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 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Abstract and introduction
 Drainage features
 Characteristics
 Records collected
 Conclusion
 Appendix


FGS



Surface-water resources of St.Johns, Flagler, and Putnam Counties, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 39 )
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 Material Information
Title: Surface-water resources of St.Johns, Flagler, and Putnam Counties, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 39 )
Series Title: ( FGS: Information circular 39 )
Physical Description: vi, 44 p. : maps, diagrs., tables. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Kenner, William E
Crooks, J. W. ( joint author )
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1963
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Water-supply -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by W. E. Kenner and J. W. Crooks.
General Note: "Prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey."
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001604863
oclc - 01534886
notis - AHM9135
lccn - a 64007049
System ID: UF00001099:00001

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Preface
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    Abstract and introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Drainage features
        Page 3
    Characteristics
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Records collected
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 14
    Conclusion
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 18
    Appendix
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Copyright
            Main
Full Text




STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
DIVISION OF GEOLOGY

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Robert O. Vernon, Director






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39






SURFACE-WATER RESOURCES

OF

ST JOHNS, FLAGLER, AND PUTNAM COUNTIES, FLORIDA





By
W. E. Kenner and J. W. Crooks





Prepared by the
U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with the
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY




TALLAHASSEE
1963







4Oo.w


AGRI.
CULTURAL
LIBRARY


Completed manuscript received
November 30, 1962
Printed by the Florida Geological Survey
Tallahassee


~''' ;
-i'r '
~---





















PREFACE


The U. S. Geological Survey performs three functions in the
field of water-resource investigations. It collects and compiles water
facts, it interprets these facts, and it disseminates the resultant
product usable information. To perform these functions effectively,
the U. S. Geological Survey enters into cooperative agreements with
State agencies. Such an agreement with the Florida Geological Survey
has resulted in this report.

The work of collecting, compiling, and interpreting data and
preparing the report was under the supervision of A. O. Patterson,
district engineer, and J. W. Geurin, district chemist, of the U. S.
Geological Survey. Funds for this work were furnished jointly by the
U. S. Geological Survey and the Florida Geological Survey. Publication
costs of the report were borne by the latter.














CONTENTS


Page


Abstract ........... ..... .........................
Introduction .........................................
Drainage features ... ....................................
Characteristics ......................................
St. Johns River .. . . . . . . . .
Lake George......................................
Crescent Lake ................... .................
Oklawaha River ....................................
Orange Creek .....................................
Moultrie Creek.....................................
Other streams .....................................
Records collected .............. ............ .........
Stage and flow records ...............................
Regular.stations ................................
Miscellaneous stations .......... ........ ..........
Chemical quality records..... .... ...... .... .......
Conclusion ....... ... ..... ......................
Appendix ............ .... ......... ... ..........


ILLUSTRATIONS


Figure
1 Surface-water features of St. Johns, Flagler, and Putnam counties .
2 Relationship of dissolved solids, chloride, and hardness to
specific conductance of St. Johns River near DeLand ........
3 Conductance duration St. Johns River near DeLand ........ ..
4 Flow duration Orange Creek at Orange Springs . . .
5 Conductance duration Moultrie Creek near St. Augustine . .
6 Relationship of sum of determined constituents, chloride, and
hardness to specific conductance of Moultrie Creek near
St. Augustine ................. ...............
7 Period of record at gaging stations . . . ..... ...
8 Location of gaging stations and miscellaneous measurement sites.
9 Location of chemical quality sampling points . ... .
10 Stage record Lake Grandin near Interlachen ... .. . .
















Table Page
1 Location of regular gaging stations St. Johns, Flagler, and
Putnam counties ................... ......... .. 22
2 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Etonia Creek near
Florahome .......... ......................... 23
3 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Little Haw Creek near
Seville ..................................... 23
4 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Moultrie Creek near
St. Augustine ................................ 24
5 Monthly and yeorlv mean discharge of Oklawaha River at
Riverside Landing near Orange Springs. . . . ..... 25
6 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Oklawaha River near
Orange Springs ................................ .. 26
7 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Orange Creek at
Orange Springs ................. ............. 27
8 Streamflow measurements Little Orange Creek . ...... 28
9 Streamflow measurements St. JohnsCounty ..... ........ 29
10 Streamflow measurements Flagler County . . . ... 30
11 Streamflow measurements Putnam County .. .......... .. 31
12 Chemical analyses Moultrie Creek near St. Augustine ....... .. 33
13 Temperature of water Moultrie Creek near St. Augustine. ...... 36
14 Chemical analyses Streams in St. Johns, Flagler, and
Putnam counties ............................... 38
15 Chemical analyses St. Johns River near DeLand .......... 40
16 Temperature of water St. Johns River near DeLand ......... 43









SURFACE-WATER RESOURCES

OF

ST. JOHNS, FLAGLER, AND PUTNAM COUNTIES, FLORIDA


By
W. E. Kenner and J. W. Crooks



ABSTRACT


This report describes water bodies in St. Johns, Flagler, and
Putnam counties, Florida. Interpretations of probable future flow rates
and chemical quality characteristics, based on past records, are given.
In addition, the report lists the sites at which water records have been
collected and indicates the kind of records secured. The locations of
collection sites are shown on maps. Summaries of records at several
sites are given in an appendix.


INTRODUCTION

St. Johns, Flagler, and Putnam counties cover a land area of
1,895 square miles and a water area of about 200 square miles. The
area lies in northeast peninsular Florida, takes in 60 miles of the east
coast, and extends 55 miles inland (fig. 1). In 1960 it had a population
of 66,812 persons 1, an increase of 28.5 percent in the last decade.
Agricultural products and the tourist industry are its principal sources
of income. Commercial fishing, manufacturing, and timbering are also
important pursuits in the area.

The area has experienced water problems in the past, particularly
those having to do with obtaining water of suitable quality for domestic
consumption in cities along the coast. There has also been difficulty,
at times, in obtaining water of suitable quality for irrigation. As the


Florida Development Commission






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


population and economic development continues to increase more problems
will arise, the solution of which will require, among other things, water-
resources information.

This report has been written as a preliminary step in what will
be a continuing process of data collection and dissemination. Its purpose
is to present the water-resource information gathered by the U. S. Geo-
logical Survey up to this time.


Figure 1. Surface-water features of St. Johns, Flagler, and Putnam counties.


Lawwp ~






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39


The report has been designed with three functions in mind. The
first of these is to tell what water bodies exist, to show their relation
to each other, and to describe the general features of the surface drain-
age. This is done by means of a map and descriptive text. The second
function is to describe the characteristic variations in flow, in water
levels, and in chemical constituents. This is done with duration curves
and text. The third function is to tell where records have been col-
lected, to tell what periods of time the records cover, and to give the
actual records, at least in summary form. This is done by using bar
graphs, hydrographs, tables, and explanatory text. Descriptions and
records for points outside the boundaries of the area have been included
where a better understanding of the area seemed to require them.


DRAINAGE FEATURES

A low ridge, which parallels the coast and lies about 5 miles
inland, forms a divide between the coastal drainage and the St. Johns
River drainage. About 20 percent of the tri-county area lies east of
this divide and about 80 percent west of it. East of the divide relatively
short creeks flow eastward and empty into lagoons. These lagoons lie
between the offshore bar and the mainland (fig. 1). They look like rivers
and for over a hundred years have borne the names Matanzas River and
Halifax River. Two inlets connect these lagoons to the ocean and the
partly manmade Intracoastal Waterway provides openings to the north
and south. The larger creeks in this area include Moultrie Creek, Moses
Creek, and Pellicer Creek, all of which flow into the Matanzas River,
and Bulow Creek which flows into the Halifax River. The lower reaches
of these creeks are tidal.

The area west of the ridge is drained by the St. Johns River and
its tributaries. The major tributaries to the St. Johns River in this area
are the Oklawaha River, Dunns Creek, Rice Creek, and Black Creek.
These streams are relatively large. Smaller tributaries include Deep
Creek,Moccasin Branch, Sixmile Creek, and Durbin Creek.

In the upland areas of western and southern Putnam County there
are hundreds of small lakes ranging in size from less than an acre to
more than 1,000 acres. Well defined streams are practically nonexistent
in these areas, indicating that the lakes serve to collect water that
would otherwise run off.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39


The report has been designed with three functions in mind. The
first of these is to tell what water bodies exist, to show their relation
to each other, and to describe the general features of the surface drain-
age. This is done by means of a map and descriptive text. The second
function is to describe the characteristic variations in flow, in water
levels, and in chemical constituents. This is done with duration curves
and text. The third function is to tell where records have been col-
lected, to tell what periods of time the records cover, and to give the
actual records, at least in summary form. This is done by using bar
graphs, hydrographs, tables, and explanatory text. Descriptions and
records for points outside the boundaries of the area have been included
where a better understanding of the area seemed to require them.


DRAINAGE FEATURES

A low ridge, which parallels the coast and lies about 5 miles
inland, forms a divide between the coastal drainage and the St. Johns
River drainage. About 20 percent of the tri-county area lies east of
this divide and about 80 percent west of it. East of the divide relatively
short creeks flow eastward and empty into lagoons. These lagoons lie
between the offshore bar and the mainland (fig. 1). They look like rivers
and for over a hundred years have borne the names Matanzas River and
Halifax River. Two inlets connect these lagoons to the ocean and the
partly manmade Intracoastal Waterway provides openings to the north
and south. The larger creeks in this area include Moultrie Creek, Moses
Creek, and Pellicer Creek, all of which flow into the Matanzas River,
and Bulow Creek which flows into the Halifax River. The lower reaches
of these creeks are tidal.

The area west of the ridge is drained by the St. Johns River and
its tributaries. The major tributaries to the St. Johns River in this area
are the Oklawaha River, Dunns Creek, Rice Creek, and Black Creek.
These streams are relatively large. Smaller tributaries include Deep
Creek,Moccasin Branch, Sixmile Creek, and Durbin Creek.

In the upland areas of western and southern Putnam County there
are hundreds of small lakes ranging in size from less than an acre to
more than 1,000 acres. Well defined streams are practically nonexistent
in these areas, indicating that the lakes serve to collect water that
would otherwise run off.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


CHARACTERISTICS

The term "characteristics" may be defined as factual description
that delineates post conditions and indicates the conditions that may
be expected to occur in the future. As applied to a water body, "char-
acteristics" is concerned mainly with descriptions of physical features
and descriptions of past and probable future fluctuations in stage, flow,
and chemical quality. In the following sections the characteristics of
various water bodies in the tri-couirty area are set forth.


ST. JOHNS RIVER

The St. Johns River, located nearly in the center of the area,
is widely used for recreational purposes, for drainage, for waste removal,
and for transportation. This river drains 8,000 square miles in eastern
peninsular Florida.

