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 Principal aquifers
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Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida, 1965-66
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 Material Information
Title: Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida, 1965-66
Series Title: Bureau of Geology. Information circular no. 61
Physical Description: v, 55 p. : ill., maps. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Healy, Henry G
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Florida -- Bureau of Geology
Publisher: State of Florida, Bureau of Geology
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1970
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Aquifers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Henry G. Healy.
General Note: Prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Bureau of Geology and other State and local agencies.
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001048701
oclc - 04677367
notis - AFD1779
System ID: UF00001121:00001
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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Principal aquifers
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Northwestern Florida
        Page 7
        Page 6
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Northern and North-central Florida
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 15
    Central Florida
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 22
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Southern Florida
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 40
    Appendix
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Copyright
            Main 1
            Main 2
Full Text







STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Robert O. Vernon, Chief






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61






WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN
AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1965-66





By
Henry G. Healy
U. S. Geological Survey




Prepared by
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with the
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES


TALLAHASSEE
1970










5 7,. 5~
F ,36 ,
fo). 4l1
1' 72


Completed manuscript received
November 11, 1968
Printed by the Florida Department of Natural Resources
Bureau of Geology
Tallahassee








CONTENTS
Page
Introduction .. . . . . . . 1
Well-numbering system .. ....... ... ... ....... 2
Principal aquifers . . . . . . .. 4
Northwestern Florida .. ............. ...... ..... 6
Pensacola area .. .. ...... . .. .. .. .. 8
Ft. Walton area . . . . . . . 8
Panama City area ................... ... .... 15
Northern and North-Central Florida . . . . . 15
Tallahassee area .................. ....... 15
Fernandina-Jacksonville area . . . . ..... 20
Central Florida . . . . .. . .. .. 22
\ Tampa-St. Petersburg area ............ .. ....... ... .. 22
Lakeland area . . . . . . . 27
Orlandoarea ........ ....... .. ........ .... 35
Cape Kennedy area .. ... .. ... ..... .. .. .. .. 38
SarasOta-Bradenton area ........................ 40
Southern Florida . . . . . . . .. 40
Ft. Myers area ..... ... ....... ........... 41
Stuart-West Palm Beach area .............. ........... 45
Ft. Lauderdale area .............. ..... ....... 45
Miami area ...... ... ... .. ............. .... 45

ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
1 Observation-well network, December 1966, and the extent of principal aquifers in
r^ Florida . . . . . . . .3
2 Well-numbering system .. .. .. .. .. .. .... ...... 5
3 Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan aquifer, in Florida, July
6-17, 1961 . . . . . . . 6
4 Locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are
given . . . . .. . . 7
5 Total yearly pumpage, city of Pensacola, Florida . . . 9
6 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escambia 45 at Cantonment, 46
near Ensley, and 62 at Pensacola, Pensacola area .. ..... 10
7 Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1965-66 11
8 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft.
Walton Beach area . . . . . . 12
9 'Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to
ff) May 1964 ......................... ... 13
10 Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1964 to
May 1966 . . . . ..... .. 14
F-- 11 Total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida . . ... 16








ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
12 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington,
Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville . . .. 17
13 Locations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which
hydrgraphs are given ............ ........ 18
14 Total yearly pumpage, city of Tallahassee, Florida . .... 19
15 Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Leon 7 at Tallahassee and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1965-66 20
16 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18
near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida21
17 Total yearly pumpage, city of Jacksonville, Florida . . ... 23
18 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122
at Jacksonville, Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at
Palatka, Florida ......... . .. ............ 24
19 Net changes of ground-water levels in the Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May
1951 to May 1964 and from May 1964 to May 1966 . . 25
20 Locations of observation wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are
given ...... .. ........................ 26
21 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehren and
Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park. Tampa area .... . 27
22 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 near Tampa and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1965-66 . 28
23 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin,
Pineilas 13 at Tarpon Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater ...... 29
24 Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at
Dunnedin, St. Petersburg area. . . . . 30
25 Total yearly pumpage, city of Lakeland, Florida . . .... 31
26 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1965-66 32
27 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport
and Polk 45 near Lakeland, Lakeland area . . ... 33
28 Trends and fluctuations of water levels ih wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51
at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring . . ... 34
29 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and
Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley . . ........ 35
30 Total yearly pumpage, Orlando, city of Cocoa and Winter Park, Florida 36
31 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1965-66 .37
32 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 45 near Orlando 38
33 Trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and eastern- central
coastal Florida .......... ............... 39
34 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9,
Sarasota-Bradenton area . . . . 41
35 Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given 42
36 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and
departures from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1965-66 43
37 Trends and fluctuations of water leels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54
Evergades, Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin 147 at Stuart, Florida 44
38 Total yearly pumpage, city of Stuart, Florida . . ... 46
39 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Stuart, 1965-66 .... 47








ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
40 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1965-66 48
41 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth,
Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami 49
42 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood,
Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A near Homestead,tDade F179 at Miami, and
Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale . . . .... .. 50
43 Changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward S830 near Ft. Lauderdale,
and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami . . . ... 51
44 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A near Homestead, and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental
Station, 1965-66 ...... ........... ...... 52
45 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S19 and G10 near Miami,
and Dade G72 northwest of Opa-locka . . . ... 53
46 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G596, G618, G613, and
G620 in central Dade County . . . . . 54
47 Changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade G354 near Miami and Dade
G469 and S529 in southeastern Dade County . . .... 55

TABLES
Table Page
1 Well and water-level data for selected observation wells in Florida .Appendix










WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN
AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1965-66
by
Henry G. Healy
INTRODUCTION
This report summarizes the trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in
the principal aquifers in Florida during 1965-66 and includes the following: (1)
hydrographs of ground-water levels in the several aquifers; (2) maps showing
changes in ground-water levels during specific periods; and, (3) a table
summarizing the principal data on selected observation wells. Observation wells
for which records are available are listed in the "Index to Water Resources
Data-Collection Stations in Florida, 1961," Florida Geological Survey Special
Publication No. 11. The index, prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in
cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey, (now the Bureau of Geology,
Florida Department of Natural Resources), includes the location, aquifer, and
type and period of records available for 3,600 observation wells.
Since World War II, and particularly during the last decade, the demand for
fresh water for industrial, municipal, and agricultural uses in Florida has
increased yearly. Although ground-water supplies have been adequate for the
increased demand in most areas, water levels have declined appreciably in some.
Because demand for ground-water continues to increase, shortages will occur and
may become critical in some areas. In coastal areas, declining water levels may
allow salt water to encroach and shortages could result from deterioration in
quality as well as from the reduction of quantity of water available. In order to
prevent future shortages, the present supplies of ground-water must be properly
appraised before they can be effectively utilized. Records of trends and
fluctuations of ground-water have long formed a basis for such an appraisal.
The principal objective of the investigations of the Water Resources Division
of the U.S. Geological Survey is to appraise and to evaluate the nation's water
resources. Although many types of ground-water investigations are carried out
on a statewide basis throughout the nation, the collection and compilation of
basic hydrologic data constitute an important part of the water resources
studies.
Objectives of the hydrologic data program include: the evaluation of available
ground-water supplies; the prediction of trends of water levels; and the
delineation of present or potential areas of detrimentally high or low
ground-water levels. Water levels are used to determine the base flow of streams,
to portray the effects of natural and man-induced forces that .act on a
water-bearing formation and to furnish information for use in basic research.
The hydrologic data program provides the foundation information necessary for
the successful and meaningful accomplishment of water resources investigations.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


The hydrologic data-collection program of the U. S. Geological Survey is part
of the cooperative investigations of the water resources of Florida in cooperation
with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, and
other state and local agencies and municipalities. The observation-well network
in 1966 included about 850 ground-water data-collection stations in the 67
counties of the state. Figure 1 shows the locations of selected ground-water
stations in the statewide network. Table 1 (see appendix) lists data on 307
observation wells selected from the statewide network of wells.
The hydrologic-data program consists of the collection, tabulation,
interpretation, evaluation, and publication of water-level and related data. Water
levels for selected wells are published, at present, once every 5 years in the U.S.
Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers.
Information pertinent to ground water is also published in interpretative
reports of investigations published by the Florida Geological Survey and the U.S.
Geological Survey. Data collected during an investigation and prior to
publication are available from the District Chief, U.S. Geological Survey, P.O.
Box 2315, Tallahassee, Florida, 32304.
The water-level data used in this report represent measurements taken from
automatic water-stage recorder charts, pressure gages, and made by tape. In
general, water-level measurements made by tape and stage recorder are shown to
the nearest hundredth of a foot, and those made with a pressure gage are shown
to the nearest tenth of a foot.
Table 1 summarizes well-data and water-level information for the several
aquifers. Well data include the aquifer, depth of well, and depth of casing. The
items: "Year record began" and "Frequency of measurements" are included as
part of the well data. In the water-level portion of the table, levels for May or
June are used because records are available for these months for a large
percentage of the wells. Also, ground-water levels generally are lowest during
May or June in most areas and records during that period constitute a base for
comparison from year to year. Highest and lowest water levels of record prior to
1965 are given in the table. Generally, highest and lowest levels are highest daily
levels if taken from recorder charts. The range of fluctuations for 1965 and 1966
are shown under "Annual range."
WELL-NUMBERING SYSTEM
Two well-numbering systems are used in this report; serially by counties or by
a grid-coordinate system based on latitude and longitude of the well location.
Frequently both numbers have been assigned to the well; e.g., a well number
may be shown as 20(008-537-2). This affords a tie-in with water-level data
published previously under well number 20 in Bay County with data that may
be published for the same well under number 008-537-2.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


THE INTERIOR


N



I,


EXPLANATION
Observation well
Chloride sample
PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS
Sand-ond-grovel

D Floridan


Floridan and/or others

SBiscyne

---- Approximate aquifer boundary
12
Chloride wells


Central ond Southern Florida
Flood Control Project

Southwest Florida
Water Monogement District


0 10 20 30 40 50 miles


-C. ci b


Figure 1. Observation-well network, December 1966, and the extent
of principal aquifers in Florida.





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Some wells used in table 1 have numbers with a letter prefix or suffix. In
Broward and Dade counties, the letter prefixes G, S, F, and NP denote
Geological Survey wells, supply wells, fire wells, and National Park Service wells,
respectively. In Dade, Escambia, Highlands, Holmes, and Leon Counties, the
letter suffix A denotes a shallow well near a deeper well having the
corresponding number without the letter suffix. In Orange County, the letter
suffixes B and C denote shallow wells drilled in the vicinity of well 47.
The grid-coordinate well-numbering system in Florida is derived from latitude
and longitude coordinates. The latitude and longitude prefix north and west and
the first digit of the degree number are hot included in the well number.
The well number is a composite of three numbers separated by hyphens: the
first number is composed of the last digit of the degree and the two digits of the
minute that define the latitude on the south side of the 1-minute quadrangle; the
second number is composed of the last digit of the degree and two digits of the
minutes that define the longitude on the east side of a 1-minute quadrangle; and
the third number gives the numerical order in which the well was inventoried in
the I-minute quadrangle. For example, well number 835-105-1 is the first well
inventoried in the I-minute quadrangle north of the 28035' parallel of latitude
and west of the 8105'meridian of longitude. The location of well 835-105-1 is
shown diagrammatically in figure 2.
PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS
Ground-water supplies for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in
Florida are available from three principal aquifers: the Floridan aquifer in
central and northern Florida; the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida; and
the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the extreme northwestern part of Florida. The
generalized areal extent of the aquifers supplying most of the ground water is
shown in figure 1.
The Floridan aquifer, which underlies all of the state, is the principal source
of water in central, northern, and most of northwestern Florida. Areas of
artesian flow and the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer is illustrated
by Figure 3. Highly mineralized water precludes the use of the Floridan aquifer
as a source of potable water in some coastal areas and in most of southern
Florida. In these areas, shallow artesian and nonartesian aquifers are the source
of supply.
The Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida is the chief source of water
supply for industries, municipalities, and irrigation. This aquifer, one of the most
highly productive aquifers in the world, underlies about 3,500 square miles of
Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach counties. The usefulness of the Biscayne aquifer
is sharply restricted in areas adjacent to the coast because of the presence of
saline waters.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


Figure 2. Well-numbering system


28040'


2830'
81010


28037'


I


" 10 I I[ I








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 3. Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan
aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961

The sand-and-gravel aquifer in extreme northwestern Florida is the principal
source of water supply, yielding large supplies of ground water for industries and
municipalities. The aquifer extends beneath all of Escambia and Santa Rosa
counties and part of western Okaloosa County.
This report of ground-water conditions has been divided into four sections as
follows: (1) northwestern Florida, (2) northern, northeastern, and north-central
Florida; (3) central Florida; and (4) southern and southeastern coastal Florida.

NORTHWESTERN FLORIDA

The northwetern section includes the Florida Panhandle extending from the
Apalachicola River westward to the Florida-Alabama line (Figure 4).


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A. L A B A


SANTA ROSA


O K A L 0 0O S A
*31. 025


013 OblrvyllOn well and number


GULF OF


MEXICO


Figure 4. Locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are given


W' A L T


BAY


S -MILES


0 5 10 80 30 40


NUALE








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 3. Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan
aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961

The sand-and-gravel aquifer in extreme northwestern Florida is the principal
source of water supply, yielding large supplies of ground water for industries and
municipalities. The aquifer extends beneath all of Escambia and Santa Rosa
counties and part of western Okaloosa County.
This report of ground-water conditions has been divided into four sections as
follows: (1) northwestern Florida, (2) northern, northeastern, and north-central
Florida; (3) central Florida; and (4) southern and southeastern coastal Florida.

NORTHWESTERN FLORIDA

The northwetern section includes the Florida Panhandle extending from the
Apalachicola River westward to the Florida-Alabama line (Figure 4).


