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 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Abstract
 Introduction
 Surface water characteristics
 Floods
 Gaging stations and records
 Appendix I
 Appendix II
 Appendix III
 Appendix IV


FGS



Surface water resources of Polk County, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 25 )
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001085/00001
 Material Information
Title: Surface water resources of Polk County, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 25 )
Series Title: ( FGS: Information circular 25 )
Physical Description: vi, 123 p. : illus., maps (part fold.) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Heath, Richard C
Geological Survey(U.S.)
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1961
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Water-supply -- Florida -- Polk County   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by R.C. Heath.
General Note: "Prepared by U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey."
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001692716
oclc - 01720954
notis - AJA4790
System ID: UF00001085:00001

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Abstract
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 10a
        Page 11
    Surface water characteristics
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 14a
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 11
    Floods
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Gaging stations and records
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 28
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
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    Appendix I
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Appendix II
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Appendix III
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Appendix IV
        Page 115
        Page 116
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        Copyright
            Main
Full Text


STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF. CONSERVATION
Ernest Mitts, Director

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Robert O. Vernon, Director





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25





SURFACE WATER RESOURCES
OF
POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA






By
Richard C. Heath
U. S. Geological Survey



Prepared by U. S. Geological Survey
in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey


Tallahassee, Florida
1961




F h




AGRI-
CULTURAL
LIBRARY


i
i











CONTENTS

Page
Abstract ................ ...................... 1
Introduction .................................... 2
Geography................................. 2
Drainage features ......................... 8
Surface water characteristics .................... 11
Water stages ............................... 11
Lakes .................. ............ 11
Streams ............................ 14
Streamflow ........... ....... ........... .16
Spring discharge .......................... 17
Floods .......................................... 19
Occurrence .............. ................. 19
Estimation ............ ................... 19
Gaging stations and records ..................... 25
Appendix I. Stage-duration curves for lakes in
Polk County, Florida ............... 93
Appendix II. Stage-duration curves for streams in
Polk County, Florida ............... 105
Appendix III. Flow-duration curves for streams in
Polk County, Florida ............... 109
Appendix IV. Monthly and yearly mean discharges
at gaging stations in Polk County,
Florida............................. 115




ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure
1 Map of Florida showing location of Polk County 3
2 Population growth, Polk County, Florida ..... 3
3 Aerial view of Lakeland, Florida............. 5
4 Annual rainfall, Bartow, Florida ............ 6
5 Temperature and rainfall, Bartow, Florida. 6
6 Mining land-pebble phosphate in Polk County
(1958) .................................. .. 7
7 Cypress Gardens ............. ...... .... 9
8 Drainage basins, Polk County, Florida.... facing 10







Page
9 Stage hydrograph, Lake Howard at Winter
Haven, Florida................................. 12
10 Stage-duration curve, Lake Arbuckle near
Avon Park, Florida ....................... 13
11 Stage hydrographs for lakes in Polk County. facing 14
12 Effect of pumpage from lakes .............. 15
13 Kissengen Spring near Bartow, Florida, during
flood of September, 1933. ................... 20
14 Kissengen Spring near Bartow, Florida (April
1947) ................................... 21
15 Peak stages during flood of October, 1953 -
Kissimmee River .... .................... 22
16 Damage to bridge on State Highway 60 at the
Kissimmee River caused by flood of October,
1953 ..................................... 23
17 Peak flow, flood frequency, and drainage area
relationship, Kissimmee River ............. 24
18 Peak flow, flood frequency, and drainage area
relationship, Polk County streams .......... 25
19 Peak flow reduction coefficients, Polk County,
Florida .................................. 26
20 Surface water gaging stations in Polk County,
Florida ................................. .facing 26
21 Stage-duration curve, Lake Arbuckle near
Avon Park, Florida ....................... 94
22 Stage-duration curve, Lake Clinch at Frost-
proof, Florida .................. ........... 94
23 Stage-duration curve, Lake Conine at Florence
Villa, Florida .... ............. .......... 95
24 Stage-duration curve, Crooked Lake near Bab-
son Park, Florida ......................... 95
25 Stage-duration curve, Cypress Lake near
St. Cloud, Florida ........................... 96
26 Stage-duration curve, Deer Lake at Winter
Haven, Florida ........ ......... ... ...... 96
27 Stage-duration curve, Lake Hamilton at Lake
Hamilton, Florida......................... 97
28 Stage-duration curve, Lake Hartridge at Win-
ter Haven, Florida ........................ 97
29 Stage-duration curve, Lake Hatchineha near
Haines City, Florida ...................... 98
30 Stage-duration curve, Lake Howard at Winter
Haven, Florida ............. ........ ...... 98










Page
31 Stage-duration curve, Lake Jessie near Au-
burndale, Florida ........................ 99
32 Stage-duration curve, Lake Kissimmee near
Lake Wales, Florida ...................... 99
33 Stage-duration curve, Lake Lulu at outlet near
Eloise, Florida .............................. 100
34 Stage-duration curve, Lake Mariana near Au-
burndale, Florida ......................... 100
35 Stage-duration curve, Mountain Lake near Lake
Wales, Florida ............................ 101
36 Stage-duration curve, Lake Otis at Winter
Haven, Florida ............................... 101
37 Stage-duration curve, Lake Parker at Lake-
land, Florida............................. 102
38 Stage-duration curve, Lake Rochelle at Lake
Alfred, Florida ................... ........ 102
39 Stage-duration curve, Scott Lake near Lake-
land, Florida ..................... ........ 103
40 Stage-duration curve, Kissimmee River below
Lake Kissimmee, Florida .................. 106
41 Stage-duration curve, Weohyakapka Creek near
Lake Wales, Florida ..................... 106
42 Stage -duration curve, Reedy Creek near Frost-
proof, Florida............................. 107
43 Flow-duration curve, Catfish Creek near Lake
Wales, Florida ........................... 110
44 Flow-duration curve, Hatchineha-Kissimmee
Canal near Lake Wales, Florida ............ 110
45 Flow-duration curve, Kissimmee River below
Lake Kissimmee, Florida .................. 111
46 Flow-duration curve, Lake Lulu outlet at
Eloise, Florida ............................ 111
47 Flow-duration curve, Peace Creek drainage
canal near Alturas, Florida ................ 112
48 Flow-duration curve, Peace Creek drainage
canal near Dundee, Florida ................ 112
49 Flow-duration curve, Peace River at Bartow,
Florida .................. ................. 113
50 Flow-duration curve, Reedy Creek near Frost-
proof, Florida ............................ 113








Table Page
I Discharge measurements or observations of no
flow of Kissengen Spring near Bartow, Florida 18
2 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Catfish
Creek near Lake Wales, Florida............ 116
3 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Hat-
chineha-Kissimmee Canal near Lake Wales,
Florida ................................... 117
4 Monthly andyearly mean discharge of Kissim-
mee River below Lake Kissimmee, Florida.. 118
5 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Lake
Lulu outlet at Eloise, Florida .............. 119
6 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Peace
Creek drainage canal near Alturas, Florida.. 120
7 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Peace
Creek drainage canal near Dundee, Florida.. 121
8 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Peace
River at Bartow, Florida .................. 122
9 Monthly and yearly mean discharge of Reedy
Creek near Frostproof, Florida ............ 123










SURFACE WATER RESOURCES
OF
POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA

By
Richard C. Heath



ABSTRACT

Polk County, the fourth largest county in Florida, is
in the "ridge" section of the peninsula. It lies on a topo-
graphic high and surface drainage is outward in all directions
from the center. Six major rivers drain from the area.

Rainfall is abundant. Although much water leaves by
way of the surface streams, large amounts are storedin the
nearly 500 lakes within the county. These lakes are vitally
important to the economy.

Frequent flooding of lowland areas takes place, espe-
cially along the Kissimmee River. The floods are caused,
usually, bythe heavy rains that accompany tropical storms.
Procedures are presented for estimating the severity of
future floods.

