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 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Abstract and introduction
 North Florida oil field summar...
 South Florida oil field summar...
 Drilling activity
 Geophysical exploration activi...
 Bibliography
 Appendix 1: 1984 drilling...
 Appendix II: Review of drilling...
 Appendix III: Review of drilling...
 Appendix IV:1984 and cumulative...


FGS



Summary of Florida petroleum production and exploration, onshore and offshore, through 1984 ( FGS: Information circular 101 )
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 Material Information
Title: Summary of Florida petroleum production and exploration, onshore and offshore, through 1984 ( FGS: Information circular 101 )
Series Title: ( FGS: Information circular 101 )
Physical Description: vii, 69 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Applegate, Albert V
Lloyd, Jacqueline M
Florida -- Bureau of Geology
Publisher: State of Florida, Dept. of Natural Resources, Division of Resource Management, Bureau of Geology
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1985
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Petroleum -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Petroleum in submerged lands -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Albert V. Applegate and Jacqueline M. Lloyd.
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 36-38.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000985853
oclc - 14404024
notis - AEW2269
System ID: UF00001162:00001

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Abstract and introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    North Florida oil field summaries
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    South Florida oil field summaries
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 13
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Drilling activity
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 27
    Geophysical exploration activity
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Bibliography
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Appendix 1: 1984 drilling activity
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Appendix II: Review of drilling in state waters...
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Appendix III: Review of drilling in federal waters...
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Appendix IV:1984 and cumulative production data
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Copyright
            Copyright
Full Text









STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Elton J. Gissendanner, Executive Director

DIVISION OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
H.J. Woodard, Acting Division Director

BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Walter Schmidt, Chief


INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101
SUMMARY OF FLORIDA PETROLEUM
PRODUCTION AND EXPLORATION,
ONSHORE AND OFFSHORE,
THROUGH 1984

by
Albert V. Applegate
and
Jacqueline M. Lloyd



Published for the
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
TALLAHASSEE
1985



.. ^ ^














3 1262 04273 6362


DEPARTMENT
OF
NATURAL RESOURCES


BOB GRAHAM
Governor


GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State


BILL GUNTER
Treasurer


RALPH D. TURLINGTON
Commissioner of Education


JIM SMITH
Attorney General


GERALD A. LEWIS
Comptroller


DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture


ELTON J. GISSENDANNER
Executive Director








LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
TALLAHASSEE
November 29, 1985

Governor Bob Graham, Chairman
Florida Department of Natural Resources
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Dear Governor Graham:
The Bureau of Geology, Division of Resource Management,
Department of Natural Resources, is publishing as its Information
Circular No. 101, "Summary of Florida Petroleum Production and Ex-
ploration, Onshore and Offshore, through 1984".
This report summarizes the exploration, production history, and
geology of Florida's oil and gas fields, recent offshore and onshore
exploration, and oil production and exploration statistics. Drilling
and production statistics are compiled primarily, but not exclusively,
for 1984. This report will be useful to oil and gas industry and
research geologists interested in the oil and gas production, explora-
tion, and geology of Florida.
Respectfully yours,

Walter Schmidt, Chief
Bureau of Geology
















































Printed for the
Florida Department of Natural Resources
Division of Resource Management
Bureau of Geology

Tallahassee
1985





iv







CONTENTS

Page
Acknowledgements ...................................... vii
Abstract ................................................. 1
Introduction ............. ................................ 1
North Florida Oil Field Summaries ........................... 5
Jay Field .. ............................ .......... 5
Blackjack Creek Field .............................. 9
Mt. Carmel Field .................................... 11
Sweetwater Creek Field .............................. 13
South Florida Oil Field Summaries ............... .......... 13
Sunoco Felda Field ................................... 13
Mid-Felda Field ..................................... 15
Townsend Canal Field ............................... 15
Lehigh Park Field .................................... 15
West Felda Field ............... .................... 17
Lake Trafford Field .................................. 19
Seminole Field ..................................... 19
Sunniland Field ...................................... 21
Bear Island Field ................... .............. 23
Pepper Hammock Field ............................... 23
Baxter Island Field ................................ 25
Raccoon Point Field ................................. 25
Forty Mile Bend Field ................................. 25
Drilling Activity ........................................ 27
1984 Wildcat and Field Drilling ....................... 27
1980-1984 Paleozoic Drilling Activity ..................... 28
Possible Future Oil and Gas Fields-
Offshore Exploratory Drilling .......................... 29
Gulf of Mexico Eastern Planning Area ................... 29
Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Area ................... 32
Geophysical Exploration Activity .......................... 34







Bibliography ......................................... 36
Appendices

I. 1984 Drilling Activity .............................. 39
IL Review of Drilling in State Waters and Marquesas OCS
Block 28 ....................................... 47
Ill. Review of Drilling in Federal Waters ................ 53
IV. 1984 and Cumulative Production Data ................ 59
V. Discovery Well Data ............................. 61
VI. Oil Field Data ..................................... 63
VII. Florida Oil Reserve Estimates ..................... 65
VIII. 1984 Geophysical Exploration Activity .............. 67

ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure
1 Oil Field Location Map ............................ 3
2 South Florida Panhandle Correlation Chart ............ 4
3 North Florida Oil Field Location Map .................. 7
4 Jay Field Structure Map ............................ 8
5 Blackjack Creek Field Structure Map ................. 10
6 Mt. Carmel Field Structure Map ...................... 12
7 South Florida Oil Field Location Map ....... ........ 14
8 Sunoco Felda, West Felda, and Mid-Felda Fields
Structure Map ................................... 16
9 Lehigh Park Field Structure Map ..................... 18
10 Lake Trafford Field Structure Map ................... 20
11 Sunniland Field Structure Map ...................... 22
12 Bear Island Field Structure Map ................... 24
13 Raccoon Point Field Preliminary Structure Map ........ 26
14 Offshore and Paleozoic Drilling Activity ............... 30
15 Structural Features of Florida ..................... 33
16 1984 Geophysical Exploration Activity ................ 35

TABLES

1 Comparison of Jay Field and Statewide Production,
1978-1984 .......................................... 2
2 Drilling Activity for 1980-1984. ..... ................. 27





ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Several Bureau of Geology staff members contributed to this
report. Oil field data, production statistics, and reserve estimates
were provided by Dr. Charles Tootle. Greg Erikson, Pauline Hurst,
and Jim Jones drafted and photographed the figures. Alison Lewis
ran a computer search for references on Florida oil and gas fields.
The geologists of the Geologic Investigations Section reviewed and
edited the manuscript.
George Winston (consulting geologist, Coral Gables, Florida)
provided geologic information and advice. Robin Ferber (Univ. of
Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, Louisiana) provided the struc-
ture map of Lehigh Park field. Mike Cheeseman (petroleum
geologist, Pensacola, Florida) provided the structure map of Lake
Trafford field.



























































































































































































Z







SUMMARY OF FLORIDA PETROLEUM PRODUCTION
AND EXPLORATION, ONSHORE AND OFFSHORE,
THROUGH 1984

by
Albert V. Applegate
and
Jacqueline M. Lloyd
ABSTRACT

Each of Florida's seventeen oil fields is described. Descriptions
included a brief history of each field along with 1984 and
cumulative production data. Geologic information, including a
structure map, is presented whenever possible.
Development drilling, exploratory drilling, and geophysical ex-
ploration activities are discussed. These discussions indicate cur-
rent and future development and exploration areas in Florida.
The appendices include a variety of statistics on Florida oil and
gas activity. These include tabulations of 1984 drilling activity, off-
shore drilling activity, 1984 and cumulative production data,
discovery and oil field data, oil reserve estimates and geophysical
exploration activity.

INTRODUCTION

There are two major oil producing areas in Florida which are
found at opposite ends of the state. One is the "Sunniland trend" in
South Florida which includes 13 oil fields (nine active, one tem-
porarily shut-in, three plugged and abandoned) in a northwest-
southeast orientation in Lee, Hendry, Collier, and Dade counties
(figure 1). Production is principally from rudistid reefs found in the
upper one hundred feet of the Sunniland Formation (figure 2) of Ear-
ly Cretaceous age.
Florida's other producing area is in the western panhandle in
Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. There are three active oil fields
and one plugged and abandoned oil field in this area (figure 1). Pro-
duction is from Jurassic-age Smackover dolomites and limestones
and Norphlet sands (figure 2).
Since the discovery of Jay field in 1970, northwest Florida has
dominated Florida oil production. Northwest Florida accounts for
394,304 million barrels (or 83 percent) of the total 474,976 million
barrels produced in Florida through December 1984 (see Appendix
IV). Jay field, the only first magnitude field in the State, has ac-
counted for 86 percent of the northwest Florida production and 71
percent of the total statewide production.
1984 oil production was down from 1983. During 1984, Florida
produced 14,461,969 barrels of oil compared to 19,475,574 barrels
for 1983. This represents a significant decrease (26 percent) in oil





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


production. Statewide production has been declining since 1979
when Jay field began its decline. A comparison of the statewide
decrease in production with Jay field's decrease in production in-
dicates Jay Field dominance in Florida oil production trends (see
Table 1).


Table 1. Comparison of Jay Field and statewide production,
1978-1984.

JAY FIELD PRODUCTION STATEWIDE PRODUCTION
% Decrease % Decrease
Total Produc- from Total Produc- from
Year tion, Barrels Previous Yr tion, Barrels Previous Year
1978 36,080,383 47,536,191
1979 36,075,891 0.01 47,167,861 0.8
1980 31,905,545 11.6 42,886,498 9.1
1981 24,972,497 21.7 34,743,513 19.0
1982 16,750,425 32.9 25,623,366 26.2
1983 12,530,827 25.2 19,475,574 24.0
1984 8,769,649 30.0 14,461,969 25.7


The discovery of Raccoon Point field in 1978 and its subsequent
development have been the major factors in maintaining the
statewide production decline at a slightly lower rate than that of
Jay field (Charles Tootle, 1985, personal communication, Florida
Bureau of Geology).
A discussion of each of Florida's seventeen oil fields follows,
beginning with Jay field and continuing in geographic order from
north to south, as shown on figure 1. A brief history of each field is
given along with 1984 and cumulative production data. Geologic in-
formation, including a structure map, is presented whenever possi-
ble. Obviously, geologic information is minimal and maps are
unavailable for small fields having only one or a few wells (e.g.,
Sweetwater Creek, Baxter Island, and Forty Mile Bend fields).
The field descriptions are followed by three sections on drilling
activity which cover 1) 1984 drilling activity, 2) 1980-1984 Paleozoic
drilling activity and 3) offshore exploratory drilling. The section on
offshore exploratory drilling, along with the final section on
geophysical exploration, yield indications of current and future
areas of petroleum exploration and interest in Florida.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Figure 1. Florida oil field location map.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


SOUTH FLORIDA


SOUTHFLORI DA


RATTLESNAKE
HAMMOCK FM.


u LAKE TRAFFORD FM.
01 SUNNILAND FM.


PUNTA GORDA
ANHYDRITE


-J I


ABLE MEMBER

TWELVE ROWN
MILE OLOMITE
ZONE
MEMBER


WEST FELDA SHALE


PUMPKIN BAY FM.




BONE ISLAND FM.


r PANHANDLE


TRINITY CLASTICS
UNDIFFERENTIATED


FERRY LAKE FM.


RODESSA FM.


PINE ISLAND SHALE


SLIGO-HOSSTON FMS
UNDIFFERENTIATED


COTTON VALLEY GROUP
WOOD RIVER FM. HAYNESVILLE FM.
SJURASSIC SMACKOVER FM.
NORPHLET FM.
RHY OLITE LOUANN SALT

TRIASSIC BASALT EAGLE MILLS FM.

PALEOZOIC CLASTICS

? \IGNEOUS


Figure 2. South Florida panhandle correlation chart.


-






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


NORTH FLORIDA OIL FIELD SUMMARIES

Jay Field

The Jay field (figures 3 and 4) was discovered in June, 1970, by the
drilling of the Humble St. Regis No. 1 (P-417) in Section 43, T5N,
R29W in Santa Rosa County. The well produced from the
15,470-15,524 foot interval of the Smackover Formation. The initial
test gauge was as follows:

DATE *BOPD *CHOKE *THP *GOR GRAVITY *BS&W
6/12/70 1712 16/64 3450 1253 50.70API 1.3%



*BOPD: barrels of oil per day; CHOKE: surface choke installed for
the purpose of restricting flow and controlling the rate of produc-
tion; THP: tubing head pressure (measure of fluid pressure exerted
on tubing at the surface, psi); GOR: gas oil ratio, cu. ft/barrel; BS &
W: bottom sediment and water.