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BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


The principal sources of ground-water supply in this section are the
sand-and-gravel aquifer in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and the Floridan
aquifer in the rest of the section. Minor supplies of ground water are obtained
from shallow nonartesian aquifers.
The Pensacola, Ft. Walton Beach, and Panama City areas of the Florida
panhandle are growing rapidly in industry and population.
PENSACOLA AREA
The Pensacola area includes Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, and like many
others in the state, is undergoing rapid economic development accompanied by
increasing use of water by industry and municipalities. Figure 5 shows that 1966
pumpage for the city of Pensacola was about six and one half times that of
1940.
The observation-well program in the Pensacola area began in 1939 as part of
the investigation to determine the adequacy and permanency of ground-water
supply in Escambia County. Figure 4 shows locations of observation wells
selected from the hydrologic-data network for which hydrographs are given in
this report, and table 1 presents data on 13 wells in Escambia county and 4 wells
in Santa Rosa county. Figure 6 shows fluctuations and long-term trends of
artesian water levels in the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the Pensacola area from
1960 through 1966.
Comparison of the hydrographs for the period of record reveals that while
water levels at the end of 1966 declined in central and southern Escambia
county, they remained above the low levels of the 1955-56 drought. Declines of
artesian water levels in the sand-and-gravel aquifer ranged from nearly 30 feet in
well Escambia 45 at Cantonment to about 10 feet in well Escambia 46 near
Ensley during 1941-66.
In the coastal area, at Pensacola, the artesian water level in well Escambia 62,
at the end of 1966, was about the 1941 level. The trends and fluctuations of
artesian ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly
average rainfall at Pensacola, 1965-66 are shown in figure 7.
FT. WALTON AREA
The Ft. Walton area includes the Ft. Walton Beach area and Eglin Air Force
Base. The rate of growth of industry and population is accelerating. Pumpage
from the Floridan aquifer for all uses is about 10.0 mgd (million gallons per
day). As a result of continuing heavy pumping, water levels have declined in
about a 640 square-mile area.











5,000

4,200.

3BOOL _____ __________













1,400
2,000__ **/m..


,>


A


Figure 5. Total yearly pumpage, city of Pensacola, Florida


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BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


ESCAMBIA 45 DEPTH 152 FT CASED 129 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER


(ARTESIAN)


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1945


1950


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Figne 6. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escambia 45 at Cantonment,
46 near Ensley, and 62 at Pensacola, Pensacola area


T68-----------------
6 ------: ----------------
70


74
76 -----------------
78---------------------------------------
76


so----------------
82---------------
84--- i-- -------------------
86------------------------------------


90

92-----------------------------\---------------------- -

96--z- -------- ------------ ----
96
98----------------------\--------------------- ----
100ice- ------- ------- -
!02
C6- ----------^---- ~ 4-- - -
1C4

,08-------------------------------- ----------------t
li c -

1!2
1 ter leel is affected by pumping of nearby wells
I I



ESCAMBIA 46 DEPTH 239 FT CASED 229 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)




62
64
66





68--- -------- ----------------
70---------------------------------------L--------------

7a-----------------------L------------------
so








76 ------------------------------ -- --_-- -_--_---_--
.0




82 ------------

84
86
a8

SESCAMBIA 62 DEPTH 142 FT. CASED 142 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)

8 -----------------------------
10-----------------f---------------rr------
12 ---- -



i8





3S-- ---------------------------------
20---------------------------------------------------------
30 ---- -- : -_ -- _








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


S
14
ESCAusIA 62
F I S nd and gniv*1 Aqtfr (Artesim
0.92 242 ft
SC,..d 142 ft.

16



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JJ F M A M J J A S 0 N DIJ F M A M J J A S 0N DIJF M A M J J A S 0 N DjJ' 1 A1 1M 1J A S 01N1DJ F M A M J J A S 0 N 0


1965


Figure 7. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1965-66

The hydrograph of well Okaloosa 3 at Ft. Walton Beach (figure 8) shows a
maximum decline of 107.0 feet from 18.5 feet above land surface in 1947 to
88.5 feet below land surface in July 1965. In August 1936, the artesian water
level was 46 feet above land-surface datum. During the period from August 1936
to July 1965, the water level in well Okaloosa 3 declined 134.5 feet, from 46
feet above land surface to 88.5 feet below land surface. The areal extent of the
decline in artesian levels in the vicinity of Ft. Walton Beach is shown by the net
change of water levels map, figures 9 and 10. Water-level changes during 1951-64
are shown by figure 9. Changes of ground-water levels for the current period,
1964-66 are shown by figure 10.


1966








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


OIALOOSA 3 DEPTH 800 FT. CASED 500 FT.


FLORIDAN .AQUlFER


U.
u




z.
VI







t_


























U.1
UJ









0
z































:>-,
U.1
w



tr



LU






























LLU.
U-




















LU
'- U


1945


1950 1955 1960 1965


1970


1975 1980


Figure Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25,
and 31, Ft Walton Beach area.


-12




-4 1 1 -- ------ -


- IS2 -- ---- -__ __-_ _


-4-

-32
-44 --






-5 2----

-60
,4 _Water level on Aug. 19, 1936 was __
S 46 feet above land surface





-84
488












Water level s affected by regional pumping

-96


OKALOOSA 25 DEPTH 609 FT. CASED 456 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
104- -- ------------------------
108



120
1-28 ---------
13- -- "_





140 Water level is affected by regional pumping

144 L.FHH 1111111- -
48 I I I I --------------





56--
60



72--------- - _ _ _


4 _.. Water level is affected by regional pumping

88
_ f: : I I I I V '
III I























i i I I I
,,e I t I I I I I I


SI I L O I D N I IQ UF1E R1 1











A L A B A M A
F .- -- ------ A- --'--- -
EPIAUATION
SSANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON-- s
Line of equal not change of grouad-
vauer levels in the Floridan quifer.
Intmrval 2 feet.

Line of equal Mnt cheap of gound- r
Sater levels In the sand-and-avel
iquiter. Interval 2 feet.
023 /
SI Observation well and
31 25 number.
J J o0 N


Figure 9. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to May 1964.


BIA














L A
----on--
L 0 R
ANTA ROSA S


B A M A PNUATIO
R L A i Ll af equal nec ohaang aol round-
R I A wae:r livlI in thi Flarvtdn qu.flfr.
I Incervel 2 it.
OKALOOSA I WALTON --
LLnl oLa qu-l nec change of grounl-
wair level iln the sndl-*ild-gravel
| equLtr, interval 2 feet.
023
Ob..rvaclon well and number, L


Figure 10. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1964 to May 1966.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


PANAMA CITY AREA

The Panama City area includes 250 square miles in Bay County, including
Tyndall Air Force Base.
The Floridan aquifer-either indirectly or directly-supplies most of the water
for municipal, industrial and military needs in the area. Springs from the
Floridan aquifer supply Deer Point Reservoir the principal source of water for
municipal use. Wells that tap the Floridan aquifer supply the paper and pulp
industry and military needs at Tyndall Air Force Base. Figure 11 shows total
pumpage from Panama City well fields at St. Andrews and Millville for 1944-66.
Pumpage of ground water for municipal use declined from an average of 1,200
mgy (million gallons per year) in 1961-62 to an average of 865 mgy in 1963-66.
To some extent, reduced pumpage by Panama City wells and a change in the site
of the source of water supply for the pulp industry allowed water levels to rise
sharply during 1964-65. During this period, levels rose about 24 feet from 78
feet to 54 feet below land surface in well Bay 7 (figure 12).
The rise of water levels in wells Walton 13 and Washington 4 during the same
period indicates that the rise of water levels at Panama City reflected a major
regional fluctuation or trend, as well as a reduction of pumping.
NORTHERN AND NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA
The northern and north-central Florida section extends from the Apalachicola
River eastward to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Georgia line southward to
the latitude of Ocala, figure 13, and includes 24 counties and parts of Levy,
Marion, and Volusia counties.
The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of ground-water supply in coastal
areas in eastern St. Johns, Flagler and Volusia counties. Another important
source of water in these areas is a shallow, nonartesian, sand-and-shell aquifer.

TALLAHASSEE AREA
The Tallahassee area includes central Leon County and the city of Tallahassee.
The area is primarily residential with only sparse light industry.
The principal water user, the City of Tallahassee, supplies water for municipal
use to the most rapidly growing residential and educational complex in northern
Florida. Since 1945, annual municipal pumpage at Tallahassee has increased
nearly 430 percent from 850 mgy to about 3,650 mgy. Figure 14 shows
pumpage for the City of Tallahassee during 1933-66.
Water-level fluctuations in the Floridan aquifer at Tallahassee are shown by
the hydrograph of well Leon 7, figure 15. The upward trend of levels of 1964
was continued into 1965-because of above average rainfall during that year.


























so
z





S o
jjl2






Z0


Figure 11. Total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida.









INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


WALTON IS DEPTH .


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


r-w
w-


.,,



UJ
> z

I--















u







0
w
n-







cc
-I




'U
-T


_i

0:i


Figure 12. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point

Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville.


26
24
22
20
18 -^ -- -- --- -- -- ----- --


18-^^ ;--- ---- ------- ------



14 -- -- - - -
18
16
14
12
10

SWater levels affected by regional pumping
4

BAY 7 DEPTH 253 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
36-
38
40
38 -------- -- ---------------------- Z

42
44 -
46
46----------------------------\y-------------------------------
48
50
50 ---------------------------- --------------
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68 ---
70 A
726I
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
Water level affected by pumping of nearby wells
988 1946 through 1963

92

WASHINGTON 4 DEPTH 785 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
8Z--------------^-----------------
10---------------------------- --- --- ------
S -
2
4
6






18
20
22
24

26
28
301- --


UJ
cc
V,
o
z



o
0

-1
CU

z
-J

-J


.^,


1 8U















0 5 0 R N I A N o .
.. I 0 N M A D I S N I HA M IL T N T s
.-"' EFFERSOJ -- / J 0A 164
., ,- ,-, /D u v \ -,/'
"~-...-..._. ,L ._._. / A K E R / ., '
ICOLUMBIA
SA~ SUWANNE E I ..-


I RADFORD
L 1 I I N A M
o W A 60 u A. ^ ._"_ l [l! \ L A C t



K,. L-", i=..i i- \ 1\ I
I EMPANATm N r. \ *?GILCHRIST
uen m wmr rtl nrwi' A L A C H U A P U Y N A M
1 X I IE ( 1 1 t .
GULF OF MEXICO -.
u i_.--.j-- ( LA 0 LE
KI t T m n r~u l-^ ;^.^-/ 'S \li i


Figure 13. Locations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which hydrographs are given.








3,800-


3,400-



3,000.








24200 7 7 11'11__

1,400-'



1,400.






600--


200


Figure 14. Total yearly pumpage, city of Tahahassee, Florida.


C,
z
0)
-J










CD
a-
S-i
Z


irj


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a,


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en


0n



S


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Cn m)






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


- iI I ifl
3 60JFMI' 0 t JFWA 10DJFMA N0JFMAM


19I6


N66


196e


1969


Figure 15. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Leon 7 at
Tallahassee and departures from monthly normal precipitation at
Tallahassee, 1965-66.

However, during 1966, levels declined. The long-term record of ground-water
levels in well Leon 7, at Tallahassee, are shown by figure 16. The hydrograph
shows no discernable long-term downward trend for the entire period of record.
The short-term trends correspond closely to the areal rainfall with levels
declining to the lowest of record during the 1954-56 drought.

FERNANDINA-JACKSONVILLE AREA

The Fernandina-Jacksonville area is one of the largest and rapidly expanding
industrial areas in the state.
Since 1945, municipal pumpage has increased from 7,900 mgy in 1945 to
13,158 mgy in 1966 with the greatest increase occurring during the 1945-55







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


LEON 7 DEPTH 314 FT. CASED 165 FT.


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


zc


-w
LU
Ir






c3c










u--
zL
-o






S{




HJ
cU





x Zh
".in


0 591 1955 1960 1 5


1970


Figure 16. trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18
near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida.


S149 p I I Ir e j .
152
155
158




170 - ---








761-----------S --- --- ^ -_ _ _

864-------------- --- : F S - -
867-------------^--\- -+- - -

960------------------:>^- ------------------
173 Water level is affected by pumping of nerby wells



SMADISON 18 DEPTH 322 FT. CASED 307 F FLORIDAN AQUIFER
161

17








20 - - -
23--
132-
35

66COLUMBIA 9 DEPTH 836 FT. CASED 680 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
69
72-------













'- -- -- ----------- --- -- --- -----
+3 -------------- -- --- -- -- -- ------ -


96------- c - -
75---------
78
81









187 -
90 1

96 -
99
102
105

-30 NASSAU 12 DEPTH 640 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
+27- 11I I I I I I I I"

-21 Water level on Mar 28, R 939 wo sF
1~ L 409 feet above land surface"

+15 _
+12
+9



0
-3V
-6 --
-9- I V

-15

-21I
-24
-27 Water level is affected by regional pumping
-30 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
-33 1 1 I I I I I -I I I I I


cr

0
z
-J
0_
-J
0
z



I--

z
-J



I-


9Y45






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


period. Total municipal and industrial pumpage at Jacksonville in 1966 was
about 21, 00 mgy. Figure 17 shows total yearly Jacksonville municipal pumpage
1921 through 1966.
Trends and seasonal regional fluctuations of ground-water levels in the area
are shown in figure 18. Ground-water levels, after a sharp rise in 1964 from
record 1963 low levels, remained about the same during 1965-66 in well Duval
164 near Mayport and in well Nassau 12 near Fernandina in the coastal areas
(figure 16). In contrast, levels at Jacksonville and inland at Callahan declined
slightly during 1965-66. Declines of about 3 feet were recorded in well Duval
122 at Jacksonville and in well Nassau 51 at Callahan. Changes in water levels in
the Floridan aquifer in the Ferandian-Jacksonville area are shown in Figure 19.
CENTRAL FLORIDA
Central Florida includes 20 counties and covers about 18,000 square miles.
The extent of this section and location of observation wells for which
hydrographs are given are shown in figure 20.
The principal source of ground-water supply in western coastal and central
peninsular Florida is the Floridan aquifer, while in the eastern coastal area the
nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of water supply. In central
peninsular Florida, levels in well Marion 5 near Ocala and in well Putnam 29 at
Palatka remained about the same in 1965-66 after rising about 6 feet near Ocala
and 4 feet at Palatka during 1963-64.
Central Florida includes four rapidly growing centers of population and
industry: the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, the Lakeland area, the Orlando-Cape
Kennedy area, and the Sarasota-Bradenton area.
TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG AREA
This area, particularly in the vicinity of Tampa and St. Petersburg, is
undergoing a rapid expansion in both industry and population.
The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan
aquifer in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area are shown in figure 21. Persistent
drought conditions and increased pumping during 1965-66 caused water levels in
illsborough 13 to decline to the lowest levels of record in 1966. Rainfall
recorded at Tampa and the fluctuations of the water level in well Hillsborough
13 for the period 1965-66 are shown in figure 22. Near Ruskin, in southern
Bilsborough County, water levels in well Hillsborough 30 declined to the lowest
level of record in 1965 (figure 23). This decline is part of an extensive regional
lowering of water levels which extends from southern Hillsborough County into
Manatee and Sarasota counties. (See figure 34.)
Water levels in two Pinellas County wells, Pinellas 13 and 246, are shown in
figure 23. No apparent trend is noted for Pinellas 13. However, a slight







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


PANAMA CITY AREA

The Panama City area includes 250 square miles in Bay County, including
Tyndall Air Force Base.
The Floridan aquifer-either indirectly or directly-supplies most of the water
for municipal, industrial and military needs in the area. Springs from the
Floridan aquifer supply Deer Point Reservoir the principal source of water for
municipal use. Wells that tap the Floridan aquifer supply the paper and pulp
industry and military needs at Tyndall Air Force Base. Figure 11 shows total
pumpage from Panama City well fields at St. Andrews and Millville for 1944-66.
Pumpage of ground water for municipal use declined from an average of 1,200
mgy (million gallons per year) in 1961-62 to an average of 865 mgy in 1963-66.
To some extent, reduced pumpage by Panama City wells and a change in the site
of the source of water supply for the pulp industry allowed water levels to rise
sharply during 1964-65. During this period, levels rose about 24 feet from 78
feet to 54 feet below land surface in well Bay 7 (figure 12).
The rise of water levels in wells Walton 13 and Washington 4 during the same
period indicates that the rise of water levels at Panama City reflected a major
regional fluctuation or trend, as well as a reduction of pumping.
NORTHERN AND NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA
The northern and north-central Florida section extends from the Apalachicola
River eastward to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Georgia line southward to
the latitude of Ocala, figure 13, and includes 24 counties and parts of Levy,
Marion, and Volusia counties.
The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of ground-water supply in coastal
areas in eastern St. Johns, Flagler and Volusia counties. Another important
source of water in these areas is a shallow, nonartesian, sand-and-shell aquifer.

