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 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Exploration
 Land
 Rules and regulations
 Sunniland field
 Rodessa - Pine Island - Sligo prospects...
 References
 Appendix 1: Exploratory well information,...
 Appendix II
 Appendix III


FGS



Summary of Florida petroleum production and exploration in 1963 ( FGS: Information circular 45 )
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001105/00001
 Material Information
Title: Summary of Florida petroleum production and exploration in 1963 ( FGS: Information circular 45 )
Series Title: ( FGS: Information circular 45 )
Physical Description: vi, 63 p. : illus., maps (1 fold.) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Babcock, Clarence L ( Clarence Lloyd ), 1904-
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1964
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Petroleum -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Petroleum -- Geology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 27-28.
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001692703
oclc - 01534947
notis - AJA4777
lccn - a 65007961
System ID: UF00001105:00001

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    Exploration
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 8
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Land
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 9
    Rules and regulations
        Page 17
        Page 16
    Sunniland field
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Rodessa - Pine Island - Sligo prospects in Northwest Florida
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    References
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Appendix 1: Exploratory well information, 1963
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Appendix II
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Appendix III
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Copyright
            Main
Full Text



STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
DIVISION OF GEOLOGY


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Robert O. Vernon, Director






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45





SUMMARY OF FLORIDA PETROLEUM
PRODUCTION AND EXPLORATION
IN 1963



By
Clarence Babcock


TALLAHASSEE
1964










r)0, 4



AGRI-
CULTURAL
LIBRARY








































Completed manuscript received
April 30, 1964
Printed by the Florida Geological Survey
Tallahassee

ii





















ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


Thanks are extended to Robert O. Vernon and the staff of the Florida
Geological Survey for valuable suggestions which greatly improved this
report.
Discussions with Milton Hruby, District Geologist with the Mobil Oil
Company and Bob Martin, Geologist with the Gulf Oil Corporation, were
of great benefit in the preparation of the cross sections incorporated with
the report.
The Alabama Geological Survey was of valued assistance in provid-
ing Mesozoic and Paleozoic tops on the Ancora Corporation and Jett
Drilling Company No. 1 Citronelle Unit B-31-7 well, a 19,204-foot hole
which is the deepest test in the Citronelle field (letter from Thomas J.
Joiner, Chief, Paleontology-Stratigraphy-Geophysics Division, Geological
Survey of Alabama, dated May 28, 1963).









TABLE OF CONTENTS



Page

Acknowledgments ......... ...................... 1
Exploration .......... .. ... .. .. .... ..... .. ... 2
Charlotte County ..................... ......... 2
Clay County. ...... .................. ....... 4
Gadsden Caonty ............................. 5
Pinellas County -............................ 8
Taylor County ............... ....... ......... 8
Land ............................ ............. 9
Florida Mainland ................. ... ........ 9
Florida-Offshore ...... ............... .. ...... 12
Geophysics .................................... 13
Florida Mainland ...... .. ........... ........ .. 13
Florida-Offshore ............................. 15
Rules and regulations ............................. 16
Sunniland field ........ .. .................... .... 17
Production .......... ........................ 17
Sunniland field well data and review of two 1962
completions ..... .......................... 17
1963 drilling operations in the Sunniland field .......... 18
Other Sunniland field activities permitted in 1963 ....... 21
Rodessa-Pine Island-Sligo prospects in northwest Florida ...... 21
Bibliography .................................... 27
Appendices ...................................
I. Exploratory well information, 1963 .............. .. 29
II The "S-45", the offshore rig used by the California
Company in drilling their no. 3 Florida State Lease 224-B
well ................. ................. 43
III. State Drilling Lease form as revised in 1963 ........ 47
IV. Oil companies with exploration, production, or research
offices in Florida ................. ......... .. 61


ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure
1 Florida petroleum exploration and production ...... .. 3
2 Areas to be excluded from future oil and gas leasing
(prepared by Jim Williams of the Trustees of the Internal
Improvement Fund). ................. ........ 14
3 Structure map of wells in Sunniland field, Florida ..... 19
4 Comparison chart of part of the stratigraphic section in
the area of the Citronelle oil field, Mobile County,
Alabama (after McCoy, unpublished thesis, 1958, p. 8) .23






Table
1 Structural information on the Gulf Oil Corporation
No. 1 Stevens Estate well and two additional tests
located 10 and 20 miles, respectively, to the
north-northwest ................... ........ 2
2 Drill stem test results, Gulf Oil Corporation, No. 1
Stevens Estate well .................. ....... 4
3 Penetration rates for drilling and reaming operations,
E. I. duPont de Nemours, No. 1 Highlands Plant waste
well ...................................... 5
4 Calculated porosity encountered in a predominantly
calcareous section below fresh water, E. I. duPont de
Nemours, No. 1 Highlands Plant waste well ......... 5
5 Wells in the Forty Mile Bend area revealing the presence
of reefal limestone of the Sunniland pay zone ........ 10
6 Rejected bids on State acreage offshore from northwest
Florida, 1963 ................... ........ 13
T Geophysical activities on the Florida Mainland in 1963 15
8 Permits granted in 1963 for the conduct of offshore
geophysical operations ......................... 15
9 Time limit for submission of specified items to the Oil
and Gas Section ............................ 16
10 Production for 1963, Sunniland field, Florida ........ 17
11 Data of the Sunniland marker, Sunniland field, Florida,
arranged in the order of structural elevations ........ 18
12 Other Sunniland field activity permitted in 1963 .... .. 21


Plates
I Mesozoic structure cross section A-A', B-B', and C-C'
and index map.. .......................... 6
2 Mesozoic stratigraphic cross sections B-B' and C-C' 7
3 Mesozoic stratigraphic cross section A-A' ........... 24























SUMMARY OF FLORIDA PETROLEUM PRODUCTION AND
EXPLORATION IN 1963


By
Clarence Babcock

EXPLORATION


In 1963, four wells deep enough to reach prospective Cretaceous
sediments were drilled in exploration for oil and gas; these wells were
located in Charlotte, Gadsden, Pinellas and Taylor counties. A fifth
deep well in Clay County was drilled through the Cretaceous section
and was deep enough to be considered an oil test though it was designed
as a chemical effluent facility. These wells are spotted on figure 1.
Data 6n these five wells, on shallower holes, and on the re-entry of an
old exploratory hole, are given in appendix I.
Exploratory footage drilled in 1961 through 1963 has been:
Exploratory
Year footage drilled
1961 87,737 feet
1962 16,378 feet
1963 37,712 feet
A summary of the deep wells drilled in 1963 in Florida counties follows:
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
The Gulf Oil Corporation, No. 1 Stevens Estate well, located about
14 miles southeast of Punta Gorda (fig. 1, app. 1), bottomed at a depth of
12,459 feet in sediments of Lower Cretaceous age, and was plugged and
abandoned December 30, 1963.
Structural information on the Stevens well and comparative data on
the Humble Oil and Refining Company, No. 1 Treadwell; and on the Gulf
Oil Corporation, No. 1 Vanderbilt is given in table 1. The Treadwell
and Vanderbilt wells are located 10 and 20 miles, respectively, to the
north-northwest of the Stevens test. Inspection of table 1 indicates that
significant faulting probably is not present between the tabulated wells.









Table 1, Structural


information on the Stevens well and two additional tests located 10 and
90 miles, respectively, to the north-northwest,


Depth and Thickness, top Thickness, top
(Datum) of the top Avon Park Lower Cretaceous -
of the Sunniland top Lower top Sunniland
marker, Cretaceous marker,
Well in feet in feet in feet


Gulf, Stevens 11,850 6,995 2,950
(-11,806)
HORC, Treadwell 11,500 6,980- 2,990
(-11,480
Gulf, Vanderbilt 11,245 7,040 2,885
(-11,224)








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


-,Completed during 1963
-all plugged and abandoned
(see appendix 1 for well data)


88 87 86 86* 94P 84" 83' 82' 8r




0 20 40 80 120 160 MILES

APPROXIMATE SCALE


Figure 1. Florida petroleum exploration and production.


30-





29'-





28-





27"-





26-





257-





24'-






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Conventional cores were taken at depths of 11,374 11,417 feet and
12,290 12,346 feet. No descriptions are available. A total of 38 side-
wall cores, with recovery from 12, were shot at various depths extending
from 8,416 to 12,347 feet; no descriptions are available.
Two drill stem tests of the deeper Lower Cretaceous section re-
covered salt water with no oil or gas show. Information on these tests
is recorded in table 2.
CLAY COUNTY
The E.I. DuPont de Nemours, No. 1 Highlands Plant waste well,
located about 8 miles north-northeast of Starke (fig. 1, app. 1), bottomed
at 3,509 feet in probable Early Ordovician sediments after having pene-
trated about 1,150 feet of Upper Cretaceous section.
The top of the Paleozoic section, as determined by the penetration
log, was reached at 3,487 feet. A bottom-hole sample at 3,509 feet con-
sisted primarily of quartzite associated with black shale stringers which
Jean M. Berdan of the U. S. Geological Survey considers to be of "Early
Ordovician (?) age" (personal written communication dated July 12,1963).
Berdan states that this lithology appears to agree with that in other wells
in Florida and Alabama dated as Early Ordovician in age by means of
fossils.
This well was designed to dispose of nontoxic waste water from the
DuPont de Nemours' Highland plant, at which titanium ores are reclaimed.
As a result of unusually large bore-hole diameter of this well and
the presence of alternating hard and porous zones, average drilling rates
were slow, circulation was repeatedly lost, and rock samples were poor.
Time for drilling the hole by the B and N Drilling Company, Laurel,
Mississippi was 3 months. Penetration rates in feet per hour for drilling
and reaming operations, and calculated porosities in a predominantly
calcareous section below fresh water are given in tables 3 and 4, respec-
tively.

Table 2. Drill stem tests results, Gulf Oil Corporation, No. 1 Stevens
Estate well
Bottom hole
Depth in feet, flowing, and Recovery, and
and (part of section Chokes, closed in time test
tested) (in inches) pressures (PSI) was open
11,320 11,356 / top 1,625, 4,809 37 barrels of
(upper Sunniland 3/8 bottom salt water, in
"pay" zone) 30 minutes
12,184 12,323 same 5,322, 5,498 405 barrels of
carbonatess included salt water, in
in lower part of 1 hour and 2
massive anhydrite section minutes






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


Table 3. Penetration rates for drilling and reaming operations, E.I.
DuPont de Nemours, No. 1 Highlands Plant waste well

Hole size Interval Average penetration rates
(inches) (feet) (feet per hour)
Drilling: Drilling Reaming
15 0- 1, 549 8.5
10 5/8 1, 549 3, 507 6.9
Reaming:
15 to 30 0 326 8.4
15 to 22 326 2, 031 3.2
10 5/8 to 15 1, 549 2, 020 4.5


Table 4. Calculated porosity encountered in a predominantly
calcareous section, below fresh water in the E.I. DuPont de Nemours,
No. 1 Highlands Plant waste well

Interval Thickness Porosity per Sonic log
(feet) (feet) (percent)
1, 815 1, 946 131 Range: 12 to 23
2, 590 2, 806 216 Aug: 23
3, 150 3, 212 62 Range: 16 to 23

Since no caliper log, neutron log, or gamma-gamma density log was
run in this hole, possible caves and fractures creating permeability could
not be located or inferred.
Drilling operations were terminated in June, 1963, and by the end of
the year DuPont Company was still experimenting with this well in an
attempt to make it work as a waste disposal facility.
GADSDEN COUNTY
The Prince and Munroe, No. 1 Owenby well, located about 3.5 miles
southeast of Quincy (fig. 1, app. 1), was drilled to a depth of 7,029 feet,
terminating in sediments of probable Lower Cretaceous Trinity Age.
The test reached the Lower Atkinson (or Lower Tuscaloosa) section
of Upper Cretaceous Woodbine Age at 3,900 feet, and on this marker it
was 18 feet lower than the Oles and Naylor, No. 1 Florida Power Comp-
any well located about 3 miles to the east-southeast.
Plate 1, which contains Mesozoic Structure Cross Section C-C', and
plate 2, which includes Mesozoic Stratigraphic Cross Section C-C', show
most of the Cretaceous sequence in the Owenby well.
The drilling site for the Owenby well was selected on the basis of
seismic interpretation by the operators who hoped to drill several pros-
pective horizons cut by an east-west trending normal fault. The Upper
Cretaceous section penetrated by this test does not appear to be signi-
ficantly anomolous structurally to that drilled in other tests located
nearby, which indicates that the Owenby well did not cut a fault in the






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Wsme


a jum
-LJ-!--a-___
im"xu
NOTE:
s mii'ii b1 rin ld *fc llY*


Plate I. Mesozoic structure cross section A-A', B-B', and C-C' and

index map.