The U. S. Geological Surveyhas collected water records
at 107 sites within the area. The location of each site is
given on a map and the records are presented in summary
form. Duration curves show the characteristic fluctuations
in stream flow and in lake levels.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


INTRODUCTION

The rapid increase in population in Polk County during
the last decade has been accompanied by a several-fold in-
crease in the number and complexity of problems pertaining
tothe use andcontrolof the streams andlakes of the county.
The increase in problems has increased the need for more
information about the occurrence and movement of surface
water. The primary purpose of this report is to give that
information. Its secondary purpose is to give information
that will promote an understanding of the nature and causes
of the problems or that will aid in arriving at practical solu-
tions.

The water records given herein were collected by the
Surface Water Branch of the U. S. Geological Survey. The
funds required for this workwere supplied bythe U. S. Geol-
ogical Survey and the following:

Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District
Florida Geological Survey
Florida Division of Water Survey and Research
Florida State Road Department
Okeechobee Flood Control District
Polk County
Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund of
the State of Florida
U. S. Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District
Winter Haven Lake Region Boat Course District

The report was prepared under the supervision of
A. O. Patterson, District Engineer, U.S. Geological Survey.
Funds for its preparation were furnished jointly by the
Florida Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey.


Geography

Polk County, namedfor James E. Polk, llth President
of the United States, is in the center of the peninsula of
Florida (fig. 1). It is bordered on the north by Lake and
Sumter counties, onthe east by Osceola County, on the south








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 3


u r or mo *o* Oo o a. TO




T L
S-- s '--. I




























Figure 1. Map of Florida showing location of Polk County.







1960 POPLIa ON aSo. OI .. COrr&cSL riGunts
20o ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- | ---------_______















1C5su, DISTRICT OrrIcc, LICLAND, FLA.
50* ------ --------- ---- ---- ---- ----____
~--1






zoo ---- ---- ----- ----- ----- ---- ---- _________ L____






125



t! ----- ------
I


Figure 2. Population growth, Polk County, Florida.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


by Highlands and Hardee counties, and on the west by Hills-
borough and Pasco counties. Polk is the fourth largest
county in the State. It is approximately 40 miles wide and
50 miles long and has a land area of 1,861 square miles
(1, 191,040 acres).

Since Polk County was formed in 1861 its population
has increased steadily and in 1950 was 123,997 persons
(fig. 2). The population growth of the principal towns has
kept pace with the growth of the county. In 1950, Lakeland
(fig. 3) had a population of 30, 851; Bartow (the county seat)
had a population of 8, 694; and Winter Haven had a population
of 8,605.

The climate of Polk County is subtropical. The aver-
age temperature is about 72 degrees and the average annual
rainfall is approximately 54 inches. January is usually the
coldest month and August the warmest. Temperatures as
low as 18 degrees and as high as 102 degrees have been
experienced. In most years June is the wettest month and
November is the driest. More than half of the rain falls
during June, July, August, and September. Figure 4 shows
annual rainfall at Bartow from 1887 to 1957 and figure 5
shows average and extremes of rainfall and temperature at
Bartow for the periods of record.

Polk County has a diversified economy. The principal
sources of income are citrus, phosphate, agricultural crops,
cattle, and tourist trade. The county has more acreage
devotedto citrus growing (95, 992 acres in 1948-49) than any
other county in the State and produces about one-third of the
citrus grown in Florida. Polk County has more pasture land
and produces more cattle than any other county inthe State.
Some of the largest land-pebble phosphate mines in the world
are locatedin the county. These mines (fig. 6) produce about
three-fourths of the phosphate mined in the United States.

Nearly all of Polk County lies in what has been called
(Cooke, 1945, p. 8) the Central Highlands topographic
division. Its soils are prevailingly sandy. Land surface
elevations are as low as 50 feet and as high as 305 feet
above sea level, but most of the land lies between 75 feet
and 250 feet above sea level.






1-t:' ~ ~ rL -~Tl
9,


Figure 3. Aerial view of Lakeland, Florida. Lake in left foreground is
Lake Hollingsworth; large lake in upper center is Lake Parker.
(Photograph courtesy of Robertson Studio, Bartow, Florida. ) a






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Figure 4. Annual rainfall, Bartow, Florida



125
-lEA. RECORD (IPr7-1, 97 71--EAR RECORD OR aL9aAGCc
MAX I"| MOhWHLY 64--EA- MccORD roR ExtR&E.s





MOX11U1 UCNTHLY
u J nU MIJM MONTHLY







e 5. T te ad r Bto, AFlori



AVERAGE OKrNTHLY
MWUINIMJJJ A 5T NLy











Figure 5. Temperature and rainfall, Bartow, Florida


z r
t *
































Figure 6. Mining land-pebble phosphate in Polk County (1958).
(Photograph courtesy of International Minerals and
Chemical Corporation, Bartow, Florida.)






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Nearly 500 lakes, ranging in size from less than an
acre to more than 35,000 acres (55 square miles), lie within
the county and along its borders. These lakes have had a
decided influence upon the development of the economy, since
many enterprises depend entirely upon the lakes for their
well-being. Others, though not directly dependent, derive
much of their income from activities that would take place
on a much smaller scale were the lakes not present. The
tourist trade, for example, probably would not have become
nearly so important if the natural beauty of the region had
not been enhanced further by the lakes. One of the many
widely known attractions in the county, Cypress Gardens
(fig. 7), has combined the esthetic qualities of Lake Eloise,
on whose shore it is located, with water-ski shows, flower
gardens, and other entertaining features. Drawing many
thousands of visitors each year, it has contributed sub-
stantially to the economy.

Indirectly, the lakes help the economy by providing a
convenient and economical supply of water for irrigating
citrus groves, crop lands, and pastures. In 1956, irrigated
land in the county amounted to 50,000 acres and, on the
average, water was being applied at the rate of 66, 000, 000
gallons (200 acre-feet) per day. 1 Some of this water came
from wells, but most of it came from lakes.


Drainage Features

Polk County is on the topographic high of Peninsular
Florida, from which water flows in all directions (fig. 8).
Water from the eastern 35 percent of the county drains east-
ward and southward into the Kissimmee River and from the
south-central 35 percent into the Peace River. Along the
western boundary, water from 8 percent of the county drains
into the Alafia River and water from 4 percent drains into
the Hillsborough River. On the north, water from about 15
percent drains northwestward into the Withlacoochee River,


IFlorida's Water Resources; report of the Florida
Water Resources Commission, 1957.

































Figure 7. Cypress Gardens. Lake Eloise is in foreground; citrus groves
in background. Circular pattern in upper center is formed by
parked automobiles. (Photograph courtesy of Florida Cypress
Gardens Association, Inc., Winter Haven, Florida..)





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


and drainage from about 3 percent moves northward into the
headwaters system of the Oklawaha River, a tributary to the
St. Johns River.

The relatively low, flat prairie land lying-in the Kis-
simmee River basin is characterizedby large, fairly shallow
lakes. Shallow natural channels andman-made canals allow
water to pass from lake to lake, and eventually to reach the
river. Duringflood times, though, much water moves over-
land on its way to collecting channels. The result is that
large areas sometimes are covered by a thin, slow moving
sheet of water.

In the high, rolling, sandy lands of the Peace River
basin, channels tend to be better defined, although many of
the natural passages between lakes are more accurately
described as long, narrow, wooded swamps than as well
defined streams. In many places these natural drains have
been improved by canalization. In this part of the county
lakes are more numerous, although smaller, than in the
Kissimmee Valley section. Many of the lakes have no sur-
face outlet and outward drainage may take place through the
ground. In several areas, lakes that had no surface con-
nections or were imperfectly joined have been connected by
canals and made into full fledged drainage systems. Notable
amongthese is the series of lakes at Winter Haven that have
been so connected. In this group, ten large lakes have been
connected by canals that are of sufficient size to permit small
pleasure boats to ply the whole "chain. Several smaller
lakes have been connectedto the chainby culverts or ditches.
The flow of water out of the chain is regulated by control
structures so that optimum-use levels are maintained. The
construction andoperation of this systemhas reducedflood-
ing by providing drainage ways, prevented overdrainage by
maintaining controlled water levels, and has created a
valuable recreational and residential asset.