TALLAHASSEE AREA
The Tallahassee area includes central Leon County and the city of Tallahassee.
The area is primarily residential with only sparse light industry.
The principal water user, the City of Tallahassee, supplies water for municipal
use to the most rapidly growing residential and educational complex in northern
Florida. Since 1945, annual municipal pumpage at Tallahassee has increased
nearly 430 percent from 850 mgy to about 3,650 mgy. Figure 14 shows
pumpage for the City of Tallahassee during 1933-66.
Water-level fluctuations in the Floridan aquifer at Tallahassee are shown by
the hydrograph of well Leon 7, figure 15. The upward trend of levels of 1964
was continued into 1965-because of above average rainfall during that year.














14,00





, 12,00
z

0


S10,00
U)








8,00
w
0.






4,00(





2,00(


0
r


0
0)


It)


0
U',


U) 0)


In
It)


0


U)


Figure 17. Total yearly pumpage, city of Jacksonville, Florida.


0





0











C
0


7JA///~///~~I'//,


I f e%. RI I I


I -7 1 -- ........... I ........... I ........ I I a 1 1 I I I I1 I I


I


I I I I I I II


I I


' |


i | l


I I


0


3


' '


I I I I I I








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


N Aotiloot A UJEE


z







'-4,
















4



2
?i1
-1J












































-E '^
-i-






4'-U

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2L |
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9U -





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-II




?Ig


in




a i,
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s **


1930


93 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1865


Figure 18. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan,
Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164 neat Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam
29 at Palatka, Florida.


n.. ..u 1 _t _rn .. Tv ..

42 [ I I I I ---- L ,- .. .. .
38 I_------ -- -------.-1-I
36 -- --L. -- A--
34U--- -- ---- -
32 ------ --
30

29



ouvaL 122 DEPTH 905 FT. CASED 5O1 Ft. _O iDAN U
S------------- -- --














cu1AL 64 DEPTH 840 FT. CASED 450 FT __ FLORnDANAQUIFER
IA-






water velis affted byd
,,-----------~ T- TTT.--- -^ ,, - -







cd O 164 DEPTH C3 FT CASED 5 FT LORIDAN AQUIF
-%3 i ....... ...... ..... ..... ...... .. .. ......... ...- --,-.. -




IL, --- L........... ..
i f i- i-- i i- ..... -^ - v- -




a t t lev l l fflected try. __ ..! ....... _=.. .... .. .... .. ..



PUTIOM DEPTH 135 FT CASED 135 F FLORIDAN AQUIFER


12



a- # -, 'r I ,- 0_ L. ..
0 > -- ._ ...-. ...... ,,_.... ,.....A-. --I-



PIUTitW" 2 DEPTH 300 FT. FLORIOAN AQUIfER I







I l I l l l 1 lt 1 l l- 1 1 -1 I _'__ ]%_~ ll-- _- ,
+I l l ll l 1 1 [ l 1 I 11 1 l I I __' l$tl I i, l r~~


unl aai rs


....l ...








































EX PLANATION
-2L--
ine of equd not honge' of
qrunwd-wdfer Iwvell in lhoe lorKlan
aquiflr. Ocaed' where apprmximfat
Intirvali 2 feet,
SIZ3'
QObervatlon wall and number








0 0 11 0
MI 1.


MAY 1951 MAY 1964


Figure 19. Net changes of ground-water levels in the Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 195.1 to, May 1964

and from May t964 to May 1966.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 20. Locations of observations wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are given.



downward trend from 1946 through 1956 can be noted for Pinellas 246. This
downward trend was reversed during the latter part of 1956 and levels continued
to rise through 1959 and were about average during 1965-66.
Changes in chloride content of water from two wells that tap the Floridan
aquifer in Pinellas County are shown in figure 24. At Dunedin, the chloride
content of well Pinellas 166 was higher during 1965 than during 1966. In 1965,
the chloride content ranged from 76 mg/1 (milligrams per liter) to nearly 500
mg/l in June. In 1966, chloride content ranged from 120 mg/1 in January to 38
mg/1 in May in the well at Dunedin.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


9H VT II ucrin r1 .ri, %rU E 40 F. -FLORIDAN AQUIFER
I

3



2 -- .---- ---- -_-_ _


-----------------------------... ,- -"
3 ---p--










06 -_-- _-- --.- -_ -. __ _
5
6
7
8

10
II
12
HILLSBOROUGH 13 DEPTH 347 FT. CASED 46 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER










,9----- -.------------------ -____ ----- -f
S--- -- I ------------- I
,l I I


12
13 II i j
14 -- -

16 -- -
17- --


20--
21 -
WI ler-level s affected by pumr of n rh wes
24
25 1 J J I I I L J
26 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IJ 1


1930


1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965


Figure 21. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near
Ehren and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa area.
At Bay Pines, during 1965, the chloride content in well Pinellas 592 ranged
from 1,730 mg/1 in January to 2,220 mg/1 in June. During 1966, chlorides
ranged from 2,050 mg/1 in October to 2,265 in May.

LAKELAND AREA

Ground-water pumpage is keeping apace with the economic development and
growth of the Lakeland area. Municipal pumpage increased about 264 percent
during 1945-66. From 1945 through 1955 pumpage increased 83 percent with
an average increase of 113 mgy. During 1956 through 1966 pumpage increased
about 98 percent with an average rate of increase of 206 mgy. Figure 25 shows
the total yearly municipal pumpage at Lakeland for 1928-66.
The marked decline of water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the vicinity of
Lakeland is shown in figure 26. A maximum decline of about 20 feet in well
Polk 45 occurred during October 1960 through May 1962. During 1964-65, the
decline was resumed with levels falling to the lowest of record in 1965.


P3A I 11


r rl- i A r" 1.


~rnrA r- cr






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


--------- ---------------
Cadi "46f





j r AJ J aSO0M J F I AMJ J JASO N 0DJ FM AMJ JSON JFMAMJ JASONDJ F MAMJJJ AONO




















1965 1969



Figure 22- Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 near Tampa
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1965-66.
In northern Polk county, water levels declined to new record low levels in
many areas during 1960-62, rose sharply in 1963, then declined to new record
J I














low levels in 1965. Levels in the Floridan aquifer declined nearly 20 feet during
1964-65 in well Polk 45 in the heavily pumped area south of Lakeland. Levels in
well Polk 44 near Davenport in northeastern Polk County declined about 2.5
feet in 1964-65 then rose slightly during 1965-66. Levels in well Polk 47 in the






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


period. Total municipal and industrial pumpage at Jacksonville in 1966 was
about 21, 00 mgy. Figure 17 shows total yearly Jacksonville municipal pumpage
1921 through 1966.
Trends and seasonal regional fluctuations of ground-water levels in the area
are shown in figure 18. Ground-water levels, after a sharp rise in 1964 from
record 1963 low levels, remained about the same during 1965-66 in well Duval
164 near Mayport and in well Nassau 12 near Fernandina in the coastal areas
(figure 16). In contrast, levels at Jacksonville and inland at Callahan declined
slightly during 1965-66. Declines of about 3 feet were recorded in well Duval
122 at Jacksonville and in well Nassau 51 at Callahan. Changes in water levels in
the Floridan aquifer in the Ferandian-Jacksonville area are shown in Figure 19.
CENTRAL FLORIDA
Central Florida includes 20 counties and covers about 18,000 square miles.
The extent of this section and location of observation wells for which
hydrographs are given are shown in figure 20.
The principal source of ground-water supply in western coastal and central
peninsular Florida is the Floridan aquifer, while in the eastern coastal area the
nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of water supply. In central
peninsular Florida, levels in well Marion 5 near Ocala and in well Putnam 29 at
Palatka remained about the same in 1965-66 after rising about 6 feet near Ocala
and 4 feet at Palatka during 1963-64.
Central Florida includes four rapidly growing centers of population and
industry: the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, the Lakeland area, the Orlando-Cape
Kennedy area, and the Sarasota-Bradenton area.
TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG AREA
This area, particularly in the vicinity of Tampa and St. Petersburg, is
undergoing a rapid expansion in both industry and population.
The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan
aquifer in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area are shown in figure 21. Persistent
drought conditions and increased pumping during 1965-66 caused water levels in
illsborough 13 to decline to the lowest levels of record in 1966. Rainfall
recorded at Tampa and the fluctuations of the water level in well Hillsborough
13 for the period 1965-66 are shown in figure 22. Near Ruskin, in southern
Bilsborough County, water levels in well Hillsborough 30 declined to the lowest
level of record in 1965 (figure 23). This decline is part of an extensive regional
lowering of water levels which extends from southern Hillsborough County into
Manatee and Sarasota counties. (See figure 34.)
Water levels in two Pinellas County wells, Pinellas 13 and 246, are shown in
figure 23. No apparent trend is noted for Pinellas 13. However, a slight








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


29


i-w

:z
-iLU

--J a IU
UJ
0--
I-1










U
im






!-w
_U,



2w
-.J

iJ
iuj 0







-I

_d


1945


1950 1955 1960


1965 1970


1975 1980


Figure 23. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near
Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater.

nonartesian aquifer near Davenport declined about 2.5 feet to a new low of
record during 1964-66. The downward trend of levels in artesiai and nonartesian
aquifers was accentuated by rainfall deficiency and increased pumping in
northern Polk County. Precipitation recorded at Lakeland shows deficient
rainfall in the Lakeland area during 1961 through 1966. During 1965 water
levels ranged from 11 feet below 1960 highest levels in the Floridan aquifer near
Lakeland to about 3 feet lower than 1960 levels in the shallow-sand nonartesian
aquifer near Davenport. Long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water
levels in the Lakeland area are shown in figure 27.
Water levels in the artesian aquifer and in the shallow sand nonartesian aquifer
in southern and southeastern Polk County are shown in figure 28.


HILLSBOROUGH 30 DEPTH 500 FT. CASED 34 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
14--- -
13
12
I
10
9 --------------------------------
\--------------------------------------------












PINELLAS 13 DEPTH 141 FT. CASED 33 Ft FLORIDAN AQUIFER









13I Water level is affected by tides
4 -- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

SPINELLAS 246 DEPTH 208 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
21

23
24
i^----------------------- ^~~




25
23----------------------------------

28 --- --
1g29 Water level is affected by tides
n I I I I I 1 1 1


.=






-v INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


1400



1200
Floridan Aquilfe
Depth 195ff.
1000



800-

















S PINELLAS --66
600




400
3 I





Z PlNELLAS 166f
j



S28400 -


Q
000
-J
o ?ooC


Fiure 24. Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at
Dunedin, St. Petersburg area.





















01







Oz










F 2. tal yearly p page, cy of Lakela, Floria.

Figure 25. Total yearly pumpage, city of Lakeland, Florida.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


a I I', s I I I I I II, 0 M I IS I, I I I II I I I . N J . N.









POL 45
r









F ygyi 1" 1 1 1 1 t a i i I a t t Ja tIs s e Ii t t i i I I I I I ii i i i
aw 643 ri












3
J.F ia JASOMDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJ JASONOJ FMAMJJASONDJFMAMJ A SOND














1







Is" M6 er r9im 1969


Figure 26. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1965-66.


The decline of artesian and nonartesian water levels due to the droughts of
1955-56 and 1961-62 and the well defined downward trend of artesian levels in
the Hawthorn aquifer are the prominent features illustrated by the hydrographs
in figure 28.
Generally, post-drought levels rose to pre-drought levels in the shallow
nonartesian sand aquifer in southern Polk and Highlands counties. In sharp
contrast, water levels in well Polk 51 in the Hawthorn aquifer near Frostproof
declined about 2.5 feet from the 1958 high level. In addition, a perceptible
downward trend of artesian levels is shown by the hydrograph of this well.
During 1965, levels in this well declined to a new record low of 20.92 feet below
land surface.








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


POl)K 44


TPED H 195 FT


LLO

HI
1,


1945


Figure 27. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 44 and 45 near
Davenport and Polk 45 near Lakeland, Lakeland area.


