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 Well construction
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 References
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Construction of waste-injection monitor wells near Pensacola, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 74 )
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 Material Information
Title: Construction of waste-injection monitor wells near Pensacola, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 74 )
Series Title: ( FGS: Information circular 74 )
Physical Description: v, 34 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Foster, J. B ( James B )
Goolsby, D. A
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Publisher: Bureau of Geology
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1972
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Groundwater -- Florida -- Pensacola   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by James B. Foster and Donald A. Goolsby.
Bibliography: Bibliography: p.14.
General Note: Prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology.
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001048700
oclc - 02012014
notis - AFD1778
System ID: UF00001134:00001

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Abstract and introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Purpose and scope
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Well construction
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Hydrogeologic data
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    References
        Page 14
    Tables: Lithologic log of selected wells
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Copyright
            Copyright
Full Text








STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Randolph Hodges, Executive Director




DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES
Robert O. Vernon, Director




BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Charles W. Hendry, Jr., Chief




Information Circular No. 74



CONSTRUCTION OF WASTE-INJECTION MONITOR
WELLS NEAR PENSACOLA, FLORIDA



By
James B. Foster and Donald A. Goolsby


Prepared by the
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES


TALLAHASSEE
1972














































Completed manuscript received
December 13, 1971
Printed for the Florida Department of Natural Resources
Division of Interior Resources-
Bureau of Geology
by Rose Printing Company
Tallahassee, Florida


Tallahassee
1972



ii









CONTENTS

Page
Abstract . . . . . . . .. .. ...... 1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Background ............................................ 1
Purposend se........................................... 1
Acknowledgements ......................................... 3
Purpose and scope . . . . . . . . . 3
Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . 3
Wellconstruction . .. . ... . . ........ .. 4
Drilling equipment and set up .................. ............. 4
Drilling procedure ..................................... 5
Casing ..... ...................... ........ .... 5
Cement grouting ................... ....... .............. 8
Hydrogeologic data.. ... .. ............ ....... ............. 10
Drill cuttings . . .. .. .. . .. ..... . 10
Potentiometric level and flow of water . . . . ... . . .11
Aquifer tests ................... ........................ 11
Geophysical logs ........................................12
Water samples .........................................12
Chemical analyses of water samples ................................. 12
Selected references ... .............. ..................... .. 14









ILLUSTRATIONS
(Figures 8 through 16 tre at end of text)


Figure


Page


1. Map showing locations of injection wells, monitor wells, and
Escambia County in Florida ..................... .............. 2
2. Photograph of rotary drilling machine showing tower and work platform ........ 4
3. Diagram showing construction details of Clear Creek monitor well .......... 6
4. Diagram showing construction details of Waldorf Lake monitor well "......... 7
5. Photograph showing 8-inch steel casing with centering guides ... .......... 8
6. Photograph showing hookup of bradenhead and cement line used
to grout well casing ...................................... 9
7. Photograph showing trailer-mounted cement-grout pump. Two men
feed cement into mixing box where water is added .................. 10
8. Geophysical and drilling time logs. A, Clear Creek monitor well;
B, Waldorf Lake monitor well .............. .................. 22
9. Graph showing computation of transmissivity of lower Floridan
aquifer at Clear Creek monitor well. Data represents decline of
water pressure in aquifer during period that well flowed at constant
rateof503 gpm ........................................ 23


10. Graph showing computation of transmissivity of lower Floridan aquifer
at Clear Creek monitor well. Data represent recovery of water
pressure in aquifer following a period of constant flow from well ....
11. Graph showing computation of transmissivity of lower Floridan aquifer
at Waldorf Lake monitor well. Data represent decline of water pressure
in aquifer during period that well flowed at constant rate of 350 gpm .
12. Graph showing computation of transmissivity of lower Floridan aquifer
at Waldorf Lake monitor well. Data represents recovery of water pressure
in aquifer following a period of constant flow from well .........
13. Graph showing quantity and chemical quality of water flow from
different zones of the lower Floridan aquifer at Clear Creek monitor well
14. Graph showing quantity and chemical quality of water from different
zones of the lower Floridan aquifer at Waldorf Lake monitor well ....
15. Graphs showing variation of chemical constituents with depth
in lower Floridan aquifer at Clear Creek monitor well ...........
16. Graphs showing variation of chemical constituents with depth
in lower Floridan aquifer at Waldorf Lake monitor well ..........


..... .. 24


. . 25


....... 26

...... 27

. . 28

....... 33

....... 34


TABLES
(at end of text)
Table Page
1. Lithologic log of Clear Creek monitor well ........................ 15
2. Lithologic log of Waldorf Lake monitor well ...................... 17
3. Lithologic log of injection well A .............................. 19








4. Methods used to analyze water samples from Clear Creek and
Waldorf Lake monitor wells ................................. 29
5. Results of chemical analyses of water sample taken from Creek
and Waldorf Lake monitor wells ........................ ...... 30
6. Results of spectographic analysis of water sample taken from
Clear Creek monitor well after completion .. ................ ....... 32
7. Results of field analyses of water from completed monitor wells .... ... .. . 32









CONSTRUCTION OF WASTE-INJECTION MONITOR WELLS NEAR
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA

By

James B. Foster and Donald A. Goolsby

ABSTRACT

The effects of injection of liquid chemical waste into the lower Floridan
aquifer at the Monsanto Company plant near Pensacola, Florida, have been
monitored since July 1963. Near the end of 1968, high concentrations of waste
were found in water samples from the monitor well that tapped the aquifer
receiving the waste. This monitor well was plugged in February 1969 to
eliminate the possibility that acid waste might corrode the well casing and escape
from the injection zone into the fresh water strata of the sand-and-gravel aquifer.
In order that the monitoring program might be continued, two additional
monitor wells were drilled during the period December 1969-January 1970 at
distances 1.5 miles south and 1.9 miles north of the injection wells.
This report compiles the geologic and hydrologic data that pertain to the
two monitor wells and were collected during the period of construction of these
wells. Included are records of drill cuttings, water samples, temperatures, rates of
artesian flow, aquifer tests, geophysical logs, and chemical analyses.
Results of the chemical analyses of water from the two monitor wells
confirm that the water of the lower Floridan aquifer is highly saline and that it
becomes increasingly saline with depth in the aquifer. Water samples taken
during the construction period are believed to represent native aquifer water.
Dissolved chemical constituents that would indicate the presence of injected
chemical waste in the immediate areas of the monitor wells were not detected.