Along the western side of the county, in the Alafia
River basin and the Hillsborough River basin, the land is
flat, fairly high, and is overgrown with pine and palmetto.
Lakes are few and small. Although the few streams in this
area are small, most of them have well defined channels.















% It

\ I
x i VER BASSk oA, II
POLK COUNT Y
SFLORIDA

-, Ci SCALE IN MILES



*- U E*o
-c
e- .. L ., V AN


C HARDER N









: HIGHLANDS COUNTY
A o,







4_a I MFOR


Figure 8. Drainage basins, Polk County, Florida







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


About 285 square miles of the northwestern part of the
county lies in the Withlacoochee River basin. The area is a
tableland tilted slightly downward to the northwest, with a
slope of less than a foot per mile. It is characterized by
innumerable small, low hammocks and shallow, saucer-like
depressions (cypress ponds). Except for the Withlacoochee
River which runs along the northern boundary of the county
there are practically no natural channels in the area.
Formerly, in times of excessive rainfall, surplus water
moved by overland routes to the river. In recent years,
however, efforts have been made to confine the drainage to
definite channels by extensive ditching.

A long, narrow strip of the St. Johns River basin ex-
tends down into Polk County from the north. It is separated
from the Withlacoochee River basin to the west and the Kis-
simmee River basin to the east by parallel, north-south,
relict dune lines. This area is high and sandy, and contains
several large lakes. Drainage is northward through two
poorly defined, swampy channels.


SURFACE WATER CHARACTERISTICS

Water Stages

Lakes

The day-to-day fluctuation in lake levels is brought
about by combinations of many factors. The factors that
usually have the greatest effect on lake levels are rainfall,
evaporation, transpiration, surface inflow, surface outflow,
pumpage, seepage, and percolation. Not all lakes are af-
fected by all these factors. However, all lakes are affected
by some of them and most lakes are affected by most of
them. Some of the factors add water to lakes and tend to
raise lake levels; others remove water and tend to lower lake
levels. Rainfall, surface inflow, and percolation add water
to lakes; the other factors remove water.

Each lake rises and falls in a manner that is peculiar
to that particular lake. In other words, each lake responds



























Figure 9. Stage hydrograph, Lake Howard at Winter Haven, Florida.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 13

to the factors in a characteristic manner. The characteristic
manner in which a lake responds is revealed by its stage
record. The stage record can be plotted in the form of a
hydrograph, as has been done for Lake Howard on figure 9,
ih order to show the characteristic fluctuations. For some
purposes, abetter way to showthe characteristic fluctuations
is to arrange the stages usually the daily means in
descending order of magnitude and plot them in the form of a
stage-duration curve, as shown on figure 10 for Lake
Arbuckle. In this form the record indicates the percent of
time that the lake has been at a particular level, or higher.
For example, the level of Lake Arbuckle, from the curve,
has been at least 55 feet above mean sea level for about 26
percent of the time.

The value of a duration curve comes from its use as
an indicator of future behavior. However, it can be put to
this use only if certain conditions that prevailed in the past
continue to prevail in the future. An important requirement
is that there be no extensive change in the physical conditions

9 -I1


PERCENT OF TIME

Figure 10. Stage-duration curve, Lake Arbuckle near Avon
Park, Florida


57






54
53

52




I so 4G6o 7 so 90 .





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


of the lake. The construction of a canal to remove water
from what previously had been a landlocked lake, for example,
would change the stage characteristics, and a duration curve
prepared from the record collected before the change would
not be applicable.

Stage-duration curves have beenprepared for 19 lakes
in Polk County and are given in Appendix I. In addition, the
stage records for 15 lakes, summarized and plotted in hydro-
graph form, are given in figure 11.

Duration curves are drawn frequently on probability
paper, on which they tend to be straight lines. The vertical
scale may be either arithmetic or logarithmic, whichever
fits the data better. The logarithmic scale lends itself to
flow-duration curves, whereas the arithmetic scale is better
for stage-duration curves. For the purpose of this report,
however, the curves were drawn on arithmetic coordinate
paper because arithmetic plotting on both scales gives a
more accurate visual impression of the duration of stages
or discharges.

Unless an intensive local study of an individual lake is
undertakenthe effect of pumping water fromit is conjectural.
Large amounts of water are lost to evaporation every month,
and for lakes of substantial size it is likely that much more
water is lostbythis process than couldbe pumped byriparian
owners.

To illustrate the effect on a lake level by pumping,
alone, a family of simple curves showing 30-day changes
in elevation for selected rates of pumping from lakes of
areas up to 14 square miles is shown in figure 12.


Streams

Stream stages fluctuate in response to the same factors
that affect lake levels, butnot in a comparable manner. The
primary factors that determine the stage of a stream at a
particular place are the rate of flow and channel conditions.

If channel conditions remain stable, an increase in
flowbrings about an increase in stage and a decrease inflow






SJ FMAM J J ASON D


58

5;"6I --F

54 9 ---,-






453
49 t- -

LAKE ARBUCKLE
(RECORD BEGAN DECEMBER 19411


LAKE HAMILTON
S RECORD BEGAN JUNE 1945)

SJ FMAM J J ASON D
.Z5




'3 !

2-LF-- -------
3 6 ,3 -- -- --- -
30.

28
27

25
24
:276- --- ----


LAKE LULU
(RECORD BEGAN FEBRUARY 1946)


LAKE CLINCH
(RECORD BEGAN JANUARY 1947)


LAKE HARTRIDGE
(RECORD BEGAN FEBRUARY 1946)


CROOKED LAKE
(RECORD BEGAN APRIL 1945)


58 J FMA M J J A S ON D
57
56
55
54
53 -
52"
51
50 ,IT
49 "2
48-
47
46-
LAKE HATCHINEHA
(RECORD BEGAN JANUARY 1942)


I I
I I

I'


LAKE MARIANA
(RECORD BEGAN FEBRUARY 1946)


12


10 -
09 --
08 __
07-- -
06
MOUNTAIN LAKE
(RECORD BEGAN APRIL 1945)


Solid lines show maximum and minimum
month-end stages from beginning of
record to September 1957


CYPRESS LAKE
(RECORD BEGAN JANUARY 1942)


136
135
134
133
132
131
130
129
128
127-
126
125
124-
LAKE HOWARD
(RECORD BEGAN APRIL 1945)

J FMAM J J AS 0 ND

83
82

80

78 .. .. .
77
76
75
74
73
72
LAKE REEDY
(RECORD BEGAN OCTOBER 1946)


Dotted lines show month-end averages
based on 10-year period, October 1947
to September 1957.


DEER LAKE
(RECORD BEGAN FEBRUARY 1946)

5J FMAM J JASOND
56--
55
55 -A- ----7-- ---

53
52-

501
53-------------- ----

50------------
49---- -
48------------^
48-
47 ^-------- ----
47
46
45 ---
LAKE KISSIMMEE
(RECORD BEGAN MARCH 1942)


LAKE ROCHELLE
(RECORD BEGAN MARCH 1946)


Figure 11. Stage hydrographs for lakes in Polk County.


J F MA M J J A S O N D


J


M A M J J A S O N D





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 15



brings about correspondingdecrease in stage. The amount
of increase in stage that results from a particular increase
inflow varies from streamto stream, each stream respond-
ing in a characteristic manner.

A practicalmethod for determining the characteristic
fluctuations in the stage of a stream is to collect a stage
record over a periodof time at the place of interest and, by
rearranging the data, construct a stage-duration curve. Such
a curve, however, has a limitation that should be recog-
nized the curve will hold only insofar as the hydrologic
events of the past are repeated in the future. Practically,
this means that if the weather stays the same, and if the
physical conditions of the stream and the land it drains stay
the same, the curve is valid; otherwise it is not.


Stage-duration curves for one location on the Kissim-
mee River, one on Weohyakapka Creek, and one on Reedy
Creek, are given in Appendix II, figures 40-42.