The Jay field is the largest oil field found in the United States since
the discovery of the giant Prudhoe Bay field in 1968. Jay field is
located within the "Jay trend" of Escambia and Santa Rosa coun-
ties, Florida, and Escambia County, Alabama. The northern exten-
sion of jay, in Escambia County, Alabama, is the Little Escambia
Creek (LEC) field. Other fields within the trend include Blackjack
Creek field to the southeast, and Fanny Church, Flomaton, and Big
Escambia Creek fields in Alabama. Flomaton, which is the only ma-
jor Norphlet field in the area, was the first of the Jay trend
discoveries (1968). The discovery of Jay field was next in June, 1970,
followed by Big Escambia Creek field in December, 1971. Blackjack
Creek, the last major field in the trend area, was discovered in
February 1972 (Ottman, et al., 1978, 1976; Sigsby, 1976). The Jay
trend fields are located on the down-dip side of a normal fault com-
plex which rims the Gulf Coast to the west through Alabama,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas. It is believed that this
fault complex probably extends to the south-southeast into the Gulf
of Mexico. At Jay, the vertical displacement is about 1200 feet. Oil
accumulation at Jay is within an asymmetrically shaped anticline
with the fault complex forming the eastern barrier to oil migration
(figure 4).
The northern seal of Jay field is formed by a porosity barrier in
Alabama where the lithology changes from porous dolomite to
dense micritic limestone. The porosity in the Jay field is due to





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


dolomitization of the pelletal grainstones and other limestones in
an upper regressive section of the Smackover. Early dolomitization,
fresh water leaching, and an anhydrite cap rock (Buckner Forma-
tion) have helped form a complex, extensive reservoir. Numerous
analyses of the Jay area Smackover, including comparisons with
modern carbonate environments, have been made in attempts to
understand this complex reservoir (Ottman, et al., 1973 and 1976;
Sigsby, 1976; Mancini and Benson, 1980; Lomando, et al., 1981;
Vinet, 1984; Moore, 1984; Bradford, 1984).
Ottman, et al. (1973, 1976) compared the facies distribution of the
Smackover at Jay with that of the Joulter Cays area in the Bahamas.
They found a good correlation between the Smackover at Jay and the
stable-flat area (Andros Platform) west of Joulter Cays, with the ex-
ception that "...the climate during the closing phase of the
Smackover sedimentary cycle was obviously more arid than the pre-
sent climate of the Bahamas."
Later models compare the Smackover to the modern Persian Gulf-
Trucial Coast sedimentary environment (Lomando, et al., 1981; Brad-
ford, 1984; Moore, 1984; Vinet, 1984). These models take into account
the more arid depositional environment of the Upper Smackover.
They also are compatible with the physiographic, carbonate ramp
model presented by Ahr (1973). The ramp, as defined by Ahr, is "an in-
clined platform that extends basinward without a pronounced break
in slope." The Jurassic Smackover and Cotton Valley are presented
as ancient examples of the ramp model; the Trucial Coast of the Per-
sian Gulf is one of the modern examples. In contrast, the Bahamas
Banks, especially the Andros Island area, is an example of the car-
bonate shelf depositional model.
Consideration of diagenetic information in relation to the deposi-
tional models indicates the influence of original facies distribution
on later porosity development in the Smackover (Sigsby, 1976; Brad-
ford 1984; Vinet, 1984). The formation of Smackover hydrocarbon
reservoirs as a result of original depositional environment, subse-
quent dolomitization of select facies, and present day structure is
summarized by Bradford (1984) as follows:
"The Smackover carbonates have both primary intergranular
porosity and secondary oomoldic and intercrystalline porosi-
ty which resulted from dolomitization of the upper
Smackover grainstones and underlying mudstones. The
porous grainstones provided a conduit for the dolomitizing
fluids and only those mudstones associated with the
grainstones were dolomitized. In areas...where no
grainstones were deposited, the mudstones were not
dolomitized. Therefore, the original depositional environment
provided an important control over later porosity-forming
dolomitization. The overlying Buckner anhydrite provided a
seal to this reservoir facies.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101 7

The original depositional environment was, in turn, controll-
ed by topographic highs which were the result of salt move-
ment. Salt movement during the Late Smackover was minor,
but provided the slight differences in elevation needed for
higher energy conditions to develop...A map of present-day
structure shows that the undolomitized lagoonal mudstones
are now structurally the highest in the area. These dense lime
mudstones have no porosity and therefore contain no
hydrocarbons. But hydrocarbons are present beneath this
lime mudstone in the underlying Norphlet Sandstone in
Flomaton field where the dense mudstone forms a seal. In
Big Escambia Creek field, hydrocarbons occur in updip
regions of the porous dolomitized grainstones and
mudstones. The contact between dolomitized and non-
dolomitized rock provides the eastern boundary to the
Smackover Field."
Reservoir energy at Jay is furnished by a combination of dissolved
gas and water drive. Water flooding and injection of nitrogen gas
have more than doubled initial recovery estimates from these fields.


NORTH FLORIDA OIL FIELD LOCATION MAP

R33W R32W R31W R R9W RW R27W 1 W.





INACTIVE IL FIELD 4IE
IND ACTIVE SOLEECLR F





I NACTIVE OCI FEL


FLORIDA I I
l \ 1 iC E






JION

Fig- ure 3. t ENSACOLA





Figure 3. North Florida oil field location map.









BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


-u I













rsy -.9-0




'9k- 4_40. e. 4
1413




50, $7 ale 49
lou
lOWA ,
fib* c ~ -54* I











a t 452


a mZ. lot"
~ ~ I -mamIU -em? '~~o


JAY FELD




STRUCTURE MAP
-TOP OF SMACKOVER-NOWIHIET
OL POOL
Ljawl"EI FlsI MO.b~ CAhs.. IS7Ma


',
at


WATM 9lECTCH waILL
ML WAM COSETACr 1074
CQL 2o0 ?


Figure 4. Jay field structure map (after Jay-LEC Unit Geological

Committee, 1974).


al


a 101111PRF
-------------
a Iwo METO






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


In his study on Florida oil reserves in 1978 (Appendix VII) Dr.
Charles Tootle (Florida Bureau of Geology) estimated the original oil
in place in the Jay field (Florida only) to be 763,129,638 barrels, and
productive acres (Florida only) to be 13,021. The estimated recovery
factor assigned this field was 42 percent with original recoverable oil
in place of 320,514,448 barrels. By year-end 1984 Jay had produced a
total of 339,382,000 barrels of oil. In January 1985, oil production for
the month was 580,087 barrels of oil, and 3,866,323 barrels of water
from the 50 remaining producing wells. A total of 113 producing
wells, 13 dry holes and 15 service wells were drilled through
December, 1984.
A key to the successful exploration and development of the Jay
-Little Escambia Creek (Alabama) fields was the unitization of the
fields. This was made possible by coring the wells, analyzing the
cores, and combining this information with bottom hole pressure
data, porosity log information, and other data to arrive at a highly
successful reservoir management program and accurate
assignments of equity to operators and royalty owners (Schirer, et
al., 1978; Langston, et al., 1981; Langston and Schirer, 1985).



Blackjack Creek Field

The Blackjack Creek field (figure 5) discovery well was the Humble
Oil and Refining Co. (now Exxon) St. Regis Paper Company 13-3 well
(P-523) drilled in Section 13, T4N, R29W, Santa Rosa County. The well
was completed February 14, 1972, as a producer in the Norphlet For-
mation in the 16,120-16,130 foot interval. The initial test gauge was as
follows:

DATE HOURS *BOPD *CHOKE *THP *GOR GRAV. *BS&W
1126/72 4 371 9164" 1400 203 51.30API 1.2





*BOPD: barrels of oil per day; CHOKE: surface choke for the purpose
of restricting flow and controlling the rate of production; THP: tubing
head pressure (measure of fluid pressure exerted on tubing at the
surface, psi); GOR: gas-oil ratio, cu. ft/barrel; BS&W: bottom sedi-
ment and water.







10 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Due to limited productivity and water production caused by a bad
cement job in the Norphlet Formation, the well was recompleted as a
Smackover producer in the 15,790-15,900 foot interval. Only 35,644 bar-
rels of oil were produced from the Norphlet Formation. Initial gauge
for the Smackover on January 22, 1975, was as follows:


*GOR


GRAV.

51.20 API


BLACKJACK CREEK
3 2 Sat 11004 Iou CoWto. Florida
STRUCTE MAP
TOP OF SMACKOVER




,0 .... ', 0,--



12 \
3

1-1 *-55\3 \

5 -080 \ \
S .3 -'5". '%-1 \\
S70 5558 \
\ --1 -13 -1-\\
3636


.\ e-* 2623



Aoo HOLE LOCUTION '800 28--

nED HOLE


WATER ELECTION WELL
---- OL WATER CONTACT
C..L 50FEET


*BS&W

0


FELD


00oo FET
200 METERS


578 PERMIT NJ6ER
-13714 DEPTH


31 321


. .. T.-- -. .-4-_ -
ST3N


Figure 5. Blackjack Creek field structure map (after Blackjack
Creek Geological Committee, 1974).


HOURS *BOPD *THP

2 1428 3250


3 5






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


*BOPD: barrels of oil per day; CHOKE: surface choke installed for the
purpose of restricting flow and controlling the rate of production;
THP: tubing head pressure (measure of fluid pressure exerted on tub-
ing at the surface, psi); GOR: gas-oil ratio, cu. ft/barrel; BS&W: bot-
tom sediment and water.

The trapping structure for the Blackjack Creek field is an anticline
located about eight miles southeast of Jay field on the downthrown
southwest side of a down-to-the-basin normal fault which has about
1,200 feet of throw at Jay (figure 5). The field was originally known as
the Joulter Cays field (named for a carbonate bank in the Bahamas)
by Exxon geologists due to its dolomitized oolites, which furnished
much of the porosity.
Reservoir energy in the field is derived from a combination of gas
and water drive. Secondary recovery was furnished by a water flood
and tertiary recovery by the injection of nitrogen.
By year end 1984,19 producers, and four dry holes had been drilled
in the Blackjack Creek field. Total production was 50,463,000 barrels.
All of this production, except for about 160,000 barrels produced
from the Norphlet Formation, was from the Smackover Formation of
Upper Jurassic age. During December, 1984, the field produced
190,546 barrels of oil and 669,000 barrels of water from nine wells.
Productive acreage totals 5720 acres (Appendix VI), and of the
100,500,000 barrels of oil (Appendix VII) calculated to be in place,
over 50 percent has been produced to date.

Mt. Carmel Field

Mt. Carmel field (figure 6) was discovered on December 19, 1971,
by the Louisiana Land and Exploration Company (LL & E). The
discovery well was the LL & E Finley Heirs 39-3 (P-504) located in
Section 39, T5N, R29W, Santa Rosa County. The field is approximate-
ly one mile east of Jay field and is separated from Jay by the Foshee
Fault system (figures 5 and 6). Productive area is estimated at 481
acres (Appendix VI).
Initial production was 1,440 barrels of 470 API oil per day and 1,195
thousand cubic feet gas per day with 0.1 percent BS&W. The produc-
ing horizon was from 15,260 to 15,325 feet in sandstone of the Nor-
phlet Formation. The horizon was perforated from 15,260 to 15,280
feet.
There is currently one producing well in the Mt. Carmel Field. As of
the end of 1984, the field had produced 4,444,692 barrels of oil and
4,624,562 thousand cubic feet of gas, with 79,557 barrels of oil and
131,783 thousand cubic feet of gas produced during 1984. Production
during December 1984 was 11,429 barrels of oil, 26,722 thousand
cubic feet of gas, and 23,304 barrels of water.







12 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY




MOUNT CARMEL FIELD
*a s3 Santa Rosa County, Floridn

U \ STRUCTURE MAP
\ TOP OF NORPHLET SAND
I (Jn MI r,. 1974)
BSCAMR CON ALABAMA -\TI
-M.rA "I TSA CouI FLOrIDA & -----



'Ui- K 4&
\\ \TO
as 0 2000 FEET










I D



















ABANDONED LOCATION s u V
OILWAT CONTACT 974
39













C. L 100 FEET






Figure 6. Mt. Carmel field structure map (after Miller, 1974).
raD
C. L 100 FEET


Figue 6 Mt.Carel feldstrctur ma (afer ille, 174)






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Sweetwater Creek Field

Sweetwater Creek Field (see figure 3) was officially discovered on
April 22, 1977, with the successful flow test of the Houston Oil and
Minerals Corp. W.M. Stokes 15-2 No. 1 Well (P-881) in Section 15, T5N,
R26W, Santa Rosa County. In the initial test the well produced 624
barrels of 43.50 API oil and only a trace of water from a Smackover
limestone interval from 14,299 to 14,340 feet. This test data, along
with the well location (approximately 18 miles east of Jay field) spur-
red rumors that a "new Jay" field had been discovered. Rumors prov-
ed to be false and offsets to the south and east of the discovery well
were dry. The field produced a total of 13,695 barrels of oil during its
entire lifetime. The discovery well was the only producer at Sweet-
water Creek field. In its final year of production (1980) the well pro-
duced 1,456 barrels of oil. It was plugged and abandoned in
December, 1980, after it began producing 100 percent water.

SOUTH FLORIDA OIL FIELD SUMMARIES
Sunoco Felda Field

The Sunoco Felda field (figures 7 and 8), located in Hendry and
Collier counties, was discovered in July, 1964, by Sunoco when they
drilled the discovery well, the No. 2 Red Cattle (P-315) in Section 32,
T45S, R29E in Hendry County, Florida. The discovery well of the se-
cond commercial oil field in Florida was drilled 21 years after the
discovery of the Sunniland Oil field and was located on a combina-
tion of seismic and subsurface data (Tyler and Erwin, 1976). In June,
1954, the Commonwealth No. 3 Red Cattle (P-191) was drilled in Sec-
tion 25, T45S, R28E, in Hendry County. A drill stem test of this well in
the 11,435-11,492 foot interval of the Sunniland Formation recovered
1,090 feet of clean oil, 350 feet of brackish water and 9,060 feet of salt
water. It was decided that a commercial completion could not be
made. The discovery well for the field was slightly over two miles to
the southeast of this test, but was drilled over ten years later. In the
development of the field, a commercial oil well, the Sun No. 1 Red
Cattle Co. "A" 25-1, Section 25, T45S, R28E (P-369) was drilled about
1,000 feet southwest of P-191.
The depositional environment in the Early Cretaceous was one of
a clear shallow subtropical sea and a very slowly subsiding sea bot-
tom. There was a regional dip to the southwest of about 20 feet per
mile. The time interval was characterized by transgressions and
regressions of the sea as shown by the carbonate-evaporite se-
quences. A localized build up of algal plates, rudistids, foraminifera,
gastropods, pellets, and other organic debris into mounds or pods
was responsible for the Sunoco-Felda oil field. The trap is
stratigraphic and is due to a porosity and permeability barrier to the
northeast which prevents migration of the oil up-dip (Tyler and Erwin,





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


1976; Means, 1977).
A permit summary shows a total of 32 producing wells and 14 dry
holes had been drilled at the close of 1984. A 1978 study made by Dr.
Charles Tootle (Appendix VI) showed a surface area of approximately
3,840 acres; the average thickness of the producing horizon was 12
feet, the oil in place was 32,368,421 barrels, and producible reserves
were 12,300,000 barrels (Appendix VII). Cumulative production
through year-end 1984 totaled 10,918,000 barrels of oil.
Oil production for the year 1984 was 227,939 barrels, and water pro-
duction was 2,258,956 barrels. There were 12 producing oil wells in
this field at year-end 1984.


