401
417
504

523
563
662
712
881
865
904
829
897
1070
1125
1170
1194
1220


Collier
Dade
Hendry
Hendry
Collier
Santa Rosa
Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa
Collier
Hendry
Lee
Santa Rosa
Collier
Hendry
Collier
Collier
Hendry
Escambia
Collier
Santa Rosa
Santa Rosa


34
24
53
48
39
204
273

155
30
35
38
254
29
58
38
42
52
178
44
245
164


11,602-11,626
11,322-11,339
11,472-11,485
11,486-11,489
11,870-11,892
15,470-15,524
15,260-15,280

15,790-15,900
11,589-11,595
11,415-11,420
11,389-11,394
14,299-14,340
11,512-11,515
11,492-11,496
11,410-11,414
11,629-11,633
11,416-11,421
16,332-16,339
11,547-11,565
14,072-14,090
15,150-15,170


11,626
11,557
11,485
11,675
11,987
15,984
15,399

16,235
11,817
11,651
11,630
14,611
11,823
11,686
11,658
11,897
11,462
16,800
11,565
14,475
15,400


Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland
Smackover
Smackover
& Norphlet
Smackover
Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland
Smackover
Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland
Smackover
Sunniland
Smackover
Smackover


Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Flowing
Flowing

Flowing
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Flowing
Swab Test
Flowing
Flowing





APPENDIX 2

1986, 1987 AND CUMULATIVE PRODUCTION DATA (1)


1986 PRODUCTION
Gas
(MCF)


Water
(Bbis)


Oil
(Bbis)


1987 PRODUCTION
Gas
(MCF)


Water
(Bbis)


CUMULATIVE
Oil
(MBbIs)


PRODUCTION
Gas
(MMCF)


NORTHWEST FLORIDA

Bluff Springs 133.281 76,555 97,489 43.434 24.404 154,394 177 102
Jay 5.518.771 8,212.553 44.652,415 4,676,964 7.830.538 51,653,832 355,936 451,819
Blackjack Creek 888,837 1.224,107 7,498,439 695,496 1.106,421 7,422.946 53,503 50,233
Mt. Carmel 45,649 54,294 205,919 31,338 71 94,032 4,590 4,780
McClellan 37,771 14,788 170 27,870 10,266 185 66 25
Sweetwater Creek (3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 15

Subtotal 6,624,309 9.582.297 52,454,432 5,475,102 8,971,700 59.325,389 414,286 506,974

SOUTH FLORIDA

Sunoco Felda 165,685 10,127 2,058,374 136,823 9,439 1,968,188 11,409 975
Mid-Felda 61,652 0 127,532 88,085 0 209.489 1,083 10
Townsend Canal 56,700 0 174,628 47,817 0 201,228 329 0
Lehigh Park 184.978 19,132 2,172,210 170,490 16,557 1,477,860 4,892 493
West Felda 918,659 58,977 7,297,077 1,032,969 62,002 7,893,180 40,102 3,141
Corkscrew 73,578 0 0 173,537 0 0 257 0
Lake Trafford 11,095 0 0 10,742 0 0 276 0
Seminole (3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 85 0
Sunniland 53,546 4,162 1,143,141 28,077 1.861 731,908 18,409 1,822
Bear Island 439,550 38,403 2,898,415 351,562 29,561 1,783,278 9,993 789
Pepper Hammock 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Baxter Island (3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Raccoon Point 793,221 105,464 478,216 754,428 90,770 605,809 2,930 348
Forty Mile Bend (3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 2

Subtotal 2,758,664 236,265 16,349,593 2,794,530 210,190 14,880,940 89,800 7,580

STATEWIDE TOTAL 9,382,973 9,818,562 68,804,025 8,269,632 9,181,890 74,206,329 503,952 514,537


1. Statistics compiled by Charles Tootle, Florida Geological Survey, Oil and Gas Section.
2. Relds are listed in order from north to south.
3. Plugged and abandoned oil fields.