-1.0

CURVES REPRESENTI CHANGE IN ELEVATION
OF VARIOUS SIZE LAKES UNDER CONTINUOUS
PUuPAoG FOR 30 DAYS AT RATES INOlCATCE
-0.8 ----- --------- -- (IN GALLONS PR MINUTEl, CONSIDERING ND
S I EVAPORATION. (1 II 40 AO*CRS)






-0.









n 10 12 14


LAKE AREA (SQouAE uIrs)

Figure 12. Effect of pumpage from lakes.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Streamflow

Because of the buffer effect of the many lakes in Polk
County, streamflowdoes not fluctuate as rapidlyor as much
as in many other counties in Florida. The lakes store water
in times of rainfall excess, thus reducing floodpeaks. Con-
versely,they release waterto streams intimes of deficiency
and thereby sustain streamflow. Each stream is stabilized
by lakes to a greater or lesser extent, depending upon the
size and number of lakes to which it may be connected.
This factor, as well as climatic and geologic factors, causes
flow characteristics to be different from stream to stream
and even from place to place on the same stream. Conse-
quently, separate determinations of characteristics must be
made at many points in an area if optimum use is tobe made
of its streams.

Eight such determinations of flow characteristics have
been made for various locations throughout Polk County.
They consist of flow-duration curves constructed by rear-
ranging the daily discharges from the flow record and
plotting them as cumulative occurrence curves. These
curves are given in Appendix III. Some of the character-
istics they show are:

1. The lowest flow of record (at the 100-percent-of-
time ordinate).

2. The highest flow of record (at the zero-percent-
of-time ordinate).

3. The median flow of record (at the 50-percent-of-
time ordinate).

4. The percent of time during which each particular
flow rate or some higher flow rate occurred.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Spring Discharge


Until it ceased to flow in 1950, Kissengen Spring, four
miles southeast of Bartow, was the largest spring in Polk
County. It was the only one of sufficient size to be developed
as a recreational facility. The flow of Kissengen Spring
was first measured by the U. S. Geological Survey on Dec-
ember 21, 1898. Its flow rate on that date was 20 million
gallons per day. Subsequently, measurements were made
in 1917, 1929, 1930, and 1931. In March 1932, monthly
measurements of flow were begun and were continued until
the spring ceased flowing in February 1950. Since 1950
monthly inspections have been made. The results of meas-
urements and inspections are given in table 1.

The record indicates that the flow remained fairly
stable at about 20 million gallons per day from 1898 to 1934.
In 1934 the flow began a downward trend which continued
until the spring ceased to flow in 1950. Since then, flow has
resumed several times but the periods of flow have been
short and the flow rates have been relatively low. In general,
these resumptions of flow have come in times of above
normal rainfall.

Peek1 has shown that there was a greatly increased
withdrawal of ground water in the vicinity of Kissengen Spring
coincident with the reduction in spring flow. He indicates
that the cessation of flow resulted from the lowering of the
piezometric pressure in the area a loweringbrought about
by the withdrawal of large amounts of ground water.







Peek, Harry M., Cessation of Flow of Kissengen
Springs; Florida Geological Survey Report of Investigations
No. 7, 1951.









Table 1, Discharge Measurements or Observations of No Flow of Kissengen Spring Near Bartow, Florida
(In million gallons per day)


Year Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May


1917


1989
1930
1931
1982
1933 18.8
1934 22.9
1935 17.1
1936 14.1
1937 14.2
1938 16.4
1939 11.1
1940 13,8
1941 14.3
1942 9.31
1943 8.79
1944 -
1945 -
1946 9.11
1947 9.60
1948 *1.1
1949 -
1980 0.743
1981 0
1982 0
1963 0
1954 2.33
1955 -
1986 0
1987 0


June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec,


13.8


19.7
22.0
18.6 12.4 14.7 18.8 16.4 19.9 19.3 18.4
18.0 18.1 16.9 16.0 20.0 19.1 21.3 28.2 26.2 24.3
20.7 19.8 16.8 16.1 18.8 23.6 21 2 22.8
16.2 14.2 13.4 12.6 13.3 14.7 14.0 18.7 17.8 15.8
16.8 17.9 20.8 19.1 22.0 18.5 16.9 18.3 21.3 18.4 14.8
14.5 16.7 14.6 17.9 16.9 16. 16.8 16.0 14.9 14.9
18.1 18.9 14.2 9.63 9.31 14.6 12.9 16.0 9.05 17.8 12.0
10.8 9.82 8.92 13.4 13.6 16.0 12.8 15.8 13.4 14.2
15.8 17.6 10.5 14.2 11.8 12.3 12.3 12.7 10.2 9.24
10.4 10.2 12.5 9.50 7.63 9.69 14.2 10.7 11.8 10,1 9.31
10.1 10.8 11.2 14.7 12.4 10.9 10.0 9.76
8.79 16.3 5.83 12.7 9.11
6.23 6.85 8.98 8.01
13.6 8.28 11.4 9.44 -
3.67 3.12 2.2 7.37 8.81 7.76 8.76 -
7.89 0.28 1.31 *0.1 2.26 18.9 8.66 2.26
1l.a 1.40 1.67 -
1.87 3.13 8.28 8.01 3.97 3.00 2.17 1.24
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
- 0 0 0 0 -
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 2.35 2.68 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0


*rBtilated







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


About 285 square miles of the northwestern part of the
county lies in the Withlacoochee River basin. The area is a
tableland tilted slightly downward to the northwest, with a
slope of less than a foot per mile. It is characterized by
innumerable small, low hammocks and shallow, saucer-like
depressions (cypress ponds). Except for the Withlacoochee
River which runs along the northern boundary of the county
there are practically no natural channels in the area.
Formerly, in times of excessive rainfall, surplus water
moved by overland routes to the river. In recent years,
however, efforts have been made to confine the drainage to
definite channels by extensive ditching.

A long, narrow strip of the St. Johns River basin ex-
tends down into Polk County from the north. It is separated
from the Withlacoochee River basin to the west and the Kis-
simmee River basin to the east by parallel, north-south,
relict dune lines. This area is high and sandy, and contains
several large lakes. Drainage is northward through two
poorly defined, swampy channels.


SURFACE WATER CHARACTERISTICS

Water Stages

Lakes

The day-to-day fluctuation in lake levels is brought
about by combinations of many factors. The factors that
usually have the greatest effect on lake levels are rainfall,
evaporation, transpiration, surface inflow, surface outflow,
pumpage, seepage, and percolation. Not all lakes are af-
fected by all these factors. However, all lakes are affected
by some of them and most lakes are affected by most of
them. Some of the factors add water to lakes and tend to
raise lake levels; others remove water and tend to lower lake
levels. Rainfall, surface inflow, and percolation add water
to lakes; the other factors remove water.

Each lake rises and falls in a manner that is peculiar
to that particular lake. In other words, each lake responds






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


FLOODS

Occurrence

Severe floods in Polk County usually come as a result
of the heavy rains that accompany hurricanes and hence nearly
always occur in September or October. Several such floods
have occurred in the last three decades. One of these, on
the Peace River in September 1933, is still remembered by
residents of the area. During this flood the river at Zolfo
Springs rose to a stage of 55. 25 feet (mean sea level) and
the flow reached a rate of 26,300 9ubic feet per second.
Figure 13 is a photograph showing the flooded pavilion at
Kissengen Spring at the time. Figure 14 is a later photo-
graph showing the normal appearance of the pavilion.

The highest flood on the Kissimmee River that has been
recorded by the U. S. Geological Survey occurred in October
1953. This flood came as a result of an exceptionally wet
summer rainy season in which four out of the five months
from June through October had well above normal rainfall
and one (July) had slightly above normal rainfall. The season
was markedby eight tropical disturbances, the last of which,
"Hazel", crossed the State from Fort Myers to Vero Beach
on October 9th and dumped an estimated three inches of rain
on the alreadyflooded Kissimmee Valley. River stages rose
to the highest ever recorded all along the valley (fig. 15)
and flood damage was extensive. Bridges and culverts were
washed out (fig. 16), pastures and crops were inundated,
and livestock was lost. The Weather Bureau reported that
estimates of the flood damage ran as high as $9 million.
Records indicate that floods of this magnitude occur on the
Kissimmee River about once in 25 years, on the average.