+I
O
- I

-3 V- - k







OLK 45 DEPTH 643 FT. CASED 325 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER


60 --- - - - ::: -

-I::---------;-----------
I I I I






72

















640
16-- --




















108
9---------I-------L---------------


76-----------------------_______

1B-C -- --- ---------I -----------













112--
10-9 ------------------------------

108-------------------------------_-






116 Wt r levi affected b re ional __

120 -

38 POLK 47 DEPTH 67 FT. CASED 60 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
38 -- -- - -- - -- -- -- --- -
39
39-- 11 1 1-------------1--
40
41 ----------------------------
42-
43 --------------------------
44 --------- -------------
45-- --------------------------
46--- -
47
48-- --
49
50
51--
52 --------------------------


UJ


C--
0
z
_j

3:



z




UJ
I-


1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980


CASED 81 FT


FLORIDAN AQUI R









BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


POLK 49


DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 14 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)


-a


J




















u








%
CI
S3




































t J
S->
5
-j _












-;u


3
a




ui





U--







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0:
'^


O
-4


-3--


-5
-6

-7
-8 -- --
9-



POLK 51 DEPTH 319 FT. CASED 208 FT. HAWTHORN FORMATION (ARTESIAN)


















12
3




40
,3--------------------------- J--------------












.4 905906177----------J1---------------
6------------------------------- H -------










Fu 28 lTeveds afl u ctatons of ||




Pl4 :s o n 1 1 near I n I

IIGPLANDS 10 DEPTH 45 FT. CASED 41 FT, SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
33__ I-_--_------------_----_--.--_--
tO -j- -- ---------------------

,2 !I I IAIN A









'3-T-------
s5 -_ -----___ __ -_ -__-- ----
6-------------------------t-------------------------------------


.9 --------------- --- ------------
Z0 -------------->------*- -------------











23------------L-----1------------------------ -
27 ------------L-----------------









29------------------------ ----------------------
30-
















1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980



Figure 28. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof,

Polk 59 at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring.
32---
33----------------------------------
34----------------------------------

35----------------------------------














Polk 59 at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


In central Highlands County near Sebring, levels rose about 3 feet in the
nonartesian aquifer from May 1965 to September 1966. During the same period,
levels rose about 3.5 to 4 feet in southern Osceola and Okeechobee counties.
Figure 29 illustrates fluctuations of water levels in the shallow nonartesian
aquifer in Highlands, Okeechobee and Osceola counties.

ORLANDO AREA

The Orlando area includes the cities of Orlando, Winter Park and Maitland in
north-central Orange County. The Floridan aquifer supplies most of the water
for municipal and industrial needs in the area. Total annual municipal pumpages
at Orlando, at Winter Park and for the City of Cocoa are shown in figure 30.
Municipal pumpage at Orlando increased about 586 percent from 1941-66.


urclnl AN1~ DEPTH 20FT. CASED 16 FT.


SHALLOW SAND AOUIFFR INONARTFSIANI


OSCEOLA 183 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 22 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)









OKEECHOBEE 3 DEPTH 22 FT. CASED 19 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)




l^ ||A: Ill _ill I k


1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980

Figure 29. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183,
and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley.













































Figure 30. Total yearly punLpage, Orlando, city ol' Cocoa and Winter Park, I:lorida.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


Hydrographs of artesian and nonartesian water levels are shown in figure 31.
The long-term trend of artesian levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Orlando area
is illustrated in figure 32.
The hydrograph of well Orange 47 shows water levels declined to record low
levels in 1962 and again during May 1965. After declining to a record low in
May 1965, levels rose in September 1966 to slightly above September 1964
levels which were about average for the period 1950-66.


24~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 1 1 1 I I 1 1 i 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I












Nm moty prePIoton






JFMAMJ J ASOND JFMAMJJ ASONDJ FMAMJ JASONDJ FMA MJ J A S ONDiJ FMAMJ JASON


1965


1966


1967


1968


Figure 31. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1965-66.







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


DEPTH 350 FT. CASED 328 FT.


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


+*


Figure 32. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47 near Orlando.


CAPE KENNEDY AREA

One of the most rapidly growing areas in the state is the Cape Kennedy area,
which includes the cities of Cocoa, Cocoa Beach, and Titusville in Brevard
County. In this area, water in the Floridan aquifer is generally brackish and is
used primarily for irrigation. Water-level fluctuations in eastern coastal Florida in
Brevard, Indian River and St. Lucie counties are shown in figure 33.
Hydrographs of wells in Brevard County generally show a long-term
downward trend of artesian levels in the Floridan aquifer. From 1946 through
1965 artesian levels have declined about 7 feet in well Brevard 79 in northern
Brevard County about 28 miles northwest of Cape Kennedy and about 14 feet in
well Brevard 148 at Cocoa. Water levels in both wells declined to new record
lows during 1965, then rose in 1966 to about 1963-64 levels.
Increased water use and deficiency of rainfall contributed to the sharp decline
of water levels in Brevard County in 1965. Annual rainfall in 1965 at Titusville
was 8.69 inches below normal. In contrast, nonartesian levels in the shallow sand


ORANGE 47


.150----- ------------ _- -_- _

,-6 !- -I- -_I- I II-- ___ _ ___ _






. -- ---------- --- --- -_- __ _
-4 I I -----------








93C 95 940 1945 1950 955 1960 1965
-7
V I 1A I I





.; \





-C 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


W
U

iQ
t<1
4


0
z
-_j


m
UJ




z
-J
CD



w
-j
_j


w
a:




4




WW

wv





cn
UJ
Li0

-J5








Oz U
Z
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LU4





ZW








cr w
W














-0
UJ
UJ






-c





W
ME




- >
ca
"g

















m1
UJ
IZn
_j z
W



U>
W

W~


ujujL


0 vfrnCV U -19o ucrin (uo r i. ,Mtnu Iu3 r I. I-LUnIUAN AUUII-tK
K4- ^ l -- -- ------- -- --









S--------- -- -- -
BREVARD 17 DEPTH 260 FT. CASED 15 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER












+7I---- -_- -------I--------- -__- -__- -
8--





















-- ------ -- -- 1 T -- -
25 ----- -
7








6--


+3
+2

31
-I




















INDIAN RIVER 25 DEPTH 1960 FT. CASED 13 FT. SHALLOWSAND AQUFER (NONARTESIAN)


30















259 - ----.1-- --.--- ---- -.- --
29
28
27
26
25

ST. LUCIE 42 DEPTH 18 FT. CASED 13 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)

30
29
28
27
26
25


1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980



Figure 33. Trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and

eastern-central coastal Florida.


nnrrrnrr Iin ~r~si ~rrr rr


~inrri~r


r^~r- -r..r~^






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


aquifer in Indian River and St. Lucie counties have generally shown no
downward trend during the period of record. Levels did decline to the lowest
May level since May 1961 in well St. Lucie 42 (figure 33). In 1966, rainfall was
14.58 inches above normal at Titusville.
SARASOTA-BRADENTON AREA
The Sarasota-Bradenton area includes Manatee and Sarasota counties in
southwestern coastal Florida. Principal economic activities in the area are
agricultural-truck and citrus farming and stock raising. The coastal section,
however, is rapidly developing as a retirement and year-round tourist center.
Figure 34 shows trends and fluctuations of water levels in observation wells
Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9.
Hydrographs of both wells show well-defined declines of artesian water levels
in the Floridan aquifer. Levels in well Manatee 92 have declined about 18.2 feet
from a May 1947 high level of 37.1 below land surface to a new record low of
55.3 feet below land surface in May 1965. Water levels in well Manatee 92 have
been declining at an average rate of 0.65 foot each year since 1941. Levels in
well Sarasota 9 have declined 13.58 feet from 0.95 foot above land surface in
May 1947 to a new record low level of 12.63 feet below land surface in May
1965. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have been declining at an average rate of about
0.5 foot per year since 1931.
A comparison of hydrographs of levels in Manatee 92 to those of well
Sarasota 9 shows the decline is continuing and that the range of fluctuations is
increasing in both wells. The regional extent of the decline is shown by
hydrographs of well Hillsborough 30 (figure 23) and of wells Manatee 92 and
Sarasota 9 (figure 33).
SOUTHERN FLORIDA
The southern Florida section includes all counties south of a line through
DeSoto County and covers an area of about 17,500 square miles. The region and
locations of selected observation wells for which hydrographs are presented are
shown on figure 35.
In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of water
supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm Beach counties, a nonartesian
shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of supply; in Broward and Dade
counties, the Biscayne aquifer is the principal source; and in southwestern
coastal Florida and inland areas, nonartesian shallow-sand and shell aquifers are
the main sources.









INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


MANATEE 92 DEPTH 600 FT. CASED 154 FT.


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


34-
35
36
37




40------ ---.. r -"-..





49-------------------- ,ff -- ~ 'M ll ^




50 ---------------------^^
38 -
39
40
41




Measurements discontinued




50

52 Watoer level is affected by regional pumping
53 ..
54
55 1-- J
56
SARASOTA 9 DEPTH 730 FT. CASED 101 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
+6
+5
-+4 -- ----
+3
42-

0---------------------------------------

-21 I I I I I 4 II A I A I I
-3----------------------------- -- --l-
-5
-4 1--1 -I -1-
-5-------------

-7
-e ---- - -l

-8 - -
-9-
Water level is affected b gional urni
-10
-12 -
-13 1 I I! I I II I I-!I- .
-14


1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965


Figure 34. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9,
Sarasota-Bradenton area.


FT. MYERS AREA

The Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties, and like the
Bradenton-Sarasota area to the north, is developing rapidly as a winter tourist
and retirement center.


iJ

0
z
I-

_:
UJ

0
cd



UJ
LU
Uj







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


SOKEECHOBEE 5

DESOTO HIGHLANDS r--


A
LAKO
: L Or E G L EEE




'------------- \
246
L E E H E N D R Y P AL


C 0 L L I E R


o


*310,, r **.*
t -1-ATC


Figure 35. Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given.


L~JF1F~L~







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


The principal source of ground water in the Ft. Myers area is the nonartesian
aquifers. Figure 36 shows the seasonal fluctuations of ground-water levels in well
Lee 246 and rainfall at Ft. Myers for the period 1965-66. Generally,.seasonal
fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers closely correspond to
seasonal fluctuations in the amounts of rainfall. Figure 37 shows the trends and
fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers for selected wells in southern
Florida.


16












0 t l l f 1 1 l l i i t t t t t t I I I I I a r i i i al l r i i t li i I m i t ri i i a t I i i
JF SM AMJJ J ASO ND]J FM AMJ J ASOND J F MAMJ d A SONIDJ FMA MJ J ATSONDJ'FMAMJ J ASOND


1968


1969


Figure 36. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft Myers and departures
from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1965-66.










BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


3 I l V 1 1





6 If I


14



12 Water levelisaffected by pumping of nearby wells


14t

COLLIER 131 DEPTH 54 FT. CASED 22 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION (NONARTESIAN)
28
27


25
27------------------------------L-----------_-_--
26-/--------------- L- ----- -----




29-------------- -- -- ----- --
23---- ---- ---- VI_ ------
22----------------
21

2-----------------------




16

COLLIER 54 DEPTH 9 FT. CASED 8 FT. SAND AND SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)




3----- I I l




7


I6 MARTIN 147 DEPTH 74 FT. CASED 73 FT. SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)






















Water level is affected by ne1rb 11
94 5906-- m i 9i5 960 h 0 9 1980
I III 15 16 1







7------- -------------- is a ed b- -ia 9--- -~ I
7 \ v | li l







i I I



-2
1945 t950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980


Figre 37. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54
Everglades, Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin 147 at Stuart, Florida.


LU LU



-1 S
LUZ
-'
ar
















U.1
>
3m





















UjI
_~i


-UJ
z-lu
ss
a:
^l5
as (














u--1



Zcc




cr rrrr


nrnrll nT rr rrrrA r rr


rrr rr~-^ .^...^--^.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


STUART-WEST PALM BEACH AREA
This area includes coastal parts of Martin and Palm Beach counties and is a
segment of the rapidly growing populous coastal complex extending from
Jacksonville southward through the Keys. Average yearly municipal pumpage at
Stuart has increased from an average of 40 mgy during 1941-45 to about 260
mgy in 1966 as shown in figure 38.
The principal source of water supply in the Stuart area is the nonartesian
shallow-sand aquifer. Trends of water levels in the nonartesian aquifer at Stuart
are shown in figure 37. The hydrograph of well Martin 147 shows a slight
downward trend of nonartesian levels. Levels declined to a record low level of
about 2 feet above mean sea level in the spring of 1962, 1963 and 1965. The
declines were caused, in part, by increased pumping in the Stuart well field.
Although pumpage increased during 1965-66, water levels declined then rose in
response to above average rainfall during 1965-66. Figure 39 shows trends of
water levels and rainfall recorded at Stuart, 1965-66.
The Biscayne aquifer is the chief source of water supply in southern Palm
Beach, Broward, and Dade counties. Figure 40 shows the trends and fluctuations
of end-of-month water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and rainfall data at West
Palm Beach. Fluctuations of water levels for several selected wells are shown in
figures 41 and 42.
FT. LAUDERDALE AREA
The Ft. Lauderdale area includes the populous coastal part of Broward
County extending from the Deerfield-Boca Raton area in the northern part of
Broward County to the Hollywood area in the southern part of the county.
Long-term downward trends of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer in and
adjacent to the Ft. Lauderdale area are shown by the hydrograph of well
Broward S329 at Ft. Lauderdale (figure 42).
The Biscayne aquifer contains salty water in areas adjacent to the coast and
along tidal canals. Figure 43 shows graphs of the chloride content of water in
well Broward S830 in the vicinity of the Ft. Lauderdale Dixie well field and in
wells Dade F64 and F296 in North Miami Beach and Miami. The chloride
content of water in well Broward S830 decreased from about 3,700 mg/1 in
1947 to about 50 mg/1 in 1958. From 1958 through 1963, chloride content
increased to nearly 2,000 mgfl. In 1964 the chloride content decreased to about
1,700 mg/l and remained at 1,700 mg/1 during 1965-66.
MIAMI AREA
The Miami area includes Broward and Dade counties and is the most populous
area in the state. The principal source of water supply is the Biscayne aquifei,
the extent of which is shown on figure 1.













































1950


V,


1955


Figure 38. Total yearly pumpage, city of Stuart, Florida.


1960


1965









INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


MARTIN 147

OIDh ?4 ft.
COW 73f It.





























IJ F M A M J J A S 0 N 01i F M A M J J A S 0 N DIJ F M A M i J A S 0 1 OIJ F IM A M J J A S 0 IN Djj F M A M J J A _S 0 N DI


1966


1967


1968


1969


Figure 39. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Stuart, 1965-66.

The locations of selected observation wells in the Miami area for which
hydrographs are given are shown by figure 35.
Water-level observations were made as early as 1933 at Homestead in well
Dade S196A. Long-term record of water-level fluctuations at Homestead are
shown in figure 42. Figure 44 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded
at Homestead Experimental Station 1965-66.
Except for the relatively narrow coastal strip, most of the Miami area is
occupied by the Everglades. Fluctuations of ground-water levels in the
Everglades are shown by hydrographs of wells Dade G72, G596, G618, and
G620, figures 45 and 46.


1965








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


MaU grcn as
NOftom Aqtft
camp T ft


















0 F ------- A-S ON-D-J F u AM---J AS-OND0J F U AS --M-JJ-A-S-O- ND -J-F-A-J-JA- SO- NDJ -FM -AMJ-JASO- N










-J F Ma J jaSO4J F M aMJ JAS NOIJ MAMJ J ASONIJ FMAMJ J AOND J F M a MJ JA SOND
JI I i I i I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 F 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


1966


1967


1968


Figure 40. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1965-66.