--WU


ID N


AQX. SCAE







-f400



- O00


Off 10011 Lt~A f.UUUfI~l"'%

SHOCKS H 011


Sll Op Uul ICI(71,0190


WASO H TA RIRC K I

PA L UX Y


D,I1s COTTON VOLsYI


-120,000l-- T ""'""TT 1 --1,000

11,100 To APPIOX.SCALi
COTTON VALLEY
NOTE:
-14000 This is not a rue strike section and the apparent slructuralrelief -14,000
Indicated In this cross.ectllon lI due primarily to Ihis foc.
See discussion onpages 21-25 of this report.

HYNEIVILLE
-1I,000-


,Ir.IOfIUCHNIIt
1l.11,0 IMACKOVIN
-11,000- I....O, NOI~PWLgT
11e,111 lLOUANN SALT
TO, 9,204


NORTH 0 SOUTH N. EASTO S.WEST
1,0001 1 3 SEA LEVEL LESS 4000 FEET 40o ISEA LEVEL LESS 2000 FEET 11 12
S.TERTIARY ROCKS TETARYROCKS

C U P P E R 4R E -P a
O 0 A Ous -ROCKS
&OT DIPPRIT '" --NOT D I
P./ Pea? 0C ,01o r,, ,coo P0, ," .... rE' -4,oo



ol s moo.'Of.0 f DI '0






10,000 o, -0 4,03 400. a, o 0





A A (k\APPEILICL L5 .0
CR S AN

nlu -S'C"- .. ,9T OR DIKES IN -No.* \ ^. .. /.-$ e^ 19


o.i/ CLASTIC ROCK0 T,,,4\ S





0, NWC,#,tic
S00,000, 3




TOD, 2.022 TO, 12,T0
1o i "RT ,
IT '0 10 .\. ..LL2...
OR DIKES I N V40IN






0 CO NolSullivn I ",...r p 33
N'olN CitrneiieUnlt BI'7ISCAMDIA Soo,9N,TI E N -R-7----"--- L ,r-- .I .C.ELT cl i i^ 19. 4
CoSnrpletedlOF TRIASSIC 16001 A Air, -A-
0, i 96l TD ,11,025' PAN 0, .5.' "-"

O ,11,350' Fro, prforolon No,l, t, cRg rCoa .. .. .--
l.wo.n.. S9-30 1 'ai69 /\ H., 35,T4N,R0 W ... P / \ od N
... On. n(llBIp oIt .CompIlted 1960 WA..ON /,
NlHUMBt, Ba\er'R' !RI HUDl"'. "

Compleledl963 /ESCAIIBttW.Soc,4,T2N,K29W T1D'11946't., r '' N 6 b
T.D.13,000' 4T 62N K2W 11^>-Sec,2,T2
T.D13,e8 T 'D:ll,22 l L, 'J4 1 i / Compl t dl963 r""/
GULF COT DRILLING

Copsleed 1956 'N "*"',1O So4,TSlSR7W / 9 ."
TD, ,, f --' ,10,011' ]L 7I.0.01



.L PUL E P ( APFRANNLI"N > A
o "pi, NolHopkins .
%1,S 0 P 2.0 30 40 O0MILES \; Sec,22,T6S,R9W ,. 3"1-+ !
... ... ............ Comp"llod 9 +!, C 1944
APPROX, SCALE ,D194' 0 6HE CALIFORNIA Co,.
APPRO, X SCAE No,2, Florida SlaoeLsole 224IA
6A 822 56"W
CCmploled 1961
T,D,10,566'


0EA l


-6,000



-1,000


-10,000


**-air;>M% "s.>I i~ifcml





8 7 8
BROOKS MOBIL
NO.1SULLIVAN NO.1 ST.REIS
PAPER CO.
D.. LEV. 222' D.. ELIV. 121'


3 9 B' C 10 11 5 12 C'
HUMBLE BROOKS STANOLIND PRINCE AND GULF COAST PURE
NO.1 ST.REGIS NO.1 CALDWELL- NO.I PULLEN MUNROE DRILLING AND NO.1 HOPKINS
PAPER CO. GARVIN NO.1OWENBY EXPLORATION CO.
-N ""O 1 U.S.A
D.F.I EV. 119' D.F. ELEV. 33' S s D.F. ELEV. 338' D.F. ELV. 220' D.F. ELV 49' D.F. ELV. 32

EAV ELUL tow LOWER USCALOOSA
LESS ,000' LOWER ,L
.- o ;,CRETACEOUS -4,000 -5,000 Is LOO.'
8,000 Fu iSaUo sno
FORMATION
S, 00 -6,000
100 PALUXY 8 s
e.so 0 n .( FORMATION -5,000 ', -' 0 0


'0 0 PRE-PALUXY -7 ,0-8,000

10,000 1,

S.100 u. 0 0, 0T0
S. 11,000 s7,00
S I N DKEs IN CLAsTIC 0\ 000





,90 ROCKS OF TRIASSiC ? AGE
0, 11000 PLAT ORNDirX.M,
1.0,.80' :;S h8 1S '
I .I11.0 0 \ :'DIABASE SILLS OR\'
,2 \ ,0 w DIKES IN CLASTIC \ -0,000

\ 141
1,% ROCKS OF TRIASSIC A0E
1'2,000 PROM Z3o.07d
TD l l,,5a N L- IO ,O 0 0 c

(SEE PLATE FOR INDEX MA1000




(SEE PLATE 1 FOR INDEX MAR)


Plate 2. Mesozoic stratigraphio cross sections B-B' and C-C'.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Upper Cretaceous section. Also, the sparse data available on the Lower
Cretaceous sequence in this well, which is the only test to drill deeper
than 4300 feet in Gadsden" County, does not indicate that significant
faulting was present in the Lower Cretaceous section.
This test was the second of two wells (the other being the No. 1
Bowman dry hole terminated at a depth of 4,196 feet in 1962) drilled by
the operators on a 14,000-acre block secured from the Sun Oil Company.
The drilling contractor for both holes was the B and N Drilling Company,
Laurel, Mississippi. The contract price for both wells was $5 per foot.
The drilling of the Owenby well required 17 days, with drilling time
varying from about 0.1 foot to 5 feet per minute.
PINELLAS COUNTY
The California Company-Coastal Petroleum Company, No. 3 Florida
State Lease 24-B well located about 8 miles northwest of the center of
Dunedin (fig. 1, app. 1), was bottomed at 10,600 feet, which is about
1,050 feet below the top of the Sunniland field "pay zone" equivalent.
It is possible that brown plastic sediments, here consisting of argill-
aceous and slightly calcareous silts which become predominant at a
depth of 10,455 feet, represents the Hosston Formation (Coahuilan Series
of Lower Cretaceous age).
On top of a thick shale section reached at a depth of 9,915 feet in
the No. 3 State Lease 224-B well, this test is 246 feet higher in struc-
tural elevation than is the Coastal Petroleum Company No. 1 Wright
well, located 16 miles to the southeast. This would not have to result
from structural anomaly, however, since the difference in structural
elevation can be accounted for by a regional dip of 15 feet per mile.
The city of Dunedin rejected the application of The California
Company to drill the No. 3 State Lease 224-B well in waters lying within
three miles of shore, and which the city claims, on the grounds that
drilling activities would be inimical to the development of the $4.5
million Caladesi-Honeymoon Island complex. The company then obtained
a permit from the U.S. Corps of Engineers to drill at a site 60 feet beyond
the 3-mile boundary limit claimed by the city. The final location was
about 0.88 mile west-southwest of the point at which the company origi-
nally intended to spud the test.
This hole was drilled with The California Company 8-45 barge and
derrick supplied with Rowan Drilling Company motors and drawworks,
and on which Schlumberger logging equipment and Halliburton plugging
and completion equipment were installed. It is reported that The Califor-
nia Company calculated its cost for drilling and auxiliary equipment used
in the operation at $6,000 a day. The rig used in drilling this well is
described in greater detail in appendix IH.
TAYLOR COUNTY
The Mattaliano No. -A Buckeye Cellulose well, located about 19
miles west of Perry (fig. 1, app. 1), was drilled to a final total depth of
4,115 feet, bottoming in Lower Cretaceous sediments.








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


This well reached the top of the Upper Atkinson sand at 3,400 feet.
On this marker the structural elevation of the well is about the same as
that of the Humble Oil and Refining Company, No. 1 Hodges test located
13 miles to the east.
This test was located on an 80,000-acre lease lying in the south-
western corner of Taylor County, and in the general area of a gravity
high. The operator's primary objective was to drill a stratigraphic pinch-
out, or a fault trap, of Atkinson sands.
It appears probable, on the basis of regional control and the appear-
ance of the induction-electrical log of the well, that the lower member of
the Atkinson Formation, which further to the west in Florida contains
Woodbine microfossils, is missing at this location. Samples in this test
are unreliable as a result of poor mud circulation and do not help to re-
solve the stratigraphy.
Prior to the completion of this hole, the operator spudded in at
three previous sites, none more than about a mile from the No. 2-A well;
the deepest of these previous holes was 180 feet. Each of the previous
holes was abandoned because of a near-surface boulder zone.
Mud circulation history of the No. 2-A Buckeye Cellulose Corporation
well was:
0- 96 feet No circulation
96- 120 feet Circulation established
120-4,115 feet (TD) Poor circulation maintained after cotton
seed hulls were added to the mud.
The drilling contractor for this well was Fennis Waltman, Citronelle,
Alabama. The contract was taken on a day-rate basis, and provided for
the payment of $800 a day, plus cost of mud, cement, and bits. This
test was spudded on November 30, 1963, and completed on December
20, 1963. Drilling rates ranged from about /2 to 5 minutes per foot.
LAND
FLORIDA MAINLAND
Charlotte County: The Gulf Oil Corporation acquired a 10-year lease
on 18,320 acres from the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission of the
State of Florida. The acreage is located in T. 42 S, R 23, 24, 25 E.,and
consists approximately of the southern one-third of the Cecil M. Webb
Wild Life Management area. Bonus payment was $37,575; annual rental
is 50 cents per acre, increasing 5 percent after the first 2 years. The
drilling commitment requires one well within 2/2 years to a depth of not
less than 6,000 feet, with an additional well each 2/2 years thereafter.
The lease date is August 1, 1963.
In addition, in the latter part of 1963, Gulf acquired about 99,000
acres of privately-owned land in 11 leases from the Babcock Florida
Corporation in Charlotte and Lee counties. This privately owned acreage
consists of T 41 and 42 S., R 26 and 27 E., and adjoins, to the east and
north, the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission lease. Bonus payment
was $1 an acre and annual rentals are 50 cents an acre.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


On November 20, 1963, Gulf spudded its first test under the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission lease, in sec. 24, T 42 S, R 24 E. Though
this well was drilled "tight", information on it was released after it was
plugged and abandoned. Detailed information is presented in this report
under "Exploration-Charlotte County", and also in appendix I, which
is the well'data section.
Dade County: A total of 24,830 acres of State land located in north-
western Dade County, and encompassing the abandoned Forty Mile Bend
field, were acquired by Wendell L. Roberts under a 10-year lease offered
jointly by the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund and the State
Board of Education. The Trustees own the minerals under the bulk of the
leased acreage, with the Board of Education holding a reserve interest
on only two sections. Cash consideration for this jointly-offered lease
was $12,500. The drilling commitment requires one well within 18 months
from the date of the lease, with an additional well drilled each 2Y years
thereafter, and each well to reach 11,300 feet of depth unless production
is obtained at a lesser depth; lease date is September 24, 1963.
The mineral rights on one section lying roughly in the middle of the
Robert's block of otherwise wholly-owned State acreage were leased in
part from the State and in part from Malcolm Wisehart. Drilling commenced
on the Wisehart lease on or before March 24, 1965, would satisfy the
IS-month commitment on this lease as well as on the wholly-owned
State acreage.
There has been considerable interest in the area of Robert's lease
in view of the presence within the block of geophysical anomalies, and
of two abandoned producers which make up the Forty Mile Bend field.
Robert's block is underlain by the reefal limestone of the Sunniland
"pay" zone, as shown in table 5.
There is also probable, but poorly developed, reefing in two addi-
tional tests, the No. 2 and No. 3 State Lease 340 wells, both drilled
by Gulf, and both located less than a mile south of the Robert's acreage
and within the confines of the Everglades National Park.