Estimation

Procedures for making reasonably reliable estimates
of the magnitude and frequency of future floods are presented
in a report by Pride. 3 The procedures described therein


3Pride, R. W., Floods in Florida, Magnitude and Fre-
quency, U. S. Geological Survey open file report, 1958.




















0













Figure 13. Kissengen Spring near Bartow, Florida, during flood of September
1933, looking east at flooded pavilion. (Photograph courtesy of
Sam W. Clark, Bartow, Florida.)





























UT




Figure 14. Kissengen Spring near bartow, Florida (April 1947), looking
northeast at pool and development. (Photograph courtesy of
Florida Geological Survey. )





22 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY












j ,3,OH ,33, 3XV,-
/ >


/
/ +"
OL *AEH VI
/ M




(v6 t I H Ia- a
/



/ 4-
/ U





/ S .4
/3
a






/.
/


23KlW3 m2oj O1






I rt
4 4
(09 "-*H 'Ij) :31m",Sl1 3v1 -
SV MW






(1l3A31 V39 MV3N 2AO1V 23j,) bIS ) V3d


































Damage to bridge on State Highway bu at the Kissimrnee River
caused by flood of October 1953, looking eastward. (Photograph
courtesy of the Florida State Road Department.)


Figure 1b.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


have been applied to construct curves, applicable to Polk
County streams, which are given here. One curve (fig. 17)
is applicable only to the main stem of the Kissimmee River,
and consists of a three-dimensional relationship combining
drainage area, recurrence interval, and peak flow. If the
drainage area is known, the estimated peak flow can be
obtained directlyfromthe curve for any selected recurrence
interval.

For all streams in Polk County except the main stem
of the Kissimmee River, two curves are required for esti-
mating the flood peaks. One of these (fig. 18) gives the
unadjusted peak flow if the drainage area and recurrence
interval are known. To get the adjusted peak flow the unad-
justed peak flow is multiplied by a reduction coefficient
obtained from figure 19 in order to take into account the
buffer effect of lakes in the basin.


1.600 1,800 2,000
fuIt)-F '-F tc' uA' t M rS)


2,400 2.P00 31200 3~8e0


Peak flow, flood frequency, and drainage area
relationship, Kissimmee River.


Figure 17.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


GAGING STATIONS AND RECORDS


The operation of gaging stations in Polk County by the
U. S. Geological Survey began in 1931 with the establishment
of a station on the Kissimmee River at State Highway 60.
Between 1931 and 1958, 107 stations were established.
Sixty-three of these were subsequently discontinued so that,
in 1958, there were 44 active gaging stations in the county.


The records that have been collected consist primarily
of stage and flow data. However, at some locations supple-
mentary data such as lake depth and lake area have been
collected. For some stations the record consists of daily
stage readings; for some it consists of daily discharges and
daily stage readings; for others it consists of stage readings
or flow determinations made at weekly or longer intervals.
The records obtained from regular gaging stations those


0.000 .

40,000 i_
20,00


lo,ooo
6.ooo Y-
6.00:

2.000 -




(,.<,o -- ----- --^ ^ :_---. ^ -- -- __--. ---- -- _
2.000 U. E 1 1O- -TION WITH W. W

uOTION 0COX601CWT0 (FleA 19)-
,006. NOT APPLiCASLr T0 T0r 066 6T01 0,.
600 a

400
200 -20 00 0 -- -0 1000 --- -


20 40 60 80 100 200 400 600 1000 Z0o
ORAINAGE AP& toast eLacv)


Figure 18.


Peak flow, flood frequency, and drainage area
relationship, Polk County streams.


4000





26 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

whose record consists of daily discharges have been pub-
lished in U. S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers.
These papers are published annually as a numbered series.


Papers containing
Year WSP No.
1932 727
1933 742
1934 757
1935 782
1936 802
1937 822
1938 852
1939 872
1940 992


records of sites in Polk
Year WSP No.


1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949


922
952
972
1002
1032
1052
1082
1112
1142


County are:

Year WSP No.
1950 1172
1951 1204
1952 1234
1953 1274
1954 1334
1955 1384
1956 1434
1957 1504


.28












. --1 _----------------------
.1 ^ ==


Figure 19.


PERCT OF ORAInAE ARA COVED BY LAKES

Peak flow reduction coefficients, Polk County,
Florida.













COUNTY


FLORIDA


LEGEND


PAVED ROAD
BITUMINOUS ROAD
GRADED AND DRAINED ROAD
PRIMITIVE ROAD
COUNTY BOUNDARY LINE
CITY

LAKE
U. S. HIGHWAY
STATE HIGHWAY
SURFACE WATER GAGING SITE


I 0 3 4


Figure 20. Surface water gaging stations in Polk County, Florida.


POLK


6113

0
0


-


i


i


i---






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


The following pages contain descriptive information on
each gaging site and on the records that have been obtained.
Preceding each station name is a number. This number
appears on the map (fig. 20) to indicate the location of the
gaging site. Tables of monthly and yearly average discharge
at eight of these stations are given in Appendix IV.


Kissimmee River Basin

1. Lake Arbuckle near Avon Park, Florida

Location: Lat.27'39'50", long. 8122Z'41", in SW sec. 25,
T. 32 S., R. 29 E., near right bank on upstream side
of bridge at south shore of lake,91 miles northeast of
Avon Park, Highlands County.

Surface area: 5.92 square miles (3,789 acres).

Records available: December 1941 to September 1957 (daily
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 51.53 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. June 27, 1945, to Novem-
ber 15, 1950, auxiliary staff gage in lake at datum
1. 29 feet lower. Since May 20, 1956, auxiliary staff
gage in lake at same datum. Ga
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1941-57 Maximum elevation, 58. 3 feet Septem-
ber 24, 1948, from flood mark; minimum observed
51. 19 feet May 25, 1956.

Maximum elevation known, about 58. 7 feet in 1926 and
1928, from information by local residents.

Remarks: Maximum depth sounded by U. S. Corps of Engi-
neers November 15-17, 1954, at elevation 54.4 feet
above mean sea level was 12.2 feet






FLORIDA .GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

Z. Lake Ariana at Auburndale, Florida

Location: Lat. 2805'05", long. 81 47'25", in SW4 sec. 35,
T. 27 S., R. 25 E., on dock at property of Walter
Caldwell on northeast shore of lake, 1 miles north
of Auburndale, Polk County.

Surface area: 1.60 square miles (1,024 acres).

Records available: June 1945 to April 1948 (weekly stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 132. 1 feet above mean
sea level (approximately), datum of 1929. Gage read-
ings reduced to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1945-48 maximum elevation observed, 137.9
feet August 28, 1946; minimum observed, 134. 2 feet
June 16, 1945.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

3. Lake Beulah at Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*02'24", long. 81"58'02", in NW sec. 24,
T. 28 S., R. 23 E., on east shore of lake in line with
East Lime Street and Lake Beulah Drive in Lakeland,
Polk County.

Surface area: 0.04 square miles (25.6 acres).

Records available: May 1954 to May 1957 (periodic stage).

Gage: Reference point. A chiseled square on lakeward end
of brick and concrete storm drain. Elevation of ref-
erence point is 180.23 feet above mean sea level,
datum of 1929. Measurements reduced to elevation
above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1954-57 maximum elevation observed, 180.47
feet May 15, 1957; minimum observed, 178.23 feet
July 9, 1956.

Remarks: Maximum depth sounded May 26, 1954, at elevation
179.6 feet above mean sea level was 25. 9 feet.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

4. Blue-Cannon Canal at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat.28"02'20", long. 81 45'40", in NE- sec. 24,
T. 28 S., R. 25 E., at culvert on Lake Cannon Drive
in Winter Haven, Polk County.

Records available: March 1946 to May 1954(periodic stage
and discharge).

Gage: Reference point. A chiseled "V" in upstream culvert
headwall about 3 inches from center railing post. Prior
to August 9, 1951, no gage.

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum discharge observed, 4 cfs
estimated Spetember 19, 1951 (reference point to water
surface, 3.97 feet) and December 1, 1953; minimum,
-0. 1 cfs estimated March 3, 1949.