Abbreviations: Bbis Barrels (42 US Gallons)
MBbIs Thousand Barrels
MCF Thousand Cubic Feet
MMCF Million Cubic Feet


FIELD (2)


Oil
(Bbis)







INFORMATION CIRCULAR No. 106


APPENDIX 3






1986 AND 1987 FIELD WELL STATISTICS (1)


FIELD (2) 1986
Number of Wells
PRO INJ SI


TA TOT


1987
Number of Wells
PRO INJ SI


NORTHWEST FLORIDA

Bluff Springs 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Jay 36 30 52 0 118 41 28 52 0 121
Blackjack Creek 9 7 7 0 23 7 7 11 0 25
Mt. Carmel 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2
McClellan 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 3
Sweetwater Creek (3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Subtotal 48 37 59 0 144 53 35 64 0 152

SOUTH FLORIDA

Sunoco Felda 8 2 2 10 22 8 2 2 10 22
Mid-Felda 2 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 0 0 2
Townsend Canal 2 0 2 0 4 2 0 2 0 4
Lehigh Park 2 0 2 0 4 2 0 2 0 4
West Felda 22 0 15 6 43 23 0 14 6 43
Corkscrew 2 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 3
Lake Trafford 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Seminole (3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sunniland 1 0 12 0 13 3 0 10 0 13
Bear Island 14 2 12 0 28 13 0 14 0 27
Pepper Hammock 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
Baxter Island (3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Raccoon Point 11 0 3 0 14 13 0 1 0 14
Forty Mile Bend (3) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Subtotal 65 4 49 16 134 70 2 46 16 134

STATEWIDE TOTAL 113 41 108 16 278 123 37 110 16 286


1. Statistics compiled by Charles Tootle, Florida Geological Survey, Oil and Gas Section.
2. Fields are listed in order from north to south.
3. Plugged and abandoned oil fields.

Abbreviations: PRO Producing Wells
INJ Injection Wells
SI Shut In Wells
TA Temporarily Abandoned Wells
TOT Total No. Wells


TA TOT








APPENDIX 4


1986 AND 1987 FIELD WELLS DRILLED


WeN (1) and Operator-Well
Permit No. Name & No.


Drill Floor
Completion Ejev., Ft.
Location (2) Date Above MSL


Total (3)
Depth, Ft.


BLUFF SPRINGS FIELD


W-15962
P-1204


W-15896
P-1179



W-15894
P-1187







W-15892
P-1191


Hughes Eastern-
Ralph J. Estes,
et al., No. 28-3





Exxon Corp. E.G.
Jeffreys, et aL, No. 6-5



Exxon Corp. St Regis
Paper Co. No. 5-10







Exxon Corp. St Regis
Paper Co. No. 5-9


869' FSL &
800' FWL
Sec. 28,
T5N, R31W




350' FSL &
60.6' FEL
Sec. 6,
T5N, R29W

SHL
1085' FNL &
1100' FWL
BHL-
975' FNL &
1100' FWL
Sec. 5,
T5N. R29W

SHL:
2266' FSL &
1974' FWL
BHL:
2025' FSL &
1750 FWL
Sec. 5,
T5N, R29W


8-22-86







1-3-86


10-21-87








3-10-86


182







201


270








262


16,500







15,815


15,789








15,880


Status


Plugged & abandoned as a d'y hole,


Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
8-22-86.






Completed as a potential producer.


Completed as a potential producer.








Completed as a potential producer.


FIELD
County


JAY FIELD

Santa Rosa


Santa Rosa








Santa Rosa






Exxon Corp. Leon
Thomas, et al., No. 40-
2B


Exxon Corp. LF. Smith
No. 19-9


SHL:
710' FNL &
485' FWL


1-17-86


220


15,760


Completed as a potential producer.


BHL.
600' FNL &
600' FWL
Sec. 40,
T5N, R29W


2253' FSL &
2331' FEL
Sec. 19,
T5N, R29W


2-5-87


297


15,778


Completed as a potential producer.