In the vicinity of Miami, fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Biscayne
aquifer are illustrated by hydrographs of wells Dade G10 about 5 miles west of
Miami, Dade S19 at Miami Springs (figure 44), and well Dade F179 at Miami
(figure 41). The water level in well Dade S19 is affected by pumping in the city
of Miami municipal well field.
In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the presence of salty water in an
aquifer is signalled by high chloride content of the ground-water. Sea water is










INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


PALM BEACH 88 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 16 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER







13 - - H -"01 -'!9 -P6 -er -lse -ih reeec -
12------------------------- -| | | to -on -ufc 1..4 ft-bv e.lvl_ __ _
0I _-1--I- ---I--I--I-I- --- I |- I I I I I I ___ __
13
to
9 II---L- I- ----

7 -
6 1 1 1 1I

4 I "-- - -
5
4

SPrior 'to 1951 records were polished with reference
h 0\ I- o I nd, surfoc 14.44 ff. obove mean ean level



+BROWARD G561 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER







+10-----------------------------------
+ 9



+6 -to d -urf- 8.15 ft. boe rpean se vel.
+5 i1
+4




-1






~2------------- - - - -
0- ---.--------- -- - -
0 --/-ll .I II-------------------EI-I--


BROWARD G617 DEPTH 29 FT. CASED 28 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER

II











71-----------------------------------
9-



















___to nd surface 12.11ft above _ean sea level.
DADE G553 DEPTH 91 FT. CASED 79 FT, BISCAYNE AQUIFER

+14 --

+1 -[Prior' to 1951 records were published with reference
to land surface 12.11 ft. abo mean sea level.
7 I I

+9 ---- ---------------

+7-- -- - -
+6
+5
+4 I I I I M 111
+3---
+2- -

+1
i4- |ii |/ | iii i i




-+::: =f. ,:ff:r:::::::::


1945 1950 1955 1960


1975 1980


Figure 41. Trends and fluctuatons of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth,
Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami.


0
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a
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03>
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Luj LL


Lu

uj
Li
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I-











BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


H TPED 107 FT


-j
"*UA
ruu

W~
Lz I
LL,

W
Lu
Lu








Lu
I- i














Lu LuI
1. >4
LU Lu













0
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- -1J




















LuLu
-r 4













Lu~
>- 0
WW
-->



Lu Lu
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w


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Lu
a

























Lu
An
Lu L
A->
w











40
4
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4-to
ct













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>4

0
S-LW
-1 >
1 U
uj_

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wr
^u a
xw
LU'*
LLs
CEL

Iz


Figure 42. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood,

Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A near Homestead, Dade F179 at Miami,

and Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale.


0

CACE SIS DEPTH 52 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER




6



5


3-
3 --- -- D-T-7----- I-A A-UIFE
II
2--------------- -- I I- V- -


















1950 19 3 5 19 41 1 19 5 1 9i I 1L 1 9 6 5
-1 - -- 77-1
CE F196 DEPTH 72 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER
ll IA V I ,












-8-
-7--










-5 1 1 INV
.-50 1-96 DE 1 20 14FT. 1 SCAYNE A1-UIER




-I- - --'-fl A - -li



-6
-5
-'


-2












l lf l l ll q] il 7
; I I I I r N I I L
i 5i i i I i i i l i i I .. v

1930 93 90 14 90 15 90 16


E NYACSIB AQUIF R


ORB WARD








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


BROWARD S830


DEPTH II9FT.


SIB CAYNE AQUlF R


4000

3000 -- ------- -






DADE F296 DEPTH 47FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER



A IEII I1+1
i500----^-------------------------------
,,ooc-- -- -----\-.-,-
8O^-- ---- --J~---------------


0


1400---------------
o -- ---



200
DADE F6830 DEPTH I47FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER






4in1200n-n 1111 ===I
"1000+ ----






1200 -I - - - - -

0tl ^ ^ ^:::::::::

;:::==::=:::='te::::::=:::=:


Figure 43. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward S830 near
Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami.

contained in the seaward reaches of the Biscayne and some encroachment of sea
water into the aquifer has occurred through the years. Water control measures
have checked the encroachment and as a result a freshening of the ground-water
has occurred in some areas.
Generally, chloride content of ground-water decreased throughout most of
Dade County during 1965-66. Chloride content of ground water in the Biscayne
aquifer in well Dade F296 on the coast north of Miami declined sharply from
500 to 100 mg/l during 1965-66.
In northern Dade County, chlorides decreased from 900 mg/l in 1946 to less
than 50 mg/l in 1963 in well Dade G354 and remained less than 50 mg/1 during
1963-66.
In southern coastal Dade County, chloride content of ground-water in the
Biscayne aquifer generally remained at low concentrations in most areas during
1965-66 although increases were noted in some areas. Chloride content increased
from 250 mg/1 to more than 1,000 mg/1 in well Dade S529. In central coastal
Dade County, chloride content in well Dade G469 decreased from about 8,600


6 491 1950 955 9 5


I1 IU


91 0







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 44. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A near Homestead,
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead
Experimental Station, 1965-66.
mg/I in 1965 to about 7,700 mg/1 in late 1965 then increased slightly in 1966.
In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the contamination of the Biscayne
aquifer by the encroachment of salty water is an ever-present problem. Through
intensive practice of water control the problem of prevention of salty water
contamination has been solved. In many areas where contamination existed the
situation has been alleviated by water control. The effectiveness of the method
of control is graphically illustrated in figure 47 by the chlorographs of wells
Dade G212, G354, and S529.









INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


DADE S19


H TPED 95 FT


D ESAC 91 FT


YACSIB NE AQUIF R


Q
Wl


LLZ
zL


ow
I-









Uj J

LLu

<- j

SSW




en


J uj



Ll
_m
W-.







>:r

I
5-


1940


Figure 45. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S19 and G10 near Miami,
and Dade G72 northwest of Opa-locka.


+10-- -
+9
+8
+7 Water levels affected b* pumping ofneorbywells
+6


+6 I- A I V I I I 1 1
+5
+4


+1




+ I I I I I II I








DADE G72 DEPTH 5 FT. CASED 4 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
+9
















12-----------_^ --- _

9 ----- -- -)J- -- -- -- -- -----f------V- ---


8 |BOMeasurement discontinued
5
+I





l1

10



12 .


1945 1950, 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975









BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


DEPTH 13 FT. CASED II FT.


BISCAYNE AQUIFER


LU'
bUJ


LUz
Ull
bC O



-r









LU
>4_
t- t



a
5U









0
4 ZI







>

wui
LU










wcn
Lz
- Co
Ca









-a
CCC 1













5 us
2*t
C-A

U.9




M
c 4
ru













LU
C-






a4


4 -W
Ul
ui>


Z-
-U


DADE G596


1A


9







a-






DADE G61B DEPTH 20 FT. CASED II FEET BISCAYNE AQUIFER

10




0-. I I l- I I IT-- -- -



DAE G613 DEPTH 21 FT CASED 18 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER














2- --
-I r-I -" -- - r -L, -"- --

















10 -

7 E G3 G613, and G620 in central Dade County.BISAYNE AQUIFER
-3 A










10 E G620 DEPTH 16 Fr. CASED 6 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
)0L







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61


DEPTH 91FT


5 891 1980 1985 19


9175 1980


Figure 47. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade G354 near Miami
and Dade G469 and S529 in sQutheastern Dade County.


1200-
1100-

900



3Cc} - - - ------
80-2Cc ----- - - - -
C00







DADE G469 DEPTH 137FT. CASED 92 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER

LaDOO-- -- ------------ ------ ------ __ _


8000-C ----- - - -- -- ---- - -
700C - - -
60C


















7000----------------------------- -- -^-------------- --_----- -
500 -
400C ------- ------------------
300







200---- -
0C--------l-----I----------
DADE G46529 DEPTH 1379FT CASED 92 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER











3500 ---------------------.--_-_-.-.------

25CC--------------------
2000-- --------------
s500 -----
00 -





Cow - ------- ------------


DADE G354


CASED 88FT


CSIB AYNE A U F R









BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


aquifer in Indian River and St. Lucie counties have generally shown no
downward trend during the period of record. Levels did decline to the lowest
May level since May 1961 in well St. Lucie 42 (figure 33). In 1966, rainfall was
14.58 inches above normal at Titusville.
SARASOTA-BRADENTON AREA
The Sarasota-Bradenton area includes Manatee and Sarasota counties in
southwestern coastal Florida. Principal economic activities in the area are
agricultural-truck and citrus farming and stock raising. The coastal section,
however, is rapidly developing as a retirement and year-round tourist center.
Figure 34 shows trends and fluctuations of water levels in observation wells
Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9.
Hydrographs of both wells show well-defined declines of artesian water levels
in the Floridan aquifer. Levels in well Manatee 92 have declined about 18.2 feet
from a May 1947 high level of 37.1 below land surface to a new record low of
55.3 feet below land surface in May 1965. Water levels in well Manatee 92 have
been declining at an average rate of 0.65 foot each year since 1941. Levels in
well Sarasota 9 have declined 13.58 feet from 0.95 foot above land surface in
May 1947 to a new record low level of 12.63 feet below land surface in May
1965. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have been declining at an average rate of about
0.5 foot per year since 1931.
A comparison of hydrographs of levels in Manatee 92 to those of well
Sarasota 9 shows the decline is continuing and that the range of fluctuations is
increasing in both wells. The regional extent of the decline is shown by
hydrographs of well Hillsborough 30 (figure 23) and of wells Manatee 92 and
Sarasota 9 (figure 33).
SOUTHERN FLORIDA
The southern Florida section includes all counties south of a line through
DeSoto County and covers an area of about 17,500 square miles. The region and
locations of selected observation wells for which hydrographs are presented are
shown on figure 35.
In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of water
supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm Beach counties, a nonartesian
shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of supply; in Broward and Dade
counties, the Biscayne aquifer is the principal source; and in southwestern
coastal Florida and inland areas, nonartesian shallow-sand and shell aquifers are
the main sources.























APPENDIX








Table I.-Sunary of well data and water levels in selected observation wells.

Well number: Well umbers are based on county numbering system e.g., Bay County well Bay 20, or on the lati-
tc nal ad lasgtltlnal syst e.g., well 008-537-2. Both numbers 20 and 008-537-2 are given where this
well haa been reported previously in a publication under the county number. Letters prefixed to well
embers in Broward and Dade Countiea; G, Geological Survey wells; S, supply wells; F, fire wells; and
HP, National Park Service wells. Letter suffix A, shallow well adjacent to deep well.
Aquifer: B, Bijcayne; F, Floridan; G, sand-and-gravel; H, Hawthorn; NA, nonartesian; S, shallow sand.
Depth of well: Measured unless otherwise noted. R, reported depth.
Frequency of measurement: Refers to current biennium. A, annually; B, bimonthly; C, continuous; H, monthly;
,. semiannually; T, Triyearly; W,'weekly.
Water level: To hundredth of a foot if measured by wet-tape method or taken from recorder chart; to nearest
tenth of a foot if measured by pressure gage or airline.
Remarks: D, measurements discontinued on date shown in Remarks;
L, lowest water level; X, water level with reference to mean sea level; P, water level affected by
pumping of nearby wells; R, recorder installed on date shown in Remarks; S, water level affected by
seasonal or regional pumping; T, water levels affected by ocean tides; X, well in use.



Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
S(feet)
cI .


S a 0 Prior to 1965 Highest water
well number g level in May
a a 0 Hay or June or June

S e High Low
S t (year). (year) 1965 1966

ALACHUA COUNTY

936-236-1 F 252 136 1958 C -23.48 -31.68 -20.49 -20.58
1960 1963

942-216-1 F 447R 175 1957 B -88.52 -94.19 -87.72 -87.36
1961 1963

949-235-2 7 300R 250 1960 B -37.34 -39.36 -36.41 -36.30
1960 1963

BAKER COUNTY

011-227-1 S 13 18 1958 B +0.17 -5.21 -2.29 -2.37
1959 1962

014-226-1 F 168 1957 B -100.48 -101.74 -94.14 -95.07
1962 1963

016-207-1 F 595R 459 1945 B -55.4 -71.45 -65.01 -64.82
1945 1963

026-214-1 H 198 102 1960 B -14.98 -20.13 -17.05 -17.04
1964 1963

015-216-2 F 825 282 1963 B -- -96.43 -94.29 -95.37
1964
026-217-3 F 905 417 1963 B -56.71 --- -55.16 -56.78
1964
BAY COUNTY

7 (010-541-1) F 253 1936 B -42.33 -78.36 -61.28 --
1947 1963


12 (017-531-1} F 290R 1961 B +1.82 +0.50 +1.35
1964 1962


Remarks
Annual
Range

1965 1966


2.96


1.69


3.35




2.56


3.75


6.30


2.86


1.84

4.42


4.17


1.55


1.60




2.15


3.64


2.44


2.51


2.52

3.26


10.90 10.20


0.96 0.82





I ) I I i


Water level above ( or below (-) 1
: (feet)
'- '--o
SWell- member Prior to 1965 highest after
-Wel nbe.r -level In May
0 a May or June or June

us as Haigh low
S(year) (year) 1965 1966 1I

BAY COUNTY (continued)

956-524-1 F 497R 424 1962 B --- -12.0 5.98 ,--- 3.77
1953

68 (023-526-1) F 160 161 1961 B +3.30 + 1.6 +4.50 --- 0.42
1964 1963

BRADFORD COUNTY

000-210-2 F 294 247 1959 B -69.52 -75.69 -70.36 -70.65 2.09
1959 1963

BREVARD COUNTY

20 (795-043-2) F 447R 125 1934 B +28.7 + 19.8 +18.5 +20.0 4.7
1947 1962


160R


206R


9


30


8


129




107


20


24


29


224


79 (847-051-1)


148 (821-045-1)