Noflow observedApril 14, June 3, 1948; May 26, 1949;
June 16, July 25, 1950.


Peace River Basin

5. Lake Bonny at Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*02'33", long. 81*55'41", in sec. 17,
T. 28 S., R. 24 E., at lake pavilion opposite house at
424 Lake Bonny Drive on northeast shore of lake, in
Lakeland, Polk County.

Surface area: 0. 54 square miles (346 acres).

Records available: July 1954 to September 1957 (periodic
stage).

Gage: Reference point. Top of extreme southwest corner of
floor of lake pavilion. Elevation of reference point is
133.9 feet above mean sealevel(by altimeter). Meas-
urements reduced to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed, 130. 3
feet July 27, 30, 1954; minimum observed, 126.4 feet
November 13, 1956.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

6. Lake Cannon at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat.28,01'57", long. 81*45'21", in sec. 19,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., on right side of dock at property
of R. G. Herndon on Lake Cannon Drive, on south shore
of lake about 2 mile s northwest of the business district
in Winter Haven, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.46 square miles (294 acres).

Records available: February 1946 to August 1947 (weekly
stage), September 1947 to June 1948 (monthly stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-48 Maximum elevation observed, 132. 32
feet January 28, 1948; minimum observed, 130. 80 feet
February 9, 1947.

Remarks: Lake Cannon is in the Winter Haven "Chain-of-
Lakes", and records are equivalent to those for Lake
Howard at Winter Haven.

Maximum depth sounded July 11, 1949, at elevation
131. 1 feet above mean sea level was 18. 6 feet. Vol-
ume of water in lake atthis elevation was 1, 85 million
gallons.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

7. Cannon-Howard Canal at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat. 28"01'52", long. 81045'03", in sec. 19,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at Lake Howard Drive crossing
in Winter Haven, Polk County.

Records available: March 1946 to July 1948 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-48 Maximum discharge measured, 15.4
cfs August 27, 1946; no flow observed September 10,
1947.
Remarks: Normal flow is from Lake Cannon to Lake Howard.
Flow is occasionally reversed by south winds.


Kissimmee River Basin

8. Catfish Creek near Lake Wales, Florida

Location: Lat. 27*57'40", long. 8129'48", in sec. 14,
T. 29 S., R. 28 E., on left bank a quarter of a mile
downstream from Lake Pierce and 7 miles northeast
of Lake Wales, Polk County.

Drainage area: 58.9 square miles.

Records available: October 1947 to September 1957 (daily
stage and discharge).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 72. 70 feet
above mean sea level (Corps of Engineers bench mark).
Gage readings reduced to elevation above mean sea
level.
Average discharge: 10 years, 53.0 cfs (34. 3 million gallons
per day).

Extremes: 1947-57 Maximum discharge, 191 cfs Octo-
ber 9, 1953 (elevation, 78.51 feet); minimum, 7.6 cfs
April 10, 1956 (elevation, 75.43 feet affectedby wind).





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Kissimmee River Basin

9. Lake Clinch at Frostproof, Florida

Location: Lat. 27*45'15", long. 8132'25", in sec. 29,
T. 31 S., R. 28 E., at Frostproof Trailer Park, 0.6
mile west of intersection of State Highways 17 and 630,
and 0.9 mile northwest of Frostproof, Polk County.

Surface area: 1.86 square miles (1, 190 acres).

Records available: January 1947 to September 1957 (weekly
or monthly stage).

Gage: Staff gage except for periods January 1947 to April
1949 and August 1949 to June 1950 when stage was
determined from a reference point. Datum of gage is
100. 00 feet above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Gage
readings reducedto elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1947-57 Maximum elevation, 110.2 feet on or
about October 10, 1948, from flood mark; minimum
observed, 102. 10 feet June 13, 1956.


Kissimmee River Basin

10. Clinch-Reedy Canal at Frostproof, Florida

Location: Lat. 27*44'40", long. 81032'05", in sec. 32,
T. 31 S., R. 28 E., at culvert on Lake Clinch Drive
at city park in Frostproof, Polk County.

Records available: January 1947 to September 1957 (periodic
discharge).

Gage: (See Lake Clinch.)

Extremes: 1947-57 Maximum discharge measured, 69.0
cfs November 15, 1948 (elevation, 108.73 feet); no
flow for long periods.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

11. Lake Conine at Florence Villa, Florida

Location: Lat. 28004', long. 8143', in sec. 9, T. 28 S.,
R. 26 E., at southeast end of pump intake canal, about
a quarter of a mile southwest of the Conine-Smart
Canal and about 1 mile northeast of Florence Villa,
Polk County.

Surface area: 0. 3 square mile, (approximately 192 acres).

Records available: March 1946 to July 1954 (weekly stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120.. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum elevation observed, 130. 63
feet September 19, 1947; minimum observed, 128.30
feet May 26, 1949.

Peace River Basin

12. Conine-Smart Canal near Florence Villa, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*03'30", long. 81"43'10", in sec. 9,
T. 18 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of State Highway 544
about 11 miles northeast of Florence Villa, Polk
County.

Records available: March 1946 to July 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum discharge observed, 14 cfs
estimated October 13, 1953, January 12, 1954; no flow
observed on several occasions.

Remarks: Flow is normally from Lake Conine to Lake
Smart. Flow was observed to reverse direction for a
short time on February 5, 1953, due to wind effect.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Kissimmee River Basin

13. Crooked Lake near Babson Park, Florida

Location: Lat. 2749'38', long. 81"33'26", near center of
sec. 31, T. 30 S., R. 28 E., on a point at north end
of the lake at west end of Seminole Road, approximately
1-3/4 miles west of Babson Park, Polk County.
Surface area: 8. 66 square miles (5, 542 acres).

Records available: April 1945 to September 1957 (weekly
stage).
Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 115.71feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1945-57 Maximum elevation observed, 123.98
feet October 8, 1948; minimum observed, 116.28 feet
February 16, 1957.


Kissimmee River Basin

14. Crooked-Clinch Canal near Frostproof, Florida

Location: Lat. 27045'19", long. 81*33'48", in sec. 30,
T. 31 S., R. 28 E., at culvert on State Highway 630,
three-quarters of a mile below Crooked Lake and 2. 1
miles northwest of Frostproof, Polk County.

Records available: January 1947 to September 1957 (periodic
discharge).

Gage: Reference point. Center of top of upstream culvert
headwall at highway.

Extremes: 1947-57 Maximum discharge measured, 65.5
cfs September 25, 1948; no flow observed on many
occasions.
Remarks: The discharge from Crooked Lake to Lake Clinch
has been controlled bythe installation of two concrete
controls at different times, and by an earthfill placed
in the canal near Crooked Lake.





36 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

15. Crystal Lake near Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*01'30", long. 81*54'35", in sec. 28,
T. 28 S., R. 24 E., on south shore of lake, on dock
at property of A. E. Schluster, South Crystal Road,
1 mile southeast of Lake Bonny and 3 miles southeast
of Lakeland, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.05 square miles (32.0 acres).

Records available: February 1951to April 1952 (daily stage),
July 1954 to September 1957 (periodic stage). Gage
readings and measurements reducedto elevation above
mean sea level.

Gage: Reference point. Top of west endof the top horizontal
Z"x 4"across lakeward end of boat dock belowthe floor
level. Elevation of reference point is 134.79 feet above
mean sea level, datum of 1929, February 14, 1951 to
April 21, 1952, water-stage recorder at site on west
shore of lake at datum of 125. 25 feet above mean sea
level, datum of 1929.

Extremes: 1951-52, 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed,
134.43 feet September 28, 1954; minimum, 127.04feet
June 10, 1951.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Kissimmee River Basin

16. Cypress Lake near St. Cloud, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*03'40", long. 81*19'58", in SW4 sec. 8,
T. 28 S., R. 30 E., about 580 feet from south shore
of lake, about 1, 600 feet east of the head of Cypress-
Hatchineha Canal, and about 13 miles south of St. Cloud,
Osceola County.

Surface area: 6.37 square miles (4,077 acres).