Table 5. Wells in the Forty Mile Bend area revealing
the presence of the reefal limestone of the Sunniland Pay Zone

Reef interval and
Well (thickness) Comment
Commonwealth, No. 1 11,404-11,450' Well developed reefing
State Lease 1055- (46')
Located about 1% miles
north af the Robert's
lease
Gulf, No. 1 State Lease 11,344-11,347' Well developed reefing
340 located within the (3') reefingg probably slightly
Robert's lease thicker than 3 feet; bottom
few feet of core were not
recovered)







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


Both of the Forty Mile Bend field abandoned producing wells were
completed in 1954 and together, during a period of about 17 months in
1954 and 1955, produced 32,888 barrels of oil from the equivalent of the
Sunniland pay zone (of Lower Cretaceous Trinity Age) of the Sunniland
field, located about 50 miles to the northwest. The second producer, the
Gulf Oil Corporation, No. 1 State Lease 340 well, is especially interest-
ing. On drill stem test an 8-foot limestone interval from 11,344 to 11,352
feet yielded gas to the surface in 5 hours with no free water. This well
was completed natural as a pumper producing 25 percent oil and 75
percent salt water with rapid decline in a few months to less than 5
percent oil. On abandonment a /-inch hole was found in the casing at
10,045 feet, placing it above the cement behind the casing and below
the pump seat inside the casing.
Hardee and Manatee counties: Texaco leased a reported 70,000 acres
of private land from Mr. Doyle Carlton in southwestern Hardee and south-
eastern Manatee counties for a consideration of 50 cents per acre bonus
and 50 cents per acre annual rental. This lease grants the right to pros-
pect for phosphate minerals as well as for oil and gas.
Gadsden County: In 1963, the Sun Oil Company released by non-
payment of rentals, its entire holdings of 16,000 acres in Gadsden
County.
Nassau County: Fuller Brothers, with offices in Fort Worth, Midland,
and New Orleans, and the South Penn Oil Company took an assignment of
leases on acreage variously reported as totaling between 30,000 to 40,000
acres assembled by the McCarter Brothers of Houston, who retained an
interest. Most of this acreage was located in Georgia just north of the
Florida State line.
As protection acreage, the Fuller Brothers and the South Penn Oil
Company jointly acquired from the Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund of Florida a 10-year lease on 181.8 acres on the Florida side of
the St. Mary's River; cash consideration was $421.78, consisting of
$18.18 for the first year's rental with the remainder being for bonus.
These companies also purchased a 10-year lease from the Florida State
Road Department on 97 acres of right-of-way for a cash consideration
of $213.34 consisting of $9.70 for the first year's rental with the remain-
der being for bonus; lease date was June 11, 1963. Rental schedules
for each of these leases was modeled after the standard payment in
Georgia on State acreage, and is:
Per acre
10 cents for the first year
25 cents for the second year
50 cents for the third year
$1 for each subsequent year
Surface work and a core drilling program involving one stratigraphic
test in or near Florida and one or more additional wells in Georgia were
the basis for the location of a 4,700-foot test about a mile north of Folks-
ton, Georgia. This was a tight hole plugged on August 1, 1963.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


FLORIDA OFFSHORE

Escambia and Santa Rosa counties (bay areas): Mr. M. F. Kirby,
Jackson, Mississippi, requested a 5-year lease on 50,581 acres in
Escambia and Pensacola bays with a rental of 20 cents an acre and a
commitment for two wells, with the first to be commenced within 9 months
from the date of the lease and the second to be commenced within 60
days after completion of the first well. All wells were proposed to be
drilled to a depth of 7,400 feet or to the top of the Lower Cretaceous,
whichever was deeper. The Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund
have received clearance from the U. S. Defense Department for adver-
tisement for competitive bids on 49,291 acres of the total requested.
About 1,290 acres, located in the southern part of the block originally
applied for, was requested to be deleted from the lease. Accordingly,
this lease comprising 49,291 acres will be advertised in January, 1964;
the current schedule calls for opening of bids on February 25, 1964.
On September 8, 1963, Mr. Philip Beal, et al., requested a 5-year
lease on 34,333 acres in East Bay, with a rental of 5 cents per acre and
the drilling of one well to be commenced within 1 year. The Trustees
approved this lease application for advertisement subject to the condition
that the applicant increase the rental from 5 cents to 20 cents an acre.
In the latter part of December, 1963, the Trustees were notified that,
in view of the increased rental, the petitioners had decided to drop their
request for advertisement of the lease. The Trustees had received clear-
ance from the Defense Department for advertisement of this lease for
competitive bids.
Florida Gulf Coast offshore: The full interest in Florida State
Leases 224-A and 224-B have reverted to the Coastal Petroleum Corpora-
tion from The California Company. This became effective on December
I, 1961, when the latter company did not exercise its option, under the
operating agreement between the two companies, to (1) agree to drill
12,000 feet of hole by March 1, 1966, and (2) pay rentals through March
27, 1966.
The California Company will terminate its Florida office, located
in Pensacola, Florida, as of January 10, 1964 (app. IV).
Monroe County: The Gulf Oil Corporation allowed the remaining 9
blocks included under their Florida State Lease No. 826 to lapse by
omitting payment of rentals due September 18, 1963; these remaining
9 blocks were located in the vicinity of the Florida Keys. State Lease
No. 826 was acquired by Gulf in 1951 under a 5-year lease which was
extended an additional 5 years. Seventeen blocks (A through J, O through
U) reverted to the State on September 26, 1961. The term on the remaining
9 comprising blocks (K, L, M, N, V, W, Y, Z), 979,160 acres, wasextended
to March, 1964, by a moratorium on drilling commitments of 2 years, 6
months, and 24 days. This moratorium corresponded to the time during
which the Tidelands case was in litigation. In the Tidelands case, the
U. S. Supreme Court opinion, dated May 31, 1960, reaffirmed the title
of Florida to lands covered by Gulf waters to a distance of 3 marine
(or nautical) leagues, (10,365 statute or land miles), from the coastline.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


Northwest Florida Offshore: The State advertised on February 18,
1963 for bids on 1,496,237 acres of submerged and tidal lands located
within 3 marine leagues from the low water mark of the uplands of the
northwest Florida coast, and extending.along the coast about 175 miles
between the Alabama line and the western tip of St. George Island near
Apalachicola. Conditions of the lease as advertised included: primary
term, 10 years; annual rental, 2 cents per acre for lands in bays, bayous,
and sounds, and 1 cent per acre for offshore bottoms with rentals to in-
crease 5 percent of the original amount after the first 2 years.
The U. S. Defense Department requested that approximately 1 million
acres of the total advertised be restricted from the bid. The area on which
restriction was requested is shown on figure 2, a map prepared by Mr.
Jim Williams, of the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund. The
Defense Department stated that offshore drilling would interfere with
with testing delicate sound detection equipment, and also hamper wea-
pons testing. The State complied with this request and rejected two bids
which are summarized in table 6.
There remains about one-half million acres of the 1,496,237 acres
originally offered by the State that still are open for lease (fig. 2).

Table 6. Rejected bids on State acreage
offshore from northwest Florida, 1963



Bidder Bonus Area bid on

The California Company $370,000.00 Entire 1,496,237 acres as
advertised
Beal, et al. $ 10,500.00 The western half
(approximately) of the area
advertised


GEOPHYSICS
FLORIDA MAINLAND
Geophysical activities completed on the Florida
are shown in table 7.


mainland in 1963









A L A A M A --- ...
A L A B A M A I L,


"Figure 2. Areas to be excluded from future oil and gas leasing (prepared by Jim Williams of the Trustees oT the
Internal Improvement Fund).







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


Table 7. Geophysical activities on the Florida Mainland in 1963


Type
County Survey Area worked Crew weeks

Escambia County
California-Chevron Seismic 4N-3EW; 5,6N,30, 31,
32W W
Okaloosa County
Texaco Gravity 4,5,6 N-23,24,25W 4
Santa Rosa County
California-Chevron Seismic 5,6N-29W; 5N 2/4
Texaco Seismic 30W, 4 N-27,28, 29 14
Texaco Gravity W; 5 N-28,29W, 1,2,
S-26,27W 5 2134

Total 26%

FLORIDA OFFSHORE
Permits granted by the State B.oard of Conservation for the conduct
of offshore geophysical operations are shown in table 8.
Table 8. Permits granted in 1963 for offshore geophysical activities


Seismographic Company to Type
Permit which issued Survey General area

No. 1963
1 Mar. 26 California Velocity Offshore from Pinellas
County, within 1,000
feet of the California-
Coastal No. 3 Flori-
da State Lease 224-B
2 Apr. 16 Mobil Oil Echo Offshore from north-
Sounder west Florida
3 Nov. 6 Mobil Oil Echo Offshore from north
Sounder coast of Florida
Keys
4 Nov. 6 Ray Geophysical Magneto- Offshore from north-
meter west Florida
5 Dec. 16 Tidelands Explo- Gravity Tentatively, plans
ration meter include the entire off-
shore Florida Gulf
Coast out to a water
depth of 100 fathoms






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Of the above permitted surveys, the only information available to
the office relative to work undertaken is that the Mobil Oil Company
completed 7 weeks of seismic activity in the Gulf of Mexico (See permit
5 above).
The Tidelands Exploration Company tentatively plans a gravimetric
survey covering the entire offshore Florida Gulf Coast out to a water
depth of 100 fathoms. However, the northern and major part of the area
they hope to cover is located within the Air Force Gulf Test Range. The
Air Force has requested Congress to enact legislation restricting the
Gulf Test Range area lying beyond the jurisdiction of the State of Florida
(3 marine leagues from shore) and out to the 100-fathom curve from the
mineral leasing provisions of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act
(43 USC 1331-1343), for a period of 5 years. This restriction would not
prohibit mineral exploration by seismic, galvanometric, or similar methods.
The State has approved a Department of Defense request to issue no
leases or permits for exploration or production operations in coastal or
inland submerged areas where such activity would be inconsistent with
the national security.
Tidelands would like to begin its survey in the northern region; they
have commitments for participation by oil companies, and are ready to
begin. If the area in question is restricted, however, they will commence
their operations in the southern region which is not affected.
RULES AND REGULATIONS
The State Board of Conservation will keep any information confiden-
tial for a period not exceeding 1 year from the date on which such infor-
mation is filed, unless exceptional hardship is proved. This is in accord-
ance with a provision added, on September 10, 1963, to section 115-B-2.05
of the Florida Administrative Code, which establishes rules and
regulations governing the conservation of oil and gas in Florida.
By an amendment to the subject section of the Florida Administrative
Code, also made on September 10, 1963, the time for supplying the Oil
and Gas Section of the Division of Geology with copies of electrical logs
or other surveys made in the drilling of a well has been changed from 6
months to 90 days. With the incorporation of this change, the time limits
for submitting items to the Oil and Gas Section in compliance withThe
Oil and Gas Act is given in table 9.