SOUTH FLORIDA OIL FIELD LOCATION MAP


Figure 7. South Florida oil field location map.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Mid-Felda Field

The Mid-Felda field (figure 8) discovery well was the R.L. Burns
Red Cattle 27-4 (P-904) in Section 27, T45S, R28E in Hendry County,
Florida. The well was completed in the 11,492-11,496 foot interval of
the Sunniland Formation on October 13,-1977. Samples show a par-
tially dolomitized fossil hash with about ten feet of oil staining. The
compensated formation density log indicated approximately 20 per-
cent porosity for an eight foot interval.
In an initial production test taken October 24, 1977, the discovery
well gauged 281 barrels of oil per day and 53.6 barrels of water on a
pump test. The well was located on a small subsurface feature be-
tween West Sunoco Felda field and the Sunoco Felda field (figure 8).
At year-end 1984, there were three producers and six dry holes.
Cumulative production at year-end 1984 from the Mid-Felda field
was 826,000 barrels of oil. Production during December was 9,467
barrels of oil and 29,066 barrels of water. Productive acreage is ap-
proximately 480.

Townsend Canal Field

Townsend Canal field is located in Hendry County, approximately
three miles north of Mid-Felda field, within the Sunniland Trend
(figure 7). It was discovered on June 27, 1982, with the first produc-
tion test of the Natural Resource Management Corp. A. Duda &
Sons Well No. 2-3 (Section 2, T45S, R28E, P-1070). The test produced
160 barrels of 28.40 API oil per day and 42 barrels of water per day.
Production was from the Sunniland Formation between 11,416 and
11,430 feet. Productive area is estimated to be 640 acres (Appendix
VI).
Four wells are currently producing at Townsend Canal field. Two
wells were completed during 1984. The Natural Resource Manage-
ment Corp. Duda (Evergreen) No. 7-2 (P-1116), located in Section 7,
T45S, R29E, was completed as a saltwater disposal well. The Natural
Resource Management Corp. A. Duda & Sons No. 3-2 (P-1151) in
Section 3, T45S, R28E, was completed as a potential producer.
Total production for the Townsend Canal Field, as of the end-of
1984, was 124,861 barrels of oil. Production during December 1984
was 9,272 barrels of oil and 26,221 barrels of water.

Lehigh Park Field

The discovery well for the Lehigh Park field (figure 9) was the Exx-
on Consolidated Tomoka No. 22-4 (P-712) drilled in Section 22, T44S,
R26E in Lee County, Florida.
This is the most northwesterly field in the Sunniland trend. The
discovery well was completed in the 11,389-11,394 foot interval of the







"4
0)

m,, .r U,, SUNOCO-FELDA, WEST FELDA, AND MID-FELDA FIELDS

'' *TRUCTURE MAP
i if TOP OF UMeA iO







n..li su\oc al 1



05- lit \46-0 + '. 3 -











Figure 8. Sunoco Feldaa,. and Mid-Felda f I elds




structure map.
add 191 ..4 T
1/ 0 I \








I a.
II 1 i .M I __ __ r _
I I 1
T ts .11" a I 1 1 -o





structure map.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Sunniland Formation. Initial production was 490 barrels per day of
27.60 API oil with BS&W of 48 percent. Completion date was July 30,
1974.
There are presently five producing wells in the field. The discovery
well (P-712) was abandoned and a deviated well (P-712A) drilled at the
same surface location to produce higher on the structure. A total of
nine dry holes were drilled to delineate the field. All of the producing
wells are deviated because bottom-hole locations are beneath the
town-site of Lehigh Park.
Production through year-end 1984 was 4,275,000 barrels of oil. Dur-
ing December 1984, the field produced 29,046 barrels of oil. Percen-
tage of oil to total fluid is 7.8 percent.
The field has an areal extent of 804 acres and the estimated
thickness of the pay interval is 16.8 feet. Dr. Charles Tootle (personal
communication, 1983) calculated original oil in place at 7.6 million
barrels (Appendix VII) and recoverable oil at 4.6 million barrels.

West Felda Field

The West Felda Field (figure 8) was discovered August 2, 1966,
with the drilling of the Sun-Red Cattle 21-3 well (P-371) in Section 21,
T45S, R28E, Hendry County.
The West Felda field is the largest oil field discovered in south
Florida. The trap is partially stratigraphic but also has closure (figure
8). The discovery well was drilled on the northeast flank of the field
and there is definite dip reversal to the northeast, which was not pre-
sent at Sunoco Felda. The West Sunoco Felda was in a more normal
marine environment than Sunoco Felda and the energy level was
higher. Porosity and permeability were thus higher in the West Felda
field with average porosity of 20 percent and average permeability of
80-100 millidarcies. Proven acres in the field are approximately 7,500.
The average oil pay thickness is 17 feet, and original recoverable oil
in place is estimated to be 50,000,000 barrels. (Appendices VI and
VII).
At year-end 1984, cumulative oil production from the West Felda
field was 37,004,000 barrels of oil from 26 producing wells. During the
month of December, 1984, oil production was 106,197 barrels and
water production was 674,675 barrels. Oil production was 13.6 per-
cent of total fluid.
In 1970 Humble (now Exxon) drilled a wildcat well in Lee County,
the Humble Lehigh Acres 14-2 in Section 14, T45S, R27E (P-407).
This well was originally considered to be the discovery well for a new
field (named the Lehigh Acres field) but was later found to be within
West Felda field.
This well encountered on altered quartz diabase at 15,625 feet
below MSL (Barnett, 1975) with age of 163 million years (Exxon). In
the Lehigh Acres well, 70 feet of dolomite were found in the








18 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


12,588-12,684 foot interval of the Brown Dolomite Zone. Most of this
dolomite was very fine grained and non-porous. Approximately ten
feet of this dolomite were estimated to have had porosity and
permeability capable of oil production had it been oil saturated.
During 1984 four wells were drilled in the West felda field. Two of
these were completed as potential producers: 1) the Exxon Turner
20-2 (P-1153), Section 20, T45S, R28E, and 2) the Exxon Consolidated
Tomoka Land 13-5 (P-1132), Section 13, T45S, R27E.


LEHIGH PARK FIELD


\T 43 5














5a.,8 1


Lee County Florid

STRUCTURE MAP
TOP OF SUNNILAND
(Robi Fr,. I1l85)


0 4000 FEET
0 1200 METERS


554
















C L 10 EE


i \ -


I
113









I 9J ,^^ I1 I
42 804 1 2841 81
2 ,0 1 2565 l3

1-- 0 +.. 8112
4
4 42"




3 04 4, 3 1 36


T44S
_f _5


Figure 9. Lehigh Park field structure map (after Ferber, 1985).


to


35,0






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Lake Trafford Field

The Lake Trafford field (figure 10) was discovered by Mobil Oil
Corp. on the Baron Collier Jr. lease in Section 9, T47S, R28E in Collier
County about one and one-half miles southwest of Lake Trafford. The
discovery well IP-401) was completed March 30, 1969.
The field is of special interest as it is a one-well field producing
from the basal part of the Sunniland Formation. The Sunniland top in
the discovery well is at 11,640 feet (11,600 feet below MSL) and the
Punta Gorda top is at 11,895 feet (11,855 feet below MSL). The Sun-
niland was perforated in the 11,800-11,892 foot interval with an initial
pumping production of 118 barrels of oil per day, and 78 barrels of
water per day after the well was acidized with 2,500 gallons of acid.
The gravity of the oil was 25.60 API. Subsequently, the well was
squeeze cemented to shut off water from above the perforations, re-
perforated and re-acidized. Offsetting locations northwest and
southeast of the discovery well were dry holes.
On July 18, 1977, Mobil sold this field to the Kanaba Corporation.
By the end of 1984, the field had a cumulative production of 242,000
barrels of oil. Oil production during 1984 was 11,963 barrels. This
field is unique in south Florida as it has not produced water since the
original bad cement job was repaired by squeeze cementing and re-
perforating.
According to Jim Richter (personal communications, 1985), who
was exploration manager of Mobil at the time the discovery well was
drilled, and is now president of Kanaba Corporation, the well site
geologist described cored material from the producing zone as "rub-
ble". The geologist noted that there were burrows in this argillaceous
limestone "rubble" which were probably made on a mud flat and ad-
ded to the porosity of the rock. Mr. Richter felt that it was a combina-
tion of this burrowing and fracturing which was responsible for the
development of the producible permeability and porosity. John A.
Means (1977) also notes that the Sunniland limestone produces from
a fractured zone in the Lake Trafford field.




Seminole Field

The discovery well for the Seminole field (figure 7) was the Weiner-
Oleum Corporation well (P-662) in Section 12, T48S, R32E, in Hendry
County. Completion was made in the 11,415-11,420 foot interval of
the Sunniland Formation on November 14, 1973. Initial production
was 26 barrels of 25.40 API oil per day and eight barrels of water per
day. This non-commercial three-well oil field was abandoned in 1978
after producing a total of 84,755 barrels of oil.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


LAKE TRAFFORD FIELD


STRUCTURE MAP
TOP OF SUNNILAND


PIOOUCER
BOTTOM HOLE LOCATION
SI + DRY HOLE
ABANDONED LOCATION
C.L 20 FEET




Figure 10. Lake Trafford field structure map (after Cheeseman,
1984, independent petroleum geologist, Pensacola,
Florida, personal communication).






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Sweetwater Creek Field

Sweetwater Creek Field (see figure 3) was officially discovered on
April 22, 1977, with the successful flow test of the Houston Oil and
Minerals Corp. W.M. Stokes 15-2 No. 1 Well (P-881) in Section 15, T5N,
R26W, Santa Rosa County. In the initial test the well produced 624
barrels of 43.50 API oil and only a trace of water from a Smackover
limestone interval from 14,299 to 14,340 feet. This test data, along
with the well location (approximately 18 miles east of Jay field) spur-
red rumors that a "new Jay" field had been discovered. Rumors prov-
ed to be false and offsets to the south and east of the discovery well
were dry. The field produced a total of 13,695 barrels of oil during its
entire lifetime. The discovery well was the only producer at Sweet-
water Creek field. In its final year of production (1980) the well pro-
duced 1,456 barrels of oil. It was plugged and abandoned in
December, 1980, after it began producing 100 percent water.

SOUTH FLORIDA OIL FIELD SUMMARIES
Sunoco Felda Field

The Sunoco Felda field (figures 7 and 8), located in Hendry and
Collier counties, was discovered in July, 1964, by Sunoco when they
drilled the discovery well, the No. 2 Red Cattle (P-315) in Section 32,
T45S, R29E in Hendry County, Florida. The discovery well of the se-
cond commercial oil field in Florida was drilled 21 years after the
discovery of the Sunniland Oil field and was located on a combina-
tion of seismic and subsurface data (Tyler and Erwin, 1976). In June,
1954, the Commonwealth No. 3 Red Cattle (P-191) was drilled in Sec-
tion 25, T45S, R28E, in Hendry County. A drill stem test of this well in
the 11,435-11,492 foot interval of the Sunniland Formation recovered
1,090 feet of clean oil, 350 feet of brackish water and 9,060 feet of salt
water. It was decided that a commercial completion could not be
made. The discovery well for the field was slightly over two miles to
the southeast of this test, but was drilled over ten years later. In the
development of the field, a commercial oil well, the Sun No. 1 Red
Cattle Co. "A" 25-1, Section 25, T45S, R28E (P-369) was drilled about
1,000 feet southwest of P-191.
The depositional environment in the Early Cretaceous was one of
a clear shallow subtropical sea and a very slowly subsiding sea bot-
tom. There was a regional dip to the southwest of about 20 feet per
mile. The time interval was characterized by transgressions and
regressions of the sea as shown by the carbonate-evaporite se-
quences. A localized build up of algal plates, rudistids, foraminifera,
gastropods, pellets, and other organic debris into mounds or pods
was responsible for the Sunoco-Felda oil field. The trap is
stratigraphic and is due to a porosity and permeability barrier to the
northeast which prevents migration of the oil up-dip (Tyler and Erwin,






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Sunniland Field

The Sunniland Oil field (figure 11) was officially discovered.in
November, 1943, by the Humble Oil and Refining Company (now Exx-
on) at Sunniland Siding in Collier County. The well, GCR No. 1 (P-42),
was in Section 29, T48S, R30E. Completion was made in the Sun-
niland Formation in the open hole interval of 11,597 11,626 feet
below seven-inch casing which was cemented at 11,597 feet. Initial
production was 97 barrels of 200 API oil per day and 425 barrels of
water per day by pumping.
The well was drilled on a prospect outlined by magnetometer,
gravity meter, seismograph and core drill. Seismic work was con-
sidered poor due to the "boulder zone", an interval of highly porous
carbonates usually encountered between 1,300 and 3,500 feet. Core
drilling data also resulted in false information. Exxon was mapping
structure on the Ocala by drilling core holes about a mile and a half
apart in selected areas. One of these core holes encountered a
sinkhole in the Ocala and when it was compared to the one hole in
the south it was falsely interpreted as a reversal, as this was not
found deeper in the section.
After drilling GCR No. 1, Exxon drilled the Humble GCR No. 2 in
Section 30, T48S, R29E. This well was structurally low and about one
mile west of the original discovery. It was a dry hole. The third well
drilled was the Humble GCR No. 4 (P-35) in Section 20, T48S, R30E.
This well was about one and one-half miles north of GCR No. 1 and
was within the field limits of the Sunniland Field. It was the true
discovery well. Through December 1984,25wells, including the Hum-
ble GCR No. 1, have produced oil in this field. There were also ten dry
holes. Production in the field is from various porous zones in rudistid
"mounds" in the upper 60 feet of the formation. These rudistids (now
extinct) were pelecypods. A modern equivalent of a rudistid would be
an oyster. The structure map (figure 11) for the Sunniland field shows
a northwest-southeast trending dome about four miles long and two
miles wide with closure of about 40 feet. It is not believed that there
has been any folding or faulting in this field, and no structure is
noticeable in the underlying Punta Gorda Formation. The explana-
tion for this dome is that as the sea gradually rose, growth of the
rudistid beds in the upper Sunniland kept up with the rising sea level.
When the seas retreated and the Lake Trafford Anhydrite formed, it
was thinnest where the thick rudistid beds of the Sunniland were pre-
sent.
At year-end 1984 six wells were producing and 12 wells were shut-
in at Sunniland. Total oil production for the year was 160,454 barrels
of oil and 2,975,137 barrels of water. Over 18.5 barrels of water were
produced for each barrel of oil, or about 5.4 percent of total fluid pro-
duction was oil. Cumulative oil production through 1984 was







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


-]---i--I---C
TABS


SUNNILAND FIELD


+ 11 1 7 CA Cont. FM

STRUCTURE MAP
e TOP OFSUNNILAND

2!5 99 I06 23

I 'N.h
06 61 1353 042


*r 27e -.c!Lr
\\ \3, 1 3445 -10





-11311
-s + -115521N
316 Pt-Sl 1042 35
11317 34 316 0 7 ~ iil~






-ti \\-toc-i
m11501 -1 1506
23 1 63
-11910 -317 -11464
15 i 51 4% all 6 I
- - - -

so 1 0 1 2




OOT 400.1 1"' 0
A SLTWATR ISPSA '0ss
JIPKONL 311 PERkffT NLA49
GILVA611ftCONACT 115 Dam 3 3


c L I m


Figure 11. Sunniland field structure map.