INTRODUCTION
BACKGROUND

In July 1963 Monsanto Company began injecting liquid chemical waste
from its plant near Pensacola, Florida, into the limestone of the lower Floridan
aquifer (Barraclough, 1966, pp. 22-24). The first injection well was completed in
March 1963; a second well was completed in July 1964. The combined injection
capacity of the two wells is about 2,200 gpm (gallons per minute) at an
operating pressure of about 190 psi (pounds per square inch) at the well head.
The lower Floridan aquifer contains water that is naturally saline. This
aquifer is overlain by a thick and impermeable layer of Bucatunna clay that
confines the saline water and the added chemical waste to the lower Floridan








\ BUREAU OF GEOLOGY



aquifer. The water of the upper Floridan aquifer, which overlies the Bucatunna
clay, is not potable.
The original monitor well was drilled into the lower Floridan aquifer to
detect movement of chemical waste and changes in hydrostatic pressure that

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Figure 1. Map showing locations of injection wells, monitor wells, and
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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


resulted from the injection process. This well was about 1,300 feet south of the
immediate area of the two injection wells. Another monitor well was drilled into
the upper Floridan aquifer to detect possible leakage of waste through the layer
of Bucatunna clay. This well is near injection well A, as shown in figure 1.
From July 1963 to April 1968 the liquid chemical waste was treated with
ammonia to increase the pH of the waste from about 3.0 to 5.5 before injection
into the aquifer. Signs of chemical waste were detected in the original monitor
well about 10 months after injection began. In April 1968, the ammonia
treatment was stopped; thereafter, liquid waste was injected at a pH of from 3 to
3.5. About 5 months later the chemical effects of this waste were noted at the
monitor well and in January 1969, acidic waste was detected. The steel casing of
this well was subject to corrosion by the acidic waste. Such corrosion and failure
of the casing might have led to the release of acidic waste from the injection
zone through the monitor well. As a precautionary measure, in February 1969
the original monitor well was completely filled with cement.
In order that the monitoring program might be continued, two monitor
wells were drilled from December 1969 to February 1970. One well is about 1.5
miles south of the injection wells, near Clear Creek, and the other is about 1.9
miles north of the injection wells, near Waldorf Lake (fig. 1).
As a part of the .cooperative program between the Bureau of Geology of
the Florida Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Geological Survey, a
fairly complete suite of hydrologic and geologic data were obtained during the
period of construction of the two wells.


PURPOSE AND SCOPE

The purpose of this report is to provide a record of the geology, hydraulic
conditions, and chemical quality of the water found during construction of two
monitor wells.
Details of the well design and drilling procedures are discussed. Hydro-
geologic data collected during the construction of the wells are presented in
tables, graphs, and diagrams. These data include lithologic logs describing drill
cuttings, drilling time logs, field and laboratory analyses of water samples,
temperatures, rates of artesian flow from different zones of the aquifer, static
water levels, aquifer tests, and geophysical logs.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The courtesies and assistance extended by the personnel of the Monsanto
Company and Layne-Central Company are greatly appreciated. The support
provided by the following individuals who were most closely associated with the







4 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


drilling is especially appreciated: B.T. Dean, C.P. Neiswender, Jr., and Arthur
Zabinski of the Monsanto Company; A.G. Symons, J. Turner, and J.C.
Armstrong of the Layne-Central Company.

WELL CONSTRUCTION
DRILLING EQUIPMENT AND SET UP

A hydraulic rotary drilling machine was used to construct the two monitor
wells, as seen in figure 2. The machine had a drilling platform, a 68-foot tower
with fingers for stacking drill pipe, a rotary table, and a transfer housing with
controls. An industrial engine fueled by propane gas was used to drive the rotary


Figure 2. Photograph of rotary drilling machine showing tower and work
platform.


I~-;~f+~5E~3~, ~P4-4r







4 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


drilling is especially appreciated: B.T. Dean, C.P. Neiswender, Jr., and Arthur
Zabinski of the Monsanto Company; A.G. Symons, J. Turner, and J.C.
Armstrong of the Layne-Central Company.

WELL CONSTRUCTION
DRILLING EQUIPMENT AND SET UP

A hydraulic rotary drilling machine was used to construct the two monitor
wells, as seen in figure 2. The machine had a drilling platform, a 68-foot tower
with fingers for stacking drill pipe, a rotary table, and a transfer housing with
controls. An industrial engine fueled by propane gas was used to drive the rotary


Figure 2. Photograph of rotary drilling machine showing tower and work
platform.


I~-;~f+~5E~3~, ~P4-4r






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


table and other associated equipment.
Two mud pits were dug, one to contain the drill cuttings which settled out
of the drilling fluid, and the other to store drilling fluid which was recirculated
through the well -by the mud pump. The mud ditch from the drill hole to the
settling pit was floored with neat cement to facilitate cleaning the ditch and the
collection of drill cuttings.
The drilling fluid used to complete the hole from the land surface to the
top of the lower Floridan aquifer was a suspension of drilling mud (clay) mixed
in water. The mix water, obtained from a nearby stream, was acidic (pH 5.5 to
6) so that it was necessary to raise the pH by adding caustic soda so that the
drilling mud would stay in suspension. The density of the drilling fluid was
maintained at about 12 to 14 pounds per gallon.

DRILLING PROCEDURE

A pilot hole 7-7/8 inches in diameter was drilled from land surface through
slightly more than 100 feet of sand and gravel interbedded with clay lenses into
the first significant clay bed. This part of the hole was then reamed at a diameter
of 21 inches to a depth of about 100 feet and a 16-inch steel casing was installed
from the surface to about 100 feet and grouted in place with cement. From the
bottom of the 16-inch casing, a 9-7/8-inch pilot hole was drilled to the top of
the lower Floridan aquifer and reamed to 15 inches in diameter. An 8-inch steel
casing was installed from land surface to the top of the lower Floridan aquifer
and grouted in place with cement. The hole was completed by drilling a
7-7/8-inch diameter hole into the consolidated limestone of the lower Floridan
aquifer. One hundred and sixty-six feet of the aquifer were penetrated by the
Clear Creek well and 183 feet by the Waldorf Lake well. Drilling was terminated
when flow from the lower Floridan aquifer no longer increased with added well
depth. Flow was measured at the land surface by use of a 6-inch Parshall flume.
Use of drilling mud was not required for drilling in the lower Floridan aquifer
because the flow of water from the aquifer was sufficient to carry the cuttings
from the hole. For each well, however, fresh water from a nearby creek was
circulated as drilling fluid. Construction details of the Clear Creek and Waldorf
Lake monitor wells are shown in figures 3 and 4.