Table 9. Time limits for submission of specified items to the
Oil and Gas Section
Item Time limit (following well completion)

Well record (form 9) 30 days
Affidavit on plugging completion
(form 12) 30 days
Well samples 90 days
Electrical logs or other surveys 90 days








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


This well reached the top of the Upper Atkinson sand at 3,400 feet.
On this marker the structural elevation of the well is about the same as
that of the Humble Oil and Refining Company, No. 1 Hodges test located
13 miles to the east.
This test was located on an 80,000-acre lease lying in the south-
western corner of Taylor County, and in the general area of a gravity
high. The operator's primary objective was to drill a stratigraphic pinch-
out, or a fault trap, of Atkinson sands.
It appears probable, on the basis of regional control and the appear-
ance of the induction-electrical log of the well, that the lower member of
the Atkinson Formation, which further to the west in Florida contains
Woodbine microfossils, is missing at this location. Samples in this test
are unreliable as a result of poor mud circulation and do not help to re-
solve the stratigraphy.
Prior to the completion of this hole, the operator spudded in at
three previous sites, none more than about a mile from the No. 2-A well;
the deepest of these previous holes was 180 feet. Each of the previous
holes was abandoned because of a near-surface boulder zone.
Mud circulation history of the No. 2-A Buckeye Cellulose Corporation
well was:
0- 96 feet No circulation
96- 120 feet Circulation established
120-4,115 feet (TD) Poor circulation maintained after cotton
seed hulls were added to the mud.
The drilling contractor for this well was Fennis Waltman, Citronelle,
Alabama. The contract was taken on a day-rate basis, and provided for
the payment of $800 a day, plus cost of mud, cement, and bits. This
test was spudded on November 30, 1963, and completed on December
20, 1963. Drilling rates ranged from about /2 to 5 minutes per foot.
LAND
FLORIDA MAINLAND
Charlotte County: The Gulf Oil Corporation acquired a 10-year lease
on 18,320 acres from the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission of the
State of Florida. The acreage is located in T. 42 S, R 23, 24, 25 E.,and
consists approximately of the southern one-third of the Cecil M. Webb
Wild Life Management area. Bonus payment was $37,575; annual rental
is 50 cents per acre, increasing 5 percent after the first 2 years. The
drilling commitment requires one well within 2/2 years to a depth of not
less than 6,000 feet, with an additional well each 2/2 years thereafter.
The lease date is August 1, 1963.
In addition, in the latter part of 1963, Gulf acquired about 99,000
acres of privately-owned land in 11 leases from the Babcock Florida
Corporation in Charlotte and Lee counties. This privately owned acreage
consists of T 41 and 42 S., R 26 and 27 E., and adjoins, to the east and
north, the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission lease. Bonus payment
was $1 an acre and annual rentals are 50 cents an acre.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45 17



During the year, there was considerable discussion of proposed
regulations to govern oil and gas leasing in Florida, and a new State
Drilling Lease form was proposed and adopted in 1963 by the Trustees of
the Internal Improvement Fund. (app. III).

SUNNILAND FIELD
PRODUCTION
Florida's only currently producing field, the Sunniland oil field,
located in northwestern Collier County of southern Florida, produced by
pump from Lower Cretaceous reefal limestone (Trinity Age) about 1,300
barrels of oil per day. Production figures for 1963 are given in table 10.
The cumulative production of the field during its 20-year history to
January 1, 1964, is 7,748,011 barrels of oil. Most of the 16 Sunniland
field wells have been very good producers, with one well producing
about 12 million barrels of oil, while two others have produced about
1 million barrels each.
The Sunniland crude oil is black and medium in weight (190 -260
API), and associated with little gas (gas-oil ratios are about 100 to 1).
It is suitable principally for fuel products.
SUNNILAND FIELD WELL DATA AND REVIEW
OF TWO 1962 COMPLETIONS
As background for a discussion of 1963 drilling operations in the
Sunniland field, a review of the captioned information is:
1. The structural data of the Sunniland marker for all wells in the
field are presented En table 11. Wells are listed in the order of structural
elevations. The subject marker is at the base of a prominent anhydrite
Table 10. Production for 1963, Sunniland field,Florida.

Month Barrels
January 32, 756
February 36, 365
March 39, 211
April 38, 539
May 41, 631
June 40, 927
July 39, 965
August 39, 729
September 36, 291
October 40, 169
November 39, 057
December 39, 002
Total 463, 642






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Of the above permitted surveys, the only information available to
the office relative to work undertaken is that the Mobil Oil Company
completed 7 weeks of seismic activity in the Gulf of Mexico (See permit
5 above).
The Tidelands Exploration Company tentatively plans a gravimetric
survey covering the entire offshore Florida Gulf Coast out to a water
depth of 100 fathoms. However, the northern and major part of the area
they hope to cover is located within the Air Force Gulf Test Range. The
Air Force has requested Congress to enact legislation restricting the
Gulf Test Range area lying beyond the jurisdiction of the State of Florida
(3 marine leagues from shore) and out to the 100-fathom curve from the
mineral leasing provisions of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act
(43 USC 1331-1343), for a period of 5 years. This restriction would not
prohibit mineral exploration by seismic, galvanometric, or similar methods.
The State has approved a Department of Defense request to issue no
leases or permits for exploration or production operations in coastal or
inland submerged areas where such activity would be inconsistent with
the national security.
Tidelands would like to begin its survey in the northern region; they
have commitments for participation by oil companies, and are ready to
begin. If the area in question is restricted, however, they will commence
their operations in the southern region which is not affected.
RULES AND REGULATIONS
The State Board of Conservation will keep any information confiden-
tial for a period not exceeding 1 year from the date on which such infor-
mation is filed, unless exceptional hardship is proved. This is in accord-
ance with a provision added, on September 10, 1963, to section 115-B-2.05
of the Florida Administrative Code, which establishes rules and
regulations governing the conservation of oil and gas in Florida.
By an amendment to the subject section of the Florida Administrative
Code, also made on September 10, 1963, the time for supplying the Oil
and Gas Section of the Division of Geology with copies of electrical logs
or other surveys made in the drilling of a well has been changed from 6
months to 90 days. With the incorporation of this change, the time limits
for submitting items to the Oil and Gas Section in compliance withThe
Oil and Gas Act is given in table 9.

Table 9. Time limits for submission of specified items to the
Oil and Gas Section
Item Time limit (following well completion)

Well record (form 9) 30 days
Affidavit on plugging completion
(form 12) 30 days
Well samples 90 days
Electrical logs or other surveys 90 days







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45 17



During the year, there was considerable discussion of proposed
regulations to govern oil and gas leasing in Florida, and a new State
Drilling Lease form was proposed and adopted in 1963 by the Trustees of
the Internal Improvement Fund. (app. III).

SUNNILAND FIELD
PRODUCTION
Florida's only currently producing field, the Sunniland oil field,
located in northwestern Collier County of southern Florida, produced by
pump from Lower Cretaceous reefal limestone (Trinity Age) about 1,300
barrels of oil per day. Production figures for 1963 are given in table 10.
The cumulative production of the field during its 20-year history to
January 1, 1964, is 7,748,011 barrels of oil. Most of the 16 Sunniland
field wells have been very good producers, with one well producing
about 12 million barrels of oil, while two others have produced about
1 million barrels each.
The Sunniland crude oil is black and medium in weight (190 -260
API), and associated with little gas (gas-oil ratios are about 100 to 1).
It is suitable principally for fuel products.
SUNNILAND FIELD WELL DATA AND REVIEW
OF TWO 1962 COMPLETIONS
As background for a discussion of 1963 drilling operations in the
Sunniland field, a review of the captioned information is:
1. The structural data of the Sunniland marker for all wells in the
field are presented En table 11. Wells are listed in the order of structural
elevations. The subject marker is at the base of a prominent anhydrite
Table 10. Production for 1963, Sunniland field,Florida.

Month Barrels
January 32, 756
February 36, 365
March 39, 211
April 38, 539
May 41, 631
June 40, 927
July 39, 965
August 39, 729
September 36, 291
October 40, 169
November 39, 057
December 39, 002
Total 463, 642






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


which immediately overlies the middle member of the Sunniland formation
as defined in an unpublished thesis by Raasch (1954, p. 11), and which
is typically the upper limit of the dolomite and fossiliferous limestone
producing section. Well locations and structure contours are shown on
figure 3.
S. The Humble Oil and Refining Company, No. 18 Gulf Coast Real-
ties Corporation well, completed in 1962, pumped on the initial production
test 178.7 BOPD (barrels of oil per day) with 10 percent BS and W (basic
sediment and water) through perforations ranging from 2 to 18 feet lowir
than the producing interval in any well in the field. Table 11 shows
that this producer is the highest well in structural elevation in the field.
The Humble Oil and Refining Company, No. 6 Lee Tidewater Cypress
Lumber Company "B" well was completed in 1962 at about the same
interval as that from which most of the field wells produce. This well
pumped on its initial production test 108.7 BOPD with 0.7 percent BS
and W. This producer is the fourth highest well in structural elevation
in the field, as shown in table 11.
1963 DRILLING OPERATION IN THE SUNNILAND FIELD
The Humble Oil and Refining Company, No. 5 Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation well originally was completed on May 24, 1947, in the open
hole from 11,560 to 11,578 feet. The initial flowing production was 518

Table 11. Data of the Sunniland Marker, Sunniland Field, Florida,
arranged in the order of structural elevations.


Humble Oil and Refining
Company lease and well Sunniland marker
number (in feet sub-sea)

Gulf Coast Realties Corporation
No. 18 -11,493
11 -11,501
13 -11,502
14 -11,504
4 -11,510
8 -11,516
6 -11,517
10 -11,519
5 -11,520
9 -11,535
1 -11,548
Lee Tidewater Cypress Lumber Co. "B"
No. 5 -11,503
4 -11,514
3 -11,516
1 -11,517
2 -11,521







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


PRODUCING OIL WELL
PRODUCING OIL WELL
RECOMPLETED IN 1963
ABANDONED OIL WELL
DRY HOLE


G.CR. CORP.........Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation
LIC.L. CO............Lee Tidewater Cypress
Lumber Company


Contouring closely conforms to Raasch(1954,p.22),
tops picked by Florida Geological Survey


Figure 3. Structure map of wells in Sunniland field, Florida.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BOPD of 250 API gravity oil with 0.3 of 1 percent BS and W through a
%-inch choke. The gas recovery was 50.2 MCF (thousand cubic feet)
per day, giving a GOR (gas-oil ratio) of 99 to 1. The tubing pressure
was 380 PSI (pounds per square inch), and casing pressure was 265 PSI.
During the initial production test conducted in September, 1962, the
well pumped 71 BOPD with 238 barrels (77 percent) of salt water.
Accumulated production from this well to October 1, 1962, was
440,571 BO with 628,257 barrels (59 percent) of salt water.
This hole was deepened on November 27, 1962, and a 4-inch tubing
was set at 11,621 feet (original total depth reached in 1947 was 11,578
feet). The well was perforated with 17 shots (4 per foot) from 11,576
to 11,580 feet, an interval extending 2 feet lower than the open-hole
completion of 1947. On the initial production test conducted January
15, 1963, the well was pumped 24 hours through a 2-inch choke and re-
covery was 28 BOPD, with 45 barrels (38.5 percent) of salt water. The
gas recovery was 2.8 MCF per day, the tubing pressure was 75 pounds,
and the casing pressure was zero.
A subsequent production test on December 5, 1963, through perfora-
tions 8 feet higher in the casing (11,562-11,568 feet), produced 84 BOPD,
with 292 barrels (78 percent) of salt water. Production from this well
during the month of December, 1963, from 11,562 to 11,568 feet was 2,410
BO with 8,556 barrels (78 percent) of salt water.
Since the final perforated interval (11,562-11,568 feet) is bracketed
within the zone from which open-hole production was obtained as a re-
suit of the 1947 completion, it appears that the 1963 operations had
the result, essentially, of a workover.
Table 11 shows that the Sunniland marker in the No. 5 Gulf Coast
Realties Corporation well occupies a relatively low structural elevation
as compared with other Sunniland field wells.
The Humble Oil and Refining Company, No. 10 Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation well originally was completed on January 8, 1948, in an open
hole from 11,566 to 11,574 feet. The well flowed initially, producing 175
BOPD of 24.80 API gravity oil with 1.8 percent of BS and W through
1,-inch choke. The gas recovery was 15.2 MCF per day, the tubing pres-
sure was 72 pounds and the casing pressure was zero.
During a production test conducted in September, 1962, the well
pumped 51 BOPD, with 50 barrels (50 percent) of salt water.
Accumulated production from this well to October 1, 1962 was 385,706
BO with 145,421 barrels (27 percent) of salt water.
On February 5, 1963, the well was deepened and a 4-inch tubing was
set at 11,678 feet (original total-depth reached in 1948 was 11,574 feet).
The well was perforated with 16 shots from 11,588 to 11,592 feet. This
was 14 feet deeper than the open-hole completion of 1948. On the initial
24-hour production test, conducted February 22, 1963, 29 BOPD, with 81
barrels (74 percent) of salt water, and a gas recovery of 2.9 MCF was
produced.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


A subsequent production test, conducted on December 5, 1963, was
taken through perforations extending from 11,572 to 11,578 feet and 11,591
to 11,597 feet. The lowest of these perforations was 23 feet deeper than
the interval of open-hole completion of 1948. This test produced 63
BOPD, with 116 barrels (65 percent) of salt water. Production from this
well during the month of December, 1963, through the two sets of perfora-
tions, was 1,807 BO with 3,343 barrels (65 percent) of salt water.
In this well, the Sunniland marker is relatively low as compared with
other wells in the field (table 11).
OTHER SUNNILAND FIELD ACTIVITIES PERMITTED IN 1963
Other Sunniland field activities for which permits were approved in
1963 are shown in table 12.