At Jacksonville, about 25 river miles upstream from the ocean, and
20 miles downstream from Durbin Creek, the river is tidal. Its daily
range in stage there is usually less than 2 feet. The flow reverses with
each tide, moving alternately inland and then toward the ocean. At Main
Street Bridge in Jacksonville the ordinary rate of flow on an outgoing
tide is about 140,000 cubic feet per second. The flow rate on the incom-
ing tide is about the same.

At Jacksonville (Main Street Bridge) the river is 1,600 feet wide
and about 80 feet deep. From there to Palatka the river is wider and
shallower, becoming nearly 3 miles wide in places. In this stretch it is
rarely deeper than 25 feet. Because of the large cross-sectional area of
the river there is little damping of the tidal fluctuations in this stretch,
and the tide range is only slightly less at Palatka than it is at Jackson-
ville. The average flow at Palatka is about 4 billion gallons per day.
About a third of this is contributed by the Oklawaha River.

Between Palatka and Lake George the channel is narrower and
considerably more tortuous than in the downstream reach. The effects
of tide are much less pronounced than they are below Palatka.

During 1948 and 1949, a period of abundant rainfall, the St. Johns
River near DeLand, 18 miles southeast of Lake George, was sodium







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39


chloride in type. The dissolved mineral constituents during this period
ranged from 213 to 1,090 ppm (parts per million); hardness ranged from
69 to 313 ppm. In periods of less abundant rainfall, the dissolved solids
concentrations would, of course, be greater.

The relation that existed between conductance and the dissolved
solids, chloride, and hardness is shown in figure 2.

Figure 3, a conductance duration curve for St. Johns River near
DeLand, shows the percent of time that the conductance equaled or
exceeded a specific value during the 2-year period.


1,200




1,000


800




600


400




200




0


800 1,200
SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE


1,600 2,000
IN MICROMHOS


Figure 2. Relationship of dissolved solids, chloride, and hardness to specific
conductance of St. Johns River near DeLand.


DISSOLVED
SOLIDS




RECORD USED-JANUARY 1948 TO
DECEMBER 1949








CHLORIDE




HARDNESS (as CaCO3)
01000


2,400






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


a 4.000
a
W 3,000
C
a
2,000







z
0
t0 itoo










> 100


70 80 90 100


Figure 3. Conductance duration St. Johns River near DeLond.




The approximate composition of the water of the St. Johns River
near DeLand can be obtained from these curves, if the conductance is
known. For instance, for a conductance of approximately 1,000 micromhos,
the dissolved solids would be 550 ppm, the chloride 240 ppm, and the
hardness 160 ppm.


The waters of the St. Johns River near DeLand during 1948 and
1949 were moderately hard, fairly high in dissolved solids, and high in
color.* The presence of predominating amounts of sodium and chloride
in the waters results from the inflow of highly saline ground waters in
the basin above this point.


Between DeLand and the Putnam County line, five large springs
and several smaller ones discharge into the St. Johns River. Three of
these springs, Silver Glen, Salt, and Alexander springs (10 miles south of
Lake George), eachodischarge at a rate higher than 100 cfs (cubic feet
per second) at !-s. The other two, Juniper Springs and Ponce de Leon
Springs (13 miles southeast of Lake George), discharge at lesser rates.


10 20 30 40 50 60
PERCENT OF TIME


RECORD USED-JANUARY 1948 TO DECEMBER 1949
I _!__ 1 ___ I --- I ---- I --- I -- --- --- ---


0


L-






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39


Most of these springs, especially Salt Springs, tend to increase the min-
eral matter in the St. Johns River. Salt Springs, for instance, is usually
several times as high in dissolved solids as the St. Johns River above
Lake George. Some of the springs have a diluting effect on the concen-
trations of the river, particularly during low-flow periods when increases
in the dissolved solids content occur.

Below Lake George, inflow of theOklawaha River causes a reduction
in the concentration of dissolved solids because it contributes large
quantities of water of better quality than that found in the St. Johns
River. Even though most of the other tributaries Ibelow the confluence
with the Oklawaha River tend to reduce further the concentration of dis-
solved solids in the St. Johns River, the effect is not significant.

Because the St. Johns River is subject to tidal fluctuations, salt-
water intrusion from the ocean occurs in the lower reaches of the river
within the three-county area. Intrusion extends up the river about 40
miles above the mouth, or to a point about 15 miles downstream from
Palatka. The distance that the salt water intrudes varies with the amount
of fresh-water flow and the height of the tides. The salinity increases
from the surface to the bottom of the stream and decreases, of course,
progressively upstream. (Reference: House Document 194, 75th Congress,
1st session, Atlantic-Gulf Ship Canal, Florida, p. 146.)




LAKE GEORGE

The St. Johns River flows through Lake George at the southern
edge of the area. This lake, the second largest in Florida, is roughly
rectangular in shape, 6 miles wide, and 12 miles long, and covers an
area of approximately 70 square miles. It has a smooth, flat, sandy
bottom and low, wooded banks. Except near the shore the lake is between
10 and 12 feet deep.

The normal level of the lake is probably about 2 feet above sea
level and, ordinarily, stage fluctuations are small. At times there are
tidal fluctuations in the lake. The range of the tidal fluctuations is
probably less than a foot. The lake is used principally for navigation,
commercial fishing, and recreation.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


CRESCENT LAKE

Crescent Lake, about 6 miles northeast of Lake George, is con-
nected to the St. Johns River by Dunns Creek. It is about 12}i miles
long, 2J'. miles wide, and covers 28 square miles. Its level is about
the same as that of Lake George and it fluctuates similarly. It is some-
what deeper than Lake George, being about 14 feet deep at the maximum.
Most of the land along the eastern shoreline rises steeply. The lake
is used principally for navigation and recreation. During November 1955
the water was sodium chloride in type and the dissolved solids concen-
tration was about 500 ppm.


OKLAWAHA RIVER

The Oklowaha River drains 2,130 square miles of central Florida.
It begins at Lake Griffin (Lake County); from there it flows northward
for about 40 miles to the south edge to Putnam County at the town of
Orange Springs. There it turns eastward and flows to the St. Johns
River, entering at Welaka, just downstream from Lake George. In the
lower reaches the channel is very crooked, winding through a low, swampy,
heavily wooded flood plain.

At Orange Springs the average flow is about a billion gallons per
day. During severe droughts the flow rate drops as low as 480 mgd
(million gallons per day) and during flood times gets as high as 6 billion
gpd (gallons per day). The level of the river stays within relatively
narrow limits. It has been known to get as high as 19.1 feet above mean
sea level and to drop as low as 9.6 feet above mean sea level, a range
of 9.5 feet. However, the yearly range in stage rarely exceeds 6 feet.

Between Orange Springs and Riverside Landing, 8 miles downstream
several small tributaries flow in from the north. The largest, Deep Creek,
drains about 60 square miles of land and adds appreciably to the flow of
the river.

The water of the Oklawaha River is hard because of the high
calcium and magnesium content. These elements are readily removed by
water treatment processes, therefore the hardness does not detract greatly
from the potential usefulness of the water. Except for color, which may
be high during high flow, other dissolved materials are not present in
objectionable amounts.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39


ORANGE CREEK

Orange Creek drains a 431-square-mile area lying in Marion, Alachua,
and Putnam counties. There are several large lakes and many small ones
in its drainage basin. The population density in the basin is low. The
land is used principally for cattle raising, timbering, and farming.

The record for Orange Creek indicates a longtime average flow
of 103 mgd and thus an ultimate yield of approximately that amount.
In dry years the flow drops as low as 14Y2 mgd but in wet years may
get no lower than 75 mgd.

The characteristic flow distribution for Orange Creek is shown
by the flow-duration curve (fig. 4). The curve shows the percent of
time that a particular withdrawal rate could have been sustained and
also indicates probable future behavior. It shows for example, that
90 percent of the time the flow was at least 5% mgd and that 80 percent
of the time the flow was at least 11 mgd.


Calcium and bicarbonate are the principal dissolved materials
present in Orange Creek. Hardness and dissolved solids are low, 46
and 61 ppm, respectively. The water is suitable for many uses although


1000

___ RECORD USED- OCTOBER 1942 TO SEPTEMBER 1952
S__OCTOBER 1955 TO SEPTEMBER 1957
-





;o -- ORANGE GREEK AT ORANGE SPRINGS
_1943-52, 1956 -57



; 10 -
o -- -- -- -- -- -- -- ---. ---
Ut


0 t1 20 30 40 50
PERCENT OF TIME


60 70 80 90 100


Figure 4. Flow duration Orange Creek at Orange Springs.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


certain materials, for instance color, may occur in amounts objectionable
for particular uses.


MOULTRIE CREEK

Moultrie Creek drains 23 square miles of sandy, fairly flat, relict
beach land. The vegetal cover consists mostly of pines, scrub palmetto,
and native grasses. Very little of the land is in cultivation and the
population density is low.

During the 17-year period, 1939-56, the yield from the Moultrie
Creek basin was 14,, mgd. This is an average for the period and indi-
cates the future probable upper limit of use. This, of course, does not
mean that 14 million gallons are available each and every day. The
flow is as low as 130,000 gpd during extended drouths and, even in wet
years, drops as low as 650,000 gpd. Incidentally, the highest flow
recorded was 885 mgd (October 1941).

A reconnaissance of the Moultrie Creek basin on September 29,
1955, indicated that there were no major cultural influences affecting
the mineral content of the water; the mineralization is a result of con-
tact of the water with the sandy soils and organic deposits of swampy
areas, and possibly to a small degree, is increased by artesian water
used as domestic supplies by rural consumers.

The waters in the streams during the reconnaissance were moder-
ately hard, fairly low in dissolved solids, and quite highly colored. The
flow at that time was 2.6 cfs (1.7 mgd) or 68 percent of the average
daily flow for the year ending September 30, 1955.

Calcium and bicarbonate predominated in the upper reaches of
Moultrie Creek near Tocoi Junction, 3 miles west of St. Augustine.
Chloride and color were higher and calcium and bicarbonate were lower
at a site about 2 miles downstream. These changes result from the
inflow of acidic and highly colored water of the tributary that joins
Moultrie Creek at the Florida East Coast Railroad.

Figure 5 shows a conductance duration curve for Moultrie Creek
near St. Augustine for the period October 1955 to September 1957. The
value that occurred most frequently during the 2 years was 423 micromhos.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39


2,000



00

600
a




oo
O00
80

S400
x
'a
0
200
a
_j



0 60
z

40
0


U-
U)


I I I I I
RECORD USED-OCTOBER 1955 TO
SEPTEMBER 1957

























0 tO 20 30 40 50 60-.. 70 80 90 10
PERCENT OF TIME


Figure 5. Conductance duration Moultrie Creek near St. Augustine.