18,198,000 barrels of oil with a gas-oil ratio of just under 100.
The original Sunniland well, GCR No. 1 in Section 29 was open to
production to the depth of 11,626 feet (11,592 feet below MSL) which
is 34 feet below the oil-water contact shown on a Humble structure
map of the Sunniland Field. This oil-water contact appears to be
about the same as the Bear Island well GCR No. 34-3 in Section 34,
T48S, R30E (P-780) which lies about 9,000 feet to the southeast. It
would thus appear that Exxon had found Bear Island in 1943 instead
of Sunniland even though Bear Island was not officially discovered
until 1972 by Tribal Oil on an Exxon farm out.
In 1981 Exxon drilled the No. 20-2 Collier Co. well (P-1042, Section
20, T48S, R30E) to 17,200 feet in the Sunniland field. They en-
countered a weathered granite at 17,092 feet, after drilling the entire
Lower Cretaceous and Jurassic sedimentary section below the Sun-
niland. This deeper pool wildcat was then completed in the Sun-
niland.


DOO FEET
OO ME'mU


- -I---


n


I






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Bear Island Field

Bear Island field (figure 12) was officially discovered on December
5, 1972, with the completion of the Exxon-Gulf Coast Realties 2-4
(P-563) well in Section 2, T49S, R30E. The "real" discovery of Bear
Island may have actually occurred in 1943 with the completion of the
"Sunniland discovery well". A discussion of this well and its
significance in the history of these two fields is included in the
preceding Sunniland field section of this report.
Bear Island is within the Sunniland trend and is located approx-
imately two miles southeast of Sunniland field (figure 8). The official
discovery well pumped 132 barrels per day of 260 API oil and 545 bar-
rels per day of water from perforations between 11,589 and 11,595
feet in Sunniland carbonates.
The deepest well in Bear Island field, the Exxon-Gulf Coast
Realties No. 12-2, (P-727, Section 12, T49S, R30E), was completed on
April 21, 1977. It bottomed in the basal clastics (base of the Wood
River Fm.) at a total depth of 17,254 feet. The well had an initial pro-
duction of 12 barrels of oil and 67 barrels of water per day from the
Sunniland Formation between 11,597 and 11,607 feet. It also
penetrated the Brown Dolomite Zone of the Lehigh Acres Formation
between 12,812 and 12,872 feet with a net dolomite thickness of
seven feet (Applegate, 1984). In this well, the dolomite had no porosi-
ty.
There are currently 24 producing wells in Bear Island field. Two
development wells were completed during 1984: the Exxon Collier
Co. No. 2-10 (P-1118) in Section 1, T49S, R30E and the Exxon Collier
Co. No. 2-11 (P-1119) in Section 2, T49S, R30E. Both wells were com-
pleted as potential producers.
The field produced a total of 8,516,000 barrels of oil as of year-end
1984, with 772,000 barrels produced during 1984. Production during
December 1984 was 67,181 barrels of oil and 363,571 barrels of water.
The structure map of Bear Island field (figure 12) indicates a
northwest-southeast trending dome about 4.5 miles long and 2.5
miles wide with a closure of about 55 feet. The field is estimated to
have 2,880 productive acres (Appendix VI), an average pay thickness
of 11 feet, and 14.7 million barrels of original recoverable oil in place
(Appendix VII).

Pepper Hammock Field

Pepper Hammock is a recently named, but inactive field, in Collier
County (figure 7). The discovery well, the Exxon Corp. Collier Co.
23-1 (P-897), is located in Section 23, T49S, R30E, approximately one
and one-half miles south of Bear Island field. This is the only well at
Pepper Hammock; it is currently shut-in pending results of further ex-
ploratory drilling.







24 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


The initial production test on September 28, 1978 (the official
discovery date), yielded 20 barrels per day of 270 API oil and 206 bar-
rels per day of water. Production was from Sunniland limestones at
11,629 to 11,633 feet. A total of 323 barrels of oil were produced
before the well was shut-in in October, 1978.


BEAR ISLAND FIELD
Cor Caw ,%a
(T 4* s, n s0 E)
STRUCTURE MAP
BASE OF ANHYDRTE M UPPER SUNILAND FOMATION


2s


* pWNXUQc
BOTTIO HOLE LOCATION
o- Oy HOLE
D WATER INJECTION WELL
-... IL/WAT CONTACT, 1978
C. LS F5ET


733 PERMIT NUMBER
-111-32 a TI


0 4000 eET

I0
0 1200 115471

I N

1003 I

~-~ ---- -I-- -



I


8 \\ 38 I
32 -11547

1\ 18



524 I 7




I I
S-1-152


Figure 12. Bear Island field structure map (after Bear Island
Geological Committee, 1978).






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Baxter Island Field

Baxter Island is a one-well, abandoned field located approximately
eight miles southeast of Bear Island field (figure 7). The single pro-
ducer and discovery well was the Diamond Shamrock Gerry Bros.
Ltd. 31-3 (P-865) located in Section 31, T49S, R32E, Collier County. In
its initial production test on August 11, 1977, the well pumped 35 bar-
rels of 22.40 API oil and 220 barrels of water per day. Production was
from the Sunniland Formation at 11,512 to 11,515 feet. The field pro-
duced a total of 1,859 barrels of oil. Production during 1978, before it
was shut in, was only 813 barrels of oil. The well was plugged and
abandoned on January 12, 1980.

Raccoon Point Field

Raccoon Point field is the southeastern-most active field in the
Sunniland trend (Figure 7). The field includes approximately 1,600
productive acres (Appendix VI). Its discovery well was the Exxon
-Oleum Corporation No. 33-4 (P-829) drilled in Section 33, T51S, R43E,
in Collier County.
Initial production was from the 11,410 11,414 foot interval of the
Sunniland Formation. The first reliable production test was made
June 20, 1978, when the discovery well pumped 57 barrels of 23.30
API oil per day and 845 barrels of water per day.
The preliminary structure map (figure 13) of Raccoon Point field in-
dicates a dome trending approximately north-south. It appears to be
at least two miles wide and two to three miles long; however, the
limits of the field cannot yet be defined. Productive acreage and
reserves have not been estimated for this relatively new oil field. It is
interesting to note that to date there have been no dry holes drilled in
the Raccoon Point field area.
There are currently nine producing wells in the Raccoon Point
field. Three development wells were completed during 1984: the Exx-
on Oleum Corp. (P-1061), the Exxon Corp. Oleum Corp. (P-1082), and
the Exxon Corp. Collier Land and Cattle Corp. (P-1130). All three
wells are located in Section 34, T51S, R34E. They were completed as
potential producers.
The production total for Raccoon Point field, at year-end 1984, was
448,580 barrels of oil. Production during December 1984 was 48,537
barrels of oil and 59,123 barrels of water.

Forty Mile Bend Field

Commonwealth Oil Company drilled the Wiseheart State Board
of Education No. 1 wildcat (P-167) in Section 16, T45S, R35E in Dade
County. The well was completed January 27, 1954, in the 11,322







26 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


-11,339 foot interval of the Sunniland Formation. The well pumped an
estimated 76 barrels of 21.30 API oil with 56.3 percent BS & W. It was
located 50 miles southeast of the Sunniland field (figure 8). A study
of the core in the open interval shows that it is a partially to fully oil-
saturated, finely crystalline dolomite and limestone with pin-point
porosity which does not appear to be commercial.
The second well in the Forty Mile Bend field, completed in 1954,
was the Gulf Oil No. 1 State of Florida, lease No. 340, (P-182). This
well, located in Section 18, T54S, R36E, about three and one-quarter
miles east of the original discovery well, was completed as a pump-
ing well in the 11,327-11,334 foot interval of the Sunniland. The initial
gauge was 112 barrels of oil per day. The oil gravity was 21.70 API,
and the BS & W was 75 percent.


1162


27
1149


RACCOON POINT FIELD
Comer County, Floida

PRELIMINARY STRUCTURE MAP
TOP OF SUNNILAND

0 4000 FEET
0 1200 METERS
0 1200 METERS


91 1
*-11360
C1031 I 1130
Se11330


Figure 13.


S I61 6 1082 928



^ -,' i / 9 ( 52

I i / /-1,

I 998
-11360


1141



1I


36
>I

0 BROWARD COUNTY
5 DADE COUI'TY


1







ui ui

I

I


998 PERMIT NUMBER
-11360 DEPTH


Raccoon Point field preliminary structure map.
Permits 1061, 1082, 1130, 1141, 1149, and 1162 are still
confidential. Data from these wells could not be used
in constructing this map.


T St3
T 52 S


SPOOUCER
aOTTOM HOLE LOCATION
SSALT WATER DISPOSAL
CL t10FErr


I
I
I
t
I
I
I
-
t 141


-


tt


Io






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


The two wells comprising Forty Mile Bend field were actually over
nine miles apart (figure 8) and could not have produced from the
same trap. Both were abandoned in 1956, after producing only 32,888
barrels of oil in about 17 months in 1954 and 1955. Low oil gravity
caused by insufficient maturation temperature, and low porosity and
permeability in the Sunniland at these locations made this field non-
commercial. In addition, a /2-inch hole was found in the casing of
the Gulf well (P-182) at 10,045 feet. This was above the cement behind
the casing and below the pump seat inside the casing. This could
have caused excessive water flow and thus shortened the productive
life of the well.

DRILLING ACTIVITY

1984 Wildcat and Field Development Drilling

As the following table indicates, 1984 Florida oil drilling activity
was about the same as the preceding five years, although there were
slightly fewer wells drilled during 1980 and 1982.

Table 2. Drilling activity for 1980-1984.

YEAR

1984 1983 1982 1981 1980
Wildcat wells drilled 11 15 12 10 8
Successful wildcats 1 0 1* 0 0
Dry holes 10 15 11 10 8
Field development wells drilled 13 9 8 13 12
Potential Producers 10 9 7 8 10
Dry holes 3 0 1 5 2
Service wells drilled 2 3 1 3 2
TOTALS 26 27 21 26 22
*Townsend Canal field discovery well

Wildcat drilling during 1984 (see Appendix I) was concentrated in
northwest Florida, primarily in Santa Rosa County (four wells) and
Escambia County (two wells), with one well in Walton County.
Jurassic Smackover and Norphlet formations were the exploratory
targets in this area. The three wildcat wells drilled in south Florida
were targeted for the Sunniland Formation. The remaining wildcat,
drilled in Dixie County, was a Paleozoic test. Paleozoics in north
Florida are presumed to be closely related to Paleozoic rocks of





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


West Africa (Cramer, 1971,1973). West African production from these
rocks has spurred exploratory interest in Florida. More information
on Paleozoic drilling can be found in the next section of this report.
The single successful wildcat drilled during 1984 is located in Sec-
tion 19, T5N, R31W, in Escambia County. The degree of success is
unknown at this point because data for this well is still confidential.
Wildcat success ratio for 1984 is 1/11, or approximately nine percent.
This appears to be a reasonably good success ratio; however, with
so few wildcats drilled per year, long term averages yield more
representative values. Wildcat drilling over the last five years yielded
two successful wells out of a total of 56 drilled (approximately 3.6
percent).
Fifteen field wells were drilled during 1984. Thirteen were develop-
ment wells and two were service wells (saltwater disposal). Of the
thirteen development wells, ten were completed as potential pro-
ducers and three were plugged and abandoned as dry holes. Three of
the producers were drilled in northwest Florida to the Smackover.
Seven were South Florida-Sunniland wells. All three dry holes were
located in south Florida one at Lehigh Park field and two at West
Felda field-and were drilled to the Sunniland.

1980 1984 Paleozoic Drilling Activity

The Paleozoics in Florida range from Devonian to Ordovician or
Cambrian in age, and faunally are closely related to African rocks
(Cramer, 1971, 1973). Production from the West Africa rocks spurred
interest in Florida; however, the Florida sandstones, which are in
the lowermost part of the section, are extremely indurated and have
very little porosity or permeability. In addition to these negative fac-
tors, the Triassic breakup of the African and North American con-
tinents was accompanied by much igneous activity and the
Paleozoics of Florida were heavily intruded by basic igneous rocks.
Amoco drilled five Paleozoic wildcat wells in north Florida be-
tween 1980 and 1984. These wells were drilled in Taylor, Madison,
Lafayette, and Dixie counties (figure 14). All were dry holes, and
none had any shows of oil. In addition to these wells, Amoco par-
ticipated in a 10,000-foot Paleozoic well in Camden County,
Georgia, just four miles north of the Florida line. Amoco held over
one million acres under lease in 1984, mainly in Taylor, Dixie,
Lafayette, and Levy counties, but many of these leases have been
dropped, and according to Amoco geologists, there are no plans to
drill any more wells in north Florida.
In addition to Amoco, other oil companies with substantial land
holdings include Star Petroleum, Pennzoil, Aminoil, and Exxon. Ex-
xon has substantial holdings north of the Florida border in Echol's,
Lowndes, and Clinch counties, Georgia, and has run many seismic
lines in Madison and Hamilton counties, Florida. Exxon also drilled






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


a dry hole in Early County, Georgia, in 1984. This well was drilled to
a total depth of 9,176 feet. Most of the acreage in neighboring
Jackson County, Florida, was under lease at the time this well was
drilled.
During the period of very active leasing, which began before the
first well was drilled by Amoco, the price of leases gradually rose
from about one dollar per acre bonus money to a maximum of about
20 dollars per acre, but has since declined as leases are being
allowed to expire.