RODESSA-PINE ISLAND-SLIGO PROSPECTS
IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA

The 1961 production from the Rodessa-Pine Island-Sligo section of
Lower Cretaceous Trinity Age in the Citronelle Oil field of Mobile County,
Alabama, located 33 miles west-northwest of the Florida-Alabama boun-
dary, was 5,872,403 barrels of high gravity (averaging 400 to 450 API)
oil from 290 pumping wells. Cumulative production from discovery of
the field in October, 1955, to January 1, 1962 was 26,945,022 barrels
of oil (Oil and Gas Yearbook- of 1962, Pt. 2, p. 11). The depths from
which production was obtained ranged in the discovery well, the Zack
Brooks, No. 1 Donovan, from 10,870 to 11,414 feet (Frascogna, editor,
1957, p. 38). This depth range of the productive zones is typical for
Citronelle field wells.
In Mississippi, 29 oil fields and'two gas fields produce from the
Rodessa-Sligo sequence, according to a summary (1962) by Henry N.
Toler, Consulting Geologist.
Table 12. Other Sunniland field activities permitted in 1963

Humble Oil and
Refining Company
Type of Date of
Lease afid well number permit permit

Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation
No. 14 deepening July 2, 1963
No. 8 workover July 9, 1963
The work on neither of the wells listed in table 12 was completed as
of December 31, 1963.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Rock units which make up the Rodessa-Pine Island-Sligo section
are shown in figure 4, a comparison chart of part of the stratigraphic sec-
tion in the area of Citronelle field, Alabama; this chart was extracted
from an unpublished thesis by Henry J. McCoy (1958, p. 8).
Mesozoic stratigraphic and structural cross sections (plates 1, 2 and
3) carry correlations through 12 wells extending from Citronelle field 'as
far east as a test drilled offshore from Franklin County, Florida. Tops
shown on these sections were based on sample and electrical log analy-
sis by several workers in this area, and by the writer, who assumes
responsibility for all the tops.
Sparse well control is inadequate to reveal the strike of Mesozoic
formations in southern Alabama and northwestern Florida, and it was not
possible to prepare a true strike section. East-west cross sectional line
A-A' only very approximately parallels the northern boundary of the basin
in which Mesozoic sediments were deposited. Southern Alabama wells
included in the cross sections were selected on the basis of the relative
ease and clearness of electrical log correlations. In northwestern Florida,
the sections include eight wells believed to have been deep enough to
have penetrated the Rodessa equivalent.
Electrical log cross sections composing plates 1, 2 and 3 reveal:

1. The depths, and possible depths, at which the
Rodessa-Pine Island-Sligo section may be reached
in northwestern Florida.
2. That the Rodessa-Pine-Island-Sligo sediments in
the three deep tests in Escambia and Santa Rosa
counties, Florida, are quite similar to those encoun-
tered in the Citronelle field of Alabama. The Fairy
Lake Anhydrite is common to both areas; this litho-
logic unit serves as a good marker in electrical log
correlations. The presence of this unit, as well as
other anhydrites, proves the existence of.an evapo-
rite basin.
3. That in wells beginning with the Pan American
No. 1 Sealy test in Walton County, Florida, and con-
tinuing eastward along cross sectional line A-A',
Mesozoic formations are about 2500-3500 feet higher
in structural elevation than they are in wells to the
west (see Structure Cross Section A-A', plate 1).
Also, Mesozoic sediments in these eastward wells
appear to have been deposited further updip than
they were deposited in wells -to the west, since they
consist more predominantly of clastics (see Strati-
graphic Cross Section A-A', plate 3). As a result,
correlations of the Mesozoic formations of the Citro-
nelle field area into the eastward wells of cross
sectional line A-A' becomes very difficult, and as a
corollary, the section shows less oil and gas pro-
mise.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


STEPHENSONetal. FRASCOGNA


1942


1957


FORGOTSON
1957


PRAIRIE BLUFF
Fm.
RIPLEY Fm.
u DEMOPOLIS
S Memb.
I ARCOLA Ls.


LU

TOMBIGBEE
E.
LL

TUSCALOOSA
Fm.
WASHITA GROUP
Undiff.
g GOOD-
i0 1 LAND Ls.
w&s WALNUT
LoU Fm.

PALUXY
Fm.

MOORINGS-
e PORT Fm.
O
a FERRY LAKE
o ANHYDRITE

RODESSA
Fm.
z
0 PINE ISLAND
..- Fm.

SLIGOz
Fm.



HOSSTON
Fm.


< NAVARRO
jom
0 TAYLOR
I
EUTAW
Fm.

L3) UPPER
O -

SMARINE
uo
(n
LOWER
L-
DANTZLER
U- Fm.
C-
LIMESTONE
S UNIT

PALUXY

MOORINGS
PORT Fm.
0 z

FERRY
Ix, LAKE
SNHYDRITE

7 o
RODESSA
f Z Fm.

w SLIGO
O Fm.
0


HOSSTON
Fm.


. t
Lu ;





0
0O
mJ



/U)


I-
z
I-2
S^ (


PALUXY


RUSK
Fm.Equiv.


FERRY LAKE
ANHYDRITE



RODESSA
Fm.


PEARSALL
Fm. Equiv.

SLIGO
Fm.?


HOSSTON
Fm.


PRAIRIE BLUFF
Fm.
RIPLEY Fm.
, DEMOPOLIS
SMemb.
I ARCOLA Ls.
u



T TOMBIGBEE
I-


TUSCALOOSA
Fm.
WASHITA GROUP
UNDIFF.
FREDERICKSBURG
GROUP Undiff.

PALUXY

J MOORINGS-
0- o PORT Fm.
0

O t' FERRY LAKE
MU ANHYDRITE


RODESSA
Fm.


SLIGO Fm.?



HOSSTON
Fm.


REDRAWN AFTER McCOY, 1958

Figure 4. Comparison chart of part of the stratigraphic section in the area
of the Citronelle oil field, Mobile County, Alabama
(after McCoy, unpublished thesis, 1958, p. 8).


McCOY
1958


E







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


NINdRA COMM RUlE MIiLE

11- 31.7
002.l10. IY 0 .1. IHBl 1119
IILLOWER PM C


TUSCALOOSA


I "ANTZIBI 2| MR M A
FORMATION


M*30 *


oDJ.EILEV. 1


AT 35124 f
CONTAINED
COAL (IN
QUATZITE
WITHOUT
FElDSPAR)
WITH POLLEN
INCLUIONS OF
JUIASSIC AGE.


T.. Iltr

SIDEILU CORE
AT I 938
QUARTZITE
WITH FELDSMAR.


(SEE PLATE 1 FOR INDEX MAP)


NOTE: THIS IS NOT A TRUE STRIKE SECTION.
SEE DISCUSSION ON PAGES 21-25 OF THIS REPORT.



SIOPS FOR WELL NOL PFIRIDED iYALABAMA GEOOGICAL SURVEY.
M ASSIGNMENT OF A *ASSIC AGE TO THE 1UANN SALT AFTER
SCOTT. HATES AND FITZ (rM
HAZZARt SPOONER AND ULANF ED (9M1CONSIE THIS FORMATION
TO E OF ERMAN AGE,


Plate 3. Mesozoic stratigraphic cross section A-A'.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45 25



It may be inferred that the eastward continuation of the structural
strike and depositional faces of the Mesozoic horizons which underlie
the Citronelle field lies south of the eastward extension of cross sec-
tional line A-A' in a trough approximately outlined by Antoine and Harding
(1963, fig. 2) on the basis of seismic refractions. As approximately
depicted, these authors show that the axis of this trough lies offshore
about 40-50 miles and parallels the coast eastward from its essential
termination; somewhat eastward of latitude 85 degrees we st which passes
through Apalachicola;that the basin is about 50 miles wide at the 12,000-
foot contour level; and that it is filled with Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedi-
ments with a thickness in excess of about 15,000 feet.



























































































































































i





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


BIBLIOGRAPHY


Antoine, John W.
19U3 (and Harding, James L.) Structure of the continental
shelf, northeastern Gulf of Mexico (Preliminary report):
The A. and M. College of Texas, Department of Oceano-
graphy and Meteorology, Project 286-Reference 63-13T,
College Station, Texas, 18 p., 9 fig., 2 tables.
Basoom, Willard
1961 A Hole in the Bottom of the Sea: Doubleday and Company,
Garden City, New York.
Forgotson, J. M., Jr.
1957 Stratigraphy of Comanchean Cretaceous Trinity group: Am.
Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 41, p. 2328.
Frasoogna, X. M., editor
1957 Mesozoic-Paleozoic producing area of Mississippi and
Alabama: Mississippi Geol. Soc., v. 1.
Harding, James L.
1963 (see Antoine, John W.)
Hazzard, R. T.
1947 (and Spooner, W. T., Blanpied, B. W.) Notes on the strati-
graphy of the formations which underlie the Smackover
Limestone in South Arkansas, Northeast Texas and North
Louisiana: Shreveport Geol. Soo. 1945 Ref. Rept., v. 2, p.
483-503.
International Oil Scouts Association
1962 International Oil and Gas Development Yearbook, 1962
(review of 1961): Part 11 (Production), v. 32, 576 p.
McCoy, Henry J.
1958 An Electric Log and Sample Study of the Citronelle Oil
field, Mobile County, Alabama: Unpublished master's the-
sis, Florida State University, p. 1-40, Florida State Uni-
versity Strozier Library, file no. 557.61 M 131 e.
Raasch, Albert C., Jr.
1954 The Sunniland oil field of Collier County, Florida: Unpub-
lished Master's thesis, Florida State University, p. 1-33,
Florida State University Strozier Library, file no. 553.28
R 111 s.
1955 Sunniland oil field of Collier County, Florida (abstract):
Meeting program of eastern section, Geol. Soc. America
Bull., p. 17.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Scott, K R.
1961 (and Hayes, W. E., Fietz, R. P.) Geology of the Eagle
Mills Formation: Transactions, v. 11, p. 1-14, Gulf Coast
Assoc. Geol. Soo.
Stepheneon, L. W.
1942 (and others) Correlations of the outcropping Cretaoeous for-
mations of the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains And Trans.
Pecos, Texas:Geol. Soo. America Bull., v. 58, p. 435-448.
Tolar, Henry N.
1962 Producing wells by fields in Mississippi, Prepared for the
Petroleum Department of the Deposit Guaranty Bank and
Trust Company, of Jackson, Mississippi: a leaflet.


















APPENDIX I
EXPLORATORY WELL INFORMATION, 1963














CLAY COUNTY


Permit
no. FGS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data


306 W-6299 E. I. du Pont de
Nemours


Highlands Plant Waste 500' N and 301' W of SE cor.
well No. 1 of SW quarter sec. 17, T 5 5,
R 23 E


Elev: 175, Gr. (est.)
Comp: June 28, 1963
T.D: 3509' (dr.)
(probably in E.
Ordovician.)