CASING

The 16-inch diameter steel casing was installed in both wells to depths of
about 100 feet to prevent caving of the unconsolidated sand and gravel.
Eight-inch nominal casing (ASTM A-53, Grade A, welded construction,
0.322-inch wall) was installed from land surface to 1,430 feet and 1,340 feet in
the Clear Creek and Waldorf Lake wells, respectively. Guides to center the casing







6 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
















LAND SURFACE
MEAN SEA LEVEL L- P __


Figure 3. Diagram showing construction details of Clear Creek monitor well.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


Figure 4. Diagram showing construction details of Waldorf Lake monitor well.


MEAN SEA LEVEL





w 100


200





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


were welded on both the 16-inch and 8-inch casings, as shown in figure 5, to
insure that the cement grout would encircle the casing and completely fill the
voids around the casing. Joints were butt welded as the casing was installed. The
bottom 20-foot section of the 8-inch casing was stainless steel (ASTM 312,
type 304, welded construction, 0.322-inch wall).


Figure 5. Photograph showing 8-inch steel casing with centering guides.


CEMENT GROUTING

Both the 16-inch and 8-inch casings were grouted in place using standard
commercial cement with no additives. In each case, cement grout was introduced
from inside the casing at the bottom and forced by pump pressure up the
annular space around the casing. The process was continued until the grout had
displaced all the drilling mud outside the casing and flowed freely at the surface.
The line through which the cement was injected was lowered to within about 2
feet of the bottom of the casing and sealed at the top of the casing with a dresser
coupling which is welded in the top of the bradenhead. The casing was filled
with drilling mud before cement was ted into the bottom of the well.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


The highly fluid cement grout settled appreciably as it set, so that the
upper 100 feet of the 8-inch casing had to be regrouted from the top. Part of the
equipment used for grouting is shown in figures 6 and 7. Grouting Clear Creek
well required 125 bags of cement for the 16-inch casing and 1,340 bags for the
8-inch casing. Grouting Waldorf Lake well required 125 bags of cement for the
16-inch casing and 1,368 bags for the 8-inch casing.


Figure 6. Photograph showing hookup of bradenhead and cement line used to
grout well casing.







10 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY




























Figure 7. Photograph showing trailer-mounted cement-grout pump. Two men
feed cement to mixing box where water is added.


HYDROGEOLOGIC DATA

A fairly complete suite of hydrologic and geologic data were obtained
during construction of the two monitor wells. These data, which include drill
cuttings and related lithologic logs, measurements of the potentiometric level of
water and related aquifer tests, rates of flow, geophysical logs, and water samples
and related chemical analyses, are presented in tables 1-7 and figures 8-16 at the
end of the text. The lithologic log for injection well A is included in the report
because it represents comparable data that were not previously published.
Because the significance of some of the data collected depends on the sampling
techniques used, these techniques are explained in some detail.

DRILL CUTTINGS

Drill cuttings were collected from the mud ditch when drilling was
interrupted to add increments of drill stem. Drill stem units ranged from 22 to






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


32 feet nominal length. Circulation of drilling fluid was continued at these times
until all or almost all of the drill cuttings were removed from the well bore.
After each sampling period, drill cuttings were cleaned from the mud ditch. Each
sample therefore represents a composite of rock material removed from
successively deeper sections of the well.
At the end of drilling each increment ot hole, the driller recorded the depth
as determined from careful measurement of the length of each drill stem added
to the string. Depth of drilling was recorded also at times when drilling action
reflected distinct changes of lithology. Rate of drilling progress in different
zones of the aquifer is indicated for the two monitor wells by drilling time logs
shown in figure 8. Lithologic logs are given for the two monitor wells and for
injection well A in tables 1-3.

POTENTIOMETRIC LEVEL AND FLOW OF WATER

In the area of the monitor wells, water in the lower Floridan aquifer is
under pressure that results partly from natural artesian pressure of water in the
aquifer and partly from pressurized injection of chemical"waste into the aquifer.
On completion of the wells, the potentiometric level of water in the aquifer
recovered to 228 feet above land surface at Clear Creek well and to 233 feet
above land surface at Waldorf Lake well. These levels were determined by use of
a pressure gage.
During the construction period the rate of water flow from the lower
Floridan aquifer was measured at times when drilling was interrupted to add drill
stem. A 6-inch Parshall flume in the mud ditch was used. Each successive
increase in the total flow from the well is attributable to flow added by the last
drilled section of the aquifer.
Flow from the aquifer was impeded to some degree by the drill stem in the
well bore. At Clear Creek well, total flow from the completed well increased
from 603 gpm with drill stem in place to 688 gpm with drill stem removed. At
Waldorf Lake well, flow from the completed well increased from 412 gpm with
drill stem in place to 435 gpm with drill stem removed.
Most of the flow in each case was derived from the uppermost zones of the
aquifer penetrated. Contribution of flow from different parts of the aquifer with
drill stem in place is indicated for the two monitor wells in figures 13 and 14.
The relative distribution of flow from the aquifer probably was not changed
appreciably by removal of the drill stem.

AQUIFER TESTS

Drawdown and recovery tests were made at both wells to determine the
transmissivity of the lower Floridan aquifer. The monitor wells normally are not






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


allowed to flow. During the drawdown test, a uniform rate of flow was
maintained by regulation of a 6-inch valve on the well. Rates of flow-503 gpm
at Clear Creek well and 350 gpm at Waldorf Lake well-were determined by use
of a 5-inch circular orifice on a 6-inch discharge pipe. A pressure gage was used
to measure the drawdown or decline of pressure of water in the aquifer as flow
continued.
The recovery test began with the end of the drawdown test when the 6-inch
valve was closed to stop the flow from the aquifer. The pressure recovery was
measured by use of pressure gage. Results of the aquifer tests are given for the
two wells in figures 9-12.

GEOPHYSICAL LOGS

Electric, fluid-resistivity, caliper, and current meter (velocity) logs were
obtained at the open-hole section of the lower Floridan aquifer for each of the
two monitor wells. A gamma-ray log of the entire well also was obtained. These
logs are reproduced in figures 8, 13 and 14. Instruments used to obtain the
geophysical logs were operated by personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey.