Possible Future Oil and Gas Fields Offshore Exploratory Drilling

Twenty miles to the west of the Florida Alabama boundary, in
Alabama state waters, lies the Mary Ann gas field (figure 14). This
field is in Mobile Bay and was discovered in the Norphlet Formation
by Mobile Oil in 1979. Mobil has six Norphlet wells, and Exxon has
two Norphlet wells in the Mary Ann field and an active drilling cam-
paign is being pursued in this area.
There are at present (year-end 1984) four Norphlet wells outside
of the Mary Ann field limits completed or in the process of comple-
tion in the Norphlet with no dry holes drilled at the present time.
Some of these wells have tested in excess of 30 million cubic feet of
gas per day. This area will add significantly to the United States' total
gas reserves and this Norphlet gas may extend to the east into
Florida waters.
A Jurassic test, the Getty Oil State Lease 2338, Well No. 1
(P-1097), in East Bay, Santa Rosa County, Florida, was drilled in
1983 to a total depth of 18,011 feet. The Smackover was tested but
produced only saltwater in the 17,482-17,530 foot interval. Two tests
in the 17,405-17,411 and 17,328-17,411 foot interval of the
Smackover produced only saltwater. The thick, porous, and
permeable Norphlet Formation and underlying Louann Salt, which
together are responsible for the prolific production in the Mobile
area, were very thin in this well.


Gulf of Mexico Eastern Planning Area

After a long history of drilling dry holes off Florida (Appendices II
and III and figure 14) in state and federal waters in the eastern Gulf of
Mexico, a sale of tracts in this relatively unexplored area on
January 5, 1984, attracted a relatively low $310,600,000 for 156
tracts of 5,760 acres each. The high bid of $31,877,000 was made by
Shell and Amoco for a block on the top of the Destin Dome. Drilling









- .. .-4 r ~ "'

'I~ ic I







TUMN
111Ulf


awaIHOR (FALSMIC) AND IR1NIFICANT WELLI
16m7 WAlI PERMITNUUMBR
ism 7VTALDZPrH07WILL


iI I




po.w



017


[ii Cm
I -1

U,? ,

~ L ~\S ~ i r'. ..


Figure 14. Florida offshore (Gulf of Mexico) and Paleozoic drilling activity.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


up to this time had taken place only on the flanks of the structure.
The second highest bid of $16,578,000 was made for Destin Dome
tract 159 (figure 14) by Conoco and Chevron. The third highest bid of
$15,486,000 was made by Mobil, Tenneco and Sohio for tract 948 in
the Pensacola area (figure 14). The amount paid for this block
reflects the success of Mobil and Exxon in the Mobile area to the
west.
In the original Destin Dome drilling, around 1975, a total of ten dry
holes were drilled in the Destin Dome area. Nine of these wells were
on the Destin Dome and one well drilled by Gulf Oil was about 80
miles to the southwest of the dome (figure 14). Three of the wells on
Destin Dome drilled by Exxon (OCS-G-2486), Amoco (OCS-G-2502),
and Sun (OCS-G-2490) penetrated the Jurassic Smackover and Nor-
phlet formations. Six wells on Destin Dome which were shallower
Cretaceous tests are not shown in the tables or on figure 14.

In the 1975 Destin Dome drilling, all of the wells were drilled on the
flanks of the dome as no leases were sold on top of the structure.
This was by far the costliest unsuccessful drilling campaign ever car-
ried out on a single structure. Much of the loss was taken by Exxon
because reliance on the seismic "bright spot" technique caused
them to pay high prices for wildcat acreage. Exxon may recoup these
losses since they bought acreage on top of the structure in the latest
lease sale.
At the present time Shell has drilled and abandoned Smackover
and Norphlet wells in Block 160. Exxon drilled and abandoned a
Smackover and Norphlet test in Block 284. Chevon is drilling below
22,000 feet in Block 422.
In the Desoto Canyon area, which lies just south of the Destin
Dome area, 27 blocks were acquired by Amoco, Shell, Conoco, Exx-
on, Getty and Chevron or combinations of these companies. Prior to
the sale, no leases had been acquired in DeSoto Canyon. In the
Gainesville, Apalachicola, and Florida Middle Ground areas, (figure
14) a total of eight blocks were acquired by Sohio.
In the Gainesville area, Sohio drilled a dry hole in block 707-1. It is
believed the well penetrated a very thick Eagle Mills section and-Was
abandoned in Paleozoic rocks at about 16,000 feet.
In the Pensacola area Sohio drilled a Smackover and Norphlet test
in block 948-1. Total depth was 18,958 feet. The well was drilled on a
Louann Salt anticline.

No new leases were nominated in the Charlotte Harbor area. Drill-
ing in this area in the past has been unsuccessful and basement
rocks have been found at 10,000 to 12,000 feet in wells which have
been drilled on a structural feature called the Sarasota Arch (figure






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


15). This arch extends from Sarasota County southwest to the con-
tinental edge.
The Pulley Ridge and Howell Hook areas, which lie within the
boundaries of the South Florida Basin (figure 14), had 57 and three
blocks leased, respectively, by Gulf, Superior, Tenneco, Shell, Union,
and Texaco, or combinations of these companies. The area most fre-
quently nominated for leasing within Pulley Ridge lies to the nor-
thwest and northeast of the Dry Tortugas, except for the three blocks
in the Howell Hook area (figure 14). This area is of interest because
the Lower Trinity rocks drilled in the Marquesas Keys (P-275 and
P-284, figure 14) had thick zones of vugular porosity in the Brown
Dolomite Zone of the Twelve Mile Member of the Lehigh Acres For-
mation. There are other possible targets, including the Sunniland
Formation which is productive onshore, and the older Coahuilan
lowermostt Cretaceous and possible Jurassic age rocks). At the pre-
sent time there are environmental constraints on drilling in the Pulley
Ridge and Howell Hook areas. This includes all acreage south of 26
degrees north latitude.
The blocks nominated are all located on a large gravity minimum,
which is at least 100 miles in length. Oil fields in the Sunniland For-
mation in the South Florida Basin have been found associated with
gravity minima.


Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Area

The COST GE-1, a stratigraphic test, was drilled in the United
States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Area about 74 miles
east of Jacksonville, Florida, in 1977. It lies within the Southeast
Georgia Embayment (figure 15). Six wildcat wells were later drilled in
the general area.
The well penetrated sedimentary strata of Early Cretaceous
through Quaternary age. Below 11,000 feet, highly indurated to weak-
ly metamorphosed shales with meta-igneous rocks were en-
countered. Dating of several samples of these metamorphosed ig-
neous rocks yielded values about 355 million years before present
(Scholle, 1979). The rocks are considered to be Late Devonian in age.
From 5,950 to 11,000 feet, Lower Cretaceous rocks which were
dominantly continental in character, with very low organic carbon
content and extremely low extractable hydrocarbons were en-
countered. Temperatures in these rocks are believed to have been in-
sufficient to have generated and expelled hydrocarbons above 8,500
feet Between 3,500 and 5,950 feet, Upper Cretaceous rocks which
were marine in origin were encountered. These rocks, below 3,600
feet, had a high content of marine organic matter but were thermally
immature. The interval above 3,600 feet was thermally immature and
had a very poor source rock potential (Scholle, 1979). The in-







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


escapable conclusion, drawn from a careful
sediments and borne out by six additional wildcat
area has an extremely low oil potential.


study of these
wells, is that this


CONTINENTAL SHELF
I -'


YUCATAN PEN. STRUCTURAL FEATURES
IN FLORIDA
AND OFFSHORE

100 0 100 200 300 400 500
I I I I I K1
B EHH HBHff HBHHHBH ^HBB ra ra


Structural features of Florida.


Figure 15.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


The two wells comprising Forty Mile Bend field were actually over
nine miles apart (figure 8) and could not have produced from the
same trap. Both were abandoned in 1956, after producing only 32,888
barrels of oil in about 17 months in 1954 and 1955. Low oil gravity
caused by insufficient maturation temperature, and low porosity and
permeability in the Sunniland at these locations made this field non-
commercial. In addition, a /2-inch hole was found in the casing of
the Gulf well (P-182) at 10,045 feet. This was above the cement behind
the casing and below the pump seat inside the casing. This could
have caused excessive water flow and thus shortened the productive
life of the well.

DRILLING ACTIVITY

1984 Wildcat and Field Development Drilling

As the following table indicates, 1984 Florida oil drilling activity
was about the same as the preceding five years, although there were
slightly fewer wells drilled during 1980 and 1982.

Table 2. Drilling activity for 1980-1984.

YEAR

1984 1983 1982 1981 1980
Wildcat wells drilled 11 15 12 10 8
Successful wildcats 1 0 1* 0 0
Dry holes 10 15 11 10 8
Field development wells drilled 13 9 8 13 12
Potential Producers 10 9 7 8 10
Dry holes 3 0 1 5 2
Service wells drilled 2 3 1 3 2
TOTALS 26 27 21 26 22
*Townsend Canal field discovery well

Wildcat drilling during 1984 (see Appendix I) was concentrated in
northwest Florida, primarily in Santa Rosa County (four wells) and
Escambia County (two wells), with one well in Walton County.
Jurassic Smackover and Norphlet formations were the exploratory
targets in this area. The three wildcat wells drilled in south Florida
were targeted for the Sunniland Formation. The remaining wildcat,
drilled in Dixie County, was a Paleozoic test. Paleozoics in north
Florida are presumed to be closely related to Paleozoic rocks of






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION ACTIVITY

Chapter 377, Part 1, Florida Statutes, as amended in 1980,
authorized the Department of Natural Resources to regulate
geophysical activity. Rules (Chapter 16C-26.07, Florida Ad-
ministrative Code) were adopted in 1984 to implement this statute.
The intent of the Rules is stated in Rule 16C-26.07 (1), F.A.C., as
follows:
It is the intent of the department to permit geophysical opera-
tions in search of naturally occurring oil, gas, or minerals in
Florida provided that this activity is conducted in a manner
which minimizes or prevents the destruction of or injury to
the environment and the natural resources of the State of
Florida. This regulation shall govern any and all geophysical
activities utilized in the exploration for hydrocarbons, in-
cluding seismic, core drilling, or other type exploration work
(whether or not involving the discharge of explosives) on or in
uplands, wetlands, submerged lands, or in the water column
above State lands in the State of Florida.
The first applications for geophysical permit were received by the
Department's Bureau of Geology on May 17,1984 (see Appendix VIII).
These applications were for a 25-mile and a 13-mile seismic survey,
both in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. These applications were
approved and given the first two permits on July 6, 1984.
Twenty-nine applications for geophysical permits were processed
during 1984; all of these applications were approved. Twenty-three of
the permits were for seismic exploration in Escambia and Santa
Rosa counties; four were for seismic exploration in south Florida in
Lee, Collier, Charlotte, and Palm Beach counties; the remaining two
were for seismic exploration in north Florida and included areas in
Jackson, Madison, Hamilton, and Columbia counties. Of these 29
permitted surveys, 23 have been completed, five have yet to be
surveyed and two were cancelled by the geophysical companies.
Figure 16 shows the areas covered by completed surveys and the
areas covered by permitted, but not completed surveys for 1984.
Seismic exploration for 1984 was concentrated in Escambia and San-
ta Rosa counties. Surveys in these two counties yielded a total of
569.5 miles of shot-hole and 51 miles of Vibroseis lines. Remaining
north Florida exploration in Jackson, Madison, Hamilton, and Colum-
bia counties covered 48 miles (Vibroseis). Only one of the south
Florida permitted surveys has been completed. It included 22 miles
of survey lines in Collier County.
Seismic exploration in 1985 is expected to again concentrate in
Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. Interest in south Florida may in-
crease due to Exxon's continued success at Raccoon Point field. If
environmental and political issues can be successfully resolved, off-
shore seismic exploration may also be expected during 1985.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101 35









S8 a a *

ALABAMA




"-. J CL < --.. / -"^ ,
Y .. C GEORGIA_
lCN MAAD P D SL. .'--o ~ -
EA E E, R Y O OALAC UA EEPUTA

LEVY L ... L L


./ -; -

"U Moa ORANGE '" -

HAiii -
L LADEZ
-- ------ ,





1984 GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION ACTIVITY I~.L I a
o COLU --r-


AREAS PERMITTED, SURVEYS COMPLETED ..'
R R U C


Figure 16. 1984 geophysical exploration activity.





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


BIBLIOGRAPHY



Ahr, Wayne M., 1973, The Carbonate ramp: an alternative to the shelf
model: Gulf Coast Assoc. of Geological Societies Transactions, vol.
23, pp. 221-225.

Applegate, Albert V., 1984, The Brown Dolomite Zone of the Lehigh
Acres Formation (Aptian) in South Florida Basin a potentially pro-
lific producing horizon: Gulf Coast Assoc. of Geological Societies
Transactions, vol. 34, pp. 1-6.

Barnett, Richard S., 1975, Basement structure of Florida and its tec-
tonic implications: Gulf Coast Assoc. of Geological Societies Tran-
sactions, vol. 25, pp. 122-142.

Bear Island Geological Committee, 1978, Bear Island field structure
map: Exxon Corporation's Sunniland Oil Pool Report for Florida
Dept. of Natural Resources Hearing No. 40.

Blackjack Creek Geological Committee, 1974, Blackjack Creek field
unit, Exhibit M-1 for Florida Department of Natural Resources Hear-
ing No. 38.