MT. CARMEL FIELD


No. W# (4) Southeastern Pipe-
P-1219 line Co. Wolfe-
Hendricks No. 36-1B


W-16124 (5)
W-16125(ST)
P-1221


James B. Furrh, Jr.
Inc. Griffis
No. 28-2


2010' FNL &
2834' FWL
Sec. 36,
T6N, R29W

SHL:
900' FNL &
1488' FWL
BHL:
1050' FNL &
1263' FWL
Sec. 28,
T6N, R29W


4-22-88




8-10-87


228




194


15,003




15,200


Completed as a potential producer.




Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
8-10-87.


MCCLELLAN FIELD


W-15962
P-1206


Exxon Corp. State
of Florida
No. 34-2


No. W# (4) Exxon Corp. State
P-1226 of Florida
No. 28-4


1298' FNL &
1313' FWL
Sec. 34,
T6N, R26W

976.2' FSL &
1377.1' FEL
Sec. 28,
T6N, R26W


2-13-87




11-2-87


252




275


14,400




14,205


Completed as a potential producer.




Completed as a potential producer.


Santa Rosa


Santa Rosa


W-15891
P-1192


W-16028
P-1210


Santa Rosa




Santa Rosa


Santa Rosa




Santa Rosa








BLACKJACK CREEK FIELD


W-15893
P-1188


Exon Corp. St.
Regis Paper Co.
No. 14-6


SHL:
205 FSL &
400' FEL
BHL:
750' FSL &
100' FEL
Sec. 14,
T4N, R29W


3-7-86


MD: 16,075 Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole.
TVD: 15.965 3-7-86.


CORKSCREW FIELD


R. K. Petroleum
Corp. Ahlco, Inc.
No. 32-1







R.K. Petroleum -
Bernice D. Pepper
No. 28-3


RACCOON POINT FIELD


Exxon Corp. -
Collier Land & Cattle
Corp.
No. 2-4


SHL:
1671.3' FNL &
186.9' FWL
Sec. 33
BHL:
1452.6' FNL &
660' FEL
Sec. 32,
T46S. R28E

SHL:
671.2' FSL &
1699' FWL
BHL 1201:
671.2' FSL
699' FWL
BHL 1201A:
677' FSL
900' FWL
Sec. 28,
T46S, R28E


SHL-
873' FNL &
755' FWL
BHL:
1320' FSL &
1320' FEL
Sec. 2,
T52S, R34E


MD: 11,721
TVD: 11.557


5-2-86









4-30-87


Completed as a potential producer.


1201: 11,697 P-1201A sidekicked from P-1201 and
1201 A: 11,849 completed as a potential producer.


3-28-86


MD: 13,325
TVD: ?


Completed as a potential producer.


Florida Geological Survey well number for samples (cuttings or core chips).
For directionally drilled wells, SHL is surfaced hole location, BHL is bottom hole location.
MD: measured depth; TVD: true vertical depth (determined by directional survey).
Well samples have not been submitted yet.
"'.- :^44 ,-.. $-%^1-


Santa Rosa


Collier


Collier


W-15913
P-1199


W-16005
P-1201 &
P-1201A


Collier


W-15914
P-1190






APPENDIX 5


1986 AND 1987 WILDCAT WELLS DRILLED


Well (1) and
County Permit No.


Operator-Well
Name & No.