WATER SAMPLES

Beginning with drilling in the lower Floridan aquifer, water from the well
was collected when drilling was interrupted to add drill stem. In drilling this part
of the hole, drill-stem sections in nominal lengths of 32 feet were used. For each
sampling, after each increment of drilling, the bit was raised about 30 feet from
the bottom of the hole. Water flowing into the 30 feet of well bore below the
drill bit flowed upward by artesian pressure through the hollow drill stem. Water
that entered the well bore above the drill bit moved upward through the annular
space between the drill stem and the wall of the well bore or casing. Separate
samples \vere taken of water flowing from the drill stem and from the casing.
The total flow of the completed well was sampled after the drill stem was
removed.
Zones of the aquifer sampled and conditions of flow in the well bore at
time of sampling are indicated in figures 13 and 14.

CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER SAMPLES

Water samples collected from Clear Creek and Waldorf Lake monitor wells
were analyzed for major and minor chemical constituents at the U.S. Geological
Survey District Laboratory in Ocala, Florida. Analytical methods used by the
laboratory are given in table 4. Results of chemical analyses of 26 water samples
from the two wells are listed in table 5. Results of a spectographic analysis, made






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


to detect the present level of metallic ions in the water of Clear Creek monitor
well, are shown in table 6.
After completion of the monitor wells, analyses were made at the well sites
for several unstable chemical constituents and physical properties of the water.
The pH and oxidation-reduction potential were measured at the weI head by use
of a flow-through chamber. These measurements were taken before the water
came in contact with the atmosphere. Ferrous iron was determined by
completing with 2,2' bipyridine. Results of these analyses are shown in table 7.
In connection with the field analyses at both wells, small gas bubbles were noted
to collect on the walls of the sample containers. The source and nature of the
bubbles were not determined.
Results of chemical analyses of water taken from the drill stem show that
all major chemical constituents of water in the lower Floridan aquifer, except
bicarbonate, become increasingly concentrated with depth (figs. 15 and 16). The
concentration of bicarbonate decreases with depth. Results of chemical analyses
of water taken from the well casing show similar but much less pronounced
trends of concentration for the same constituents. The effect of change in
concentration with depth is diminished in this case because the flow from
different zones of the aquifer is mixed with a disproportionately large part of
the total flow coming from the uppermost part of the aquifer (figs. 13 and 14).
At the time of construction, water of the lower Floridan aquifer in the
immediate areas of the two monitor wells probably was native to the aquifer.
Chemical changes of the water that would result from injection of chemical
waste materials were not apparent in the results of chemical analyses made.
These changes would include increased concentration of total organic carbon,
organic and ammonia nitrogen, calcium, total hardness, and total alkalinity. A
slight decrease of pH also might be expected.





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


REFERENCES

Barraclough, J. T.
1966 Waste injection into deep limestone in northwestern Florida: Ground Water
Jour., Tech. Div., Nat. Water Well Assoc., v. 4, no. 1, p. 22-24.
Baraclough, J. T.
1962 (and Marsh, O. T.) Aquifers and quality of ground water along the Gulf Coast
of western Florida: Florida Geol. Survey, Rept, Inv. 29, 28p.
Ferris, J. G.
1962 (Knowles, D. B., Brown, R. H., and Stallman, R. W.) Theory of aquifer tests:
U.S. GeoL Survey Water-Supply Paper 1536-E, 174 p.
Goolsby, D. A.
1971 Hydrogeochemical effects of injecting wastes into a limestone aquifer near
Pensacola, Florida: Ground Water Jour., Tech. Div., Natl. Water Well Assoc., v.
9, no. 1, p. 13-19.
Jacob, C. E.
1950 Flow of ground water, Engineering Hydraulics: chap. 5 in Rouse, Hunter, New
York, John Wiley and Sons, New York, p. 321-386.

Marsh, 0. T.
1962 Relation of the Bucatunna Clay Member (Bryam Formation Oligocene) to
geology and ground water of westernmost Florida: Geol. Soc. America Bull., v.
73, p. 243-252.
Musgrove, R. H.
1965 (Barraclough, J. T., and Grantham, R. G.) Water resources of Escambia and
Santa Rosa counties, Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Rept. Inv. 40, 102 p.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74 l



Table 1. Lithologic log of Clear Creek monitor well.
(Florida Bureau of Geology No. W-10490)
(USGS No. 303417N0871417.1)
(Lithologic description by J. B. Foster)

Owner: Monsanto Company Aquifer: Lower Floridan
Location: On Clear Creek Altitude (land surface): 15.23 ft.
Driller: Layne-Central Company Water level: 229 ft above land
James C. Armstrong surface 12/24/69
Date drilled: December 1969 Yield: 686 gpm (flow)
Total depth: 1,596 ft Transmissivity: 8,000 gpd/ft
Depth of casing: 1,430 ft Storage coefficient: -
Casing diameter: 8 in Chloride concentration: 8,150 mg/1
Well finish: Open hole Temperature: 35'C
Method of drilling: Hydraulic rotary
Thickness Depth
Lithology (feet) (feet)
Sand, white to orange, quartz, very fine to very
coarse; clay, white and orange; few heavy
mineral grains. 12.0 12.0
Same as above. Fragments limonite. 10.0 22.0
Same as above. White kaolinitic clay. 10.0 32.0
Sand, white to yellow, quartz, very fine to granule,
foster; clay, white and yellow; limonite. 6.0 38.0
Same as above. Orange clay. Increased granule size
of sand. 10.0 48.0
Sand, tan to pink, quartz, medium to 60% granule; clay, 40%
white, yellow, and lavender; black heavy mineral. 28.5 76.5
Clay, tan to lavender, 70%; sand, 30%. 25.0 101.5
Clay, gray, some white and red streaks; some sand,
very fine to medium; mica. 6.0 107.5
Sand, gray, medium to very coarse, quartz; clay, gray
to white, 20%; black organic material. 6.5 114.0
Same as above. Less clay; grains of heavy minerals. 23.1 137.1
Same as above. Limonite grains. 23.0 160.1
Sand, white to gray, quartz, fine to granule; some
clay; black phosphorite. 22.9 183.0
Same as above. 75% fine to medium sand. 16.0 199.0
Clay, light gray, 60%; sand, 40%, fine to coarse;
few granules. 30.0 229.0
Sand, gray, quartz fine to coarse; clay, 20%, gray;
black phosphorite. 23.0 252.0
Sand, tan to white, quartz, fine to very coarse, 70%
coarse, frosted; clay, white to pink; black
phosphorite. 23.0 275.0
Sand, light gray, quartz, fine to coarse; some
white clay. 23.0 298.0
Sand, light gray to white, quartz, medium to very
coarse; black phosphorite. 23.0 321.0
Same as above. Black phosphorite. 23.1 344.1
Same as above. Less very coarse sand. Heavy
mineral fragments. 23.0 367.1
Sand, gray, quartz, very fine to coarse; clay, 20%,
gray; black phosphorite grains; mica. 22.9 390.0