From the duration curve it may be noted that this value occurred approxi-
mately 35 percent of the time, or about 255 days, during the period of
of observation. By use of the correlation curves in figure 6 it may be
seen that chloride for these days was about 40 ppm, hardness about 135,
and the sum of determined constituents about 235 ppm.


Most of the time, with the exception of color and hardness, the
water was well within the limits prescribed for public water supply.
Iron exceeded allowable limits several times but is believed completed
with color so that in treatment for color removal it would be reduced,
if not completely removed. The highest concentrations of dissolved
minerals were observed during the period February 11-28, 1957, when
the concentrations ranged from 500 up to about 850 ppm. This was the
only time that the recommended value of 500 ppm was exceeded.


The record of water temperatures of Moultrie Creek shows that
it would be very desirable for cooling purposes. For the 2 years of
record the temperature ranged from 420F to 780F, and the average was
660F (table 13).






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


700




800




500


400




300


200




tOO


RECORD USED--OCTOBER 1955 TO
SEPTEMBER 1957



SUM OF
DETERMINED
CONSTITUENTS









H ARNES
as CoC0;















0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200
SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE IN MICROMHOS


Figure 6. Relationship of sum of determined constituents, chloride, and hardness
to specific conductance of Moultrie Creek near St. Aug-stine.


OTHER STREAMS


Several of the other streams in the three-county area show possi-
bilities as sources of supply. Deep Creek near Orange Springs had
considerable flow (26 mgd) even in a dry period (1956). Its average flow
is estimated to be more than 100 mgd. Etonia Creek near Palatka,
a tributary to Rice Creek, also shows good possibilities.


Haw Creek, which drains an area east and southeast of Lake
Crescent, is a major collection stream in Flagler County. Its average flow






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39


is probably in excess of 100 mgd. However, the Ic-.J drained is relatively
flat and has few lakes, and the geology is not conducive to extensive
shallow ground-water storage; therefore the flow of this creek may not be
well sustained during drouths. One of its large tributaries, Little Haw
Creek, flows northward out of Lake Disston and enters Haw Creek about
2 miles upstream from Lake Crescent. Its average flow is about 50 mgd.
However, the flow becomes as low as 130,000 gpd during moderate
drouths and is as high as a billion gallons per day during severe floods.


Pellicer Creek near Marineland appears to have well sustained
dry-period flow. The physical makeup of its drainage basin is similar
to that of Moultrie Creek and the flow characteristics of the two streams
are probably similar. The yield of Pellicer Creek at the Florida East
Coast Railway bridge is estimated to average some 20 mgd. The lowest
flow to be expected is estimated to be 1 mgd.

Two other creeks in the area, Durbin Creek and Sixteen Mile Creek,
also seem to offer good possibilities as supplies. It appears that both
of these creeks continue to flow even during moderately severe drouths.
Each of these creeks should yield an average of 100 mgd.

Generally the streams to the west of the St. Johns River are of
better chemical quality than those to the east of the river. Dissolved
solids and hardness are lower and objectionable amounts of individual
constituents are absent. For instance, Orange Creek, Deep Creek, and
Etonia Creek had solids less than 100 ppm even during the drouth in
1956. Streams to the east of the river, How Creek, Sixteen Mile Creek,
and Sixmile Creek had dissolved solids greater than 100 ppm and the
color was high. Measurements on these streams were made in November
1955 during the drouth.

There is little, if any, use of the streams west of the St. Johns
River above the sites where the measurements were made. The mineral-
ization of the water, therefore, results from natural conditions. Because
the measurements were made during drouth conditions, the samples are
representative of the probable maximum mineral concentration that would
be expected in the streams. Color, of course, may be expected to in-
crease considerably during periods. of higher runoff due to leaching of
vegetation.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Some of the streams to the east of the St. Johns River receive
irrigation return flow. Artesian waters, already more mineralized than
the surface runoff from the area, increase in concentration because of
their use for irrigation and cause an increase in the mineral content
of the streams they flow into. Sixteen Mile Creek is an example of this
condition. During periods of normal rainfall the mineral content would
be lower, but it is likely that objectionable amounts of some constit-
uents would be present even during these periods.


RECORDS COLLECTED

The U. S. Geological Survey has collected stage, flow, and chemical
quality information at a number of locations within the tri-county area.
Some of this information has been published in the annaul water-supply
papers of the Survey and the remainder has been, until now, unpublished.
The purpose of this section is to tell what water records have been
collected, to tell where they have been collected, and to tell what periods
they cover. The data obtained at the various sites have been summarized
and are given in the appendix.


STAGE AND FLOW RECORDS

REGULAR STATIONS

Normally, values of daily discharge are published for each 'regular"
gaging station. The use of the word "regular" here denotes a data-
collection site at which readings are made at least once a day over a
period of a year or longer. Some regular stations are operated for the
purpose of obtaining only a stage record, whereas some are operated
for the purpose of obtaining both a stage record and a flow record.
Eight of the more important regular stations that have been.operated
in or adjacent to the area are listed in figure 7. This figure also shows
the type and length of record of each station. Word descriptions of the
locations of the regular stations are given in table 1 and they are plotted
on the map (fig. 8).
















Stations a b r M a a a


Etonin Croek noar Flntqhonmn P'l.

Lake Orandtn near tnferlmrhen, Pin.

ILttle fla Crena nmor Seville, Fil.

Monltrlie rrork neor St. lugtdotne, Fla.

Oklnwnht flyer npmr OrsnnrP Springn, Fla.

OklwnAha River at iverllde Landing
nerlo Orangeprt.g, Pin.

Orange Crelt at Oranga Sprlogs, Fin.

ft. John- IIiV- I at Butfain aff--
near "'1 ik.. Fle.


Daily lntimn nyu flow record Ilil.- angn, rrrori only


Figure 7. Period of'record at gaging stations.


0







0
7n







z

0





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


MISCELLANEOUS STATIONS

"Miscellaneous" designates those sites at which flow and stage
information is obtained irregularly and infrequently. The results of
flow measurements at 27 such sites in the area are available and are
given in the appendix (tables 9-11). The locations of these sites are
sIkown in figure 8.


Figure 8. Location of gaging stations and miscellaneous measurement sites.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39


CHEMICAL QUALITY RECORDS

Chemical quality information has been collected at 24 sites in
the three counties (fig. 9).

Temperature measurements were made and samples were collected
daily from Moultrie Creek near St. Augustine during the period October 1,
1955, to September 30, 1957. The results of analyses of these samples


Figure 9. Location of chemical quality sampling points.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


81--
j -rr





LAKE GRANDIN




SS O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J IF I
r91T 1958 1959


Figure 10. Stage record Lake Grandin near Interlachen.


and records of once-daily temperature readings for Moultrie Creek may
be found in the appendix (tables 12,13). Results of analyses of samples
collected at other points during reconnaissances of Septemberand Novem-
ber 1955 and April 1956 may be found in the appendix (table 14).

Daily samples for chemical analyses were collected from the
St. Johns River near DeLand, about 23 miles upstream from Lake George,
from January 1948 to December 1949. Results of the analyses and
daily water temperature observations are given in the appendix (tables 15,
16).


CONCLUSION

The largest stream in the three-county area is the St. Johns River.
At Palatka, midway of the area, its flow averages 4 billion gallons per
day. The Oklawaha River, a tributary to the St. Johns River, flows at
the rate of 500 mgd even during droughts. Many of the smaller streams
in the area yield more than 10 mgd in drought periods and average con-
siderably higher during normal rainfall.

The streams are suitable for municipal, agricultural, and some
industrial uses most of the time. Hardness and color must be removed
before use for some purposes, particularly during low flow. In the St.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Some of the streams to the east of the St. Johns River receive
irrigation return flow. Artesian waters, already more mineralized than
the surface runoff from the area, increase in concentration because of
their use for irrigation and cause an increase in the mineral content
of the streams they flow into. Sixteen Mile Creek is an example of this
condition. During periods of normal rainfall the mineral content would
be lower, but it is likely that objectionable amounts of some constit-
uents would be present even during these periods.


RECORDS COLLECTED

The U. S. Geological Survey has collected stage, flow, and chemical
quality information at a number of locations within the tri-county area.
Some of this information has been published in the annaul water-supply
papers of the Survey and the remainder has been, until now, unpublished.
The purpose of this section is to tell what water records have been
collected, to tell where they have been collected, and to tell what periods
they cover. The data obtained at the various sites have been summarized
and are given in the appendix.


STAGE AND FLOW RECORDS

REGULAR STATIONS

Normally, values of daily discharge are published for each 'regular"
gaging station. The use of the word "regular" here denotes a data-
collection site at which readings are made at least once a day over a
period of a year or longer. Some regular stations are operated for the
purpose of obtaining only a stage record, whereas some are operated
for the purpose of obtaining both a stage record and a flow record.
Eight of the more important regular stations that have been.operated
in or adjacent to the area are listed in figure 7. This figure also shows
the type and length of record of each station. Word descriptions of the
locations of the regular stations are given in table 1 and they are plotted
on the map (fig. 8).






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 39 19

Johns River, salt-water intrusion from the Atlantic Ocean occurs to a
point about 15 miles downstream from Palatka and affects the suitability
of the water for some uses.

The surface-water resources are used primarily for recreation.
With the exception of return flow from irrigation the streams are not
influenced by man's activities. Thus, the flow, stage, and chemical
quality of the water result from natural causes and, until increased
use of the water occurs, no major changes in the characteristics given
in this report are expected.









FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


81--
j -rr





LAKE GRANDIN




SS O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J IF I
r91T 1958 1959


Figure 10. Stage record Lake Grandin near Interlachen.


and records of once-daily temperature readings for Moultrie Creek may
be found in the appendix (tables 12,13). Results of analyses of samples
collected at other points during reconnaissances of Septemberand Novem-
ber 1955 and April 1956 may be found in the appendix (table 14).

Daily samples for chemical analyses were collected from the
St. Johns River near DeLand, about 23 miles upstream from Lake George,
from January 1948 to December 1949. Results of the analyses and
daily water temperature observations are given in the appendix (tables 15,
16).


CONCLUSION

The largest stream in the three-county area is the St. Johns River.
At Palatka, midway of the area, its flow averages 4 billion gallons per
day. The Oklawaha River, a tributary to the St. Johns River, flows at
the rate of 500 mgd even during droughts. Many of the smaller streams
in the area yield more than 10 mgd in drought periods and average con-
siderably higher during normal rainfall.

The streams are suitable for municipal, agricultural, and some
industrial uses most of the time. Hardness and color must be removed
before use for some purposes, particularly during low flow. In the St.




