REMARKS: (1) Casing record: 24" at 300'; 11 3/4" at 2, 035'.

(2) 'This well is to be used to dispose of non-toxic waste water from the Highlands plant. A permit
was required for drilling the hole in view of the fact that it was designed to penetrate below fresh
water levels.

(3) The Induction Electrical Log indicates that the first interval of significantly brackish water occurs
from 1, 820 to 1, 950 feet, with a sharp increase in salinities at 1, 990 feet. The equivalent sodium chloride
below a depth of 2,015 feet exceeds 15, 000 (log analysis by Schlumberger Well Surveying Corporation.)
(Casing was set at a depth of 2, 035 feet.

(4) Porous zones encountered were:


Porous zones
Interval Thickness
(feet) (feet)


1815-1946
2590-2806
3150-3212


131
216
62


Porosity, per
Sonic log
(%)

range: 12 to 23
aug: 23
range: 16 to 23






CLAY COUNTY


Permit
no, FGS no, Company or owner Well name Location Well data

REMARKS: (cont.)

(5) Much of the drilling was characterized by very hard formations interspersed with porous
zones in which circulation was lost, and drilling was quite slow. Probably this accounts for
the fact that drilling was discontinued almost 1, 000 feet short of the originally proposed depth
of 4, 500 feet.
The average penetration rates in feet per hour for drilling and reaming operations were:

Hole Size Interval Average Penetration Rate ( feet per hour)
(inches) (feet) Drilling Reaming

Drilling:
15 0-1549 8.5
10 5/8 1549-3507 6.9

Reaming:
15 to 30 0-326 8.4
15 to 22 326-2031 3.2
10 5/8 to 15 1549-2020 4.5

(6) The top of the Paleozoic section, as determined by the penetration log, was reached at 3,487 feet. A
bottom-hole sample at 3, 509 feet consisting primarily of quartzite associated with black shale stringers
contained a fossil fragment which, according to Jean M. Berdon of the U. S. G. S. appears to be part of a
large phosphatic brachiopod of a type that is fairly common in the Early Ordovician of Florida; also, the
lithologies appear to agree with those in other wells in Florida and Alabama dated as Early Ordovician by
means of fossils.

(7) Logs: Induction-Electrical (310'-3,438'); Sonic (1700'-3,435'); Caliper (1,600'-2,228').

(8) Other surveys: Formation tester (test depth, 2, 028';) to recover salt water sample.







CHARLOTTE COUNTY

Permit
no. FGS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data


Gulf Oil Corporation


No. 1 Stevens Estate


Center of NW of
SE, sec. 24, T 42 S,
R 24 E


Elev:-approx. 25'
above MSL
Comp: Jan. 2, 1964
T.D. -12,459'


REMARKS: (1)


Casing record: Drove 2 joints (30') of 24" drive pipe and set at 30'. Set 16" conductor pipe at 555' with 200 sacks
of Florida Portland neat cement. Ran (to a depth of 4,115') 4,097. 20' of 9 5/8" 40 pound J-55 casing with 9 5/8"
Howco DV tool and metal petal basket at 1, 773.44'; Cemented around 9 5/8" casing shoe with 300 sacks of Florida
Portland neat cement, and also pumped 50 sacks of Florida Portland neat cement through the DV tool at 1, 773.44'.


(2) The contractor for this well was the Larco Drilling Company.

(3) Cores: Took 2 conventional cores at 11, 374-11,417 feet and 12,290-12, 346 feet; no descriptions provided. Attempted
38 sidewall cores, recovering 12, at various depths extending from 8,416 to 12, 347 feet; no descriptions provided.


(4) Drill stem tests run in this hole were:


Depth in feet and
(part of section tested)

11,320-11,356
(Upper Sunniland "pay"
zone)

12,184-12,323
carbonatess included in
lower part of massive
anhydrite section)


Chokes,
in inches

S- top
3/8 bottom


same


Bottom Hole Flowing,
and closed-in pressure (PSI)

1,625-4,809


5,322-5,498


Recovery, and
time tool was
open

37 bbls, salt
water in 30 min.


405 bbls. salt water in
1 hr. and 20 min.


(5) Logs: Induction-Electrical, 566-4,115'; Dual Induction-Laterolog, 4,115-12,442'; Integrated Sonic Caliper-Gamma
Ray, 566 12, 395'; Formation Density, 3,150 12, 357'; Open hole temperature, 500 4,110.









GADSDEN COUNTY


Permit
no, FGS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data


W.6217 C. E. Prince and
Willaim Bradley
Munroe ( a co-venture


No, 1 Ermine, M
Owenby


2,080' S and 950' E of NW
corner of sec. 29, T 2 N,
R 3 W, (about 2 miles SE of
Quincy near St. Hwy 268),


Elev: 210' D,F,
Comp: Feb. 26,
1963
T, D: 7,029' (in
Lower Trimity-
sediments of
Lower Cretaceous
age).


REMARKS: (1) This test is the second of two wells (the other being the No. 1 Bowman dry hole, terminated at a depth
of 4,196 feet in 1962) drilled by the operators on a 14, 000 acre farmout block secured from the Sun Oil
Company.

(2) The drilling site was selected on the basis of seismic information as interpreted by the operators, who
hoped to drill an east-west trending normal fault. Well control indicates, however, that this test did
not cut a fault in the Upper Cretaceous section, which contains several prospective horizons. Furthermore,
it appears probable that no significant faulting was present to the total depth of the well.

(3) On top of Lower Tuscaloosa sediments this well proved to be 18 feet lower than the Oles and Naylor No. 1
Florida Power Company well, located about 3 miles to the east southeast.

(4) Sample electrical log and drilling time correlations indicate that this well bottomed in possible Rodessa-
Pine Island sediments.

(5) Drilling contractor for this hole was the B and N Drilling Company of Laurel, Mississippi; contract price
was $5. 00 per foot. Drilling of the well required 17 days, with drilling time varying from as fast as about
5 feet per minute to as slow as 9 minutes per foot.


305








GADSDEN COUNTY


Permit
no. FOS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data



REMARKS: (cont.)
0
(6) This well was converted to use as a water well; a cement plug of 80 sacks of Portland cement was
set from 1, 000 feet up to 756. feet.

(7) Logs: Induction-Electrical (487'-7, 028')

(8) Other surveys: None 0





0
9f&







ORANGE COUNTY


Permit
no. FCS no Company or owner Well name Location Well data

W.3673 Geotechnical Corp- No. 1 Terry Center of SW SE Elev: 99, D, F,
oration (former sec. Z1, T 23 S, R 31 E. Comp: Nov. 13, 1955
operator was Warren Recomp: May 1, 1963
Petroleum Corporation) T, D. (orig): 6, 589'
T. D. (recomp): 6, 582' .

REMARKS: (1) This well was recompleted so that a seismometer could be installed for the Defense Department. The work was
done under a permit granted April 23, 1963 to the Geotechnical Corporation of Dallas.

(2) The original hole, carried to a depth of 6, 589 feet, reached the top of the Lower Cretaceous at 5,445 feet, and the
top of basement at 6, 550 feet, According to Paul L. Applin (1951, p. 2, fig 1) basement in this area consists of o
Pre-Cambrian (?) granite, diorite, and metamorphic rocks.
8
(3) Casing record for original hole: 20" casing set in a 24" hole at 198' with 250 sacks of regular cement using a pump
pressure of 1,000 pounds; 13 3/8" stainless steel tubing set in a 17" hole at 596' with 500 sacks of regular cement
using a pump pressure of 1, 000 pounds; 9 5/8" stainless steel tubing set in a 124" hole at 3,234' with 400 sacks
of regular cement using a pump pressure of 1,000 pounds.

(4) Additional casing run upon recompletion: Hole was cleaned out to 6, 577'. Circulation was lost at undisclosed in-
terval(s) between 3,234' (the 9 5/8" casing seat) and total depth; presumably this explains why the reconditioned
hole was not carried approximately 68 feet deeper to the proposed depth of 6, 650 feet.

(5) Logs: Electrical (596'- 6,589'); Microlog ( 1,722'- 6,586'); Gamma Ray-Neutron (1, 225'- 6,588').

(6) Other surveys: 215 cores from 5, 215'- 5,608'.






PINELLAS COUNTY- OFFSHORE


Permit
no. FGS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data

304 California Company- No. 3 Florida State Lat. 28005', 32" N; Elev:-36',D.F.
Coastal Petroleum Co. Lease 224-B Long. 82'52', 50" W(about Comp: April 11,1963
15, 900' W of mean low water T. D: -10,600' (approx.
line at the N end of Honeymoon i, 050' below top of
Island). Sunniland "pay" equi-
valent).

REMARIKS: (1) Casing record: 26" to 21'; set 13 3/8" at 544' with 350 sacks common cement; set 9 5/8" at 4, 386' with 750
sacks common cement

(2) The City of Dunedin rejected the application of the California Company to drill in offshore waters lying within
the 3-mile boundary limit which it claims, on the ground that drilling activities would be inimical to the develop-
ment of the $4. 5 million Caladesi-Honeymoon Island complex. The company then obtained a permit from the U. S.
Corps of Engineers to drill at a site 60 feet beyond the 3-mile boundary claimed by the City; the final location
was about 0. 88 mile west southwest of the point at which the company originally had intended to spud the test.

(3) Water depth at the well location is 20 feet.

(4) The hole was drilled with the California Company's S-45 barges and derrick supplied with Rowan Drilling Company
motors and drawworks, and on which Schlumberger logging equipment and Halliburton plugging and completion O
equipment were installed. It is reported that the California Company calculated its cost for drilling and auxill-
iary equipment used in this operation at $6,000.00 a day.

(5) On top of a thick shale section, reached at a depth of 9,915' is the No. 3 State Lease 224-B well, (this marker is
370 feet below lithology believed to be the Sunniland "pay zone" equivalent) this test is 246 feet higher in structural
elevation than is the Coastal No. 1 Larsh well, located 16 miles to the southeast. This probably is not the result
of a structural anomaly, however, since the difference in structural elevation can be accounted for by a regional
dip of 15 feet per mile.


00
-4








PINELLAS COUNTY OFFSHORE


Permit
no. FOS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data




REMARKS: (cont.)
(6) It is possible that a brown clastic lithology, here consisting of argillaceous and slightly calcareous silts which
become predominant at a depth of 10,455 feet, represents the Hosston Formation (Coahuilan Series of Lower
Cretaceous age).

(7) Logs: Induction-Electrical (541-10, 523 feet); Gamma Ray-Neutron (4, 349-10, 317); Sonic (541-10, 291)

(8) Other surveys: (a) A velocity survey was run in this hole to a reported depth of about 8, 800 feet. (b)
Took 48 sidewall samples, with recovery from 17, no shows on florescence reported.






TAYLOR COUNTY


Permit
no. FGS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data

308 Wgi-1766 Mattaliano No. 1 Buckeye Cellulose NW corner of SI of Elev: 14' (topo)
NE,NE sec. 12, T 4 S, Comp: July 19,1963
R4E. T.D:67'
Proposed depth: 5, 000'

REMARKS: (1) Casing record: ran 14" to 18'; ran 12" to 50': Then 21 sacks of cement were used with about 5 sacks being poured
into the bottom of the 12" casing (subsequently to be drilled out), and the remaining quantity of approximately 16
sacks being grouted behind the two strings of pipe; most of it went behind the 12-inch pipe.

(2) This hole was abandoned at 67 feet after lost circulation in a boulder zone, beginning a short distance below the
12-inch casing seat (at 50 feet), could not be regained within 36 hours of operating time.

(3) The Buckeye Cellulose Corporation has accepted responsibility for the abandoned hole which will be converted to
use as a fire fighting facility. The water is fresh and drinkable.

(4) This well is located on an 80, 000 acre lease lying in the southwestern corner of Taylor County and in the general
area of a gravity high. The operator's primary objectives were to drill a stratigraphic pinchout, or a fault trap,
of Atkinson sands containing Woodbine fauna of Upper Cretaceous age.