Bradford, Cynthia A., 1984, Transgressive-regressive carbonate
faces of the Smackover Formation, Escambia County, Alabama: in
Ventress, William P.S., Don G. Bebout, Bob F. Perkins, and Clyde H.
Moore (editors), The Jurassic of the Gulf Rim: Proceedings of the
Third Annual Research Conference, Gulf Coast Section, Society of
Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Foundation, pp. 27-39.

Cramer, Fritz H., 1971, Position of the north Florida Lower Paleozoic
block in Silurian time; phytoplankton evidence: Journal of
Geophysical Research, vol. 76, no. 20, pp. 4754-4757.

1973, Middle and Upper Silurian chitinozoan suc-
cession in Florida subsurface: Journal of Paleontology, vol. 47, no. 2,
pp. 279-288.

Ferber, Robin, 1985, Lehigh Park field structure map: from Master's
Thesis (in preparation), Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette,
Louisiana.

Jay-LEC Fields Unit Geological Committee, 1974, Structure Map -Top
of Smackover-Norphlet Oil Pool: Exhibit No. G-1 for Florida Depart-
ment of Natural Resources Hearing No. 36.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


Langston, E.P., and J.A. Shirer, 1985, Performance of Jay-LEC field
unit under mature waterflood and early tertiary operations: Journal of
Petroleum Technology, vol. 37, pp. 261-268.

Langston, E.P., J.A. Shirer, and D.E. Nelson, 1981, Innovative reser-
voir management key to highly successful Jay-LEC waterflood:
Journal of Petroleum Technology, vol. 33, pp. 783-791.

Lomando, Anthony J., Jr., Charlotte Schreiber, and Roy D. Nurmi,
1981, Sedimentation and diagenesis of Upper Smackover grainstone,
Jay-field area, West Florida (abstract): American Assoc. of Petroleum
Geologists Bulletin, vol. 65, no. 5, p. 950.
Mancini, E.A., and D.J. Benson, 1980, Regional stratigraphy of Upper
Jurassic Smackover carbonates of southwest Alabama: Gulf Coast
Assoc. of Geological Societies Transactions, vol. 30, pp. 151-165.
Means, John A., 1977, Southern Florida needs another look: The Oil
and Gas Journal, vol. 75, no. 5, pp. 212-225.

Miller, Jim, 1974, Mount Carmel field structure map: The Louisiana
Land and Exploration Company's Report for Florida Department of
Natural Resources Hearing No. 27.

Moore, Clyde H., 1984, The Upper Smackover of the Gulf Rim: deposi-
tional systems, diagenesis, porosity evolution and hydrocarbon
development: in Ventress, William P.S., Don G. Bebout, Bob F.
Perkins, and Clyde-H. Moore (editors), The Jurassic of the Gulf Rim:
Proceedings of the Third Annual Research Conference, Gulf Coast
Section, Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists
Foundation, pp. 283-307.

Ottman, R.D., P.L. Keyes, and M.A. Ziegler, 1973, Jay field a Jurassic
stratigraphic trap: Gulf Coast Assoc. of Geological Societies Trans-
actions, vol. 23, pp. 146-157.

Ottman, R.D., P.L. Keyes and M.A. Ziegler, 1976, Jay field a Jurassic
stratigraphic trap: in Braunstein, Jules (editor), North American Oil
and Gas Fields: American Assoc. of Petroleum Geologists Memoir
24, pp. 276-286.

Scholle, Peter A. (editor), 1979, Geological studies of the COST GE-1
well, United States south Atlantic outer continental shelf area: U.S.
Geological Survey Circular 800, 114 pp.

Shirer, J.A., E.P. Langston, and R.B. Strong, 1978, Application of field
- wide conventional coring in the Jay-Little Escambia Creek Unit:
Journal of Petroleum Technology, vol. 30, pp. 1774-1780.





38 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

Sigsby, R.J., 1976, Paleoenvironmental analysis of the Big Escambia
Creek-Jay-Blackjack Creek field area: Gulf Coast Assoc. of
Geological Societies Transactions, vol. 26, pp. 258-278.

Tyler, A.N. and W.L Erwin, 1976, Sunoco-Felda field, Hendry and Col-
lier Counties, Florida: in Braunstein, Jules (editor), North American
Oil and Gas Fields: American Assoc. of Petroleum Geologists
Memoir 24, pp. 287-299.

Vinet, Marshall J., 1984, Geochemistry and origin of Smackover and
Buckner dolomites (Upper Jurassic), Jay field area, Alabama
-Florida: in Ventress, William P.S., Don G. Bebout, Bob F. Perkins,
and Clyde H. Moore (editors), The Jurassic of the Gulf Rim: Pro-
ceedings of the Third Annual Research Conference, Gulf Coast Sec-
tion, Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Foun-
dation, pp. 365-374.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


APPENDIX I

1984 DRILLING ACTIVITY







1084 WILDCAT WELLS DRILLED


Drill Floor
Completion Elev., Ft.
Date Above MSL


NORTHWEST FLORIDA
Escambia W.15440
P-1125


Escambla W-15660
P-1136


Santa Rosa W.15462
P-1123


Santa Rosa W-15525
P-1128


Santa Rosa W-15707
P-1148


Santa Rosa No. W-number2
P.1154


Stone Petroleum
Corp. St. Regis
Paper Co. 29-4

Stone Petroleum
Corp. St. Regis
Paper Co. 29-3

Conoco, Inc.-
Charlie Lee
Wlndhorst 12-3

Jenkins Oil &
Gas Inc. -
Jenkins-Haynes
8-1
Jenkins Oil &
Gas, Inc. -
Jenkins-Lee
8-2
Exxon Corp.-H.M.
Atkins, et ux.
24-2


1000' FSL &
1350' FEL
Sec. 29,
T5N, R31W
1901' FSL &
1534' FWL
Sec. 29,
T5N, R31W
1528.5' FSL &
1009.9' FWL
Sec. 12, T3N,
R29W
1550' FNL &
1650' FEL
Sec. 8,
T3N, R28W
1570' FNL &
1609' FWL
Sec. 8,
T3N, R28W
1270'FNL &
1270' FWL
Sec. 24,
T4N, R26W


2-16-84



7-20-84



2-22-84



9-7-84



8-5-84



11-6-84


178 16,800 Completed as a
potential producer.


170 16,476 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 7.20-84.


231 16,933 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 2-23-84.


205 16,640 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 9-7-84.


213 16,251 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 8-5.84.


254 15,350 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 11-9-84.


County


Well' and
Permit No,


Operator-Well
Name & No.


Location


Total
Depth, Ft.


Status


Count Permt No








1984 Wildcat Wells Drilled (cont'd)


Drill Floor
Completion Elev., Ft.
Date Above MSL


Total
Depth, Ft. Status


Walton


W-15561
P-1138


NORTH FLORIDA


Dixie


W-15489
P-1129


SOUTH FLORIDA


Collier



Collier



Collier


W-1549
P-1127


W-15553
P-1134


W-15719
P-1137


Gold King Prod.
Co. Walton
Land & Timber
16-33

Amoco Production
Co. Buckeye
Cellulose Corp.
5-1


Davis Oil Co. -
James F. Barfleld
et ux. 28-4

Exxon Corp. -
Turner Corp. 20-2


Preston Oil Corp.-
Turner Corp. 35-1


788' FSL &
789' FWL
Sec; 16,
T1N, R18W

1439' FNL &
1500' FEL
Sec. 5,
T9S, R11E


2075' FSL &
725' FEL
Sec. 28,
T47S, R29E
489' FNL &
1500' FWL
Sec. 20,
T47S, R29E
1320' FNL &
1334' FEL
Sec. 35,
T48S, R29E


7-13-84


2-24-84


2-2-84



6-4-84



12-19-84


182 5,200 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 7-13-84.


593
(RKB)


9,075 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 2-24-84.


44 11,999 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 2-2-84.


45 12,030 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 6-4-84.


40 11,960 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 12-19-84.


1. Florida Bureau of Geology well number for samples (cuttings or core chips).
2. Well samples have not been submitted yet.
3. RKB: Elevation of rotary kelley bushing, ft. above MSL.


County


Well1 and
Permit No.


Operator-Well
Name & No.


Location


Countv






1084 FIELD WELLS DRILLED


Drill Floor
Completion Elev., Ft.
Date Above MSL


Santa Rosa W-15712
P.1145


Santa Rosa W.15558
P.1113


BLACKJACK CREEK FIELD
Santa Rosa W-15714
P-1144


TOWNSEND CANAL FIELD


Hendry


Hendry


W.-5637
P-1151



W-15250
P-1116


Exxon Corp.-
Ted May,
et ux. 17.3

Exxon Corp. -
St. Regis
Paper Co. 5-6


Exxon Corp.-
Dawson Nowling,
et al., 14-5



Natural Resource
Mgmt. Corp.-
A. Duda & Sons
3-2

Natural Resource
Mgmt. Corp. -
Duda (Evergreen)
7-2


2450' FNL &
100' FWL
Sec. 17,
T5N, R29W
60'FNL &
155' FWL
Sec. 5,
T5N, R29W


1700' FNL &
1925' FWL
Sec. 14, T4N,
R29W


1575' FNL &
1563' FWL
Sec. 3,
T45S, R28E

1183' FNL &
1189' FWL
Sec. 7,
T45S, R29E


9-7.84



1-12-84


8-16-84


10-19-84




2.2-84


258 15,850 Completed as a
potential producer.


210 15,800 Completed as a
potential producer.


183 16,103 Completed as a
potential producer.


52 11,424 Completed as a
potential producer.


54.5


11,490 Completed as a salt-
water disposal well
(Reentry of P-1081.
Available logs are
filed under P-1081;
elevations correspond
to those logs).


County


Well' and
Permit No.


JAY FIELD'


Operator-Well
Name & No.


Location


Total
Depth, Ft.


Status








1984 Field Wells Drilled (cont'd)


Location


Drill Floor
Completion Elev., Ft.
Date Above MSL


LEHIGH PARK FIELD


Exxon Corp.-
Consolidated
Tomoka Land
Co. 29-4


WEST FELDA FIELD


Exxon Corp.-
Consolidated
Tomoka Land
Co. 13-5




Exxon Corp.-
Turner Corp.
20-2

Exxon Corp.-
Consolidated
Tomoka Land
Co. 13-1


Lee


12-2-84






7-6-84







11-30-84



5-25-84


45 12,836 MD3 Plugged & abandoned
11,509TVD as a dry hole, 12-2-84.






51.5 12,495 MD3 Completed as a
11,487TVD potential producer.






53 11,600 Completed as a
Potential Producer.


W-15697
P-1158


SHL
1139.1'FNL &
1266.9' FWL
BHL:
1320' FSL &
1320' FEL
Sec. 29
T44S, R27E
SHL:
2769' FNL &
1045' FEL
BHL:
660' FSL &
1880' FWL
Sec. 13,
T45S, R27E
1500'FNL &
891' FWL
Sec. 20,
T45S, R28E
SHL:
2769' FNL &
1045' FEL
BHL:
1992' FNL &
1874' FEL
Sec. 13,
T45S, R27E


County


Well1 and
Permit No.


51.5


Operator-Well
Name & No.


11,802 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 5-25-84.
(Directional survey not
available).


Total
Depth, Ft.


Lee


Status


W-15560
P-1132


Hendry


W-15698
P-1153


W-15559
P-1131







1084 Field Wells Drilled (cont'd)


Location


Drill Floor
Completion Elev,, Ft.
Date Above MSL


Hendry


W-15688
P-1147


Exxon Corp.
Turner Corp.
20.4


BEAR ISLAND FIELD


Collier


W.15706
P-1118


Exxori Corp. -
Collier Co.
2.10


RACCOON POINT FIELD


Collier


W-15704
P-1061


Exxon Corp..
Oleum Corp.
34-3


660' FSL &
2013' FEL
Sec. 20,
T45S, R28E



SHL'
1532' FSL &
638' FWL
Sec. 1
BHL:
2850' FSL &
350' FEL
Sec. 2,
T49S, R30E



SHL:
1040' FSL &
938' FEL
Sec. 33
BHL:
1318' FSL &
1333' FWL
Sec. 34,
T51S, R34E


10-3-84


1-27-84


8-16-84


52 11,545 Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 103-84.


39.6 12,000MD' Completed as a
11,668TVD potential producer.


34 11,980MD1 Completed as a
11,457TVD potential producer.


County


Well' and
Permit No.


Operator-Well
Name & No.


Total
Depth, Ft,


Status


___









1984 Field Wells Drilled (cont'd)


Location


Drill Floor
Completion Elev., Ft.
Date Above MSL


No W-number'
P-1082


W-15703
P.1130


Exxon Corp. -
Oleum Corp.
34-4


Exxon Corp.
Collier Land &
Cattle Corp.
34-1


SHL:
574' FNL &
689'FWL
Sec. 2,
T52S, R34E
BHL:
1322' FSL &
1333' FEL
Sec. 34,
T51S, R34E

SHL:
1603' FSL &
1816' FWL
Sec. 35
BHL:
1950' FNL &
1600' FEL
Sec. 34,
T51S, R34E


3-14-84


9-13-84


34 12,295MD2 Completed as a
11,398TVD potential producer


33 13,258MD3 Completed as a
11,479TVD potential producer.


County


Well' and
Permit No.


Operator-Well
Name & No.


Collier


Total
Depth, Ft.


Status


Collier







1084 Field Wells Drilled (cont'd)


Well' and


Operator-Well


Drill Floor
Completion Elev., Ft.


Total


County Permit No. Name & No. Location Date Above MSL Depth, Ft. Status

Collier No W-number Exxon Corp. 34.5' FSL & 1-12-84 23.5 3,900 Completed as a salt,
P.1121 Raccoon Point 699.5' FWL (RKB)' water disposal well.
SWD System No.1 Sec. 35,
Well No. 1 T51S, R34E


1. Florida Bureau of Geology well number for samples (cuttings and core chips).
2. Fields are listed in order from north to south as shown on Figure 1 and as discussed in text.
3. MD: measured depth; TVD: true vertical depth (determined by directional survey).
4. Well samples have not been submitted yet.
5. RKB: elevation of rotary kelley bushing, ft. above MSL


O


0

0






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


APPENDIX II


REVIEW OF DRILLING IN STATE WATERS
AND MARQUESAS OCS BLOCK 28







REVIEW OF DRILLING IN STATE WATERS AND MARQUESAS OCS BLOCK 2H
NOTE: Some wells which did not reach deeper horizons are not reported In this summary. These wells are In the Florida
Keys and are less than 10,000 feet deep.