759-045-1


807-039-2


814-048-2


822-047-2




F291


G561


G616


C617


G820



G853


S329


+5.1 -0.55 -1.20 +1.05 4.20
1947 1962

+10.9 +4.3 +0.6 +5.30 8.6
1953 1962

-3.5 -7.2 -4.5 --- 1.7
1964 1962

-6.1 -8.4 -8.3 -6.03 1.8
1964 1962

-0.0 -3.1 -2.0 --- 2.4
1964 1961

+32.6 +29.9 +26.6 +29.3 5.2
1960 1960

BROWARD COUNTY

+4.3 +0.4 +0.83 +1.67 5.73
1958 1952

+4.1 +0.2 +0.77 +1.57 6.18
1958 1956

+12.90 +8.72 +8.70 +9.94 5.62
1957&58 1956

+6.6 +2.57 +3.51 +4.08 3.19
1954 1962

+1.15 -0.70 -3.15 +4.68 3.15
1962
& 63

+3.75 +2.80 0.00 +6.20 11.28
1964 1962

+5.5 +0.5 -0.28 +2.97 6.09
1955 1954


B 22 21 1960 C


B 68 --- 1940 C


1.84


H
M


M


M


M


M; Prospect
well field


M; Pampzio
well fleld

M; Dixie well
field
field


and surface


Remarks
Annual
Range

965 1966


1.17




3.3 S









~ ater level above (+) orbelow (-) land surface

P Prior to 1965 lighest water
o o a level In Key Annual
n Myr or Jana leg Remarks
(a (y 196or 1966 Range1 1

(

I (026-502-1) 7 212 1961 8 -0.43 -3.05
1964 1962


7 (026-509-1) 188


64 1961 S +10.6 +7.4


1964 1962
II (014-511-1) f 1471 47 1961 S +13.6 +10.9
1964 1962

CIBRUS C00M1
15 (902-228-1) 7 78 -- 1935 B -8.62 -19.87
1959 1963
856-223-2 7 91 1961 B -45.38 -48.58
1964 1963

ClAY COUIZY
5 (006-148-2) F 530 157 1940 S +35.5 +21.0
1947 1957
948-202-6 B 144 80 1960 8 -45.33 -51.06
1960 1963
948-202-7 5u 43 40 1960 B -28.38 -35.70

1960 1963
948-202-8 I 250 193 1960 C -55.02 -59.80
1961 ,964

COLLM COWWIy
54 B 9 8 1951 C +13.1 + 8.05

1958 1962
131 B 54 22 1952 C +26.2 +20.90
1958 1962
271 3 38 -- 1959 C +0.18 -2.50
1963 1960
296 1 45 1959 C -6.4 -7.65
1963 1962

COLMBA COUMIr
9 (010-238-I) 7 8361 680 1942 C -79.60 -97.02
1948 1957

0Du0 C00010
4, 3B 85 1939 C +3.9 +1.6
1960 1960
179 B 77 1939 C +6.0 +0.9
1958 1945
2=0 B 60 1939 C +2.42 --
1964
S133 17 13 1940 C +5.40 +0.47
1958 1945


-0.80 -1.43


+10.3 49.0


+13.9 +12.0


0.10


0.6


1.3


-10.60 -11.37 2.91


-39.64 -40.17 5.16


+25.7 +25.5


-46.15 -45.57


-28.21 -28.70


-56.72 -55.54




--- +11.16


+21.73 +24.38


-3.81 +0.01


-10.95 -7.51


2.2


1.46


1.27


2.82




1.32


4.34


4.30


5.60


1.42


0.4


5.4




2.40


15.95




1.4


1.00


0.65


1.42


-85.30 -85.10 2.75 2.71


-1.40 +5.90


+1.45 +2.69


+1.23 +5.22


+2.05 +2.47











SH Water level above (+) or below.(-) land surface

A :o 8Prior to 1965 Highest water
Well number 0 level in May Annual

i< 5I 5R a High low


DADE COUNTY (continued)


-- 1940 C +6.70 -0.04
1954 1962

11 1940 C +3.00 -0.50
1958 1951

6 1940 C +6.00 +0.50
1958 1945

6 1939 C +7.20 -0.94
1958 1962

4 1940 C +6.50 +1.20
1958 1945

19 1947 C +5.50 +0.40
1958 1950&56

79 1947 C +8.60 +0.97
1958 1962


4 1960 C 44.84 +0.95
1961 1962

11 1949 C +8.50 -1.88
1958 1962

11 1949 C +8.40 +2.11
1958 1962

18 1950 C +5.50 -0.98
1954&58 1962

18 1950 C +8.20 +0.37
1958 1962

11 1950 C +8.40 +2.56
1958 1962

6 1950 C +8.30. 44.07
1958 1956

6 1950 C +7.0 +3.6
1958 1952

10 1957 C +9.30 +1.50
1958 1962

10 1956 C +7.30 +1.15
1958 1962

10 1956 C +7.80 +1.65
1958 1962

11 1959 C 44.15 +1.80
1964 1959

10 1959 C +2.87 +0.40
1964 1959

10 1958 C -4.20 -5.60
1964 1962

135 1959 C +3.70 +1.30
1960 1962


G858 B 20 11 1959 C 46.30 +1.82
1960 1962


40.03


-1.42


+2.83


+2.15


+3.95


+1.24


+2.45



+1.89


-1.92


+3.47


-0.67


+1.46


+6.06


+7.43


+3.21


+1.47


-0.04


+1.80


+1.75


+0.75


-4.85


+1.64


+2.20 +6.95 5.00 4.08 M


G580A


0595


0596


0613


G614


0618


0619


0620


G757A


0789


0799


0851


G852


0855


G857


- --


1+r.o 6.56 4.69 H


+2.44 6.27 3.59 M; P


+3.99 3.58 2.43 H


+3.52 3.60 3.20 M; P


--- 2.74 --- M; D, 1966


+1.73 4.43 1.13 D, 1966; M


+5.75 6.89 4.96 M; Casing
slotted
36 to 79 ft

+3.70 3.80 2.84 M


--- 6.14 --- D; 1966;
M; P

+5.85 5.51 3.96 H


+2.37 6.52 4.34 M


+3.10 7.21 5.58 M


+6.81 2.27 1.42 M


+8.08 1.99 --- M; D, 1966


-6.04 4.09 1.95 M


+8.20 6.05 5.52 M


+6.95 6.69 5.08 M


+5.90 3.75 3.10 M; P


+6.25 3.27 4.49 M


44.43 4.37 3.25 M


-0.85 5.05 4.35


+5.74 4.40 5.07 M











SSWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface
3 0
a Prior to 1965 Hithest water
l a I --- l1C l Inay hnnrl
X0 r f. ma. u My or June or Jae Ian" R
a. : "; ?-- -

(year) (ear)) 1965 1966 1965 1966
DADN COUTn (continued)


(359


Ga60


0861


0863


Gca64


G865


6968


G9686


0970


0972


G973


G974


G975


G976


G378


01165


GU66
GL66


01183





8146


3962


%67?


37T2 B 20 6 1962 C 44.05
1963


11 1959 C +5.8
1960

11 1959 C +5.0
1960

11 1961 C 44.05
1964

6 1961 C +3.90
1964

11 1959 C +5.3
1959

13 1959 C +1.85
1964

- 1960 C +5.45
1964

- 1961 C +5.80
1964

10 1958 C 44.0
1960

10 1958 C +5.5
1960

10 1958 C 44.5
1960

10 1958 C +5.4
1960

10 1958 C +6.9
1960

10 1958 C +6.0
1960

10 1958 C +6.7
1960

11 1961 C +3.65
1964

11 1961 C +5.80
1964

1961 C +2.35
1963

1960 C 44.50
1961

960 C +1.55
1964

9 1962 C +2.58
1963

6 1962 C +2.88
1962


46.44 5.15 3.57 H


+1.20 +0.45 +2.18
1962

+1.15 +1.10 +3.35
1962

+2.25 +2.05 +6.25
1962

+1.49 +0.55 +5.08
1962

+0.45 -1.00 +6.23
1962

+0.9 +1.44 +1.65
1960

+3.05 44.12 ---
1962

+3.60 44.20 +6.57
1962

+2.18 +2.34 +2.67
1962

+3.50 +3.83 +5.47
1962

+1.68 +1.95 44.05
1962

+2.68 +2.70 +5.44
1962

44.20 44.10 +6.55
1962

+2.90 +3.43 +6.37
1962

+2.90 44.12 +6.78
1962

+1.45 +1.90 +5.06
1962

44.75 +3.99 +6.85
1963

-1.00 -0.63 +5.18
1962

40.2 -1.43 +5.04
1960

-0.30 -1.45 +2.27
1962

--- -1.17 44.28


+1.70 -1.75 +3.10
1964


7.45


6.60


4.92


6.30


8.23


4.74


2.52


4.15


2.50


2.39


2.45


2.95


3.10


2.44


2.40


3.27


2.82


5.31


7.30


3.79


3.14


4.50


7.53


2.48


3.50


4.60


5.28


3.40


2.85


2.02


2.21


1.27


2.20


1.83


1.32


1.19


2.33


2.48


2.82


4.30


4.18


1.01


2.56


2.73


-- -1.50











I .. Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface

S, Prior to 1965 Highest water
Well nmbe r a o o -- level in May Annual
SMay or June or June Range
t ^ ,s %k- HighI Low
(year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966

DADE COUNTY (continued)


S18


S19


S68


S182


S196A


703-157-1


704-147-1


720-148-1


15 (937-306-1) F 215R


12 (019-140-1)


18 (018-140-1)


102 (019-133-1)


107 (023-136-1)


115 (016-142-1)


118 (018-143-1)


122 (023-138-1)


123 (019-142-1)


129 (015-141-1)


145 (028-137-1)


149 (024-136-1)


151 (023-139-1)


152 (027-133-1)


785R





875R





729R


900R


905R


1,075R


600R





800R


700R


642R


-- 1939 C +3.2 +0.10
1942 1945

91 1939 C +7.3 -1.30
1958 1962

51 1939 C +3.2 -2.97
1958 1962

-- 1940 C +9.5 0.0
1958 1945

-- 1932 C +8.5 -1.0
1958 1945

DESOTO COUNTY

189 1962 B +32.05 +25.0
1963 1962

112 1962 C + 3.90 + 3.44
1963 1964

137 1962 C -10.53 -14.7
1964 1963

DIXIE COUNTY

105 1957 S -2.77 -9.12
1959 1962

DUVAL COUNTY

-- 1938 S +27.5 +15.1
1947 1962

-- 1938 S +39.9 +20.1
1947 1962

400 1939. S +6.4 -20.94
1931 1962

S 1939 S +53.2 +34.4
1939 1962

476 1930 B +36.2 +11.6
1938 1962

-- 1939 S +32.9 +11.9
1947 1962.

571 1930 M 444.9 +25.6
1947 1962

-- 1930 S +39.0 +15.7
1931 1962

470 1940 S +40.4 +17.4
1947 1962

-- 1940 S +24.2 44.97
1947 1963

-- 1940 S +25.7 +8.8
1947 1963

560 1940 S 443.4 +31.0
1952 1962

1940 S +29.9 +19.6
1952 1962


+1.75 +2.49


-0.18 +0.60


-2.19 -1.38


+2.17 +3.28


+0.32 +2.84


+28.15


+ 2.73


-21.41


+27.75


+2.84


-16.97


4.06


4.00


4.15


5.07


6.56




3.00


2.88


13.70


-4.87 -4.76 0.77 0.15


+26.1


-17.56


+ 38.2


+ 17.6


+ 19.0


+ 29.5


+22.5


+24.0


+ 8.7


+11.2


+36.2


+22.6


+22.8


+29.0


-13.66.


+37.5


+20.1


+19.0


+30.2


+22.1


+26.4


+ 9.3


+12.1


+37.1


+23.3


M;P


H; P


L; M; P


M


H
N


9*












SWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface


0 Prior to 1965 Highest water
e nmber a a I level in May Annual
number a U Remarks
S t May or June or June Range

High I(ya
(year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966

DADE COUNIT (continued)


-359


060


3361












3963
;96d





G970


397"


,973


G?74


1373


0975


G978


G1165


1166


c1183





E4ap


MP62


IF67


11 1959 C


11 1959 C


11 1961 C


6 1961 C


11 1959 C


13 1959 C


-- 1960 C


- 1961 C


10 1958 C


10 1958 C


10 1958 C


10 1958 C


10 1958 C


10 1958 C


10 1958 C


11 1961 C


11 1961 C


1961 C


1960 C


1960 C


9 1962 C


6 1962 C


+5.8
1960

+5.0
1960

+4.05
1964

+3.90
1964

+5.3
1959

+1.85
1964

+5.45
1964

+5.80
1964

+4.0
1960

+5.5
1960

+4.5
1960

+5.4
1960

+6.9
1960

+6.0
1960

+6.7
1960

+3.65
1964

+5.80
1964

+2.35
1963

44.50
1961

+1.55
1964

+2.58
1963

+2.88


+1.20 +0.45
1962

+1.15 +1.10
1962

+2.25 +2.05
1962

+1.49 +0.55
1962

+0.45 -1.00
1962

+0.9 +1.44
1960

+3.05 *4.12
1962

+3.60 +4.20
1962

+2.18 +2.34
1962

+3.50 +3.83
1962

+1.68 +1.95
1962

+2.68 +2.70
1962

44.20 +4.10
1962

+2.90 +3.43
1962

+2.90 +4.12
1962

+1.45 +1.90
1962

44.75 +3.99
1963

-1.00 -0.63
1962

+0.2 -1.43
1960

-0.30 -1.45
1962

--- -1.17


+1.70 -1.75


1962 1964


+2.18


+3.35


+6.25


+5.08


+6.23


+1.65


--.


+6.57


+2.67


+5.47


-4.05


+5.44


+6.55


+6.37


+6.78


+5.06


+6.85


+5.18


+5.04


+2.27


-4.28


+3.10


7.45


6.60


4.92


6.30


8.23


4.74


2.52


4.15


2.50


2.39


2.45


2.95


3.10


2.44


2.40


3.27


2.82


5.31


7.30


3.79


3.14


4.50


7.53


2.48


3.50


4.60


5.28


3.40


2.85


2.02


2.21


1.27


2.20


1.83


1.32


1.19


2.33


2.48


2.82


4.30


4.18


1.01


2.56


2.73


MF7Y B 20 6 1962 C 44.05
1963


--- -1.50 46.44 5.15 3.57 M











Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface

S u : Prior to 1965 Highest water
Well number 1 0 0 a level in May Annual Remarks
elln er May or June or June Range

0 I. High low
(year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966

DADE COUNTY (continued)


818


519


S68


8182


S196A




703-157-1


704-147-1


720-148-1


15 (937-306-1) F




12 (019-140-1) F


18 (018-140-1) F


102 (019-133-1) F


107. (023-136-1) F


115 (016-142-1) F


118 (018-143-1) F


122 (023-138-1) F


123 (019-142-1) P


129 (015-141-1) I


145 (028-137-1) I


149 (024-136-1) 1


151 (023-139-1) 1


152 (027-133-1) 1


52


95


61


51


20




468


460


478




215R




785R


---.