(5) This site is about 50' west of the location originally spudded by this operator as the No. 1 Buckeye Cellulose (on
July 4, 1963). This original location was abandoned after only 16 feet of depth because drilling in the loose gravel
caused the cellar area to wash out rather badly; the contractor did not want to continue operations which he felt
might cause his rig to tip over.

(6) The rotary rig contractor during these operations was the B and N Drilling Company, of Laurel, Mississippi. It
is understood that contract price was $5. 00 per foot.

(7) Logs: None

(8) Other surveys: None








TAYLOR COUNT Y
Q


Permit
no. FOS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data


W.6505 Mattaliano


No. 2 Buckeye Cellulose 1800, 32' N of S line and
2286.03' S of E line of
sec. 11, T 4 S, R 4 E.


Elev: 14'
Comp: Sept, 5,1963
T. D: 180' ( in
Ocala Limestone
of Eocene Jackson
age).


REMARKS: (1) This hole was abandoned because of crookedness. The site was 32 feet south of the same operator's subse-
quently drilled No. 2-A Buckeye Cellulose well.

(2) Casing record: Drove 16" (ID) casing to 15'4"; ran 12" to 110'. Upon abandonment, only the 16" casing was
left in hole; the 12" casing had been pulled in an attempt to straighten the hole.

(3) This hole was drilled with cable tools, with Rowe Brothers of Tallahassee, as contractor; contract price
was reported to be $20. 00 an hour.

(4) This well was used to supply water for the drilling of the No. 2-A test. Fresh water rose in the hole to a
height of 5 feet below surface, and pumping through 3-inch tubing did not appear to lower this level. The
well was turned over to the Buckeye Cellulose Corporation as a fire fighting facility.

(5) Surveys: None






TAYLOR COUNTY

Permit
no FGS no. Company or owner Well name Location Well data


No. 2-A Buckeye
Cellulose


1832. 32' N of S line
and 2286. 03' W of E
line of sec. 11, T 4 S,
R4 E.


Elev: 14' (topo)
Comp: Dec. 20,
1963
T. D: 4, 115 (in
Lower Cretaceous)


REMARKS: (1) This site is 32 feet north of the location of the same operator's No. 2 Buckeye Cellulose well, a cable
tool hole abandoned on September 5, 1963 at 180 feet because of crookedness.

(2) Casing record: Operator set three welded-together barrels in a hand-dug hole with 35 sacks of common
cement; this prevented the cellar area from caving in as it did in the No. 1 Buckeye Cellulose well. Set 8 5/8"
with 130 sacks common cement mixed with 2% Ca C12.

(3) According to the Induction-Electrical log, and also the drilling time log, this well reached the top of the
Upper Atkinson sand at 3,400 feet. On this marker, the well is at about the same structural elevation as the
Humble Oil and Refining Company, No. 1 Hodges well located about 13 miles to the east. Regional control
indicates that there may be a saddle between the two wells.

(4) Mud circulation history:


0-96 feet
96-120 feet
120-4,115 feet (T. D. )


No circulation
Circulation established
Poor circulation established after cotton seed hulls were added to the mud.


(5) Plugging information: set 75 sacks of common cement from 500 to 700 feet; set 10 sacks from 240 to 260 feet;
set 7 sacks to seal the casing at the surface.

(6) Logs: Induction-Electrical to 250'-3,945'.

(7) Other surveys: Took 9 sidewall samples, with recovery from all; all consisted of chalk or
shaly chalk, some with a sulfur odor; no shows.


Mattaliano

































































































































































































































I


















APPENDIX II









INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


THE "S-45",
THE OFFSHORE RIG USED BY THE CALIFORNIA COMPANY
IN DRILLING THEIR NO. 3 STATE LEASE 224-B WELL

The investment of The California Company in this rig, the S-45, is
about one-quarter of a million dollars, and this is for the barges and
derrick only. This does not include other items installed and leased to
The California Company but owned by other companies such as:
Rowan Drilling Company motors and drawworks
Schlumberger logging equipment
Halliburton plugging and completion
The California Company figures its cost for equipment operating the
rig at $6,000.00 a day.
The rig is serviced by an operating crew of about twenty men. The
California Company uses only supervisory and technical personnel, con-
sisting of two engineers and two geologists. Rowan provides tool pushers
and roughnecks. Roustabouts are supplied by one labor contracting firm,
and cooks and helpers are supplied by another such firm. Yet another
firm provides the three auxiliary transportation boats. The men work 12
days and are off 6.
The unit consists of a standard derrick about 125 feet high and the
barge serves as a stable platform. The barge also contains a large pipe
deck, helicopter port, motor room, and quarters for personnel. Access
from transport boats to the deck of the unit is by crane. Personnel hold
onto the outside of a birdcage-like rope wicker basket. A lift of about 40
feet is required to transfer personnel to the deck of the unit.
The unit rests on four large pontoons which are filled with water and
sunk to rest on the ocean floor. Extending upward from each of these
pontoons are two straight legs, each of which appeared to be approximate-
ly 2 feet in diameter. These legs are jacked upward, so that the upper
part of the unit rests on them. The raising is accomplished by hydraulic
jacks which are similar to mud pumps in operation. To dismount the rig,
an operation which on this job required about 15 hours, the water is
pumped from the foundation pontoons and they are floated. The derrick is
left upright. In case of a bad storm, the pontoons are again sunk, and the
unit stays in one place until the storm abates. The unit is towed from
one location to another by two tugs at a speed of about 3 miles an hour.
The trip from Tampa to New Orleans requires about 8 days.
This unit drillbd in water 20 feet deep, about 3 miles offshore, to a
depth of 10,600 feet.
Other offshore drilling units: The California Company has two
other units, both larger than this one. The largest is about four times
the size of this unit, has a complement of sixty men and will drill in
water 1I0 to 200 feet deep. There are oil well drilling units which will
drill in water 500 feet deep or more, according to the Winter, 1963 publi-
cation circulated to the employees of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana).
Shell has leases covered by 600 feet of water offshore from Louisiana.
For purposes of research, the Mohole rig drilled in water more than
10,000 feet deep, cutting cores through about 500 feet of section; it is
reported the Mohole rig will drill, ultimately, an offshore hole 3,000 feet
deep in water about 13,0.00 feet deep (Bascom, 1961).



































































































































'I


















APPENDIX III






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


This is the standard form as revised in 1963, and contains
the minimum requirements for oil and gas leasing. This form is
subject, in individual cases, to the modification of specified
requirements and to the inclusion of additional requirements,
provided such changes do not conflict with the statutes.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


STATE DRILLING LEASE


NO.-

THIS INDENTURE OF LEASE, made pursuant to the provisions of

Chapter 22824, Laws of Florida, Acts of 1945, as amended, by and

between

hereinafter referred to as "Lessor" and



hereinafter referred to as "Lessee".

WITNESSETH: Whereas, Lessor has performed all acts required by

law as conditions precedent to execution of this lease and whereas,

sealed bids submitted for this lease were duly opened by Lessor at

a meeting for that purpose, held in the City of Tallahassee, Florida,

on the day of A. D. 196_ and it was thereupon,

found and determined that



has submitted the highest and best bid for the lease on said premises,

which bid is by the said Lessor accepted and approved.

NOW, THEREFORE, the Lessor on this the day of

196_, by authority of said law and in consideration of the payment by

Lessee, of the sum of $ cash consideration, receipt

whereof is hereby acknowledged, and of the royalties, covenants,

stipulations and conditions contained herein, and hereby agreed to

be paid, observed and performed by Lessee, does hereby demise, grant,

lease and let exclusively unto the said Lessee, the said land

described in Exhibit A, which is made a part hereof, for the purpose

of investigating, exploring, prospecting, drilling of bore-holes

for the discovery and production of oil, gas, sulphur, salt and/or

other brines from the leased premises and for the laying of pipe

lines, building of roads, tanks, power stations, communications

equipment and other structures and equipment needed to produce, save,







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


take care of, treat, transport and own said products and if the lands

covered by this lease exceed 640 acres, to house its employees engaged

in drilling and/or production.

For the purpose of calculating rental payments hereunder, the

land covered by this lease is estimated to comprise acres,

whether it actually comprises more or less, and each tract described

in Exhibit A is estimated to comprise the number of acres stipulated

in said Exhibit A, whether it actually comprises more or less.

The term "products" used herein shall in the absence of other

meaning by immediate context, include oil, gas, sulphur, salt and/or

other brines.

The term "production" used hereinafter shall mean only such oil,

gas, sulphur, salt and/or other brines as shall have been reached by

the drilling of a bore-hole and that such products have been made

available and accessible and can be removed, in commercial and paying

quantities through and by means of a drilled hole.

1. Subject to the other provisions herein contained, this lease

shall be for a term of _____ years from the date hereof (called the

primary term) and as long thereafter as there is production from said land

or operations are being carried on in good faith and in a workmanlike

and diligent manner with no cessation of more than thirty consecutive

days, it being understood that this lease will terminate at the

expiration of its primary term in the absence of drilling or reworking

operations or production from said land in paying quantities.

Upon the expiration of the primary term or at any time or times

thereafter when this lease is not otherwise maintained, this lease

shall remain in force only as long as operations for drilling or

reworking are prosecuted on said land or upon land pooled with the

land herein leased or any part thereof, with no cessation of more

than sixty (60) consecutive days, but in the absence of production

in paying quantities upon completion of such drilling or reworking

operations, in progress on the date of expiration of the primary







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


term, then this lease shall automatically terminate upon the lapse

of sixty days in which no reworking or drilling has been prosecuted.

No drilling operations shall be conducted upon any submerged

lands leased herein, under the public waters, landward of any bulkhead

line heretofore or hereafter established pursuant to statutory

authority until Lessee has filed with Lessor written consent of the

owner of upland to which such drilling location is riparian.

No drilling.operation shall be conducted within any public road

right of way upon or across submerged lands in the public waters nor at

any location in the public waters which will materially interfere with

any riparian or other right vested in any owner, nor shall the grant

of this lease interfere with any right of the Lessor to make conveyances

of submerged lands pursuant to statutory authority, nor any right to

dredge and/or fill submerged lands in compliance with statutes appli-

cable thereto and all such parcels so sold shall automatically be

released from the terms and conditions of this lease upon the vesting

of title to said parcels in such purchasers and appropriate rental

adjustment made at next anniversary date of this lease. Such sales

shall be made subject to the express provision that during the effective

period of this lease, no lease for oil, gas, sulphur, salt and/or other

brines shall be made by the purchaser thereof to other than the

holder of this lease.

2. The Lessee shall commence and complete operations for the

drilling of at least one test well on the lands covered hereby within

the first two and one-half years period of the term of this lease,

and shall commence and complete operations for the drilling of at

least one additional well in each succeeding two and one-half years

period of the term of this lease until the total number of wells

drilled shall equal one-half the number of sections of land embraced

in this lease, and, after commencing such operations shall prosecute

same in good faith and with reasonable diligence and in a workman-

like manner to discover and to develop said land for production until






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


such well be completed or abandoned. The Lessee at the time the

drilling of each well is commenced shall file with the Lessor a

written declaration describing the two sections of land to which

such well shall apply. If no well shall be commenced and continued

to completion with reasonable diligence and in a workmanlike manner

to discover and develop said land for production until such well

is completed or abandoned within the first two and one-half years

period of the term of the lease, the entire lease shall be void.

If no additional well shall be commenced and continued to completion

with reasonable diligence and in workmanlike manner to discover

and develop said land for production until such well is completed

or abandoned, then this lease at the end of such applicable two and

one-half years period of the term of the lease shall become forfeited

and void as to all of the land covered hereby, except that upon which

wells have been drilled in accordance with the provisions of said

Chapter 22824, Laws of Florida, Acts of 1945, as amended, that is to

say, this lease shall, in such event, become forfeited and void as

to all lands covered hereby, except those included in the sections

designated by the Lessee, as hereinabove provided, as the sections to

which a well, commenced and completed in accordance with the provisions

of this Section 2 shall apply. It is further understood and agreed

that the only penalty for failure to drill such well or wells is the

cancellation or forfeiture of this lease or a portion thereof, as

hereinabove provided.