Location


Drill Foor
Completion Elev., Ft
Date Above MSL


NORTHWEST FLORIDA


No. W# (2) Hughes Eastern -
P-1212 S. E. Killam
No. 9-1


W-16126 ARCO R.H.
P-1228 Sherrill No. 34-3



W-16068 David New Drilling
P-1227 Co., Inc. Buckeye
Cellulose Corp.
et al., No. 20-3

No. W# (2) Inexco Oil Co. -
P-1173 Pittman Estate
No. 26-2


W-15915
P-1194



W-15871
P-1195


Exxon Corp. -
State of Florida
No. 33-1


Pruet Production
Co. Floyd
No. 6-3


1108' FNL&
486' FEL
Sec. 9,
T5N, R31W

1029' FSL &
1050' FWL
Sec. 34,
T5N, R33W

1675' FSL &
1350' FWL
Sec. 20,
T6S, R5W

2076.1' FNL &
2228.9' FWL
Sec. 26,
T5N, R29W

1101' FNL &
1186' FEL
Sec. 33,
T6N, R26W

1050' FSL &
1202' FWL
Sec. 6,
T4N, R28W


5-14-87




3-17-88




11-25-87


1-24-86


2-15-86




3-18-86


270




193




40


16,311




17,262




12,478


Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
5-14-87.



Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
3-17-88.



Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
12-4-87.


MD: 15,586 Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
TVD: 15,572 1-24-86.


244




164


14,475




15,448


Completed as a potential producer.
(McClellan field)



Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
1-24-86.


Total
Depth, Ft


Status


Escambia




Escambia




Franklin


Santa Rosa


Santa Rosa




Santa Rosa








Sana Rosa


315 FNL &
1290' FEL
Sec. 10,
T3N. R30W


W-15078 Tenneco Oil Co. -
P-1207 Champion Int rna-
gonal No. 10-1


No W# (2) Red Rock Oi &
P-1220 Minerals Corp. -
Pittman Elate
No. 26-2A

No W# (2) Pruet Production
P-1229 Co. Champion
International
No. 35-41


11-17-86


6-22-87


1-6-88


17,030


15,400


6,800


Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole.
11-17-86.



Reentry of P-1173. Completed as a
potential producer. (Coldwater Creek
field)


Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
1-14-88.


SOUTH FLORIDA


W-15975 Triton Oil & Gas -
P-1202 Alico Development
No. 7-1


W-16049 Triton Oil & Gas -
P-1222 Turner Corp.
No. 26-2


W-15880
P-1193


J.M. Huber Corp. -
Lykes Brothers,
Inc. No. 26-2


1373' FNL &
1258' FEL
Sec. 7,
T46S, R30E

1105.5' FNL &
1178.1' FWL
Sec. 26,
T47S, R29E

1400' FNL &
1850' FWL
Sec. 26,
T39S, R31E


8-22-86


10-9-87


2-14-86


11,600


11,900


9,235


Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
8-22-86.



Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
10-9-87.



Plugged & abandoned as a dry hole,
2-14-86.


1. Florida Geological Survey well number for samples (cuttings or core chips).
2. Well samples have not been submitted yet.


2.076.1' FNL &
2,228.9' FWL
Sec. 26,
T5N. R29W

1962' FSL &
756' FEL
Sec. 35.
T6N. R29W


Sana Rosa


Glades






APPENDIX 6


1986 AND 1987 GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION ACTIVITY


PERMIT GEOPHYSICAL CO.


SURVEYED FOR


PERMIT EXPIRATION
COUNTY APPROVED DATE


STATUS


SHOT SURVEY
ENERGY DEPTH, CHARGE HOLE LENGTH,
SOURCE FT. SIZE, LBS SPACING MILES


G-54-85 GECO


GECO


Western
Western
Ward Exp. Co
Shell Westem E&P
Petty-Ray
Exxon
Shell Offshore
GECO
GFS
Seis Pros
Conoco

Shell Western E&P
Shell Western E&P
Shell Western E&P
Shell Western E&P
Western
Petty-Ray
Shell Western E&P
GFS


G-81-86 Shell Western E&P


Shell Western E&P
GFS
GFS


G-85-87 GFS

G-86-87 GFS

G-87-87 Western


Exxon
Exxon
Hughes Eastern
Shell Western E&P
Exxon
Exxon
Shell Offshore
GECO
Bruxoil
Seis Pros
Conoco

Shell Western E&P
Shell Western E&P
Shell Western E&P
Shell Western E&P
Tenneco
Amoco
Shell Western E&P
LA Land & Exp