APPENDIX








Toabl ), Locatlon of Rlgular Coaing station* St, Jolins, Flagler, and Putnnm Counties


Station Name

Etonia Creek near Plorahome, Fla,



Lake Orandin near Interlachen, Fla.


Little Haw Creek near Seville, Fla,


Moultrie Creek near St. Augustine, Fla,


Oklawaha River near Orange Springs, Fla,


Oklawaha River at Riverside Landing
near Orange Springs, Fla.

Orange Creek at Orange Springs, Fla.



St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff
near Palatka, Fla.


lrainage Area
....C m.-I_. .L ..


120


22


2,010



2,100

431



5,840


in sec. T, 9 S., R, 24 E,, 130 feet down-
stream from bridge on County Road, 14 miles
east of Florahome,

in NEf sec, 34, T, 9 S,, R, 24 E., on south
shore of take, 2.8 miles north of Interlachen.

in sec. 32, T, 13 S,, R. 29 E., at bridge on
State Highway 305, 6.4 miles east of Seville.

in sec. 11, T. 8 S., R. 29 E., at bridge on
Kings Road, 5 miles southwest of St. Augustine.

in sec. 29, T. 11 S., R. 24 E., at Jordans
Ferry, 12 miles east of Orange Springs.

in sec. 33, T. 11 S., R. 25 E., at Riverside
Landing, 8* miles east of Orange Springs.

in sec. 25, T. 11 S., R. 23 E., at bridge on
State Highway 315, 1/4-mile northwest of
Orange Springs.

in sec. 27, T. 10 S., R. 26 E., at ACL rail-
road bridge at Buffalo Bluff, 4j miles
southwest of Palatka.


:
i



i

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:i

,2 i I

'"II '




~1 n: : i ''













1949





1951'














1951
1952 '
, i .














1955










i 1956
1957,
ill
!; '


28.8 28.6 22.6


13.1 7.22 13.1


17,8 17.9


Table 3. Monthly and Yearly Mean Discharge of Little Haw Creek Near Seville

(in cubic feet per second)


Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct.


6.94 2.02
95,8 9.46
249. 33.6
11.8 9.38
6.27 2.67
1.12 1.71
1,57. 2.26


0.90 103


2,65'
5.40
6,77
1.37
1.00
65,0


1.11
10.4
8.26
4.86
4.07
60.5


65.6 95.1 383
12.4 239 349
197 860 561
10.0 4.72 71.3
15,0 11.6 20.5
19.8 9.40 176


143


249


Nov.

158
80.8
131
28.5
26.9
39.9


Dec. Year


103
18.2
225
26.8
11.4
6,28


90.5
108
201
31.9
13.5:
23.4


Jan,


18.1
39.3


Table 2. Monthly and Yearly Mean Disclinrie of rtoin Croek Near F lorahome

(in cubic feet per second)

Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aul,. Sepl Oct. Nov. Dec, Year
26.0

11.1 36.6 19.9 7.68 13.9 64.6 21.2 109 170 73.2 40.3 49.0


Jan,,

57,8
65.8
16.9
147
20.5
6.70
3.22


81.3
220
51.6
35.3
30.9
9.48
2,56


24.8
205
76.5
20.5
11.4
3.58
2.09


1

~ :








Toble 4, Monthly and Yearly Moen Dicharpg of Moultrl Creek Near St, Auwgwutne
(in cubtl feet per MeQond)

Jan. Feb. Mar, Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dee, Year


1039
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1960

1952
Z953
i954
1955
1956
1957


22,8
5,04
10,6
.85
78,0
1,26
1,89
52.2
12.4
10.8
.83
.96
5.54
72.1
1.58
1.05
1.02
2.45


1.38
.82
1.03
.96
2,43
,38
1.58
17,8
.81
1,02
.64
.54
1.15
4.45
.85
.69
.93
5.61


6,32
1.07
5,95
.97.
2,14
34.6
1.33
43.3
1.19
1,07
.45
.90
.83
.82
.69
.67
.53
33.8


24.1
25.6
12,1
1,05
28,0
56.6
9.21
30.2
4.70
1.71
4.74
.82
.64
1.13
.47
1.88
.68
42.1


19.0 32,6
32.1 35,2
7.51 8.15
13.8 117
67.8 16.2
70.2 103
59.3 116
31.4 57.8
50.6 62.6
23.3 120
.79 35.3
.85 2.66
.59 9.16
130 213
.36 .55
1.70 4.70
.40 .38
123 27.8


23.9 7.61
19,0 16.4
18,1 65,8
1.24 1.46
5.13 40.3
3.64 1.03
9.10 6.80
18.3 58.1
32.6 109
13.4 2.42
1.00 1.30
7.65 2.76
31.6 18.0
4.15 21.9
5.96 4.85
12.9 2.11.
13,.7 ',*, 2.77
'1.23' 3.17


7,07
20,3
21.5
1.30
10.0
6.15
42.5
3.11
58,3
2.56
1.59
6.30
6.79
5.60
19.2
9.82
29.8
.a8 '


9,76
145
2,05
67.5
109
49.7
73.9
63.4
100
113
70,8
43.7
132
101
1.91
24.4
7.71


3,10
1,07
85.8
,92
2.75
16,5
5.67
59.0
51.6
2.69
7.10
17.6
62,6
17.6
11.4
6.94
3.93
1.62


2.70
5,17
37,6
1.52
1,73
3.59
68,4
8.67
12.2
2.80
2.25
3.68
15.0
2.34
33.8
2.35
1.28
.87


-
13.3
35.5
13,0
17.5
31.8
33.6
32.5
36.6
36.7
24.8
11.6
12,0
18.9
50.1
3.80
5.40
2.76


r
iB
~a I
rr..


ii



it
I
ij
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Table 5. Monthly


.'.,; '



Jan.

194

i 195 1,919
S.1946 2,933
'1,947 1:,010
1948 3,203'
1949 2,396
S 1950 2,225
;: 1951 2,345
". : 41952 1,885
953 1 ,649
:: 9'5" 4-" 3,860
1955 1,271
: 1956 971
: 1957 827
: 1958 1,221'


', :




;~ic:! ,"" .i .:





































, ,': .


and Yearly Mean Cischarge of Oklawohn River nt Riverside
Landilr Near Orange prints
(in cubic, foot pe*,.econdl)


Feb. MAr. Apr, Mny J'une July Aug. Sept, Oct. Nov. Dec. Year

1,823 1,441 1,365 -
1,263 1,555 2,013 1,190 1,219 1,549 2,160 1,662 2,597 2,275 1,772 1,730
1.610 1,311 1,132 1,047 1,079 2,300 2,995 3,360 2,624 2,228 2,522 2,014
2,421. 2,815 1;950 2,204 1,961 2,194 3,089 3,337 3,299 2,726 2,268 2,602
1,882 2,581 2,752 1,807 1,619 2,074 2,504 3.,042 3,618 3,721 3,203 ;2,563
3,381 4,038 3,082 2,136 1,771 2,164 3,684 3,194 3,902 2,793 2,862 3,019
2,510 1,931 2,425 1,751 1,567 1,909 2,115 3,377 3,171 2,806 2,569 2,375
1,846 1',741 1,478 1,248 1.147 1,308 1,323 3,666 5,549 2;874 2,337 2 061 '
2,151 1,870 1,542 1,272 1,223 1,342 1,458 1.581 2,162 2,184 2,151 1,772.
2,495 2,625 2,234 1,794 1,658 1.534 1,590 1,581 2,038 1,612 1,382 1,867
1,526 1,424 2,094 1,408 1,445 1,525 2,303 3,764 4,210 3,169 3,846 2,368
3,183 2,778 2,184 1,703 1,519 1,497 1,388 1,334 1,563 1,354 1,316 1,967
1,360 1,172 1.116 1,019 975 937 945 1,172 1,002 858 878 1,057
1,057 883 807 903 812 870 809 828 1,159 974 871 .912
S784 816 771 781 956 999 1,633 1,595 1,447 1,130 1,110 1,073
1,173 2,51.2 2,588 2,384 2,016 1.707 1,842 1,321







Tnble 6, Monthly and Yearly Moen Dischqrge of Oklawahq River Near Oranog Springs

(in cubia teet per second)
Jan. Feb. Mar, Apr. May June July Aug, Sept, Oct, Nov, Dec, Year

1930 2,500 2,730 1,880 9,590 2,710 2,190 2,230 1,840 1,620 1,770 -
1931 2,150 2,070 2,740 3,140 2,410 1,810 1,490 1,570 1,350 1,150 1,000 1,060 1,830
1932 1,010 947 971 874 858 965 804 824 804 778 847 790 872
1933 763 855 773 1,480 854 770 1,290 1,410 3,760 2,060 1,740 1,600 1,454
1934 1,670 1,700 1,520 1,400 1,550 2,970 2,810 2,620 2,810 2,437 1,678. 1,454 2,052
1935 1,417 1,309 1,284 1,052 881 802 952 1,306 3,023 2,026 1,510 1,377 1,410
1936 1,458 2,980 2,845 2,111 1,509 1,878 1,505 1,501 1,403 1,784 1,443 1,450 1,817
1937 1,359 1,515 1,411 2,105 1,477 1,260 1,182 1,564 2,514 2,548 1,964 2,091 1,749
1938 1,983 1,784 1,418 1,155 1,029 1,007 1,585 2,051 1,421 1,612 1,589 1,385 1,500
1939 1,261 1,192 1,061 915 845 1,190 2,046 2,322 2,038 1,648 1,293 1,191 1,419
1940 1,186 1,312 1,150 1,103 885 1,004 1,223 1,430 1,289 982 851 1,040 1,127
1941 1,339 .1,416 .1,630.. 1,723 1,135 1,383 1,977 2,008 1,807 2,837 3,403 2,698 1,932
S1942 2,832 2,394 3,051' 2,599 1,721 1,874 .2,207 1,797 1,711 1,523 1,273 1,310 2,023
C' 1943 1,271 1,137 1,148 992 940 891 1,100 1,570 2,088 1,434 1,192 1,123 1,241
1944 1,214 1,063 1,223 1,571 1,027 1,052 1,263 1,599 1,376 1,986 1,768 1,443 1,383
1945 1,553 1,362 1,130 984 921 928 1,829 2,389 2,675 2,127 1,786 1,967 1,640
1946' 2,332 1,963 2,374 1,640 1,713 1,668 1,812 2,535 2,721 2,727 2,222 1,831 2,130
1947 1,587 1,564 2,020 2,142 1,590 1,442 1,803 2,131 2,391 2,759 2,848 2,448 2,063
1948 2,491 2,661 3,270 2,503 1,753 1,505 1,630 2,754 2,442 2,976 2,180 2,212 2,365
1949 1,913 1,961 1,589 1,911 1,430 1,323 1,562 1,770 2,595 2,448 2,156 1,979 1,885
1950 1,760 1,511 1,430 1,266 1,115 1,029 1,148 1,160 3,087 2,705 2,130 1,878 1,684
1951 2,082 1,863 1,560 1,344 1,145 1,103 1,181 1,285 1,471 1,684 1,775 1,836 1,526
1952 1,722 2,131 2,196 1,948 1,535 1,370 1,330 1,359 1,332





Ti r 1:





j ;
BJ .: i


'~''
6j i






Brli




ii.