Lease No.
Operator and Area


nuialry
Total Table
County Depth,ft. Elev., ft.


Geological Significance


State of Florida
Lease 373
Big Pine Key


State of Florida
Lease 826-A
Florida Bay


State of Florida
Lease 826A


offshore
Monroe


offshore
Monroe


offshore
Monroe


15,455


12,631



15,478


1947


Year


Permit
No.


P-22


Gulf Oil
Corp.


1955



1959


23 No porosity in Sunniland Fm. Much
anhydrite, Well bottomed in Pump.
kin Bay (Late Coahullan). Very
difficult to correlate this well
because of anhydrite development.
Structurally very low.
32 Well cored from 11,661-12,544' In
Sunnlland and Punta Gorda. En-
countered some salt stringers in
Punta Gorda. Only 60' of dark,
dense calcilutlte In SOnnlland.
56 Four drill stem tests:
12,474.12,533' (Lake Trafford?)
12,534-12,554' (Sunnlland)
12,582-12,822' (Sunniland)
14,642-14,702' (Brown Dolomite)
The 12,474-12,533' test recovered
15 barrels 220 gravity oil and
14.1 barrels saltwater. The
tests recovered only saltwater.
Joe Banks (personal communication)
believed well capable of low volume
production (65 BOPD on pump).
Brown Dolomlte(?): 14,650-15,036';
some of this vugular. This may be
principal target In area. Net
dolomite estimated at 400'.


Gulf Oil
Corp.


Gulf Oil
Corp.


P-232



P-275


Year _


I i







Review of Drilling In State Waters and Marquesas OCS Block 28 (cont'd)


Lease No.
Operator and Area


Total
County Depth,ft.


Rotary
Table
Elev. Ft.


Geological Significance


P-280 The California
Company

P-281 The California
Company


P-284











P-289


Gulf Oil
Corp.


State of Florida
Lease 1011
Big Pine Key
State of Florida
Lease 224A
St. George Is-
land Area

Marquesas
OCS Block 28


California State of Florida
Coastal Lease 224-B


P-290 The California
Company


OCS Block 44-
Lease 0672
Marquesas


offshore 6,030
Monroe


1959


1959


7,030


15,294











14,000


4,687


21 Bottomed in Lower Cretaceous.


26 Bottomed in Lower Cretaceous.
No shows.



22 Probably low volume oil producer in
12,336-12,685' interval (Lake Trafford
and Sunniland) (Charles Tootle, 1985,
Bureau of Geology, personal com-
munication). Much porous dolomite
in 14,360-14,640' interval of Brown
Dolomite Zone (?). Slight oil staining
at 14,563' and 14,576-14,578' Interval.
Ran drill stem test in 12,345-12,483' in.
terval. Tested black saltwater. Ran
drill stem test in 14,409-14,508' interval
of Brown Dolomite. Also tested black
saltwater. Dolomite: 14,420-14 640'.
Net dolomite estimated at 246'.
39 Brown Dolomite 12,485-12,589'. Est.
net dolomite 103'. This dolomite is
believed to extend offshore.
37 Well too shallow to reach horizons
of interest. Lost well in Rebecca
Shoals Reef (Paleocene and Upper
Cretaceous).


Year


Permit
No.


offshore
Franklin



offshore
Monroe










offshore
Lee

offshore
Monroe


1960











1960


1960


In
0










Z
0
2


C
CE







Review of Drilling In State Waters and Marquesas OCS Block 2H (cont'd)


Lease No.
Operator and Area


Rotary
Total Table
County Depth,ft. Elev., ft.


Geological Significance


California State of Florida
Coastal Lease 224-A


Gulf.
California
Company


OCS Block 46
Marquesas


1961



1961



1961










1962


offshore
Franklin


offshore
Monroe


offshore
Lee









offshore
Monroe


10,560



7,871



12,600










12,850


P-293



P-296



P-297










P-298


Year


Permit
No.


California State of Florida
Coastal Lease 224-A









California State of Florida
Company Lease 1011
Marquesas


34 Did not encounter Smackover Forma-
tion. Bottomed in Eagle Mills of
Triassic Age. Diabase found In
Eagle Mills.
79 Well drilled Into top of Lower
Cretaceous. Well abandoned due to
drilling problems of Rebecca Shoals
Reef.
40 There is an estimated 40' of dolo-
mite In the 12,445-12,560' Brown
Dolomite Interval. No evidence of oil
staining. Dolomite microcrystalline to
finely crystalline, with no lost circula-
tion material. A four-inch diamond
core with core analysis from 11,255-
11,625' Sunniland interval showed no
permeability, extremely low porosity,
and no oil.


57 This well bottomed in Punta
Gorda. No shows of oil and no
porosity reported. A drill stem test
of the 12,521-12,600' interval tested
saltwater. Rebecca Shoals Reef
(Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous)
present.


__ I ___ __ _








Review of Drilling In State Waters and Marquesas OCS Block 28 (cont'd)


Permit
No.


Lease No.
Operator and Area


Rotary
Total Table
County Depth,ft. Elev., ft.


Geological Significance


1963



1967






1967






1967


P-304



P-375






P-382






P-383


10,600



12,931






6,035






4,735


California State of Florida
Coastal Lease 224-B


Mobil Oil State of Florida
Corp. Lease 224-B





Mobil Oil State of Florida
Corp. Lease 224-A





Mobil Oil State of Florida
Corp. Lease 224-A


Year


offshore
Pinellas


offshore
Charlotte





offshore
Citrus





offshore
Levy


37 This well bottomed in Lower
Cretaceous. Very poor samples. No
oil shows. Carbonates-clastics below
7,000'.
21 This well drilled into Pumpkin Bay
Formation (Upper Coahuilan) at
12,230'. Drilled into basement (rhyo-
lite porphyry at 12,830). No shows in
Sunniland Formation. Brown Dolo-
mite Zone: 11,920-12,000'. Estimated
net dolomite 70'. Samples poor.
22 Mixed faces carbonatess, sand-
stones, and shales) at 4,325', Tri-
assic (Eagle Mills) at 5,625'; Paleo-
zoic at 5,920'. Very indurated shale
and siltstone. Some quartzite. Bed-
ding planes vertical in this core. No
shows and no porosity.
25 Mixed faces carbonatess, sand-
stones and shales, 2,882' in Cre-
taceous. Predominantly varicolored
unconsolidated sandstone below
4,180'. Highly indurated quartzites
and Interbedded shales in core (Pal-
eozoic) from 4,720-4,735'.







REVIEW OF DRILLING IN STATE WATERS AND MARQUESAS OCS BLOCK 28 (cont'd)


Rotary
Total Table
County Depth,ft. Elev., ft.


Geological Significance


Mobil Oil State of Florida
Corp. Lease 224-A


offshore
Franklin


14,369


37 This well encountered Jurassic lime-
stone, First Indication of possible
Smackover in Apalachlcola area.


Year


Permit
No.


Operator


1968


Lease No,
and Area


P.387





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


APPENDIX III

REVIEW OF DRILLING IN FEDERAL WATERS
OCS BLOCKS







REVIEW OF DRILLING IN FEDERAL WATERS


* Bureau of Geology does not have samples from these wells. Much of this Information was obtained from oil company geologists,


Rotary
Table
Elev. ft.


Geologic Significance


Lehigh Acres 10,330'.
Near crest of Sarasota
Arch. Basement (rhyollte)
11,180' (Paleozolc).
Granite 11,375'(Paleozolc).
Top of Lehigh Acres 9,883'
Granite 11,375' (Paleozoic).
On crest of Sarasota Arch.
TD in rhyolite and
granodlorite (Paleozoic)
at 11,240'.
Brown Dolomite 10,748-
10,836'.
Rhyolite at 11,320'.
Bottomed in Bone Island.
Drilled 1,100' of
Paleozoics. Bottomed in
volcanic.


Area


Well
No.


Depth


Charlotte
Harbor


Charlotte
Harbor

Charlotte
Harbor


Charlotte
Harbor

The Elbow
The Elbow


' OCS-G-3917



* OCS-G.3912


* OCS-G.3909



* OCS-G-3906


* OCS-G-3344
* OCS-G-3341


Operator


Tenneco



Shell


Odeco Oil



Gulf Oil


Mobil
Mobil


Location


Blk. 672



BIk, 265


BIk. 188



BIk. 144


BIk. 566
BIk. 915


11,302



12,362


11,361



11,374


15,865
18,128


_ __ I








Review of Drilling in Federal Waters (cont'd) Rotary
Well Table
Area No. Operator Location Depth Elev. ft. Geologic Significance

Florida OCS-G-2516 Texaco BIk. 252 15,633 81 Brown Dolomite equiv.
Middle 10,310-10,380' appears
Ground as limestone. West Felda
Member 10,560-10,650'.
Cotton Valley-Wood River M
(green waxy shale) at 0
12,900'. Probable
unconformity.
Paleozoics at 14,200'.
Schlumberger TD 15,640'. O
St. OCS-G-2527 Shell BIk. 7 18,401 82 No Paleozoics in well.
Petersburg West Felda Member 12,722-
12,820'. Igneous (135 MY
pink granite). Transition to C
north Florida plastics in
lower part of well. Granite
at TD.
Z
St. OCS-G-2523 Texaco BIk. 100 17,388 84 Brown Dolomite Zone 0
Petersburg 12,154-12,392'. Mostly
plastics below this point. o
Diabase and rhyolite
16,330' to TD.
Vernon OCS-G-3903 Mobil Oil BIk. 654 10,768 88 Near top of Sarasota Arch.
Lehigh Acres 9,167 ft.
Granite at 10,150 ft.

Pensacola OCS-G-3886 Mobil Oil Blk. 973 23.264 91 Abandoned.


Smackover-Norphlet test. M







Review of Drilling In Federal Waters (OCS Blocks) (cont'd)


Location


Depth


Rotary
Table
Elev. ft.


Geologic Significance


OCS-G-6391


Sohlo


OCS-G-2502 Amoco


OCS-G-2486


* Exxon


OCS-G-2468 Gulf Oil


Pensacola


Blk. 948

BIk. 31



BIk. 162








Blk. 360


18,948

18,338



17,938








20,988


* Exxon drilled another six wells to shallower depths than the Smackover. These wells were all on the flanks of the Destin Dome.


Area


Well
No,


85 Testing (August, 1985)
Smackover.Norphlet test
83 Well plugged &
abandoned, 1975.
Smackover and Norphlet
test.
83 E*-og tops by Janyth
Tolson of Alabama Geol.
Survey: Cotton Valley Gp.
12,460'; Haynesvllle Fm.
14,950'; Buckner Anhydrite
not present; Smackover Fm.
17,150'; Norphlet Fm.
17,560'. Louann Salt repor-
ted by Exxon 17,938'.
90 Abandoned 1975. In Destin
Dome Planning Area but
about 75 miles to the west
of the Destin Dome sub-
surface feature.


Operator


Destin
Dome


Destin
Dome


Destin
Dome








Review of Drilling In Federal Waters (cont'd)


Location


Depth


Rotary
Table
Elev. ft.


Geologic Significance


OCS-G-2490


OCS-G-6417


GE-1


Sun Oil


Shell Oil


Continental
Offshore
Stratigraphic
Test Group.


BIk. 166


Blk. 160


Lat 30137' N
Long 80017'59" W
Located 74
miles east of
Jacksonville,
Florida.


17,608


17,761


95 Abandoned 3-9-75. Smack-
over 16,740'. Norphlet
17,360'. Louann 17,530'.
105 Reached TD 5-1-85.
Logged well.
Set open hole plug.

79 Water depth 136'. Upper
Cret. (3,570.5,950);
Lower Cret. (5,950-
11,000); Devonian
(11,000'-TD).


13,254


The Upper Cretaceous is
marine, thermally immature,
with good organic carbon
content. The Lower Creta-
ceous is thermally imma-
ture above 8,500 feet. The
Lower Cretaceous has low
total organic content of
hydrogen deficient "gas-
prone" kerogen.


* Six other dry wildcat wells were later drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment.


Area


Well
No.


Operator


Destin
Dome

Destin
Dome


* Atlantic-
Southeast
Georgia
Embayment







REVIEW OF DRILLING IN STATE WATERS AND MARQUESAS OCS BLOCK 28 (cont'd)


Lease No.
Operator and Area


County


Rotary
Total Table
Depth,ft. Elev., ft. Geological Significance


The Devonian Is highly In.
durated to weakly meta.
morphosed sedimentary
rocks and Intrusive and ex.
truslve Igneous rocks.