Shell Western E&P

Shell Western E&P
Exxon
Ashland

Ashland

Ashland


BY,CA,
GU,LI,F
ES,SR
CO,LA,SU
ES
CL
OK,SR
Offshore
Offshore
Offshore
SR
CL,HE
SR

CL
DD,PB,BR
CL
CL,DD,MN
ES,SR
F
HE,PB
SR

BR,CL,
HE,PB
CL
SR,OK
SR,ES

SR,ES

SR,ES


09-Sep-86 08-Mar-87 Completed

12-Mar-86 10-Jun-86 Completed
N.A. Withdrawn
28-Mar-86 27-Sep-86 Completed
11-Apr-86 06-Apr-87 Completed
29-May-86 25-Nov-86 Completed
19-Aug-86 15-Feb-86 Completed
09-Sep-86 08-Mar-87 Cancelled
19-Aug-86 14-Aug-87 Completed
09-Jul-86 05-Jan-87 Completed
19-Aug-86 15-Feb-87 Completed
12-Aug-86 08-Feb-87 Completed

12-Aug-86 08-Feb-87 Completed
07-May-87 06-May-88 Completed
20-Nov-86 19-May-87 Expired
02-Sep-87 01-Sep-88 Expired
20-Nov-86 19-May-87 Completed
05-Dec-86 03-Jun-87 Cancelled
N.A. Withdrawn
18-Dec-86 16-Jun-87 Completed

02-Apr-87 01-Apr-88 Completed

02-Apr-87 01-Apr-89 Completed
02-Apr-87 01-Apr-88 Completed
01-May-87 30-Apr-88 Completed

01-May-87 30-Apr-88 Cancelled

01-May-87 30-Apr-88 Completed


Southern Fuel C,HR,L,P,S 27-Jul-87 26-Jul-88 Completed


Vibroseis N.A.


Dynamite
Vibroseis
Seismogel
Vibroseis
Dynamite
Airgun
Airgun
Airgun
Dynamite
Vibroseis
Offroad
Vibroseis
Dynamite
Vibroseis
Dynamite
Dynamite
Dyn, Vib
Dynamite
Dynamite
Offroad
Vibroseis
Dynamite

Vibroseis
Dynamite
Seismic
Gel
Seismic
Gel
Seismic
Gel


80-120
N.A.
150
N.A.
80-120
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
80-150
N.A.
N.A.

6-200
N.A.
6-50
27
70
50
6-28
N.A.

6-28

N.A.
100
100


N.A. N.A. 548.50


15
N.A.
1-15
N.A.
10
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
10
N.A.
N.A.


220
N.A.
440
N.A.
220
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
330
N.A.
N.A.


13.75
100.00
4.45
45.50
62.00
105.00
250.00
2,225.00
3.00
180.00
9.00


G-62-86
G-63-86
G-64-86
G-65-86
G-66-86
G-67-86
G-68-86
G-69-86
G-70-86
G-71-86
G-72-86

G-73-86
G-74-86
G-75-86
G-76-86
G-77-86
G-78-86
G-79-86
G-80-86


N.A. N.A.
20 440
20 440


25.00
77.80
63.40


100 20 440 50.00

100 20 440 7.00


Vibroseis N.A. N.A. 440 124.00


.33-20 Test 6.00
N.A. N.A. 91.70
0.33-2 15 29.00
2 50 97.00
2 165 133.00
20 440 40.00
.33-2 15 38.50
N.A. N.A. 11.40

.33-2 15 140.00


G-82-87
G-83-87
G-84-87


_ .__








G-88-87 Degacon
G-89-87 Shell Western E&P

G-90-87 Shell Western E&P


G-91-87
G-92-87
G-93-87


Shell Western E&P
Shell Offshore
GFS


G-94-87 Dee Expl
G-95-87 Coastal Petroleum

G-96-87 Western
G-97-87 GFS


Conoco
Shell Western E&P

Shell Western E&P

Shell Western E&P
Shell Western E&P
Davis Petroleum


Confidential
Coastal

ARCO
Union TX


SR 16-Sep-87 15-Sep-88 Completed
CL.HE,PB 21-Mar-88 21-Mar-89 Pending


DD.BR

DD,BR
Offshore
SR

SR.ES
GL.HE,
MT,OE.PB
Offshore
SR


N.A.