All wells required to be drilled under the provisions of this

Section 2 shall be drilled in an efficient, diligent and workmanlike

manner and in accordance with the:best practice to a depth of 6000

feet or to the top of the Lower Cretaceous, whichever is deeper as

determined by the State Geologist, before abandonment thereof, unless

production in paying quantities has been accomplished at a lesser depth.

3. This lease shall terminate'as to both parties on any anniver-







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


sary date hereof as to all land covered hereby on which rentals are

payable hereunder on such anniversary date as hereinafter provided,

unless Lessee shall on or before anniversary date pay in advance to

Lessor an annual rental of $ per acre,





which shall be increased or decreased as hereinafter provided, for

the number of acres included in such land on which rentals are so

payable.

After the first two years of the term of this lease, the

rental above provided for shall be increased by 5 % of such

original amount annually, unless increase, in compliance with

requirements of Sec. 253.53 Florida Statutes, 1961, is required in

the provisions of the preceding paragraph herein.

Rental shall be payable under this lease on the anniversary

date on all lands then covered by this lease, except land in a

section applicable to a drilled well or upon which section production

in paying quantities has been obtained or upon which section drilling

or reworking operations have been conducted in good faith and in

workmanlike manner within thirty (30) days next preceding the

anniversary date.

The rentals hereinabove provided for may be paid by check or

draft of Lessee, with exchange, payable to Lessor and mailed or

delivered to Lessor at its office in the Elliot Building in

Tallahassee, Florida, on or before the anniversary date for which

such rent is payable.

The cash consideration is the consideration for this lease,

according to its terms, and shall not be allocated as a mere rental

for a period.

Lessee may relinquish the rights granted hereunder, either

as to the entire area covered hereby or any portion thereof at any







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


time by filing a release for record in the County where the land

released is situated and filing a duplicate original, certified copy.

or photostatic copy, of the release with Lessor within 30 days from

the date it is filed for record, and thereafter no rental shall be

payable hereunder as to the acreage so released and Lessee shall be

released from further obligations as to such release acreage.

4. If after production is obtained from the land covered by

this lease, such production should cease, the lease may be maintained

if it be within the primary term of commencing or resuming the payment

of rentals or commencing operations for drilling or reworking said

land, in good faith, and in a workmanlike and diligent manner on, or

before, the anniversary date next ensuing after the expiration of

sixty days, or if it be after the expiration of the primary term,

this lease may be maintained in force and effect by commencing and

continuing operations for drilling or reworking said land for

production on, or before, sixty days after the cessation of produc-

tion and prosecuting same with diligence and in a workmanlike manner

with no cessation for moiethan thirty consecutive days, and if such

operations within a reasonable time thereafter result in production

from this lease in paying quantities, this lease shall remain in

effect thereafter as long as there is production therefrom in paying

quantities.

The amount of the annual rental payments to be made under this

paragraph shall be governed by the provisions of Section 3 of this

lease.

5. When production from the land covered by this lease is

secured, the Lessee agrees to pay or cause to be paid to Lessor,

during the term hereof, the following royalties:

(a) On oil 1/8 of the gross production from this
lease, the same to be delivered to Lessor at the
wells or to the credit of Lessors into the pipe
line to which the wells may be connected or in
lieu of delivering such royalty oil in kind, Lessee








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


may pay Lessor th- value thereof at the wells on
the date of production.

(b) On gas, including casinghead gas or other
gaseous substance, produced from this lease and
sold or used off the premises or for the extraction
of gasoline or other products therefrom, the value
at the well of 1/8 of the gas so sold or used.
On gas sold at the well, the value thereof shall
be 1/8 of the amount realized from such sale.

(c) On sulphur, salt and/or other brines, $_
per long ton, marketed.

The royalties hereinabove provided for shall be computed after

deducting any oil or gas reasonably used for the production thereof.

Lessee shall have the right to use any water that may be on the

premises for operation hereunder and the right to use so much of

the surface of the land covered hereby as may be reasonably necessary

for developing and operating on this lease for production and for

storing, marketing, and transporting the products therefrom, such

use to be conducted under conditions of least injury to the surface

of the land.

It is agreed that if Lessor or the State of Florida owns the

title to or an interest in the oil and gas under the land covered by this

lease less than the entire fee simple estate, then the royalties and

rentals herein provided for shall be reduced proportionately.

6. All royalties due Lessor shall be paid promptly and invoiced

in accordance with acceptable practice of the oil and gas industry,

subject however, to accounting and audit as the Lessor may reasonably

require.

7. For the purpose of examining the production therefrom, Lessor

or their authorized representatives or agents, shall, at all reason-

able times, have access to the wells, gauge books, oil and gas meters,

tanks, reservoirs, sump holes, buildings, and other structures and

appliances placed upon the land herein leased by Lessee.

8. The State shall have a first lien upon all production from







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


the lands described in Exhibit A to secure the payment of all unpaid

royalty and other sums of money that may become due under this lease.

9. Lessee shall have the right at any time while this lease

is in force and effect, or within a reasonable time after the

expiration of this lease, to remove all property and fixtures placed

by Lessee on the land covered hereby, including the right to draw

and remove all casing, provided Lessee has complied with all obli-

gations under this lease at the time of such removal. When required

by Lessor, Lessee will bury all pipe lines below ordinary plow depth,

and no well shall be drilled within two hundred (200) feet of any

residence or barn now on said land without Lessor's consent.

10. This lease contemplates the reasonable development of the

production from the land described in Exhibit A, including the

drilling of as many wells as a reasonably prudent operator would

drill under the same or similar circumstances. In the event

production in paying quantities should be brought in on adjacent

land and within three hundred (300) feet of and draining the leased.

premises, or acreage pooled therewith, Lessee agrees to drill such

offset wells as a reasonably prudent operator would drill under the

same or similar circumstances.

11. A log of each well drilled on this lease shall be filed

with the Lessor, at its office in Tallahassee, Florida, within

thirty (30) days after such well shall have been completed or

abandoned, and the correctness of such log must be sworn to by

Lessee, its agent or driller, and it must be accompanied by a plat

showing the exact location of said well.

12. Lessee is hereby given the right to pool or combine the

acreage covered by this lease or any parts thereof with other land,

lease or leases in the immediate vicinity thereof, and whether State

land or privately owned land, when reasonably necessary to conform with

drilling units established by the State Board of Conservation or to

conform with any pooling or integration order issued by such Board.








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


Operations for drilling, reworking or production on any part of

a pooled unit composed in whole or in part of the land covered hereby

shall be considered as operations for drilling, reworking or

production on land covered by this lease and the entire acreage

constituting such unit or units shall be treated for all purposes as

if the same were included in this lease, except that in lieu of che

royalties elsewhere herein specified, Lessor shall receive on produc-

tion from each of such units the proportion of the royalties herein

stipulated that the amount of their ownership in the mineral rights

in the acreage placed in the particular unit involved bears to the

entirety of the mineral right in such unit.

13. In developing the lands covered hereby, Lessee shall be

liable for all damages to lakes, shores pr beaches on or adjacent to

said lands proximately resulting from any negligent acts or omissions

of Lessee in its operations on said lands, and likewise, said Lessee

shall be liable for all damages to crops or citrus groves on or

adjacent to said lands proximately resulting from negligent acts

or omissions of Lessee in its operations on said lands. It is

further agreed that if for any cause, whether from negligence or

not, any oil, salt water or other similar substance should escape

and flow into any lake, body of water, or onto any beach or shore

on or adjacent to the lands covered hereby, then in such event, the

Lessee shall be obligated immediately to use such methods as a

reasonably prudent operator would use under the same or similar

circumstances to remedy and abate such pollution.

14. This lease shall not be assigned in whole, or in part, on

any land covered hereby, until and except the Lessor shall approve

and consent in writing to such assignment. Subject to the preceding

sentence, the covenants, conditions, and agreements contained herein

shall extend to and be binding upon the successors or assigns of the






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Lessee herein.

In the event of assignment hereof in whole or in part, in

accordance with the provisions hereof, liability for breach of

any obligation hereunder shall rest exclusively upon the owner of

this lease or a portion thereof, Who commits such breach. If this

lease is assigned in accordance with its terms as to a segregated

portion of the land covered hereby, rentals payable hereunder shall

be apportionable as between the several leasehold owners ratably

on an acreage basis and default in rental payment by one shall not

affect the rights of other leasehold owners hereunder.

15. If Lessee is unable to secure a valid drilling permit

to drill a well, or if by reason of war, labor troubles, or lack

of materials caused either by the exercise of governmental authority

or by strikes, lack of labor, or transportation, or as a result of

flood, storm, fire or blowout, the Lessee is prevented from commencing

or completing operations for the drilling of any well or wells

required under this lease, then the time during which Lessee is so

prevented from carrying out the terms of said lease shall: nbt be

counted against Lessee, and Lessee shall automatically have that

additional period within which to comply with the terms of this

lease. In this connection, Lessee shall at all times be required

to use reasonable diligence to overcome such difficulties as

promptly as the circumstances will permit.

16. If the Lessee should fail or refuse to make payment of any

sum due either as rental on this lease or for royalty on the production

within thirty days after it shall become due, or if the Lessee

or its authorized agent should knowingly make any false return or

false report concerning production, royalty, or drilling, or if the

Lessee should fail or refuse to drill any offset well or wells in good

faith as required by law and the rules and regulations adopted by the

State of Florida, or if the lessee or its agent should refuse the






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


proper authority access to the records pertaining to operations

under this lease, or if such Lessee or its authorized agent should

knowingly fail or refuse to furnish the log of any well, as provided

herein, or if Lessee shall knowingly violate any of the material

provisions of this lease and should Lessee fail, within thirty

days after written notice to Lessee by Lessor setting out the

matters as to which Lessor considers Lessee in default, to take

reasonable action to remedy any such default this lease shall be

subject to forfeiture by the Lessor, and when forfeited the area

shall again be subject to lease to the highest bidder, under the

same regulations controlling the original sale of leases. However,

when a proper showing is satisfactorily made to Lessor, the rights

of Lessee under this lease may be reinstated, provided the rights

of third parties have not intervened.

17. Notwithstanding any of the provisions, covenants or

stipulations contained in this lease, should there be any conflict

in any of the provisions of this lease with the law governing the

issuance and operation of leases on the area herein described,

in that event the provisions of such law shall be written into this

lease and shall control.

18. The Lessee joins in this lease for the purpose of

indicating its assent to all the terms and provisions thereof,

and agrees to be bound thereby.

19. All terms and express or implied covenants of this lease

shall be subject to all Federal and State law-s, executive orders,

rules or regulations, and this lease shall not be terminated in

whole, or in part, nor Lessee held liable in damages, for failure

to comply herewith, if compliance is prevented by, or if such

failure is the result of any such law, order, rule or regulation.






60 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

IH WI'ESS WHEREOP, the



the Lessor, have hereunto subscribed their names and have caused

the seal of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Florida

to be hereunto affixed, and the Lessee has caused this instrument

to be executed in its name by its President, and its

corporate seal to be affixed, attested by its Secretary,

as of the date aforesaid.





















APPENDIX IV










INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 45


OIL COMPANIES WITH EXPLORATION, PRODUCTION
OR RESEARCH OFFICES IN FLORIDA


Oil companies with exploration offices in Florida in 1963 were
Coastal Petroleum Corporation, Mobil Oil Company, Sun Oil Company,
and The California Company.
The office of The California Company, located in Pensacola, Florida,
will close as of January 10,1964, after which date correspondence with
the company should be addressed to:
P. O. Box 822
Jackson, Mississippi 39205
Mr. M. D. Horton, formerly of the Pensacola office, will be in charge
of matters pertaining to Florida.
The only producing company in Florida is the Humble Oil and Re-
fining Company, operator of Sunniland field.
The Gulf Oil Corporation and the International Petroleum Company,
Limited, have established important foreign exploration offices (primari-
ly for activities in the Western Hemisphere) in Coral Gables. The Shell
Oil Company maintains, in Coral Gables, a very active research staff
interested primarily in studies related to oceanographic work.










FLRD GEOLOSk ( IC SUfRiW


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