16 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY



Thickness Depth
Lithology (feet) (feet)
Same as above. Increased mica. 22.9 412.9
Sand, light gray, quartz, coarse silt to medium; some
clay; mica; heavy mineral; black phosphorite;
few shells. 22.9 435.8
Same as above. 10% gray clay. 23.0 458.8
Clay, gray; sand, coarse silt to fine; shells; black
phosphorite; mica. 68.4 527.2
Same as above. Clay, waxy, dense, bluish-gray. 136.4 663.6
Sand, light gray, quartz, very fine to medium, some
coarse grains; clay, gray; black phosphorite. 45.2 708.8
Same as above. Shells. 44.3 753.1
Clay, gray; sand, coarse silt to medium; shells;
mica; black phosphorite. 44.8 797.9
Sand as above. Increased sand. 88.7 886.6
Sand, gray, quartz, fine to medium, frosted; clay,
gray; shells; black phosphorite; slightly
calcareous. 22.2 908.8
Limestone, gray; foraminifers; few sand grains;
limonite fragments; black phosphorite. 22.4 931.2
Clay, gray, dense, calcareous; some sand; shells. 22.1 953.3
Limestone, white, finely crystalline; few foraminifers. 44.2 997.5
Limestone, light gray, finely crystalline; shells; some
sand; black phosphorite; some clay; mica. 153.6 1151.1
Same as above. Lense of crystalline dolomitic
limestone. 21.0 1172.1
Clay, gray, dense, waxy, calcareous; coarse
silt; shells. 110.2 1282.3
Same as above. Limestone fragments. 99.8 1382.1
Limestone, white, finely crystalline; abundant
foraminifers; shell; green glauconite; fragments
of silty clay; magnetite fragments. 33.0 1417.1
Limestone, fight gray, finely crystalline, bioclaustic;
80% foraminifers; green glauconite; shells. 22.9 1440.0
Limestone, white, fine grained, sandy; sand fone to
medium; green glauconite; black phosphorite;
calcite; foraminifers; shell fragments. 31.9 1471.9
Same as above. Brownish dolomitic limestone
fragments; increased calcite; iron stain. 124.1 1596.0







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74 17



Table 2. Lithologic log of Waldorf Lake monitor well.
(Florida Bureau of Geology No. W-10487)
(USGS No. 303657N0871543.1)
(Lithologic description by J. B. Foster)

Owner: Monsanto Company Aquifer: Lower Floridan
Location: On.Waldorf Lake Altitude (land surface): 7.73 ft
Driller: Layne-Central Company Water level: 233 ft above land
James C. Armstrong surface 03/17/70
Date drilled: February 1970 Yield: 433 gpm (flow)
Total depth: 1,523 ft Transmissivity: 3,000 gpd/ft
Depth of casing: 1,340 ft Storage Coefficient: -
Casing diameter: 8 in Chloride concentration: 7,100 mg/1
Well finish: Open hole Temperature: 35C
Method of drilling: Hydraulic rotary

Thickness Depth
Lithology (feet) (feet)
Sand, white to yellow, quartz, fine to granule,
foster; clay fragments, white to yellow; heavy
mineral grains. 38.4 38.4
Sand, white to tan, quartz, medium to granule,
foster; some clay. 23.0 61.4
Clay, light gray; sand, fine to coarse; grains of
heavy minerals. 23.0 84.4
Clay, gray; sand; heavy mineral. 23.0 107.4
Sand, light gray to tan, quartz, coarse to very
coarse; clay, gray; mica; grains of heavy minerals. 27.7 135.1
Sand, white to yellow, quartz, fine to very coarse;
clay, white to orange; limonite; black phosphorite
grains. 23.0 158.1
Same as above. Some purple clay coating sand grains. 69.0 227.1
Same as above. Increased black phosphorite. 46.0 273.1
Sand, light gray to gray, quartz, medium to granule;
clay, gray; black phosphorite granules; mica. 23.0 296.1
Sand, tan to light gray, quartz, fine to coarse;
shells; few foraminifers; black phosphorite; some
gray clay. 23.0 319.1
Same as above. Increased gray clay. 23.0 342.1
Same as above. Increased shell. 22.9 365.0
Clay, gray, silty; sand, fine to coarse; shells;
black phosphorite. 22.9 387.9
Same as above. Increased clay. 45.9 433.8
Clay, bluish-gray, dense, waxy; sand, fine to coarse;
black phosphorite. 22.8 456.6
Same as above. Increased sand. 22.8 479.4
Sand, light gray, quartz, very fine to medium; clay,
light gray; fine grained black phosphorite; mica. 91.1 570.5
Same as above. Increased clay. 22.7 593.2
Clay, gray, waxy, silty; sand, fine to coarse; shells;
fine black phosphorite. 22.6 615.8
Clay, gray, waxy, silty; few sand grains; black
phosphorite; shell. 22.5 638.3
Same as above. Some sand. 67.8 706.1
Same as above. 30% sand. 22.2 728.3








18 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY



Thickness Depth
Lithology (feet) (feet)

Sand, light gray, quartz, silt to coarse; clay, gray,
30%, waxy; some shell; fine black phosphorite. 44.7 773.0
Clay, gray, calcareous; sand; shell; black phosphorite;
limestone lenses; mica. 90.7 863.7
Limestone, gray, finely crystalline; some clay; silt;
sand; shells; black phosphorite. 44.6 906.7
Same as above. 25% sand. 44.2 950.9
Same as above. Increased clay. 22.1 973.0
Limestone, gray, dense, hard; black phosphorite;
shells. 66.2 1039.2
Same as above. Increased shells; foraminifers. 22.1 1061.3
Same as above. Lenses of brownish-gray dolomitic
limestone. 22.2 1083.5
Clay, gray, waxy, calcareous; sand; limestone. 22.0 1105.5
Sand, light gray, quartz, silt to medium, few
granules; clay, gray; black phosphorite;
limestone; foraminifers. 21.1 1126.6
Same as above. Shells. 21.0 1147.6
Clay, gray, dense, waxy; sand; limonite; limestone
fragments. 132.9 1280.5
Limestone, gray to white, finely crystalline;
black phosphorite. 22.7 1303.2
Limestone, light gray to cream; foraminifers; shells;
black phosphorite; green glauconite. 38.0 1341.2
Limestone, white, granular; green glauconite;
foraminifers; shells; black phosphorite;
limonite stains. 119.7 1460.9
Sand, white, quartz, fine; limestone fragments;
foraminifers; shell; green glauconite filling
fossil tests. 60.8 1521.7
Limestone, white; foraminifers; shells; green
glauconite. 2.0 1523.7









INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


Table 3. Lithologic log of injection well A.
(Florida Bureau of Geology No. W-6225)
(USGS No. 303537N0871456.1)
(Lithologic description by J. B. Foster)


Owner: Monsanto Company Aquifer: Lower Floridan
Location: At plant Altitude (land surface): 32.2 ft
Driller: Layne-Central Company Water level: 36.6 ft above land
James C. Armstrong surface 04/01/63
Date drilled: March 1963 Yield: 128 gpm (flow)
Total depth: 1,808 ft Transmissivity: 6,300 gpd/ft
Depth of casing: 1,390 ft April 1963
Casing diameter: 12 in Storage coefficient: 0.0001,
Well finish: Open hole April 1963
Method of drilling: Air reverse rotary Chloride concentration: 7,350 mg/1
Temperature: 35"C

Thickness
Lithology (feet)
Sand, light brown, quartz, very fine to very coarse;
tan to orange clay; black organic material. 20.0
Sand, tan to white, quartz, medium to very coarse,
frosted; orange clay coating some grains. 20.0
Sand, tan to white, quartz, fine to granule, frosted;
tan to orange clay coating grains; few black
phosphorite granules. 57.0
Sand, light gray, very fine to coarse, quartz; clay,
35%, light gray; mica; black phosphorite grains;
limonite fragments. 22.0
Sand, light gray, fine to coarse, quartz, frosted;
clay 20%, white; heavy mineral. 23.0
Sand, tan, fine to coarse, quartz, frosted; clay,
orange to white; black phosphorite; mica;
heavy mineral. 22.0
Same as above. 60% coarse to very coarse sand. 53.0
Sand, light gray, quartz, very fine to coarse, frosted;
clay, light gray, coating sand grains; black
phosphorite; heavy mineral; mica. 15.0
Same as above. Some coarse sand; increased clay. 22.0
Sand, white, quartz, very fine to coarse, frosted;
black phosphorite grains. 23.0
Same as above. Some white clay. 24.0
Same as above. Sand coarse to very coarse. 20.0
Sand, light gray to white, quartz, very fine to
granule, frosted; clay, light gray to white;
black phosphorite; black carbonaceous material. 23.0
Same as above. Fine to coarse sand. 22.0
Sand,.light gray, quartz, medium to granule,
frosted; clay, light gray, coating sand grains;
granule size black phosphorite. 10.0
Same as above. Some shell. 11.0
Sand, gray, quartz, very fine to very coarse,
frosted; shell, abundant; clay, gray; black
phosphorite; mica. 25.0
Same as above. Less shell. 23.0
J


Depth
(feet)

20.0

40.0


97.0


119.0

142.0


164.0
217.0


232.0
254.0

277.0
301.0
321.0


344.0
366.0


376.0
387.0


412.0
435.0








20 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY



Thickness Depth
Lithology (feet) (feet)


Sand, light gray, quartz, fine to medium; clay,
gray; few shell; mica; fine black phosphorite. 22.0 457.0
Same as above. Wood fragments. 22.0 479.0
Same as above. Increased wood fragments. 46.0 525.0
Sand, light gray, quartz, fine to coarse, frosted;
few shells; mica; fine black phosphorite. 44.0 569.0
Clay, gray; sand, fine to coarse, 20% of sample. 24.0 593.0
Same as above. Fewshells. 21.0 614.0
Sand, light gray, quartz, very fine to medium,
frosted; clay, light gray; fine black phosphorite. 23.0 637.0
Same as above. Some very coarse sand; clay, gray. 46.0 683.0
Same as above. Few shell 69.0 772.0
Same as above. Increase in very fine sand. 22.0 794.0
Same as above. Mica flakes. 21.0 815.0
Same as above. Few foraminifers; increase fine
black phosphorite. 68.0 883.0
Clay, gray; sand, fine to coarse; shell, abundant. 45.0 928.0
Sand, light gray, quartz, fine to coarse, frosted;
limestone, white; shell; some clay. 23.0 951.0
Limestone, gray to white, fine crystalline; sand,
fine to coarse; shell; foraminifers. 21.0 972.0
Sand, light gray, quartz, fine to medium; limestone,
white to gray; shell; foraminifers. 16.0 988.0
Limestone, light gray to tan, fine crystalline; some
sand; shell; foraminifers; black phosphorite. 31.0 1019.0
Same as above. Some brown crystalline dolomitic
limestone. 24.0 1043.0
Limestone, light gray to white, fine crystalline;
few sand grains; foraminifers; pyrrhotite grains. 29.0 1072.0
Limestone, dolomitic, brown, crystalline; few shells. 32.0 1104.0
Limestone, white, crystalline; some foraminifera;
few sand grains; some shells. 29.0 1133.0
Sand, white, quartz, very fine to fine; limestone,
white; few foraminifers. 22.0 1155.0
Cay, gray; sand, fine to very coarse; mica;
pyrrhotite; some shells. 77.0 1232.0
Cay, gray, dense; few sand grains. 138.0 1370.0
Limestone, white to light gray, finely crystalline;
clay, gray; few sand grains. 20.0 1390.0
Limestone, white to light gray, fine grained to
dense, gray color from glauconite or phosphorite;
some shells. 26.0 1416.0
Same as above. Some foraminifers. 23.0 1439.0
Same as above. Abundant foraminifers. 23.0 1462.0
Limestone, white, dense to fine crystalline;
foraminifers; shells; some black phosphorite
or glauconite particles. 23.0 1485.0
Same as above. Pyrrhotite flakes. 55.0 1540.0
Limestone, white, fine crystalline, 70% calcite
crystal structure; abundant green glauconite;
shells; foraminifers. 29.0 1569.0







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74 21


Lithology Thickness Depth
(feet) (feet)
Limestone, white, finely crystalline; abundant
foraminifers, 60%; green glauconite; shells; some
sand grains. 41.0 1610.0
Sand, white, quartz, very fine to medium; limestone,
40%, white, finely crystalline; green glauconite;
foraminifers; shell. 23.0 1643.0
Limestone, light gray, finely crystalline; sand,
quartz, 15%; few foraminifers; green glauconite. 30.0 1673.0
Same as above. Increased foraminifers. 27.0 1700.0
Clay, greenish-gray, calcareous, dense; limestone
fragments; foraminifers; green glauconite. 83.0 1783.0
Same as above. Few quartz sand grains. 25.0 1808.0






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Clear Creek monitor well


Waldorf Lake monitor well


Figure 8. Geophysical and drilling time logs.