875R


---


729R


900R


905R


1,075R


600R





800R


700R


642R


--- 1939 C +3.2 +0.10
1942 1945

91 1939 C +7.3 -1.30
1958 1962

51 1939 C +3.2 -2.97
1958 1962

-- 1940 C +9.5 0.0
1958 1945

--- 1932 C +8.5 -1.0
1958 1945

DESOTO COUNTY

189 1962 B +32.05 +25.0
1963 1962

112 1962 C + 3.90 + 3.44
1963 1964

137 1962 C -10.53 -14.7
1964 1963

DIXIE COUNTY

105 1957 S -2.77 -9.12
1959 1962

DUVAL COUNTY

--- 1938 S +27.5 +15.1
1947 1962

-- 1938 S +39.9 +20.1
1947 1962

400 1939. S +6.4 -20.94
1931 1962

-- 1939 S +53.2 +34.4
1939 1962

476 1930 B +36.2 +11.6
1938 1962

--- 1939 S +32.9 +11.9
1947 1962A

571 1930 M +44.9 +25.6
1947 1962

-- 1930 S +39.0 +15.7
1931 1962

470 1940 S +40.4 +17.4
1947 1962

-- 1940 S +24.2 44.97
1947 1963

-- 1940 S +25.7 +8.8
1947 1963

560 1940 S +43.4 +31.0
1952 1962

-- 1940 S +29.9 +19.6
1952 1962


+1.75


-0.18


-2.19


+2.17


+0.32




+28.15


+ 2.73


-21.41


+2.49


+0.60


-1.38


+3.28


+2.84




+27.75


+2.84


-16.97


4.06


4.00


4.15


5.07


6.56




3.00


2.88


13.70


2.17


4.33


4.73


2.52


5.53




3.00


2.43


8.95


-4.87 -4.76 0.77 0.15


+26.1


-17.56


+ 38.2


+ 17.6


+ 19.0


+ 29.5


+22.5


+24.0


+ 8.7


+11.2


+36.2


+22.6


+22.8


+29.0


-13.66


+37.5


+20.1


+19.0


+30.2


+22.1


+26.4


+ 9.3


+12.1


+37.1


+23.3


M;P


M; P


L; M; P


M
H

H











5 Water level above (+) or blow (-) land surface

SPrior to 1965 Bigst water
B -level in may Annual f a
Wett 0- R ang a-,oJl
Sor mne for Jun oJ

C- S Nigh Loe a
(year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
DUVAL C00NUT (continued)


160 (018-123-1) F 585 357 1934 B 441.7
1934

164- (025-125-1) F 840 450 1930 S +43.8
1931

206 (015-145-1) P 1,9201 1,000 1941 8 -2.06
1948

262 (026-135-1) F 1393R 584 1951 B +37.0
1951

263 (026-135-2) P 1,025R 850 1951 S +35.5
1952

266 (026-35-3) 7 700R 450 1951 S +35.3
1952


265 (025-136-1) F 556R




39 (023-716-2) G 244


45 (036-719-1) G 152


4 (031-716-1) G 239


62 (02 -715-1) G 142R


62& (024-715-2) G 18


73 (035-715-3) G 306


74 (036-716-1) a 352


83 (035-714-3) G 301


026-713-5 G 150


026-713-6 G 65


032-724-1 G 170


054-726-1 G 206


054-724-2 C 107


+20.2
1962

+25.8
1962

-16.75
1962

+23.4
1963

+24.0
1963

+23.2
1962


+23.1 +24.5


+28.9 +29.4


-13.62 -14.23


+26.8 +27.5


+27.4 +28.0


+27.0 +27.7


- 1951 S +39.4 +19.4 +33.0
1952 1963

ESCAMIIBIA C00UN1

- 1940 M -4.59 -12.00 -11.03
1940 1955

129 1940 C -69.30 -111.82 -103.58
1941 1956

229 1939 W -58.09 -82.12 -69.43
1948 1956

142 1940 M -6.50 -23.84 -13.24
1949 1955

18 1940 n -8.66 -13.05 -12.14
1964 1962

198 1951 C -39.03 -56.66 -52.78
1953 1958

260* 1951 C -77.37 -89.52 -89.10
1952 1959

- 1954 B -36.10 -42.45 ---
1955 1962

145* 1959 W -58.15 -63.57 -62.04
1960 1963

60* 1959 W -51.78 -56.81 -55.68
1960 1963

165* 1959 M -91.18 -93.04 -92.58
1960 1963

201* 1959 B -82.95 -90.06 -87.85
1962 1964

102* 1959 B -65.21 -76.15 -72.27
1962 1964


+34.0


-11.82 6.51


-102.70 2.22


-72.90 5.14


-11.30 2.68


-11.38 2.52


--- 4.51


-90.20 2.78


--- 6.25


-61.61 1.64


-55.44 2.98


-92.66 1.09


-88.88 1.20


-71.08 2.02


3.7 S; T


2.4 S; T


--- 8S


1.5 S; T


0.9 S; T


0.3 S; T


3.2 S; T




6.56


2.16 P


4.04


2.91


2.15


4.57 P


2.15 P; *Screen
260 to 270 ft
& 310 to 350 ft
4.38 P


2.99 *Screen
145 to 150 ft

4.68 *Screen
60 to 65 ft

1.77 *Screen
165 to 170 ft

0.97 *Screen
201to 206 ft

3.77 *Screen
102 to 107 ft











Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
W M6
S -- A Prior to 1965 Highest water
W n r o S0 level in May Annual
ell nuber May or June or June Range

S s. s am Hitgh Low
(year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
FIAGL.C OUNTY


;


S


45 41 1948 C +90.7 +83.9
1958 1956


-7.20 -8.27 2.29


-12.34 -10.99 4.80


-3.80


+2.30


-10.30


+4.09


14 (927-115-1) F 417 --- 1936 B -3.4 -8.19
1937 1962
44 (928-122-1) P 159 --- 1956 B -7.67 -13.42
1959 1962

FRANKLIN COUNTY

10 (950-439-1) F 380R --- 1958 8 -0.35 -4.45
1964 1962

31 (943-458-1) F -- --- 1949 B +3.95 +0.40
1950 1952
947-446-1 F 98R --- 1961 S -9.67 -11.35
1964 1963
957-443-1 F --- --- 1961 S 44.87 +2.97
1964 1962

GADSDEN COUNTY
035-434-1 F 406R --- 1961 S -90.76 -91.40
1964 1963
039-425-1 F 525R 381 1961 8 --- -143.96
1962

GULF COUNTY
30 (948-518-1) F 522 475 1946 S -7.11 -27.22
1956 1950

33 (939-521-1) F 595 487 1961 B +1.29 +0.96
1962 1963

HAMILTON COUNTY
036-305-1 F 273R 60 1961 B -84.73 -107.05
1964 1963

HARDEE COUNTY
731-145-1 F 267 39 1962 C -29.56 -33.60
1964 1962

BENDRY COUNTY
3 S 10 8 1941 C +0.3 -5.76
1958 1962
5 S 13 8 1941 C -0.81 -6.3
1959 1956

HERHANDO COUNTY

838-215-1 F 140R --- 1961 B -16.30 -20.46
1964 1962

HIGHBL&DS COUNTY

9 S 26 22 1948 C +130.4 +126.0
1953 1949


-8.62


+1.28




-90.31




-49.5


--- 0.90


--- 0.44


0.18


3.30


2.94




.--


1.10


0.50


1.10


2.64 0.17


--- 3.35


--- 0.93


--- 0.57


-99.43 21.29 18.27




-40.02 21.01 13.48


-3.11 -2.35 4.17


-3.44 -2.99 3.07


-17.19 -16.68 5.15 2.78


+127.64 +128.61 3.08


+85.17 +88.46 4.77


S 16 13 1956 C 448.3 443.71 444.93 445.82
1957 1962


3.14 3.30 M


P, prior to
1954


-85.16 -85.13


--- -134.40











SWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface

SPrior to 1965 Highest water
aro r t level in May Annual R r

l BMw 0-. Rema S
so' May or June or June Range


S(yar) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
HICHLANDS COUWrY (continued)


L3 (307-230-31


30 (74.-225-39)


500 (7.42-219-1)


751-203-1


30I-213-15




- (O13-556-t)


7 (058-539-1)


TA (05d-535-2) 0


)50-54d-1


051-556-1


052-545-2


23 (042c-453-)


4-506-1


046-515-1


053-527-1


058-503-1


S 20 16 1948 C +28.9 +20.57 +25.01
1957 1962

S 23 19 1948 C +58.3 +53.8 +54.60
1953 1956

S ZZ 18 1956 C +116.9 +111.3 +111.3
1958 1962

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY

P 347 46 1930 C -6.70 -15.76 -16.59
1931 1964

F 500R 34 1950 C +8.70 +1.66 +2.29
1959 1952

F 330 97 1951 B -50.82 -57.98 -56.88
1958 1956

P 211 65 1957 B -42.52 -61.35 -63.91
1958 1963

F 413R 67 1958 C +0.55 -10.04 -10.18
1959 1962

HOLMES COUNTY

F 187R 1938 B +6.90 +1.82 ---
1964 1956

F 205R 170 1938 8 -8.09 -15.66 -9.95
1949 1956

UA 13 10* 1960 B -1.34 -8.34 -3.05
1964 1963

F --- 1961 S +5.50 +1.40 +5.20
1964 1963

F 260R 1961 S -205.20 -209.10 -204.68
1964 1963

P 300R 1961 5 +17.6 +11.2 +16.7
1964 1963

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY

S 19 13 1950 C +30.2 +25.4 +26.35
1957 1956

JACKSON COUNmT

i 475R 100 1950 B -17.37 -38.15 -20.77
1964 1951

7 210 94 1961 S -62.98 -76.05 -66.40
1964 1962

F 180 1961 B -86.82 -102.95 -91.37
1964 1963

P 341 260 1961 S -77.72 -87.20 -71.57
1964 1963

P 83 1955 S -14.98 -29.11 -17.25
1964 1963


+26.30 1.82


+57.70 4.25


--- 5.7


3.71 M


3.13 M


---


-19.18 10.02 12.86 P


+2.34 6.16 6.61 P


--- -- D, 1965


-64.60 5.50


-6.90 1.08


--- 2.85 3.51


--- 2.12 2.48


--- 6.27 7.68 *Screen
10 to 13 ft

- -- 1.50


--- 2.1


+28.05 5.78 3.67 M


-23.33 5.60


-68.00 3.65


-95.83 ---


2.09


-21.15 ---


8.89


6.72


5.17 D, 1966


1.04


5.75











S Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface

S U S > Prior to 1965 Highest water
Weall nuber level in Hay Annual
Wellnumber S May orJune or June Range
a .o noB I e
4 Z o- High LOW
(year).,, (year) 1965 11966 1965 1

JEFFERSON COUNTY

022-356-1 F 216 169 1960 S -139.57 -142.62 -138.35 -140.24 --- 1.87
1964 1962

038-336-1 F 183 147 1960 S -19.10 24.36 -13.33 -17.17 4.16 6.00
1960 1960

LAFAYETTE COUTNY


008-317-1 F 106 --- 1961 B -35.53 -44.04 -26.19 -33.80 1
1964 1962

958-312-1 F 146 112 1961 B -4.23 -8.89 -5.91 -6.02


18 (857-138-1) F


20 (900-123-1) F


22 (909-131-1) F


822-149-1 F


822-149-2 S


832-154-334 F


832-154-334A S




246 S


414 H




7 (027-416-1) F


36A (037-410-2) H


115 (031-420-1) F


024-420-1 S


024-420-2 S


026-417-1 F


034-407-1 F


190R


252R


254R


192


23


160


30




28


94




314


41


194


57


15


310


231


1964 1962

LAKE COUNTY

--- 1936 B -50.52 -59.82
1960 1957

--- 1936 B +9.9 +5.45
1942 1963

--- 1936 B -0.72 -3.54
1964 1962

100 1959 T -1.80 -5.25
1960 1962

18 1959 T -0.36 -5.06
1960 1963

63 1969 C -1.88 -5.47
1960 1962

17 1959 C -1.60 -5.03
1964 1962

LEE COUNTY

19 1945 C +19.13 +10.5
1959 1949

60 1948 C +18.8 +11.1
1957 1955

LEON COUNTY

165 1945 M -149.05 -169.91
1948 1955


-56.63 -55.73


+7.5 +12.0


-1.92 2.61


-4.71 -4.09





-3.78 -3.00







+13.13 +14.11


+16.01 +15.69




-154.62 -155.98


38* 1935 H -1.42 -33.14 +0.66 +0.15
1948 1956

104 1950 M -76.9 -93.3 -75.0 -77.2
1959 1957

57 1960 B -7.88 -15.81 --- 9.75
1960 1963

12* 1960 B -4.98 -9.32 --- 4.28
1960 1963

146 1960 B -74.40 -78.37 -67.95
1964 1963

-- 1960 S -163.92 -173.24 -155.74 ---
1960 1963


1.07 3.64


3.34 2.77




2.58 2.78


5.0 5.0


1.29 1.48


--- 1.58


--- 2.69


3.33 2.02


0.74 0.76 Gravel Pack
17 to 30 ft



6.80 5.52


3.49 7.12 M; P




5.45 7.39 P


3.94 *Screen
38 to 41 ft

6.9


5.75


2.21 *Well point
12 to 15 ft

5.28


7.08










Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface

S 1 ?Prior to 1965 Highest water
Bol number io level in May Annual-
S t r.j 3 May or June or June Range Rerk