Records available: January 1942 to September 1957 (daily
stage).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage 48.78 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929 (levels by Corps
of Engineers). Prior to June 6, 1950, at site near
northwest shore at same datum. Gage readings reduced
to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1942-57 Maximum elevation, 57.42 feet Sep-
tember 23, 1947 (wind effect); minimum, 48. 50 feet
August 21, 1956.

Remarks: Maximum depth based on contour map prepared
by U. S. Corps of Engineers on soundings taken March
1953 at elevation 52 feet above mean sea level was
10 feet.

Flow into the Cypress-Kissimmee Canal begins at
about elevation 53. 2 feet. Overflow over the south shore
commences at a slightly higher stage.






38 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Peace River Basin

17. Deer Lake near Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*01'40", long. 81*45'50", in SE- sec. 24,
T. 28 S., R. 25 E., on dock at property of G. E.
Carpenter, on north shore of lake, 1.9 miles west of
Winter Haven, Polk County.

Surface area: 0. 19 square miles (122 acres).

Records available: February 1946 to September 1957 (weekly
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximum elevation observed, 140.96
feet September 7, 1953; minimum observed, 138.30
feet June 17, 1956.


Peace River Basin

18. Deer-Cannon Canal near Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat.28 01'40", long. 81045'40", in SW- sec. 24,
T. 28 S., R. 25 E., at southwest end of culvert from
Deer Lake to Lake Cannon on northeast shore of Deer
Lake, about 1l miles west of Winter Haven, Polk County.

Records available: March 1946 to July 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: (See Deer Lake. )

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum discharge observed, 5 cfs
estimated October 13, 1953 (elevation, 140.77 feet);
minimum, no flow for many days.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

19. Lake Deeson near Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. Z8*06'38", long. 81"55'51", in sec. 29,
T. 27 S., R. 24 E., on northwest corner of dock at
Oak Ridge Trailer Park on south shore of lake, about
miles northeast of Lakeland post office, Polk County.

Surface area: 0. 18 square miles (115 acres).

Records available: July 1954 to September 1957 (periodic
stage).

Gage: Reference point. No. 2: Head of arrow carved on
south edge of 2"x 6" across outermost piles of dock
near western edge of the 2"x 6"; elevation not deter-
mined. Prior to July 15, 1957, reference point No. 1:
Top of extreme corner of pier floor at the Amvet Club
on the southeast shore of lake at elevation 138.48 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929 (prior to 5-19-55
at elevation 138.46 feet). Measurements reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed, 135.49
feet September 28, 1954; minimum observed, 127. 68
feet January 24, 1957.

Peace River Basin

20. Lake Drane Outlet near Haines City, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*05', long. 81039', in sec. 31, T. 27 S.,
R. 27 E., at State Highway 25 crossing, about 2 miles
southwest of Haines City, Polk County.
Records available: March 1947 to June 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: Reference point. Bottom of bevel at center of center
pier at upstream end of culvert.

Extremes: 1947-54 Maximum discharge measured, 42.6
cfs August 19, 1948; no flow observed on several oc-
casions.






40 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Peace River Basin

21. Lake Eloise near Eloise, Florida

Location: Lat. 2759'34", long. 81*41'34", in NW- sec. 2,
T. 29 S., R. 26 E., on dock at Cypress Gardens on
northeast shore of lake, 2-3/4 miles east of Eloise,
Polk County.

Surface area: 1.83 square miles (1, 171 acres).

Records available: April 1945 to January 1946, March 1948
toAugust 1952 (periodic stage), February 1946 to Feb-
ruary 1948 (daily stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to June 2, 1945,
reference point at same site at elevation 132. 44 feet
above mean sea level. June 2, 1945 to February 14,
1946, staff gage at same site at datum 5. 25 feet higher.
February 15, 1946 to February 6, 1948, water-stage
recorder at same site and datum. Gage readings re-
duced to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1945-52 Maximum elevation, 132.36 feet Sept-
ember 23, 1947; minimum observed, 129. 14 feet
June 2, 1945.

Remarks: Lake Eloise is in the Winter Haven "Chain-of-
Lakes", and records are equivalent to those for Lake
Howard at Winter Haven except for periods when con-
necting canal was blocked by earth fill.

Maximum depth sounded July 12, 1949 at elevation of
131. 1 feet above mean sea level was 21. 9 feet. Volume
of water in lake at this elevation was 4, 584 million
gallons. Lake Eloise is the largest lake in the "Chain-
of Lake ".






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

22. Eloise-Lulu Canal near Eloise, Florida

Location: Lat. 27 59'35", long. 8142'39", in sec. 4,
T. 29 S. R.26 E. at bridge on road connecting State
Highways 540 and 540A about 11 miles east of Eloise,
Polk County.

Records available: March 1946 to July 1952 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-52 Maximum discharge observed, 20 cfs
estimated October 7, 1949; no flow observed on many
occasions.

Remarks: Normal flow is from Lake Eloise to Lake Lulu.
Earth dam blocking canal observed March to July 1946
and December 15, 1953 to January 25, 1954. Flow is
occasionally reversed by wind effect.


Peace River Basin

23. Lake Fannie near Florence Villa, Florida

Location: Lat. 28003', long. 8142', in sec. 14, T. 28 S.,
R. 26 E., on south shore of lake on dock atproperty
of L. A. Daniel, about 2.0 miles east of Florence Villa,
Polk County.

Surface area: 1. 30 square miles, approximately (832 acres).

Records available: March 1946 to January 1954 (periodic
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Prior to July 16, 1947, copper disc and
nail reference point at same site.

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum gage height observed, 4.94
feet January 12, 1954; minimum observed, 3. 80 feet
July 9, 1952.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

24. Lake Garfield Outlet near Alturas, Florida

Location: Lat. 27"54'58", long. 81*43'56", in sec. 32,
T. 29 S., R. 26 E., at bridge on State Highway 60
about 31 miles northwest of Alturas, Polk County.

Records available: January 1947 to June 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: Reference point. Bottom of bevel at exact center of
upstream side of bridge at center guard rail post.

Extremes: 1947-54 Maximum discharge measured, 79. 3
cfs October 29, 1952 (reference point to water surface,
6. 27 feet); no flow observed on a few occasions.


Peace River Basin

25. Lake Gibson near Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28"06'03", long. 81"57'48", in sec. 25,
T. 27 S., R. 23 E., on northeast corner of dock at
Carpenter's home on south shore of lake, 4.2 miles
north of Lakeland post office, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.74 square mile (474 acres).

Records available: July 1954 to September 1957 (periodic
stage).

Gage: Reference point. Top of extreme northeast corner of
fishing pavilion floor lakeward of the corner post.
Elevation of reference point is 146.4 feet above mean
sea level (by altimeter). Measurements reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed, 143.6
feet July 30, 1954; minimum observed, 141.4 feet
July 5, 1956.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

26. Haines-Rochelle Canal at Lake Alfred, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*04'40", long. 81"42'50", in sec. 4,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at concrete bridge near south-
east corner of city limits of Lake Alfred, Polk County.

Records available: August 1946 to July 1947 (occasional
discharge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-47 Maximum discharge observed, 9 cfs
estimated July 16, 1947; no flow observed February 20,
April 10, 1947. Flow observedin reverse toward Lake
Haines August 28, 1946, estimated as 4 cfs.


Peace River Basin

27. Lake Hamilton at Lake Hamilton, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*0Z'40", long. 81*38'20", in sec. 17,
T. 28 S., R. 27 E., at municipal park on east shore
of lake, 0.8 mile west of city of Lake Hamilton, Polk
County.

Surface area: 3.4 square mile, approximately (2,176 acres).

Records available: June 1945 to September 1957 (weekly
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 115. 17 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to January 31, 1947,
staff gage at property of H. A. Pollard on southwest
side of lake at approximately 0. 53 feet higher datum.
January 31, 1947 to May 22, 1951, staff gage at Lake
Region Golf and Country Club about half a mile south-
east of Pollard's property at present datum. Gage
readings reduced to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1945-57 Maximum elevation observed, 124. 34
feet October 3, 1948; minimum observed, 117.03 feet
June 29, 1956.