180 So-226 ft (static pressure prior to test) 1

S 2 S 1-S 2.16.7 feet

S, ^^ 2 t
150




120


Jacob modified nonequilibrium formula (1950, p. 321-386) 4



& S (S1-S2)
3 T, transmissivity, gpd per ft (gallons
per day per foot) z
60 Q, flow rate, gpm (gallons per minute)
t1 and t2, random successive times
81 and a2, drawdowns at t1 and t2, respectivley

D 3For one log cycle, t2/t1 = 1, and S -S 216.7 feet
po g 30 For a flow rate of 503 gpm,
3 T = (264) (503 8,000 gpd per ft.
0 5 (16.7)



10-4 10-3 10-2 10"1 10
TIME SINCE PUMPING BEGAN, t, DAYS









BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


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Figure 1. Graph showing computation of transmissivity of lower Floridan

aquifer at Clear Creek monitor well. Data represent recovery of

water pressure in aquifer following a period of constant flow from

well.


0

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


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Figure 11. Graph showing computation of transmissivity of lower Floridan

aquifer at Waldorf Lake monitor well. Data represent decline of

water pressure in aquifer during period that well flowed at constant
rate of 350 gpm.


lu


\9 $









BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


cO


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iaaad *IVaH aanIISSaaa


o 0 0 0
AO vH 00is

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Figure 12. Graph showing computation of transmissivity of lower Floridan

aquifer at Waldorf Lake monitor well. Data represent recovery of

water pressure in aquifer following a period of constant flow from

weu.l


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Figure 13. Graph showing quantity and chemical quality of water flow from
different zones of the lower Floridan aquifer at Clear Creek monitor
well


I








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


T I I


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___ ||____________ -
-S
S0 02 g
I- 0 Co




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Figure 14. Graph showing quantity and chemical quality of water flow from
different zones of the lower Floridan aquifer at Waldorf Lake
monitor well.


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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74



Table 4. Methods used to analyze water samples from Clear Creek
and Waldorf Lake monitor wells.


Constituent
Silica
Calcium
Magnesium
Strontium
SSodium
Potassium
Bicarbonate
Sulfate
Chloride
Fluoride
Dissolved Solids
Total Hardness
Non-Carbonate Hardness
Alkalinity as CaCO3
Specific Conductance
pH
Nitrate
Nitrite
Ammonia
Organic Nitrogen
Total Combined Nitrogen
Total Organic Carbon
Color
Orthophosphate
Total Phosphorus
Bromide
Iodide
Arsenic 1/
Boron
Chromium 1/
Copper 1/
Iron 1/
Managanese 1/
Lead 1/
Zinc 1/
Lithium
Oxidation-Reduction
Potential
Hydrogen Sulfide
Ferrous Iron


Analytical Method
Molybdate blue
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Potentiometric Titration
Turbidimetric
Visual Mercuric Nitrate
Spectrophotometric-Eriochrome Cyanine R
Calculated from sum of determined constituents
Calculated from Calcium, Magnesium, and Strontium
Calculated
Calculated
Conductivity meter
Potentiometric
Cadmium reduction-Technicon Autoanalyzer
Diazotation-Technicon Autoanalyzer
Distillation-Titration
Kjeldahl digestion-distillation-titration
Calculated
Beckman Carbon Analyzer
Color-comparitor
Single reagent-Technicon Autoanalyzer
Persulfate digestion-single reagent-Technicon Autoanalyzer
Oxidation
Oxidation
Silver diethyldithiocarbamate
Carmine
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Solvent Extraction-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Potentiometric-platinum electrode

lodiometric
Spectrophotometric-Bipyridine


1/ Filtered through a 0.45 micron-membrane filter and acidified to pH2 with double distilled
nitric acid at time of collection.










30 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY






Table 5.- Results of chemical analyses of water samples from lear Creek and Waldorf Lake monitor wells.
Dissolved constituents in milligrams per liter.










CLEAR CREEK WELL DRILL STEM FLOW
U i



S39 0854 1,472 19 163 141 16 4,900 71 272 0 7.900 3.0 13,400 1,010 783 223 23,000
a .U E, U

6 6 6 6 0 1 2 9,800
CLEAR CREEK WELL DRILL STEM FLOW
1-23-69 0854 1.472 19 163 141 16 4,900 71 272 0 7.900 3.0 13,400 18010 783 223 23,000
12-23-64 0955 1,503 21 181 154 18 5,100 72 264 0 8,400 3.0 14,100 1,110 890 217 24,00
12-23-69 1012 1.503 21 181 151 18 5.100 75 260 0 8,400 2.9 14.100 1.090 881 213 24,004
12-23-69 1110 1.533 21 237 196 23 5.780 80 242 0 9,600 3.0 16,100 1,420 1.230 198 272,00
12-2-6 12213 1.564 24 300 243 30 6.230 86 216 0 10,300 3.0 17,300 1,780 18610 177 29.800
31-23-69 1331 1.596 26 302 234 31 6,540 9 26 0 0 216 0.900 18,200 1,750 1.580 177 29,900
CLEAR CREEK WELL CASING FLOW
12-2-690 00 0 17 1 24 32 116 13 4.500 64 288 0 7,400 2.9 12.400 822 586 236 217,00
12-2-690 102 1503 20 140 11 22 14 4.700 67 276 0 7,500 3.0 12,700 868 642 226 21,500
12-23-69 1111 1,533 20 144 124 14 4,610 70 274 0 7,500 3.0 12,600 886 662 225 '21,700.
12-23-6 1214 1.564 20 149 129 14 4.720 70 276 0 7,700 3.0 12.900 919 693 226 210,00
12-23-69 133 1596 20 155 131 15 4,730 70 272 0 7.800 3.0 13,100 943 720 223 22,200
12-24-679 091 1.596 20 172 146 16 5.030 75 264 0 8,200 3.0 13.800 1,050 832 217 25,200
03-11-70 1625 1.596 18 181 142 22 4.920 65 266 0 8,150 2.9 13,700 1.060 843 218 23,500