'~~Y~:





'




::):;
::



~i:~
lit .



: r
;
I.


Table 7. Monthly and Yearly Mean Discharge of Orange Creek at Orange Springs

(in cubic feet per second)

Mnr. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Year


7.05 10.2
27.8 45.7
9.10 125
149 238
103 110
178 197
77.6 71.1
9.09 41.9
12.2 14.7
88.6 60.0


1942
1943

1944

1947
1948
1949
'C)!I)
3951
1952


1955
1956
1957
1958


64.7 107 44.1 24.9
44.5 129 19.6 12.4
68,2 45.7 116 85.5
119 175 136 74.4
613 733 788 556
163 278 427 652
472 404 598 366
113 177 228 191
42.9 526 612 430
19.0 37.2 166 207
57,5 56.8 75.4 31.4.


31.2
31.5
105.
237
198
518
186
95.0
214
198




9.97
6.89
32.8


14.6
15.8
72.7
191
170
586
208
64.2
161
267




11.9
7.65
36.2


18.5
54.6
34.3
192
299
938
139
63.5
125
344




5.72
14.1
200


7.35
102
13.5
119
298
755
232
42.0
67.8
242




6.45
14.0
270


6.62
40,2
8.77
179
166
349
116
21.3
25.8
129




7.04
22.2
1815


8.11
36.5
112


15.1 10.9 8.06
22.6 97.4 82.5
81.1 59.0 33.0


11.1 6.60
55.4 11.4
32.3 12.6


44.6
13.7
74.2
170
345
536
297
151
286
253
23.4


5.67
8.00
14.4


26.2
59.1
87.2
363
284
471
157
186
109
131




13.2
30.4


Jan. Fob.


i
I'
I
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:B


''


I r
i
I .
:
.:
,:


.~~:r








Tqble 8. Stronmflaw Measurementi Little Ora nu Crek


Measurement stte;


Drainage area


Flow
Date (cu. ft,/seo,)


1946
June 24
July 29
Aur. 27
Oct. 3
Oct. 29
Dec. 6
1947
Mar. 27
Aug. 27
Oct. 7
Nov. 6
Dec. 4
1948
Jan. 8
Feb. 2
Mar. 3


46,9
110
99.7
49.3
61.9
39.6

82.6
56.5
236
136
106

46.2
146
65.9


in NW\ sea, 19, T, 11 8,, R. 24 E,, at
1-1/4 miles north of Ornngo Springa,

78,0 square miles


Flow
Date (cu, ft./aec.)


1948
Mar, 31
Apr. 27
July 29
Sept. 2
Sept. 29
Oct. 28
Dec, 2
Dec. 30
1949
Mar, 3
July 27
Aug. 31
Sept 28
Nov. 2
Dec. 1
Dec. 27


167
44.4
44,0
91.9
64.4
80,.3
81.9
81.9

49.2
35.6
104
88.0
61.5
44.4
23.6


bridge on dirt road,


e P ow
Date (cu, ft,/sec,)


1950
Feb. 1
Sept. 12
Sept, 28
Nov. 1
1951
Feb. 5
Sept. 21
1952
Jan. 25
Apr. 16
1956
Apr. 24


17.8
178
109
121

44.2
25.4

31.6
45.6

3.8










Stream

Crocker Cree


': i":: Deep Creek


D'urbin Creek



SMill Creek



S Moccasin Croe


Moses Creek



ii Six-Mile Cre<



Sixteen-Mile



Si Trout Creek




i' ," ": "' ,


Table 9. Streamflow Measurements St. Johns County


k


Creek


Tributary to

Deep Creek


St, Johns River


Julington Creek



Six-Mile Creek



St. Johns River


Matanzas River



St. Johns River



Deep Creek



St. Johns River


Location of Measurement Site

in SW, sec. 18, T. 9 S;, R. 28 E.. at
State Highway 207, at Hastings.

in NWf soc. 35, T. 9 S., R. 28 E., at
County road near Byrd

in NEA sec. 6, T. 5 8,, R. 28 E., at
bridge on County road, 5 miles
northwest of Durbin

in NWY sec. 11, T. 6 S., R. 28 E., at
culvert on State Highway 16, 5 miles
north of Bakersville

in sec. 26, T. 3 S., R. 28 E., at
State Highway 207 near Armstrong

in NJ of sec. 45, T. 8 S., R. 30 E.,
at bridge on U. S. Highway 1, 3 miles
south of Moultrie

in SWA sec. 4, T. 7 S., R. 28 E., at
bridge on State Highway 13-A,
at BakersVille

in NE* sec. 34, T..9 S., R. 28 E.,
at bridge on State Highway 13,
near Byrd

at State Highway 210 near Sampson
Church


Date


Discharge
(cu. ft./sec.)


4-11-58 3.4
6-23-58 No flow

4-11-58 37.5
,6-23-58 No flow


5-23-56
4-11-58
6-24-58

4-11-58


6-23-58


4-11-58
6-23-58

4-11-58
6-23-58


SNo flow
63.5
7.7

10.3
.4


15.4
1.2

16.6
.6


5-23-56 .6
4-11-58 34.8
6-23-58 No flow

4-11-58 67,0
6-23-58 6.8


4-11-58
6-24-58


9.5
3.4


: II

1



i3:,
1,::



: :. `,.


::i F





i

i i .'

.i 1
I


k'







TnblW 10, Straqmflow Me sur.emntI FIgler County


Stream

Black Branch



Bulow Creek


Haw Creek


Middle Haw Creek



Middle Haw Creek



Pellicer Creek



Salt Branch Canal



Sweetwater Branch


Tributary to

Haw Creek



Halifax River


Crescent Lake


Haw Creek



Haw Creek


Matanzas River



Crescent Lake


Haw Creek


Location of Measurement Site

in NEM sea, 21, T, 12 S., R, 30 g,,
at bridge on State Highway 11, 1-3/4
miles southwest of Bunnell

in sec, 11, T. 12 S,, R. 31 E., at
State Highway 11 near Flagler Beach

on section line between sec. 2 and 3,
T. 13 S., R, 29 E,, at bridge on State
Highway 305, 7-1/4 miles southwest of
Bunnell

on section line between sec, 10 and 11,
T. 13 S., R. 29 E., at bridge on State
Highway 305, 8 miles southwest of Bunnell

near center of sec. 19, T. 13 S.,
R. 30 E., at bridge on State Highway 11,
8 miles south of Bunnell

in sec. 47, T. 10 S., R. 30 E., at
FEC railroad bridge, 10 miles north of
Espanola

in sec. 29, T. 11 S., R. 28 E., at
bridge on State Highway 20, 5.2 miles
north of Crescent City
I
in NW* sec. 32, T. 12 S., R. 30 E., at
bridge on State Highway 11, 4 miles
southwest of Bunnell


Discharge
Date (cu, ft,/sec,)

4-18-46 No flow


4-11-58
6-24-58

4-18-56
4-11-58
6-24-58


4-18-56
4-11-58
6-24-58


1.7
No flow

No flow
119
No flow


No flow
87.0
No flow


4-18-56 No flow


5-24-56
4-11-58
6-24-58

4-11-58
6-24-58


2.2
66.8
6.7

92
No flow


4-18-56 No flow






Table 11. (Continued)


Tributary to

Etonia Creek





St. Johns River


Location of Measurement Site


Discharge
Date (cu. ft./sec..)


on section line between sec. 31, T. 7 S., 4-24-56
and sec. 4, T. 8 S., R. 26 E., at bridge
on State Highway 214, 1-1/4 miles east
of Sun Garden and 6 miles northeast of
Bostwick


in SEO sec. 21, T. 11 S., R. 26 E., on
east bank of St. Johns River at Nashua


5- 8-46
4-19-56


No flow





1.8
2.5


Stream.

Simms Creek


Spring









Table 1). Stremflow Measurements Putnam County


t ream

Branch


Branch


Bruntbridge Brook


Deep Creek



Etonia Creek



Etonia Creek



Nashua Spring


Rice Creek


Tributary to

Palmetto Branch


Rice Creek


Oklawaha River



Oklawaha River


Rice Creek



nice Creek


St. Johns River


St. Johns River


Location of Meanurement Site

in SW( sec. 15, T. 9 S., R. 25 E., at
bridge on State Highwav 100, 1/4-mile
northwest of Carriayand 10 miles
northwest of Palatka

in SE) seac 33, T, 9 S., R. 26 E., at
bridge on State Highway 100, 3/4-mile
northwest of junction with State Highway
216 and 4 miles northwest of Palatka

in SE sec, 15, T, 11 3., R. 24 E., at
bridge on dirt road, 4 miles northeast
of Orange Springs

in NW sec. 18, T, 11 S., R. 25 E., at
bridge on State Highway 310, 7 miles
northeast of Orange Springs

in NWj sec. 17, T. 9 S., R. 26 E., at
bridge on State Highway 309, 6j miles
northwest of Palatka

in SEj sec. 2, T. 9 S., R. 24 E., at
bridge on County road, 1) miles east
of Florahome

in NE) sec 28, T. 11 S., R. 26 E., on
east bank of St. Johns River at Nashua

in sec. 39, T. 9 S., R. 26 E., at bridge
on State Highway 100, 3 miles southeast
of Carraway and 7 miles northwest of
Palatka


Discharge
Date (cu, It,/cee,)


4-19-56


0,25


4-19-56 No flow




4-24-56 No flow


4-24-56
9- 9-58


1- 3-46
4-20-56


4-20-56



5- 8-46
4-19-56

1- 3-46
4-19-56


40.3
68.9


288
2.8


10.1


.5
No flow

205
2.5












Period


Table 12. Chemical Analyses Moultrie Creek Near St. /Auu:.ine



I ar. In
gIas Cal




Part per million

21 11 0.56 20 3.7 20 1.w 47 4.0 37 0.2 0.0 218 65 27 226 6.5 450
40 10 .41 8.9 3.8 15 .7 16 .5 27 .2 .0 197 37 24 138 5.9 480
4.2 13 .38 19 4.5 20 .3 44 .2 38 .1 .0 220 66, 30 202 6.8 400
5.612 .38 17 I 4.5 20 .5 39 3.2 38 .2 .0 219 61 29 199 6.7 400
2.1 18 .30 28 5.6 23 .5 77 .5 44 .1 .0 247 93 30 265 7.1. 400
1.4 14 .11 40 5.2 26 .6 114 .246 .1 .0 262 121 28 338 7.3 225
1.2 18 .24 49 4.9 26 .6 146 4. 46 .1 .0 279 142 23 382 7.4 210
1.2 19 .18 56 7.6 35 1.1 157 2o 64 .2 .0 339 171 42 481 7.5 175