(yeer) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966


U9Y COOnTY

902-241-1 7 58 1961 B -5.80 -8.34
1964 1962

919-Z45-L F 961 1961 B -0.55 -0.68
1962 1964

LIEBET COUNTY

14 (001-459-1) 7 -- -- 1955 S -3.60 -7.12
1964 1961

010-440-1 7 1181 89 1961 B +13.0 +6.8
1964 1961

023-447-1 F 160R -- 1961 S +4.80 +2.8
1964 1961

028-456-1 F 360 1961 S -83.82 -85.64
1964 1962

MADISON COUNTY

17 (028-325-1) F 320 300 1953 S -20.16 -38.12
1959 1955

13 (028-325-2) F 322 307 1952 B 17.16 -34.87
1964 1955

MANATEE COUNT

92 (726-213-1) F 600 154 1941 B -37.10 -52.65
1947 1962

MARION COUNTY

5 (91-159-1) F 135R 135 1933 C +13.62 +3.35
1960 1957

.7 (902-156-1) F 179 165 1936 B -13.84 -24.26
1960 1956

48 (359-150-1) F 152 -- 1936 B -0.82 -10.23
1961 1956


49 (910-L38-1) F 175 1936 B -25.0 -31.19
1942 1957

5L (911-210-1) F 106 -- 1935 B -26.04 -34.39
1960 1956

905-822-1 F 482 125 1964 C --

MARTIN COUNTY
14a S 31 20 1950 C +20.2 +15.77
1957 1961

147 S 74 73 1952 C +9.8 +2.12
1958 1962

928 S 11 10 1957 C +32.4 +28.40
1957 1962

933 S 15 14 1957 C +23.4 +20.40
1960 1963


-6.23 -6.86 2.61 2.42


-0.69




-5.18


+13.3


44.90


-83.30




-12.30


-6.10




-55.33




+11.01


-18.05


-4.23



-27.46


-27.32


-80.27



+16.74


+2.62


+27.10


+19.60


-0.70


-- D, 1966


--- 0.26


--- 2.3


44.10 0.70


-83.95 0.60




-21.05 11.94


-18.92 14.88


2.20


5.8


0.20


0.49




6.13


7.74 P


-54.15 11.40 8.45 D, 1966; S


+11.32


-16.95


-3.17



-26.38


-27.40


-80.41



+19.45


+5.01


+32.35


+23.40


3.73


4.21


3.56



2.71


4.03


2.08



4.30


5.20


5.97


3.78


1.74


1.73


2.31 Well flowed
Apr 1960 -
Apr 1961

0.93


2.26


1.51



1.94 x


7.52 M; P


4.08 M


3.07 H











S Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface

a g | Prior to 1965 Highest water
Well b u a o level in May Annual
Well number y M iy orr June Range Rearks
"V 0 0 4 ,
U igh LI
(year) (year) 1965 11966 1965 1966
NASSAU COUMnY


350 1939 S 442.0 +18.4
1947 1963

-- 1939 S 441.1 +20.6
1947 1962

--- 1939 S +24.0 -18.3
1947 1963


2 (035-127-2)


8 (032-126-1)


12 (038-127-1)


27 (040-126-1)


44 (037-136-1)


50 (036-142-1)


51 (033-150-1)


55 (037-130-1)




3 (024-636-1)


23 (034-026-1)


25 (038-631-1)


27 (030-635-2)


29 (035-637-1)


31 (037-645-1)


34 (028-629-1)


580R


680R


640R


191


1,000R


569R


580R


540R




800R


652R


609R


591R


766R


690R


540


+21.8 +20.8


+22.6 +22.3


-15.42 -17.73


-18.72 -24.68


--- +1.26


+23.0 +21.3


+30.0 +28.9


49.7 +6.9




-78.77


-116.4 ---


-128.3 -129.4


-62.2 -64.6


-128.1 -129.6


-- 1939 B


450 1934 A


-- 1940 S


-- 1940 S


504 1940 S




500 1936 S


409 1947 S


456 1947 B


422 1948 S


524. 1947 S


527 1948 S


1947 S +26.6 -9.22 -5.40
1950 1962


OKEECHOBEE COUNTY

S 21 18 1949 C 446.7 +38.82 +40.92
1957 1962


S 22 19 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +57.98
1959 1950

ORANGE COUNTY

F 350 328 1930 C +2.20 -14.30 -12.19
1960 1962

S 20 17 1948 M +3.04 -10.01 -9.72
1960 1962
S 50 46 1948 M -27.47 -39.35 -35.93
1960 1953

F 492 151 1961 H -26.51 -28.67 -26.96
1961 1963


+43.15 3.55 4.89 M Gravel
Packed
16 to 21
ft
+59.85 4.00 2.79 M


-9.72


-6.44

-34.94


-26.47


-46.8 -68.8 -70.4
1948 1963 & 64


+10.1 -29.34
1946 1963

+19.8 -2.13
1947 1963

440.5 +19.8
1940 1963

+42.0 +25.2
1947&48 1963

+33.1 + 4.9
1947 1963

OKALOSA COUNTY

+20.1 -72.19
1950 1963

-93.3 -125.2
1948 1963

-108.1 -127.5
1949 1963

-27.9 -65.2
1951 1962

-102.3 -127.0
1948 1963.


3.0


2.8


4.01


9.86


51.10


1.4


2.8


7.4


2.8


1.7


6.45


4.2


2.3


5.27


8.10


-..


0.5


0.3


4.0




26.48


3.47


2.2


7.9


5.40


2.6


14.39


S


P


P, X


S





S


S; X


S; X




S


D, 1966; S


S


S


S Recor-
der installed
May 6,1966
S


S


-71.8


.--.


47 (832-128-1)


47B (832-128-3)

47C (832-128-4)


832-105-1











SWater lvel above (+) or below (-) land surface

S Prior to 1965 Highest water
a ay or Ju n, lanM Remarksr e
r as a::i m ayn J1 1"
i. =I Ulak L a ow I
S(ya) (yar) 1965 1966 1965 1966
OSCsozA cOMIry


13 (315-226-1) F 49


826-2-l-L F 227


13 (808-245-1)


166 (800-247-1)


246 (738-247-1)


665 (78-244-4)


F 141


F 195


F 208


1 299


-. (810-136-1) r 195


45 C759-158-1) F 643


13 1950 C +32.1 +27.8 +28.40
1957 1956

18 1949 C +47.1 443.27 445.57
1960 1962

14 1948 C +77.9 +71.72 +73.83
1957 1962

16 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +58.45
1957 1950

22 1948 C +73.2 +68.3 +69.81
1957 1956

PALM BEACH COUNTY

16 1944 C +8.6 +3.6 +5.35
1948 1956

16 1948 C +10.0 +5.5 +6.42
1957 1956

9 1950 C +18.9 +15.0 +15.70
1957 1956

8 1951 C -2.60 -6.00 -5.80
1962 1962

PASCO COUNIr

43 1934 C -4.77 -10.1 -7.98
1959 1945

49 1959 C -9.97 -22.75 -19.16
1960 1962

PDMnIAS COUIOY

33 1947 C -8.29 -10.70 -8.80
1948 1950

- 1945 B -12.18 -18.34 -14.86
1951 1953

- 1945 C -25.12 -28.72 -27.64
1948 1956

81 1954 C -20.12 -24.55 -22.33
1959 1955

POLK COUlTy

81 1945 C -1.70 -5.74 -4.60
1960 1962

318 1948 M -63.65 -84.82 -92.10
1948 1962


W (810-L36-2) S 67 60 1948 C +111.7 +106.9 +107.85
1960 1962


+107.67 2.21 1.62 M


+32.38 4.42


+46.95 3.31


+75.55 4.66


+58.55 3.90


+71.05 4.41




+6.50 5.80


+7.46 4.70


+18.65 4.33


-2.40 3.50




-7.36 4.51


-17.40 3.17


-8.73


-13.79


-26.94


-22.53


-3.31 3.26


-89.73 15.36


3.23 M; Gravel
Packed 11 to
19 ft
2.79 M


4.18 H


3.58 H


3.53 N




5.24 M


4.19 M


1.42 H


1.50 B




3.26


4.80




1.56 T


8.35


1.86 T


3.29




1.69


9.44 S











Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface

Sprior to 1965 Highest water
Well umber O4 O P level in May Annual remarks
j May or JUne or June aonge

i & & 'g High Low
S (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
POUI COUNTI (continued)


48 (732-131-1) S 62 59 1948 C +100.8 +96.2 +98.23
1954 1956

49 (748-119-1) S 17 14 1949 C +104.7 +98.99 +101.07
1957 1962

51 (744-131-1) H 319 208 1949 B -5.08 -17.25 -13.51
195b 1962

753-158-311 F 710 237 1955 C -15.88 -38.57 -47.15
1958 1962

802-132-1 F 463 137 1959 B -7.65 -11.68 -11.81
1961 1963

805-155-2 F 311 82 1956 B -15.18 -25.64 -23.79
1959 1962

805-155-3 H 72 62 1955 B -12.52 -21.73 -20.07
1959 1962

806-156-1 S 13 10 1955 S -3.69 -9.73 -9.43
1959 1963

806-156-2 H 103 63 1956 S -16.89 -29.66 -27.50
1959 1962

PUTNAM coUNr

28 (925-138-1) F 159 --- 1936 B -6.2 -9.81 -8.40
1944 1962

29 (939-138-1) F 300R --- 1936 B +10.8 +2.02 44.42
1936&57 1962

937-153-1 F 303R 300 1934 S -29.51 -35.65 -28.70
1961 1957

939-134-11 F 547 113 1958 S 44.26 -1.75 +0.48
1959 1962

943-152-1 H 151 125 1956 B -43.20 -46.66 -43.40
1961 1957

ST. JOHNS COUNTY

5 (007-123-1) F 350R 180 1934 A +43.9 +33.8 +37.0
1951 1963

8 (005-129-1) P 336R 240 1934 A +36.5 +22.7 +25.7
1947 1963

000-123-2 F 258 --- 1957 B 44.72 -0.57 +1.13
1959 1962

937-122-1 F 622 142 1958 C -17.30 -21.51 -21.10
1959 1963


+99.93 2.97 1.99 M


+103.86 4.07


-15.71 11.78


-44.45 17.37


-12.34 1.24


-22.75 4.55


-18.92 4.19


-7.02 3.07


-24.57 6.87


-7.99


+4.33


-27.85


-1.16


-42.45




+36.1


+27.4


-0.50


-19.56


3.12 M


7.29 P


14.02 P


3.14


3.25


2.91


1.94 *Screen
10 to 13 ft

4.86




1.80 S


2.87 S


0.18 X


4.81


0.26


2.92





SWVater level above (+) or below (-) land surface

U Prior to 1965 Bihelst water
Wel numr level in May Annual
M T May or June or June Range

(i a i 9igh I Lo
(yar) (year) 1965 I 1966 1965 1966


ST. JlONS COUNIT (continued)


94--129-7 F 541 118 1955 B +10.1 +1.52
1959 1962

b4-16b-L F 275 101 1956 B -1.55 -10.86
1958 1962

ST. LUCI COUNTY

41 8 17 13 1950 C +28.2 +25.2
1957 1956

Z s 18 13 1950 C +26.9 +23.76
1951 1961

SANTA ROSA COUNTY

L0t (021-709-8) S 41 31* 1950 A -4.43 -9.52
1960 1955

035-706-1 G 211 206* 1959 n -82.84 -89.10
1961 1963

0-708-L C G 128 23* 1959 M 44.83 +1.28
1961 1963

541--44-t G 98 93* 1959 8 -56.34 -61.90
1960 1963

SARASOTA COUNTY

4 (71.-225-l) P 71 R 101 1930 C +4.51 -9.36
1931 1962

SEMINOLE COUNTY

125 (.1-121-1) F 14b 63 1951 C -34.18 -42.60
1960 1962

257 (37-l11-6) F 206 --- 1951 B +5.10 +0.27
1953 1962

SUMTER COUNTY

852-201-1 P 125 45 1961 B -29.94 -33.26
1964 1963

SUWANNHE COUNTY

319-Z49-1 F 138 135 1961 B -18.94 -35.31
1964 1963

TAYLOR COUNTY

S3 (003-II-1-L) 230 189 1946 C -1.00 -30.9
1949 1962

36 (004-331-1) S 35 --- 1947 B -5.05 -23.95
1964 1957

UNION COUNTY

001-224-1 F 256 198 1960 8 -89.54 -93.57
1961 1963

007-222-1 P 724 694 1958 C -86.92 -93.00
1959 1962


+3.29


-13.11




+24.45


+24.16




-6.92


-86.76


+2.83


-58.27


-2.01 ---


-17.39 9.48




+26.04 3.81


+25.05 3.40







-89.48 3.89


+1.70 4.41


--- 1.23


---


--- P


--- *Screen
31 to 41 ft

1.57 *Screen
206 to 211 ft

2.05 *Screen
123 to 128 ft

2.74 *Screen
93 to 98 ft


-8.55 -7.51 8.91 6.88 S


-41.48 -39.32 4.20


+1.15 +3.19 3.47


-29.42 -28.52 4.55 3.81


-29.43




-19.1


-6.01




-87.91


-87.52


-30.80 8.00 13.24


-21.3 9.9


-7.41 1.69




-88.18 2.12


-87.80 3.73


7.0 P


2.52 P




1.45


3.81


r


Rimarks








Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface

SPrior to 1965 Highest vater
Wall numbr level in Hay Annual Remarks
H b C 1 S May or Juna or June Range

5 I High Low
(year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
VOLUSIA COUNTY


29 (911-125-1) F 107 --- 1936 8 -11.86 -18.73 -17.23
1951 1963

30 (917-128-1) F 180R --- 1936 B +11.2 +6.7 +9.0
1959 1948

31 (856-105-1) F 121 113 1936 C -4.72 -8.60 -6.83
1953 1962

32 (919-125-1) F 138R --- 1936 B -1.2 -5.11 -4.26
1937&38 1963

905-113-3 F 351 94 1955 B -0.22 -3.66 -1.78
1958 1956

909-106-1 F 235 102 1955 B -5.25 -8.07 -8.39
1959 1963

909-106-9 F 496 480 1955 B -6.62 -9.55 -9.33
1958 1963

910-105-1 F 498 152 1955 B -12.84 -19.73 -16.67
1958 1962

911-104-4 F 235 115 1955 B -15.72 -25.85 -27.55
1955 1963

911-104-9 F 500 483 1955 B -10.26 -13.89 -13.17
1948 1963

WAKULLA COUNTY

2 (009-412-1) F 65 22 1946 B -0.86 -3.05 -1.38
1958 1951

11 (000-426-1) F 70 45 1946 A -5.58 -8.25 -7.10
1955 1960

005-417-1 F 77 --- 1961 B -1.13 -3.48 -2.35
1964 1963

011-410-1 F 80 --- 1961 B -0.12 -1.87 -0.73
1964 1962

WALTON COUNTY

13 (022-606-1) F 450R --- 1936 B +15.8 +11.1 +12.4
1950 1956

019-610-1 F 615 188 1961 B +14.7 +11.6 +14.2
1964 1963

029-614-1 F 160 --- 1961 S +21.0 +19.5 +18.3
1964 1963

043-612-1 F 509 323 1961 A -144.2 -148.2 -144.0
1964 1962

WASHINGTON COUNTY

4 (046-548-1) F 785R --- 1935 B -7.20 -15.09 -10.25
1964 1954

037-542-2 F 206 202 1961 B -13.72 -20.20 -16.25
1964 1963


-17.20


+9.22


-5.35


-3.99


-0.52


-6.68


-8.80


-16.04


-20.25


-12.62


-1.62 1.39 0.88


-- 0.97


-- 1.61


-1.23 0.27 0.56


- 0.8


--- 0.8


--- 2.4






--- 4.25


--- 2.95


2.3 X


X


8.15


5.78










FLRD GEOLOSk ( IC SUfRiW


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