Year


Permit
No.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


APPENDIX IV


1984 AND CUMULATIVE PRODUCTION DATA







1904 AND CUMULATIVE PRODUCTION DATA

(With 1983 Subtotals for Comparison)


Number of wells
PRO INJ SI TA


TOT


Oil
IBbls)


1984 Production
Gas
(MCFR


Water
IBblu)


Cumulative Production
Oil Gas
IMrBblas IMCF)


Northwest Florida
Jay 50 31 36 0 117 8,769,649 11,014,328 49,240,215 339,382 426,336
Blackjack Creek 9 7 8 0 24 2,218,417 2,539,869 5,770,786 50,463 46,057
Mt. Carmel 1 0 0 0 1 79,557 131,783 112,480 4,445 4,625
Sweetwater Creek' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 15
Subtotal 60 38 44 0 142 11,065,623 13,685,980 -5,132,481 394,304 477,033
1963 Subtotal 62 38 37 0 137 16,269,743 23,251,402 38,104,162
South Florida
Sunoco Felda 12 6 9 0 27 227,939 16,416 2,258,956 10,918 943
Mid-Felda 3 0 0 0 3 83,869 0 287,371 825 10
Townsend Canal 4 0 0 0 4 67,123 0 150,440 125 0
Lehigh Park 5 0 0 0 5 330,756 33,134 3,820,922 4,275 431
West Felda 26 0 14 2 42 1,321,000 88,792 7,938,007 37,004 2,950
Lake Trafford 1 0 0 0 1 11,963 0 0 242 0
Semlnole3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 85 0
Sunniland 6 0 12 0 18 160,454 14,383 2,975,137 18,198 1,803
Bear Island 17 9 1 0 27 771,792 61,884 4,239,224 8,516 662
Pepper Hammock 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Baxter Island3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Raccoop Point 10 0 0 0 10 421,450 42,175 558,780 449 42
Forty Mile Bend' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 2
Subtotal 84 15 37 2 138 3,396,34 256,784 2880,672 ,843
1983 Subtotal 75 14 37 2 128 3,205,831 232,804 20,809.923
STATEWIDE TOTAL 144 53 81 2 280 14,461,969 13,942,764 77361,318 474,976 483,877
1983 TOTAL 137 52 74 2 265 19,475,574 23,484,206 58,914,085
1. Statistics compiled by Dr. Charles Tootle, Florida Bureau of Geology, Oil and Gas Section.
2. Fields are listed in order from north to south as shown on Figure 1 and as discussed in text.
3. Plugged and abandoned oil field.
Abbreviations: PRO producing wells Bbls barrels (42 U.S. Gal.)
INJ injection wells MBbIs thousand barrels
SI shut in wells MCF thousand cubic feet
TA temporarily abandoned well MMCF million cubic feet
TOT total wells CUM cumulative


Field'






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


APPENDIX V

DISCOVERY WELL DATA







FLORIDA OIL FIELD DISCOVERY WELL DATA
February, 1985


Discovery Permit


Date


No. Field


County


Perforations or
Open Hole


Total
Depth


Name of Produ-
cing Formation


42
167
315
371
401
417
504


Sunniland
Forty Mile Bend
Sunoco Felda
West Felda
Lake Trafford
Jay
Mt. Carmel


9-26-43
2-1-54
7.22-64
8-2-66
3-3069
6-1570
12-19-71

2-14-72

12-5-72
11-14-73
7-30-74
4-22-77

8-11-77
10-13-77
6-20-78
9-28-78


Collier
Dade
Hendry
Hendry
Collier
Santa Rosa
Santa Rosa


11,602-11,626
11,322-11,339
11,472-11,485
11,486-11,489
11,870-11,892
15,470-15,524
15,260-15,280


Santa Rosa 15,790-15,900


Collier
Hendry
Lee
Santa Rosa

Collier
Hendry
Collier
Collier


11,589-11,595
11,415.11,420
11,389-11,394
14,299-14,340

11,512-11,515
11,492-11,496
11,410-11,414
11,629-11,633


11,626 Sunniland
11,557 Sunniland
11,485 Sunniland
11,675 Sunniland
11,987 Sunniland
15,984 Smackover
15,399 Smackover
& Norphlet
16,235 Smackover
& Norphlet
11,817 Sunniland
11,651 Sunniland
11,630 Sunniland
14,611 Smackover


11,823
11,686
11,658
11,897


Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland
Sunniland


Hendry 11,416-11,421 11,462 Sunniland


Discovery
Status


Oil Gravity,
*A.P.I.


_A.P.I.


523 Blackjack
Creek
563 Bear Island
662 Seminole
712 Lehigh Park
881 Sweetwater
Creek
865 Baxter Island
904 Mid-Felda
829 Raccoon Point
897 Pepper Hammock


Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Flowing
Flowing

Flowing

Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping

Pumping
Pumping
Pumping
Pumping


26
21
25
26 t
C
26
51
42 0

51 0
0
r
26 o
25 G
28
45

22
26
23
27


&27-82 1070 Townsend Canal


Pumping 28






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


APPENDIX VI


FLORIDA OIL FIELD DATA






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


FLORIDA OIL FIELD DATA


Field'


NORTHWEST
FLORIDA
Jay (Fla only)


Blackjack Creek

Mt Carmel

SSweetwater
Creek

SOUTH FLORIDA
Sunoco Felda


Mid-Felda

Townsend Canal

Lehigh Park

West Felda


Lake Trafford

Seminole

Sunniland

Bear Island

Pecper Hammock

'Baxter Island

Raccoon Point

"Forty Mile Bend


County


Santa Rosa
& Escambia

Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa



Collier &
Hendry

Hendry

Hendry

Lee

Collier, Lee
& Hendry

Collier

Hendry

Collier

Collier

Collier

Collier

Collier

Dade


Productive
Acres2


13,021


5,720

481

160




3,840

480

640

800

7,500


160

480

2,080

2,880

160

160

1,600

320


Depth3
(ft)


15,490


15,800

15,120

14,330




11,475

11,490

11,462

11,890

11,450


11,870

11,430

11,570

S11,800

11,897'

11,510

11,658

11,340


Gravity
(VA.P.I.)


Average Pay
Thickness (ft)


T. An asterisk (*) indicates an abandoned oil field. Fields are listed in order from
north to south as shown on Figure 1 and as discussed in text.
2. Estimated by Dr. Charles Tootle, Florida Bureau of Geology, Oil and Gas Sec-
tion.
3. Depth listed is the average depth to center of perforated zones (calculated by
Dr. Charles Tootle, Florida Bureau of Geology, Oil and Gas Section).
4. Total depth of open-hole discovery well.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


APPENDIX VII

FLORIDA OIL RESERVE ESTIMATES






66 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


FLORIDA OIL RESERVE ESTIMATES


Original Oil Estimated Original Recoverable
in Place, Recovery Oil in Place,
Field Stock Tank Barrels Factor Stock Tank Barrels
NORTHWEST
FLORIDA
Jay' 728,000,000 0.58 420,000,000
Blackjack Creek2 100,500,000 0.40 40,184,000
Mt Carmel3 17,500,000 0.20 3,500,000
Sweetwater Creek7 624,116 0.02 13,695
SOUTH FLORIDA
Sunoco Felda4 32,368,421 0.38 12,300,000
!Mid-Felda3 567,829 0.30 170,349
Townsend CanalP 704,260 0.35 246,491
Lehigh Parks 7,625,249 0.60 4,575,144
West Felda* 142,857,143 0.35 50,000,000
Lake Trafford3 1,792,098 0.10 179,210
Seminole7 1,354,124 0.06 84,755
Sunniland' 37,685,118 0.50 18,842,559
Bear Island" 35,658,559 0.41 14,676,718
Pepcer Hammock"
Baxter Island7 480,714 0.004 1,859
Raccoon Point5 10,480,784 0.30 3,144,242
Forty Mile Bend7 180,550 0.18 32,888

TOTAL 1,118,378,965 567,951,9109





Langston and Shirer, 1985; estimates are for entire Jay-LEC unit (Florida and
Alabama). Primary, secondary (waterflood) and tertiary (N2 injection) recovery
are included in the estimated recoverable oil in place.
2. Blackjack Creek Geological Committee, 1974.
3. Tootle. Charles, 1978, Volumetric calculation (personal communication).
4. Tootle, Charles, 1978, Extrapolated production decline curves (personal com-
munication).
5. Tootle, Charles, 1983, Volumetric calculation (personal communication).
6. Tootle, Charles, 1978, Core analysis estimate (personal communication).
7. Plugged and abandoned field. Recoverable oil value listed is equal to total
production for the field. Original oil in place calculated by volumetric method
(Tootle, Charles, 1978, personal communication).
8. Single well (P-897) is shut-in. No estimates available.
9. The sum yields only an order-of-magnitude estimate of original recoverable
oil in place because many of the calculations were done more than six years
ago. In fact, four fields (Blackjack Creek, Mt. Carmel, Mid-Felda, and Lake
Trafford) have already produced more than their estimated recoverable oil in
place. Work on updated values is in progress. Statewide cumulative produc-
tion as of Jan. 1, 1985, equals 474,842 MBbls. A rough (conservative) estimate
of remaining reserves is therefore equal to 567,951-474,842 MBbls or 93,109
MBbls.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 101


APPENDIX VIII

1984 GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION ACTIVITY





1864 GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION ACTIVITY


Permitl (GioitlIyW
cal Co


G. 184
G0284

0-384

0-464

Q-W




G-M4

0-1184


0.1084,


0.1204
G-12-84

0-1314

G-1484

0-1544

G-1864

0G-1744


GFS5

OFB
GF$

OFS

Geo Sets.
mic Sorv.
Western Ge-
ophys. Co.
OFS

Geosource

Seismogr.
Serv. Corp.
Teledyne
Explor.
GFS

Geosource

Southern
Sols. Exch.
GFS

GFS

Texaco

GFS

GFS


butrrryw Counly


Prnnmr EApirslonr
Appsrovl Dlat


survey Cona
plreIon Fvea
(i~koctow(


Source


Pello Escarnbia & 7644 1 2 85 20 84 Sesmimc
Odi Co Santa Rosa GQelain
Claylon Escambia A 7664 12866 6920804 Seismic
Wmi., Jr Santa Rosa Gelatin
Milstlone Lee 8-1784 81186 Permit Seismic
Perol. Co Expired Gelatin
Getty Oil Santa Rosa 7.2344 121t5 9-1884 Seismic
Co. Gelatin
Santa Rosa 7.2364 1-21.86 924.84 Vibroses

Vector Geo- Escambia & 81744 811-86 Permit Seismic
phys. Serv. Santa Rosa Expired. Gelatin
Seismic Escambia & Survey completed prior to rule Implementation.
Exch. Inc. Santa Rosa Application submitted for information only.
Exxon Jacks, Hamlt. 81784 2-1386 1-11-86 Vbroseis
Mads. CImbia
Exxon Escambla 8-2944 2.2786 9-24-84 Dynamite

Union TX Santa Rosa 9-12-84 3-1385 12.4-84 Seismic
Petr. Co. Gelatin
Cities Escambia & 10684 4-285 4-1186 Hi-velocity
Service Santa Rosa explosives
Gull Cst. Escambla & 10684 4-2-85 4-185 Seismic
Geodata Santa Rosa GOlatin
Tenneco Escambia & 106-84 4-2-84 12-4-84 Seismic
Oil E & P Santa Rosa Gelatin
Vector Geo- Santa Rosa 10684 4-285 124-84 Seismic
phys. Serv. Gelatin
Texaco Collier 11-2044 5-185 5-285 Seismic
Gelatin
Union Escambia 9-2584 3-2585 12-4-84 Seismic
Oil Corp. Gelatin
Belnorth Escambla 10684 4-2-85 12-4.84 Seismic
Petr. Corp. Gelatin


5Snot fitoe Survey
Dspln Cnrlgse Specing, Lingin Cwommnlt
II Si e. lib FI Mi
100130 26 330 as
16-180 100
100-130 2 330 13
160-180 100
10-40 20 330 17 Survey w
not te run.
10 2.0 220 28
50 & 100 2.5
N.A. NA. NA. 11

90-130 2.5 330 71 Survey wtt
160180 10.0 not be run.


N.A. N.A.

120 Not
stated
150-180 15-20

80120 5

120 15

150-180 2.5
120130 75
150180 15-20

10 0.25

150-180 10-15

150-180 10-15


NA.

Not
stated
330

Not
stated
330

330

330

220 &
330
330

440


48

2.75

26

88

120

62

22

22

17

17


C

V?


For lfor- C
mato tonl O




0
r
0








Minihte
survey










1984 GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION ACTIVITY (continued)


Permit Geophysi. Surveyed
cal Co. for
G-1884 Teledyne Exxon
Explor.
G-1984 GFS Bass En.
terprises
G-2084 GFS Mobil

G-21484 GFS Jenkins
Oil & Gas
G-2284 Western ARCO
Geophys.
G-2344 Ward Ex- Pennzoil
ploratlon
G-2444 GFS Vector Geo-
phys. Serve.
G-2584 Shell West- Shell West
ern E & P am E & P
G-2584 GFS Vector Geo-
Phys. Serve.
G-2784 GFS Pelto Oil
Co.
G-2884 Exxon Exxon

G-2944 Selmograph Exxon
Service
G-3084 Ward Ex- Sun Ex-
ploration ploration


County

Escambia &
Santa Rosa
Escambia

Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa

Escambia

Escambia &
Santa Rosa
Santa Rosa

Palm Beach

Escambia &
Santa Rosa
Escambla &
Santa Rosa
Lee &
Charlotte
Hamilton &
Columbia
Santa Rosa


Survey Cornm
Permit Expiration pletion Form
Approved Date Received
10-284 423.85 5-24-85

102684 4-2385 6-3-85

11.584 3-85 6-385

11.84 5385 N.A.

11684 5685 1-8-85

11-2084 51885 523-85

11-1384 11-7485 Permit
Expired
12.1984 12-17-85

12-1984 12-1585

12-1984 617-85 6-3-85

1485 74&85 Permit
Expired
12-1984 NA. N.A.

3-1985 9.1545 5.23-85


Energy
Source
Dynamite

Seismic
Gelatin
Seismic
Gelatin
Seismic
Gelatin
Vibroseis

Seismic
Gelatin
Seismic
Gelatin
Watergel
Explosive
Seismic
Gelatin
Seismic
Gelatin
Vibrator

Vibroseis

Seismic
Gelatin


Shot Hole Survey
Depth, Charge Spacing, Length, Comments
ft. Size, lbs. FL Mi.
120 Not Not 6.25
Stated Stated
150180 10-15 330 4

150-180 15-20 330 12

150-180 10-15 330 3 Permit
cancelled
NA. NA. N.A. 40

150 1-15 Not 33
Stated
150-180 25 330 47
120-130 75
100.150 50 Not 4
Stated
10-20 5-2.5 330 37
150-180 20
10-20 0.5-2.5 330 21
150-180 20
N.A. N.A. N.A. 15 Survey will
not be run.
N.A. N.A. N.A. 17 Pemit
cancelled
150 1.15 Not 22.5
Stated


Z


F1



O

C

o
r-



Z

0
=D










FLRD GEOLOSk ( IC SUfRiW


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