1.4 18 6 6.9 26 .9 11 10 48 .0 .0 280 143 28 392 7.2, 110
1.6 17 .15 49 7.5 35 1.2 137 19 62 .1 .0 326 153 41 454 7.1 100
5.7 15 .20 26 5.1 26 .9 64 12 51 .0 .1 247 86 33 295 6.7 220
14 12 .25 14 4.9 22 1.0 26 9. 44 .0 .3 232 55 34 215 6.3 280
37 11 .30 15 3.5 21 .7 24 6.5 40 .1 .1 226 46 26 191 6.2 360
9.3 1 .22 14 4.6 21 .7 0 10 39 .2 .1 193 54 21 208 6.8 360

5.2 12 .20 18 5.1 23 .7 52 7. 42 .2 .1 211 66 24 258 6.8 300
2.2 12 .18 26 5.1 24 .8 78 5. 42 .1 .1 223 86 22 283 6.9 290
1.0 15 .07 47 9.5 38 1.2 130 28 70 .2 .1 38 15 50 485 7.4 160
.8 17 .00 60 13' 49 1.6 167 36 84 .1 .1 404 205 66 602 7.5 90
.8 19 .00 69 15 56 2.3 190 52 102 .2 .1 60. 2 78 71 77 50
1.5 19 .00 65 14 47 2.6 176 52 85 .2 415 21 7 626 7.6 65
1.4 16 .06 46 9.4 33 1.8 142 24 58 .1 .1 304 15 37 453 7.3 100
.417 .00 57 8.9 4 1.0 196 4. .1 .0 267 17 16 426 7. 60
.5 16 .00 61 8.3 22 1.0 212 1. 33 .1 .1 264 18 1 432 7.7 45
.5 15 .29 46 6.4 18 .8 160 1. 29 .2 .1 210 1 1 343 7.2 40
.6 14 .27 43 6.4 18 .8 153 1.C 28 .2 .1 202 13 331 7.3 40
1.0 14 -- 31 5.8 20 .8 108 .0 2 .1 .81083 32 1 187 1 13 288 7.1 75
.7 14 .60 36 5.4 20 .9 116 7. 34 .1 .2 205 11 1 309 7.1 90
.4 14 .16 45 6.7 19 .8 157 2. 30 .1 .1 212 14 341 7.5 35
.8 1 .M1 6 ~ 9 19 gP Icn al 1 4Q I


Oct. 1-10, 1955
Oct. 11-20
Nov. -1-10
Nov. '11-20
Nov. 21-30
Dec. 1-10
Dee. 11-20
Dec. 21-31
Jan. 1-10, 1956
Jan. 11-20
Jan. 21-31
Feb. 1-10
Feb. 11-20
Feb. 21-29
Mar. 1-10
Mar. 11-20
Mar. 21-31
Apr. 1-10
Apr. 11-20
Apr. 21-30
May 1-10
May 11-20
May 21-31
June 1-10
June 11-20
June 21-30
July 1-10
July 11-20
July 21-31









T ,ble I4, (C(ori nurl J


Ap,. I, 2, 5-10
Aug, 3, 4
Aug, 21.-)1

1uept. 1-10
clpt. 11-13, 15, 1'(20
)0Opt. 14, 1'j
nmpt. 22-27, 29-30

Oct. 1-15
Oct. 16-31.

Nov. 1-10
Nov. 11-20
Nov. 21-30

Dec. 1-16
Dec. 17-20, 22
Doc. 21, 23, 24, 27
DNc. 25, 26, 28-31

Jan. 1-10. 1957
Jan. 11-20
Jan. 21-51

Feb. 1-10
Fob. 11-1i, 21, 22
F',b, 16-20
Feb. 23-28

Mar. 1-10
Mar. 11-20
Mar. 21-*1I


'jn a Ir I ,, a
I B u
SB c p- c i
4 0ft1.


.4 12 .41 32 4.6 17
.4 8,9 1,4 2.8 14
.4 15 .06 46 5.6 23
.4 14 .29 38 4.9 18
.4 15 .14 47 5,8 20
.4 17 .03 66 4,7 21
.3 8.2 -- 2.4 2.2 --
.4 18 .00 66 5.7 21

.8 19 .03 57 10 27
14.2 12 .33 18 4.6 28

2.8 13 .39 31 7.4 38
1,2 17 .22 45 7.2 35
,8 20 .13 58 5.' 28

.9 22 .07 65 6.3 29
1.0 23 .03 77 11 58
.9 8.3 .16 2.4 2.4 14
.8 23 .04 75 10 50

.7 20 ,03 67 7.5 36
.9 18 .04 76 7.9 .42
.9 15 .04 73 7.8 39
.9 14 .05 67 8.0 32
1.3 16 .03 88 19 91
1,1 16 .02 96 28 128
1.9 15 .04 67 14 63
1.6 15 .07 61 8.8 51
1.3 16 .07 52 7.4 41
6.3 13 .18 32 6.8 36


rPrts per million

.8 115 3.0 26
.5 16 4.0 22
.0 160 350 27
.8 132 2,0 27

.9 .64 2.0 28
226 .2 52
- 11 .5 26
.8 224 .5 32

.2 204 12 48
.7 31 18 52

,7 68 18 72
.2 130 14 64
.9 181 7.5 50
.1 214 9.8 51
.9 203 38 104
4 16 5.8 26
.4 229 28 84

.1 214 17 63
.2 234 21 74
.1 232 18 67

.9 234 6.5 54
.8 204 89 174
,8 196 '32 242
6 150 51 123
2 153 34 93
7 152 16 74
3 70 27 71


.1

.1
,1
.1
.2
.1


.6




.3
.3
.0
.3

.3
.4
.3
i .5
.3
.5
.5

.1
.3


.1
.1
.1

.1
.1
1.8
.2

.1
.2

.2
.2
,1

.2
.1
.7
.0
.0
.0
.2

.2
.2
.0
.0

.2


162

202
183
215
266

276

305
262

330
332
312

322
480
68
421

347
395
377
328
644
820
524

446
360
321


Ia







99 5 266
15 2 101
138 7 334
115 7 297
142 7 343
184 0 439
15 6 108
188 4 439

183 11 478
64 38 270

108 52 398
142 36 437
168 20 447

188 12 484
237 70 711
16 3 107
228 40 653

198 22 548
222 30 619
214 24 593

200 8 523
298 130 1,020
354 194 1,300
22'4 102 7 77'

188 62 604.
160 36 512
108 50 398


7,1
5.8
7,3
7.1

7.3
7.6
5.7
7.4

7.2
6.1

6.7
7.1
7.4

7.2
7.4
6.1
7.5

T. 5

7.4

7.5
7.6
7.6
7.6

7.4
7.8'
T7.5


a I


45

30
30
25
20

55
475
450
250
110

95
60
5
45
25
45
40

55
40
45
95
110
120
210-





Table 12. (Conltnued)


HardtnesS
A& CC

Period so
f^ t I I I 1, I I ^ d


Parts per million


Apr. 1-10
Apr. 11-20
Apr. 21-30

May 1-10
May 11-19
May 20-31
June 1-6
June 7-20
June 21-30

July 1-10
July 11-19
July 20-31

Aug. 1-10
Aug. 11-20
Aug. 21-31

Sept. 1-10
Sept. 11-20
S Sept. 21-30


5.3
1.3
.7

1.9
2.3
11.1

3.5
67.5
4.7

15.7
15.0
84.4

127
39.6
195
44.2
24.1a
15.2


13
16
19

15
14
12

13
9.1
12

10
11
7.7
8.5
8.9
7.0

7.6
8.6
9.4


26
39
57
41
37
22

24
9.2
20

15
13
7.4
5.6
7.6
6.8

6.4
8.6
9.8


5.6
6.0
5.4
6.2
7.2
5.1
4.9
3.4
3.6
2.6
2.8
2.2

2.9
2.3
1.5

2.2
2.1
2.8


33
29
26

30
30
23

27
13
18

16
15
9.2

8.7
9.9
7.8
9.6
11
13,


54
57
40

50
24
31
26
25
16
14
18
14
16
19
22


88e
222
164

128
122
76
80
37
65

48-
44
28
26
28:
23
25
30.
36


348'
380
435

397
375
253
286.
136
195

159
150
97.3
86.8
100
82.6

93.5
108
127


7.2
8.,1

7.8
S7.9'
7.2

6.5
6.0
6.5

6.3
6.3
6.0

6.0
6.2
6.2
6.2
6.4
6.4


270'
gio
210
90

135
225
325
270
400.
450

420
460.
440

450
550
320

370
380
360







Tacle 13, frmp.ratui e `F) f' wj tor Moulirr (:reIk eIri, ",. f w ,bll*


rjitIber 1955 to September 1956
Day october lovember' IDcembor JMuary February Marrh April May Juno July August September

1----.----* 73 57 54 54 b 55 58 6 9 70 73- 74 74
2............ 7 58 53 52 60 55 58 69 70 75 74 7
3 .......... 74 59 56 51 64 60 64 69 68 73 75
4........... 74 6 62 50 59 6 64 70 69 73 7 75
5 ....-...... 75 58 65 53 64 62 62 70 70 73 74 4
6- -- 75 56 65 53 64 62 65 64 70 73 74 7
7 .......I.... 5 65 677
7 .*.-. 75 57 65 51 65 68 64 73 69 73 75 75
.......... 74 58 62 50 58 66 67 70 69 73 7
9---------- 74 59 59 42 59 60 64 69 69 74 7
10........ 74 62 55 43 64 54 6 68 70 74 75 72
11.....--------..- 7 63 50 42 64 61 60 72 70 74 7 7
12............ 72 61 52 46 61 63 60 70 71 75 7 6
1............ 73 61 53 8 54 65 57 69 71 76 74 6
15---.-.---- 68 63 60 42 53 69 58 70 72 75 75 69
16--------.. 62 64 58 47 62 71 61 70 72 76 75 70
17---- ---- 63 65 52 49 64 66 66 6 72 76 74
18- ..-- --.... 63 64 56 48 65 56 64 70 71 76 74 72
19----------- 61 65 56 53 67 60 60 66 71 76 74 72
20------------ 60 63 56 54 67 58 60 67 73 75 74 7
21----.----- 62 59 56 50 65 54 6 66 7 75 74 -.
22 ------. .64 58 60 52 57 52 6 9 73 75 75
23-------- 64 60 58 54 64 7 7 75 74 74
24--.....---..-- 2 6 55 52 57 6 65 71 71 75 74 74
25-------- ............ 67 62 60 53 5 62 71 73 75 74 72
26------------ 66 64 60 52 62 52 63 71 73 74 75 70
7 .------...-- 64 60 60 50 63 53 65 72 73 74 -- 66
2-----..... 64 63 60 50 65 65 73 3 74 73
29----------- 66 53 59 57 61 61 68 69 73 74 -- 70
0------------ 67 53 57 55 60 68 70 73 74 75 72
51------------ 62 51 59 6l 70 74 74