WALDORF LAKE WELL DRILL STEM FLOW
02-02-70 1300 1,367 18 110 102 15 3,450 54 304 0 5,800 2.5 9,690 716 462 249 17.800
02-02-70 1402 1.398 18 121 111 3.530 55 300 0 6,100 3.1 10,00 767 520 246 18,600
02-02-70 1508 1.429 17 152 132 20 3,970 58 284 0 6,700 3.2 11,200 946 713 233 20,000
02-03-70 0850 1,460 17 138 118 21 3.660 56 296 0 66300 3.2 10.400 85 4 612 243 19,000
0:-03-70 0914 1.492 18 223 191 32 5.090 75 248 0 8.800 3.2 14.500 1,380 1,180 203 25.000
02-03-70 1106 1.523 18 282 223 42 5.950 82 228 0 10,100 3.1 16,800 1,670 1,480 187 28,200
WALDORF LAKE WELL CASING FLOW
02-02-70 1300 1.367 104 93 15 3.720 52 312 0 5,600 660 404 256 17,001
02-02-70 1402 1.398 100 95 14 3,340 50 308 0 5.600 657 404 253 17.000
02-02-70 1508 1.429 101 95 14 3.290 50 328 0 5.700 659 390 269 17.000
02-03-70 0850 1,460 108 95 18 312 0 681 425 256 17.000
02-03-70 0913 1.492 115 101 3,520 51 328 0 5,800 709 440 269 17,500
02-03-70 1106 1.523 18 149 126 22 4,000 58 292 0 6,700 3.1 11,200 916 676 239 19,900
03-12-70 1600 1.523 18 159 132 19 4,280 55 288 0 7.100 3.1 11,900 962 726 236 20,8(0


*Contamination suspected












INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 74


Nitrogen Species -^
0

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a. I- z Z < oz ^-z Ifu & < a u u .3 s .J ,


S 0.0 0.01 11 0.00 9.0
S35.0 .0 .01 11 .00 9.0
S35.0 .0 .03 10 2.0 10.2
S35.0 .0 .01 12 .00 9.9
.9 35.0 .0 .01 14 .00 11.5
8.0 35.0 .0 .04 8.2 2.1 8.8


.2 5
5
31* S
2 5
4 5
I 5


.02 11 .00 9.0
.01 10 .55 8.8
.01 9.7 1.5 9.5
.01 9.9 .45 8.6
.01 11 .00 9.0
.02 9.7 2.7 10.7
.01 9.3 2.1 9.8


.01 9.3 .82 8.5
.01 9.8 1.4 9.5
.01 9.1 1.6 9.1
.01
.01 9.0 2.7 10.1
.01 6.8 5.4 11.0


S
5
5
5
1 5
5
3 0


3 5
1 5
2 5
1
2
2


.01 9.6 .94 8.8 1
.01 8.6 1.5 8.5 2 0


.01
.01
.01
.01
.01
.01
.00 0.01 28 l.5


.02 .03 23 .93
.01 .03 30 .97
.01 .05 27 .93

.00 .02 40 1.1
.02 .03 32 .82


6.4






.00 5.1 .02 .03 1.7


.02 .03 5.4
.00 .01 22 2.0 .01 4.5 .02 .02 1.6


.28
.27
.28
.28
.29
.29
.31 .0 .01 .03


.23
.23
.23
.23
.23
.26
.28 .01 .00 .02


'8.1 34.0 .0
P.1 .0
8.2 35.0 .0
8.2 35.0 .0
P.1 35.0 .0
8.0 .0
;7.8 35.2 .0


7.7 34.4 .0
7.5 34.4 .0
i7.8 34.4 .0
S.6 35.0 .0
V.7 35.0 .0
'.8 35.3 .0


,7.5 34.4
7.7 34.4
.9 34.4
7.6 35.0
.6 35.0
.7 35.3 .0
.9 34.8 .0







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Table 6. Results of spectrographic analysis of water sample
taken from Cear Creek monitor well after completion.



Date of collection March 11, 1970


Element
Aluminum (Al)
Barium (Ba)
Beryllium (Be)
Bismuth (Bi)
Cadmium (Cd)
Cobalt (Co)
Gallium (Ga)
Germanium (Ge)
Molybdinum (Mo)
Nickel (Ni)
Rubidium (Rb)
Silver (Ag)
Tin (Sn)
Titanium (Ti)
Vanadium (V)
Zirconium (Zr)


Concentration
micrograms/liter
460
140
( 45
( 220
ND
( 200
ND
( 220
( 90
( 220
( 30
S 22
( 220
( 220
( 220
ND


( Less than figure shown
ND Specifically sought, not detected




Table 7. Results of field analyses of water from
completed monitor wells.


Clear Creek Waldorf Lake
Monitor Well Monitor Well


Date of Analysis
Time of Analysis
Specific Conductance (Micromhos at 25)
Temperature 'C
pH (Field measurement in closed system)
Oxidation-reduction potential at observed
temperature (volts)
Bicarbonate (HCO3), mg/1
Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S), mg/1
Ferrous Iron (Fe+2)


March 11, 1970
1500-1600
22,320
35.2
7.31

0.032
270
1.0


March 12, 1970
1600-1700
19,350
34.8
7.37

+ 0.023
302
0.8


1.6 1.2





CALCIUM (Co)
MILLIGRAMS PER LITER


1350


W 1400




O 1450
<
-J

0
-Jsa


1550


(THOUSANDS)
SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE
MICROMHOS PER CENTIMETER
AT 250 CENTIGRADE


6 7 8 9 10 225 250 275 300 325
(THOUSANDS)
CHLORIDE CONCENTRATION BICARBONATE (HCO3)
MILLIGRAMS PER LITER MILLIGRAMS PER LITER














5'


8
I



r 3




Si.
Cu


p.



S
Cu


I"*

II


SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE
MICROMHOS PER CENTIMETER
AT 250 CENTIGRADE


30 7 8 9 10
(THOUSANDS)


CHLORIDE CONCENTRATION
MILLIGRAMS PER LITER


CALCIUM (Co)
MILLIGRAMS PER LITER
100 150 200 250 300


II 12 200 250 300


BICARBONATE
MILLIGRAMS PER


(HC03)
LITER


1400


l 1450


(,
S1500


-i
o
u 1550
m


25
(THOUSANDS)


1600










FLRD GEOLOSk ( IC SUfRiW


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