02-Mar-88
14-Dec-87
15-Jan-88


02-Mar-89
13-Dec-88
14-Jan-89


15-Jan-88 14-Jan-89
Application Incomplete


Vibrator NA N.A
Seismic 27 3


Withdrawn Sesmac


Pending
Pending
Completed


Pending
Pending


10-Mar-88 10-Mar-89 Pending
11-Feb-88 1 0-Feb-89 Completed


Vibroseis
Air Gun
Seismic
Gel
Dynamite
Marne
Vibroseis
Airgun
Vibrator


N.A.
150


2875
85.50


27 3 150 151.50

N.A. N.A. N.A 85.93
N.A. N.A. N.A. 250.00
100 15 330 12.40


100 15 440
N.A. N.A. N.A.

N.A. N.A. N.A.
N.A. N.A. N.A.


10.00
199.00

64.00
20.00


County Abbreviations:


L-Lake
LI-Uberty
MT-Martin
MN-Monore
OK-Okahoosa
OE-Okeechobee
PB-Palm Beach


P-Pasco
SR-Santa Rosa
S-Sumter
SU-Suwannee


Total Miles in Applications
Total Surveyed
Central Peninsula
South Florida
Panhandle Onshore
Panhandle Offshore
Total Pending (Permitted)
Total Pending (Not Currently Permitted)
Total Withdrawn. Cancelled, or Expired


BR-Broward
BY-Bay
C-Citrus
CA-Calhoun
CL-Collier
CO-Columbia
DO-Dade


ES-Escambia
F-Franklin
GL-Glades
GU-Gulf
HE-Hendry
HR-Hemando
LA-Lafayette


124.00
488.20
994.45
2,330.00


5.387.08
3.936.65




495.43
199.00
756.00






APPENDIX 7


1986 AND 1987 WELLS DRILLED IN FEDERAL


AREA


Charlotte Harbor


Desoto Canyon


Destin Dome


Destin Dome


Florida Middle
Ground

Pensacola


Pensacola


WELL
NO.


OCS-G-4950


OCS-G-6472


OCS-G-6406


OCS-G-8338


OCS-G-8363


OCS-G-6391
No. 2

OCS-G-6391
No. 2 ST


OPERATOR


Shell Off-
shore, Inc.

Shell Off-
shore, Inc.

Conoco, Inc.


Amoco Pro-
duction

Tenneco


Tenneco


Tenneco


LOCATION


Block 622


Block 512


Block 56


Block 111


Block 455


Block 948


Block 948


DEPTH, FT.
BELOW MSL


10,450


12,250


Confidential


Confidential


12,301


Confidential


Confidential


WATERS, OFFSHORE FLORIDA


PLUGGED &
SPUD ABANDONED


DATE


05/10/86


04/26/86


06/12/87


06/10/87


09/24/86


10/14/87


06/07/87


DATE


06/21/86


06/21/86


01/26/88


10/16/87


11/08/86


01/19/88


10/07/87


COMMENTS


Plugged and abandoned.
Lower Cretaceous test.

Plugged and abandoned.
Lower Cretaceous test.

Temporarily abandoned.
Lease is qualified as producible.

Plugged and abandoned.
Lease is qualified as producible.

Plugged and abandoned.
Lower Cretaceous test.

Temporarily abandoned.
Not qualified.

Temporarily abandoned.
Not qualified.


Driller's depth and information listed under "comments" provided by David Cook (MMS, personal communication,
Wiese (1988).


1988). Remaining data from Slitor and


0
z



0



z
p
0


- ---