Average--..- 68 60 58 50 61 60 63 70 71 74 7 74





j 'I

t;:,



~
.:.;
:r~
I





i',




i I


i ::


: :
:iii :






,,,












.~ :


October 1956 to September 1957


Day October November December January February Mnrcb April May Jure July Aueust September

1...-------- 70 64 51 55 64 61 62 68 71 76 77 75
2----------- 70 66 49 51 64 57 61 67 71 75 78 76
------------ 70 68 51 -- 65 55 64 68 72 75 77 76
4------------ 71 70 51 53 65 58 67 69 72 75 76 76
5--------.--- 70 67 50 59 66 59 67 65 72 76 76 74

6--------- -- 66 49 56 63 59 66 64 73 75 76 75
7------------ 69 62 52 53 62 57 62 61 74 76 75 76
------- 63 55 51 63 54 65 64 75 76 76 76
9--.--- 70 61 57 59 65 53 64 65 75 76 76 74
10--------- 69 56 58 61 64 50 63 67 75 76 77 76

11--------- 69 54 57 60 63 52 62 68 75 76 77 77
12----- -- 68 55 57 58 555 61 69 7 76 76. 77
15--.-------. 68 57 60 57 54 58 64 70 74 75 77 .77
14------------ 69 58 62 59 55 61 67 70 74 75 77 77
15----------- 69 60 64 59 54 61 67 71 74 75 77 77

16------------ 69 6 5 63 54 61 66 70 74 75 77 76
17----------- 67 63 65 57 50 60 62 70 74 76 78 75
18------.---- 63 65 48 54 61 65 70 74 77 77 76
19------------ 67 64 64 45 60 63 64 70 74 77 76 76
2o------------ 68 63 65 51 58 64 63 72 75 76 76 76

21--------- 69 6 61 57 57 62 67 73 75 76 76 76
22----------- 70 60 64 61 57 62 65 74 75 75 74 77
23-------- 69 53 62 64 59 63 66 74 75 76 74 76
-------- 68 54 56 62 60 63 64 73 75 75 74 76
5------------ 68 54 58 61 60 65 64 73 73 75 73 75

26----- ------ 66 54 57 60 62 64 65 72 74 76 74 74
27------------ 65 51 56 62 64 60 66 72 76 76 74 74
28------------ 63 46 55 64 64 58 67 72 77 77 74 74
29----------- 64 50 -- 66 58 68 72 76 77 76 73
30---------- 65 50 53 66 57 69 72 76 76 76 74
31------------ 6 57 64 57 72 76 76

Average----- 68 59 58 58 60 59 65 70 74 76 76 76


Toble 13 (Continued)


''
1
r:





j :


i
1
"
i





1






i ;











TllC ,4, r, ernical nnlyts 'ren.. it. ?|, Jaii ,, FIn,l f, and Putnom Couwfri


lource and location


St. Jthna liver at Aator


Moultrie Creek at Toooi
Hvy, near Tocoi Junction

Tributary to Moultrie Creek
at railroad bridge near
Tocoi Junction
Moultrie Creek, j mile east
of hry. 207, near Toool
Junction
Moultrio Creek at Hwy. 207
near Tocoi Junction
Fort Peyton'e Branch at
Old Kings Road near
Moultrie-
Haw Creek at Hwy, 305 near
Bunnell
Middle Haw Creek at Hty.305
near Bunnell
Lake Dieeton near Seville
Little Haw Creek near
Seville


I MHardness
"I! "" '^ g -"-""
as OLOa cu

sT I d l h 9
9 ~ ~ ~ S H B r B ila Q~
,4 o ., 9 u H ol l' k"9 5 y S


12-18.52
10-6- 53
5-17.54

9-29-55


9.29-55 10


9-29-55

9-29-55


9-29-55

11-8 -55

11-8 -55
11-8 -55

11-8 -55


0,02

.01


.12


.23

.21


.17


28 11
15 7.0
47 23

70 11


7.1 2.7


19 4.5

23 7.4


5.9 3.2

23 8.9

7.0 1.8
3.5 1.8

3.9 1.4


Parts per million


98 56
42 38
153 93

14 264


23 10


29 42

20 58


16 12

43 10

11 8
3.8 6

3.8 7


38
17
67

2.0


375
177
619

268


215

55
27

26


1.8 48


5.2 63

3.8 57


1.0 36

29 06

3.5 28
2.5 12

1.0 12


705
360
1,220

430


164


271

269


130

485

138
68.3

72.8


6.8
7.3

7.8


5.4


6.8

7.1


5.7

5.5

5.5
5.9

6.0


40

65


720


600

480


480

700

450
160

165


-----~. .--. .l.


--- -- J






Table 14. (Continued)

,.! 'ardn es



Source and location


Parts per million

Orange Creek at Orange
'prings 24-24-56 1.9 .03 14 2.7 .6 .4 53 7.0 5.0 0.2 .1 61 46 2 107 7.7 35
Little Orange Creek near
Orange Springs 4-24-56 5.8 .01 9.6 2.2 3.2 .4 40 4.5 5.0 .2 .1 51 33 0 82.5 7.8 10
Oklawaha River at Riverside
Landing near Orange Spri s 4-27-56 8.9 .01 61 15 36 .3 148 64 80 .1 .0 322 214 92 617 8.0 10
S Deep Creek'near Roman 4-24-56 8.2 .0122 6.6 2.9 .3 101 .5 5.5 .2 .0 96 82 0 172 7.8 5
WtA Unnamed spring near Satsuma 4-19-56 8.5 .01 47, 22 195 7.4 101 55 350 .2 .0 784 208 125 1,370 8.0 10

'Eonia Creek near Florahome 4-20-56 1.0 .05 16 5.4 5. .2 60 12 9.0 .1 .9 80 62 13 145 6.8 5
Etonia Creek near Palatka 4-20-56 2.9 .05 8.4 2.7 5.0 .2 37 9.5 7.0 .2 .2 54 32 2 85.0 7.4 40
Rice Creek near Carraway 4-19-56 10 .0327 8.9 22 1.0 90 17 43 .2 .0 173 104 30 315 7.6 30
Unnamed branch near Palatka 4-19-56 6.3 .04 3.2 .7 5.1 .1 12 1.0 9.5 .1 .1 32 11 1 50.8 6.9
Crescent Lake at Crescent
City 11-8 -55 -- -- 42 18 104 635 55 210 -- -- 460 179 128 910 7.2 460
Crescent Lake near Andalusia 11-8 -55 -- -- 56 22 11 78 74 234 -- -- 53 230 166 1,060 7.3 45
Sixteen Mile Creek near
Hastings 11-9 -55 -- 96 35 78 114 183 191 -- -- 639 384 o90 1,160 7.4 200
Six Mile Creek at
Bakersville 11-8 55 40 6.9 15 112 22 -- 172 128 36 331 7. 210
?,,"; // '






,1 ,








T(bl I5, Ch.mlical Arnulye ,- Sr, Johin Rivyr Huar DLand


&a- C&nSa

P er od .. 1i 1 I h U J


Parts per million

Jan. 1.10, 1948 4,445 4,4 0,0 o 2 11 77 .1 46 27 150 0.0 04 555 303 65 620 6.7
Jan, 11.0 .601 4.0 .02 24 1 84 :6 48 30 160 .0 .4 378 109 70 678 6.6 90
Jan, 281.5 0195 3.9 ,01 2 12 80 4,0 48 2a 160 .0 ,4 371 112 72 664 6,7 95
Feb. 1-10 5,452 4.1 .01 24 12 84 4.0 42 31 160 .0 .4 369 109 75 674 6.7 110
eb. 11.80 5,04 2.8 .03 25 12 89 5.6 40 52 170 .0 .4 391 11 79 703 6.7 105
reb. 21-29 5,917 5.0 .01 27 13 97 5.6 46 55 190 0 417 121 85 760 6.8 100
Mar. 1-10 5,500 5.8 .01 30 14 100 .8 49 57 190 .0 .3 45 12 92 791 6.9 100
Mar. 11-.0 5,521 5.7 .01 31 14 104 4.0 55 39 200 .0 .4 458 155 90 828 6.9 95
Mar. 21-31 3,754 8.1 .03 31 15 106 4.0 5 40 200 .0 .4 466 159 95 840 7.0 95
Apr. 1-10 2,763 5.6 .03 34 16 119 5.2 58 46 22 .0 .4 517 151 103 915 6.7 90
Apr. 11-20 1,868 5.6 .02 37 17 129 3.4 62 50 242 .0 .4 564 162 111 1,000 6.7 70
Apr. 21-50 1,569 84 .03 46 22 154 4.0 86 1 88 .0 .4 662 205 155 1,00 6.9 50
May 1-10 1,782 6.7 .01 46 21 149 .8 84 63 282 .0 .2 659 201 132 1,180 7.0 50
May 11-20 1,585 7.5 .01 48 22 160 .0 86 66 300 .0 .5 698 10 140 1,50 7.0
May 21-31 1,46 10 .07 51 24 190 6.2 104 73 335 .0 .1 74 226 141 1,370 7.1 40
June 1-10 1, 92 9.0 .08 53 25 146 5.6 102 72 320 .0 .1 742 235 151 150 7.2 35
June 11-20 1,524 9.0 .08 57 25 182 109 80 335 .0 .2 782 16 1,400 7.2
June 21-50 1,765 6.8 .07 54 26 198 7.8 95 76 370 .0 .1 783 242 164 1j460 7.3 40
July 1-10 1,762 9.4 .07 56 24 190 7.5 101 81 350 .0 .0 786 239 156 1,440 7.2 35
July 11-20 1,781 9.0 .1 62 2 176 6.4 98 106 320 .0 .9 776 258 178 1,590 7.5 0
July 21-51 2,525 8.4 .16 60 26 205 6.6 83 108 370 .0 .5 839 257 189 1,500 7.2 75
Aug. 1-10 5,014 7.6 .20 57 29 215 6.2 58 121 410 .0 .3 920 261 216 1,650 7.1 80
Aug. 11-20 5,545 8.8 .16 75 24 181 6.9 58 121 33550 .0 .2 783 236 188 1,580 7.1 160
Aug. 21-1 4,545 6.4 .14 48 26 171 .0o 49 105 315 .0 .4 742 227 186 1,300 6.7 180
Sept. 1-10 4,045 2.6 .04 40 22 144 11 45 81 276 .0 .4 646 190 153 1,140 6.7 220
Sept. 11-20 5,568 .0 .04 38 21 137 12 61 6 269 .0 1.0 619 181 11 1,110 6.7 210
Sept. 21-30 5,886 2.4 .08 34 18 125 5.4 54 56 239 .0 .6 526 159 115 970 6.7 180







'







: :
'''



r


;


I.i,


~~


Oct. 1-10,
Oct. 11-20
Oct. 21-31

Nov. 1-10
Nov. 11-20
Nov. 21-30
Dec. 1-10
Dec. 11-20
Dec. 21-31

Jan. 1 12-20, 1949
Jan. 21-24, 26-31

Feb. 1-10
Feb. 11-20
Feb. 21-28

Mar. 1-10
Mar. 11-20
Mar. 21-31

Apr. 1-10
Apr. 11-20
Apr. 21-24, 26-30

May 1-10
May 11-20
May 21-31

June 1-10
Juno 11-20
June 21-30


11,820 1.8 .16
13,380 1.2 .12
11,820 2.0 .12

9,748 1.0 .04
7,660 1.6 .08
6,161 2.4 .08

4,897 4.3 .12
4,830 4.0 .09
3,577 5.5 .14
-- 8.2 04
2,534 7.7 .08
2,234 6.5 .06
2,096 6.8 .06
1,634 6.5 .20

1,813 8.2 .04
1,747 7.7 .1o
2,058 6.0 .12

1,696 7.4 .20
1,779 6.8 .08
1,654 8.2 .04

1,634 5.9 .01
1,405 6.5 .01
1,751 7.8 .03
1,683 5.9 .08
2,221 7.6 .03
2,437 5.1 .03


22
16
16

16
18
20

21
23
26

29
32

57
38
43
46
50
45
52
53
56

52
54
56

56
56
55


11
7.2
7.0

7.1
8.2
9.1

9.0
9,4
12

14
13

17
17
20

22
22
20

26
20
26

26
28
26

50
24
23


29
16
14

14
17
19

27
28
35
44
52
60
63
60

93
71
86

81
98
86

83
82
85
86
85
91


135
93
92
88
.10
118

124
132
153
200
200

223
233
262

226
304
232

340
245
330

365
345
380

402
358
365


.6
.6


.5
.6
.6

.2
.3
.4

1.1
1.0

1.0
.9
1.0

1.1
.6
.8

.6
.6
.8

.7
.6
,8

1.0
.7
1,0


323
227
213

224
253
281

321
337
388

435
524

563
574
666

695
763
715
843
778
814

876
847
855

897
838
840


100 69
70 44
69 43
65 40
79 50
87 49
89 54
96 58
114 74

130 86
133 81
162 105
165 111
190 133
205 136
215 151
195 122

237 166
214 .133
247 176

237 156
250 171
247 162

263 186
238 154
232 165


577
387
350

374
429
476

525
550
700

769
861

946
977
1,080

1,190
1,260
1,200

1,390
1,310
1,370
1,480
1,420
1,560

1,610
1,510
1,510


160
170
210

160
180
140

120
120
120

80
90
65
80
80

60
50
70
60
50
50

35
35
30

50
35
35


Table 15. (Continued)

Hardness
Sas CaC03


SPat per million
Parts per million

















Farts pir million

July 1-10 2,372 1 ,3 .04 57 32 242 70 109 j40 .1 1.4 1,000 274 210 1,760 6.6 35
July 110 3,31 5.1 ,00 63 278 56 15 50 .1 6 1,090 313 268 1,890 6.8 50
July 21-31 3,847 4.6 .c 55 34 241 46 150 450 .1 7 967 T77 239 1,690 6.8 90
Aug. 1-10 3,007 6,5 .02 52 29 235 48 142 405 1 .8 869 24 210 1,520 6.9 20
Aug. 1U.20 2,618 7.0 .02 50 29 200 54 142 345 .1 .7 826 244 200 1,440 6.8 140
Aug. 21.31 2,55 6.8 .02 46 26 198 56 17 335 .1 1.2 751 222 176 1,300 6.9 100
Sept. 1.10 5,631 5.9 .0S 37 20 142 42 92 250 .1 .3 602 175 140 1,020 7.0 90
Sept. 11-20 6,010 5,4 .05 30 15 107 6 62 195 .1 .6 466 137 107 794 6.7 120
Sept. 21-30 6,591 7.8 .01 26 13 93 42 51 165 .1 .5 406 18 84 674 6.9 80
Oct. 1-10 8,779 5.9 .01 23 11 73 40 42 130 .1 .6 346 103 70 558 7.1 150
Oct. 11.20 9,567 5.1 .00 20 1166 36 38 120 .1 .6 293 95 66 461 6.7 160
Oct. 21.31 8,404 7.7 .30 19 8.6 60 .6 34 30 108 .1 1.2 272 83 55 475 6.6 160
Nov. 1-10 7,471 7.7 -20 19 8.3 66 .6 37 28 118 .0 .9 281 82 51 492 6.8 150
Nov. 1120 6,355 7.7 .20 20 8.6 64 38 27 114 .0 .8 282 85 54 497 6.7 10
Nov. 21-30 5,793 7.2 .20 22 10 68 .9 40 32 123 .0 .8 300 96 63 536 6.9 120
Dec. 1-10 4,464 7.2 .20 24 11 75 .0 42 40 136 .1 .7 329 105 71 588 7.0 130
Dec. 11-20 5,461 7.7 .- 27 12 84 1.6 48 39 153 .0 .6 366 117 77 650 7.0 100
Dec. 21-31 5,927 7.7 .10 28 12 87 1.4 50 45 163 .0 .4 387 119 78 697 7.0 240


Toble I, (1Con, uid)





iii i
f~' :

rt; ':! '' '
i ''
,~ le ;

: : :~ I











iki;:; t


"''
,
~!
L: '":
i:" i :~: ~ ~

'i' '"



~~ ~

i


1-----.......--
2-----------
5-----------
4------------






11............
1----------
6-----------
7------------
9-----------
9-----------
10--------
11-----------
12------------
13-----------
14------------
15------------
16------------
17----------
18-----------
19---------
20---------.

21-----------
22---------
23------------
24----------
25------------

26------------
27-----------
28---------
29-----------
30---------- .
31------. ---


63
64
64
62
60

59
59
60
59
60

60
60
61
59
56

54
54
54
55
56

59
59
59
60
60

59
59
61
61
61
63 1


I


61 72
59 72
59 70
60 74
62 72

61 70
63 68
65 69
67 68
66 70

64 70
65 73
66 71
67 70
66 68

65 70
65 69
66 72
68 73
67 75

68 75
70 76
69 77
68 76
68 77

70 77
70 77
74 76
74 74
71
S71

66 72


79
79
80
80
81

82
81
81
79
80


6o2
1:2

132
b2

82
82
83
82
--2


---56
85
85
85
85

85
86

63


80
82
82
81
78
78'
78
78
78
78


70
69
70
70
70

70
70
70
71
69


74
74
74
74
72

72
74
72
78
78

77
79
77
78
78

77
78
78
78
77

77
78
78
78
78

77
77
78
78
78


i


i


I ~
!


;;;'
'
I::I
i


'


~i%:;
i

; i,

i

~I


Averae---- 59


1 r I r- r 1 ,


76


Table 16. Temperature (OF) of nter St. John. "ivr ernr ErLnrnd

Day J ry Fbe Jy 1948

Day January February March April May Jibe July August Septembe October November December


80 b2 84 84 86 78 74 68
80 81 83 84 84 78 74 68
80 61 84 83 84 78 75 70
81 82 84 83 82 78 75 71
81 b2 84 84 84 76 75 72

82 83 85 84 62 77 73 73
83 64 84 83 81 76 75 72
82 ,4 86 83 80 (6 76 72
82 Lt 86 83 80 *7 75 73
81 b4 86 83 60 73 76 72

81 84 85 84 eo 73 76 o7
81 tL 6 84 79 71 76 69
82 85 85 84 79 73 74 70
82 L7 04 84 79 71 76 70
81 89 82 85 80 YO 74 70

82 i64 84 84 79 66 73 67
02 L7 84 P4 79 70 75 67
83 L6 86 e4 78 69 74 66
81 66 84 64 80 71 74 66
80 66 84 85 80 73 70 65
81 62 84 70 65


61 84 84 84 2 75 74 69

















1. .:......
7 ...........

S............
I:::::::::::::
..............
10..--------*--
6 .............








17 .............
10.............
81..-------


91............
122.......-.p..

1 5.............



25......--.......
ly.......------

1 7-... ...-

19------------



18------------


29............

30 .............
23-----------
25----
2-6---------
26-----------
....------
3 1------------
31--****-----


65
66
66
66
67
68
68
69
69

70
71
71
71

72
72
72
72
71
70


... Ji.y Auuat bupseimber I otbrbe 1 Noverbtr December


70
69
69
70
71
70
71
71
72
75
7o
70
70
70
70
71
71
71
71
73
75
72
74
75
74
73
74
72


68
68
68
69
68
68




69
68

69

69
69
69
69
69


70
70
70
74
70
70
71
70
75
79
78
78
79


76
77
7)
78
76
77
76
76
80
79
80
80
73
78
72
77
79
78
73
78
78
78
80
81
82
80
80
80
78
81
80


79
LI
77
77
to
i0
LO
Lt
Ll
60
79
'76
to
61

62
64
84

62
64

E2
83
62
82
el
82
83
82
83


84
84
84
85
85
84
84
85
85
84
84
85
85
85
84


83


84
83
82
82
83
84
84
85
85
86
86


85
84
83
85
83

84
85
85
84
86
84
83
80
81
82

83
85
85
85
85
84
82
81
82
83
83
80
79
78
81
80


81
82

05
83
82
84
84
85
83
81
80
80
81
80
81
82
83
82
84
83
82
82
81
82
80
o80
80
79
79


79
78
78
79
78

79
80
80
80
79
78
79
78
79
77
76
78
78
78
76
76
76
75
71
76
77
76
77
77
78
79


Average --- -- 71 70 74 78 80 84 8 1 82 78 63 68


76
75
70
6a
60
61
60
61
62
69
62
70
70
69
70
68
62
62
61
60
62
59
60
60
61

59
51
52
53
61


59
59
60
55
60
do
60
59
61
62
62
65
60
60
62
63
65
60
65
66
60
62
62
62
64
65
65
66
67
65
68
67


--


T1 C l~~-T L --L


Tlkd It. (Cnminud#)


January February Ma oh


April










FLRD GEOLOSk ( IC SUfRiW


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