44 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Peace River Basin

Z8. Lake Hamilton Outlet at Lake Hamilton, Florida

Location: Lat. 28"02', long. 81"39', in sec. 19, T. 28 S.,
R. 27 E., at control, 300 feet above a clay road on
the south side of the lake and 1- miles southwest of
the city of Lake Hamilton, Polk County.

Records available: January 1947 to September 1957 (peri-
odic discharge).

Gage: Reference point. Head of 60d galvanized nail in pile
at right side of right culvert on downstream end.

Extremes: 1947-57 Maximum discharge observed, 18 cfs
estimated December 27, 1950; no flow observed on
several occasions.


Peace River Basin

29. Lake Hancock near Highland City, Florida

Location: Lat. 27' 58'24", long. 81 51'27", in sec. 7,
T. 29 S., R. 25 E., at fish shed at end of Malloy
Cemetery Road, on west shore of lake 1. 4 miles north-
east of Highland City, Polk County.

Surface area: 7. 10 square miles (4, 544 acres).

Records available: August 1950 to March 1951 (occasional
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 89.4 feet above mean
sea level, approximately, datum of 1929. Gage read-
ings reduced to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1950-51 Maximum elevation observed, 97.81
feet, December 7, 1950; minimum observed, 96.92
feet, August 28, 1950.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

30. Lake Hartridge at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat. 28"03'10", long. 81*45'00", in NE- sec. 18,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E. on southeast end of dock at property
of C. H. Yawn on west shore of lake, 21 miles north-
west of Winter Haven, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.7 square mile, approximately (448 acres).

Records available: February 1946 to September 1957 (weekly
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximum elevation observed, 132. 76
feet September 30, 1948; minimum observed, 128. 68
feet June 9, 1956.

Remarks: Lake Hartridge is in the Winter Haven "Chain-of-
Lakes", and records are equivalent to those for Lake
Howard at Winter Haven.

Maximum depth sounded July 12, 1949 at elevation
131. 1 feet above mean sea level was 16. 6 feet. Vol-
ume of water in lake at this elevation was 1, 362 million
gallons.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

31. Lake Hartridge outflow to the northeast near Lake Alfred,
Florida

Location: Lat. 28*04", long. 81*44', sec. 8, T. 18 S.,
R. 26 S., at control above culvert on U. S. Highway 17,
600 feet below Lake Hartridge and 2 miles south of
city of Lake Alfred, Polk County.

Records available: June 1946 to September 1957 (periodic
discharge).

Gage: Reference point. Bottom of bevel on top of concrete
control at right side of bay on upstream side.

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximum discharge observed, 19.3
cfs (15. 7 cfs measured in Hartridge-Conine Canal and
3 cfs estimated in Hartridge-Rochelle Canal)-October 7,
1949; no flow observed on several occasions.

Remarks: Records are for combined flow from Lake Hart-
ridge to Lakes Conine and to Lake Rochelle.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Kissimmee River Basin

32. Lake Hatchineha near Haines City, Florida

Location: Lat. 28000'00", long. 810ZZ'50", in sec. 36,
T. 28 S., R. 29 E., at southeast shore of lake at head
of Hatchineha-Kissimmee Canal, 14 miles east of Lake
Wales, Polk County.

Surface area: 10.4 square miles (6, 656 acres).

Records available: January 1942 to September 1957 (daily
stage).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 47.23 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to June 8,
1950, water-stage recorder near northwest shore at
same datum. Gage readings reducedto elevation above
mean sea level.

Extremes: 1942-57 Maximum elevation, 56.97 feet
October 9, 1953 (wind affected); minimum 47. 19 feet
July 28, 1956 (wind affected).

Maximum elevation known, about 57. 0 feet June 1934
from information by Clayton R. Yates.

Remarks: Maximum depth based on contour map prepared
by U.S. Corps of Engineers on soundings taken in 1953
at elevation 51 feet above mean sea level was 12 feet.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Kissimmee River Basin

33. Hatchineha-Kissimmee Canal near Lake Wales, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*00'00", long. 8122'50", in sec. 36,
T. 28 S., R. 29 E., at southeast shore of Lake
Hatchineha at head of Hatchineha-Kissimme Canal,
3- miles upstreamfrom Lake Kissimme and 14 miles
east of Lake Wales, Polk County.

Drainage area: Indeterminate. Total drainage area of
Hatchineha-Kissimmee Canal above site of staff gage
at Camp Mack and Cypress-Kissimmee Canal above
station is 1, 185 square miles.

Records available: January 1942 to September 1957 (daily
stage and discharge).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 47. 23 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929 (Corps of Engineers
bench mark). Prior to-October 1, 1949, water-stage
recorder at northwest shore of Lake Hatchineha at
same datum. October 1, 1949 to September 30, 1950
staff gage at Camp Mack 1. 6 miles downstream at
datum 0.48 feet lower. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Average discharge: 15 years, 771 cfs (498 million gallons
per day).

Extremes: 1942-57 Maximum daily discharge, 2, 820 cfs
October 1, 1953; maximum elevation 56.97 feet Octo-
ber 9, 1953 (affected by wind); minimum daily dis-
charge, 27 cfs July 28, 1956 (elevation, 47.47 feet).

Remarks: Discharge measurements are made about 11 miles
downstream near staff gage at Camp Mack. Records
do not include diversions above Lake Hatchineha
through Cypress-Kissimmee Canal and overflow chan-
nels.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

34. Lake Hollingsworth at Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*01'05", long. 8156'48", in sec. 30,
T. 28 S., R. 24 E., at Lakeland Yacht Club dock on
south shore of lake near intersection of Cleveland
Heights Boulevard, with Lake Hollingsworth Drive in
Lakeland, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.56 square miles (358 acres).

Records available: July 1954 to September 1957 (periodic
stage).

Gage: Reference point No. 2. Top of chiseled 2-inch square
in concrete floor near center of eastern and east-west
section of "T"-shaped dock. Elevation of reference
point No. 2 is 133. 7 feet above mean sea level (by alti-
meter). Prior to May 20, 1955, reference point No. 1
at site 350 feet east which was top center of lakeward
end of easternmost brick and concrete wall of boat slip
at approximate elevation 134.7 feet above mean sea
level.

Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed, 133.2
feet above mean sea level May 17, 1957; minimum
observed, 131.9 feet May 1, 1956.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

35. Lake Howard at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*01', long. 8144', in NW sec. 29,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at east shore of lake on city dock
andboat house near inter section of We st Central Avenue
and Lake Howard Drive in Winter Haven, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.8 square mile, approximately (512 acres).

Records available: April 1945 to January 1946 (periodic
stage), February 1946 to September 1957 (daily stage).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 120.00 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to Feb-
ruary 13, 1946, staff gage at same site at datum 7. 85
feet higher. Gage readings reduced to elevation above
mean sea level.

Extremes: 1945-57 Maximum elevation, 132. 79 feet Sep-
tember 28, 1948; minimum 128. 67 feet June 16, 1956.

Remarks: Lake Howard is in the Winter Haven "Chain-of-
Lakes"andis representative of the entire chain except
for periods when connecting canals were blocked by
earth dams.

Maximum depth sounded July 11, 1949, at elevation
131. 1 feet above mean sea level was 16. 1 feet. Vol-
ume of water in lake at this elevation was 2,107 million
gallons.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 51

Peace River Basin

36. Howard-May Canal at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*00'55", long. 81*44'25", in sec. 29,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of Lake Howard Drive
on southeast shore in Winter Haven, Polk County.

Records available: March 1946 to July 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum discharge observed, 43 cfs
estimated October 13, 1953; minimum observed, -40
cfs estimated April 5, 1954.

Remarks: Normal flow is from Lake Howard to Lake May.
Flow is frequently reversed from wind effect.


Peace River Basin

37. Lake Hunter at Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28"01'43", long. 81"58'11", in SWt sec. 24,
T. 28 S., R. 23 E., on southwest shore of lake at
control in outlet in Lakeland, Polk County.

Surface area: 0. 16 square mile (102 acres).

Records available: May 1954 to September 1957 (periodic
stage).
Gage: Reference point. Chiseled square in top of control in
Lake Hunter outlet 2 inches toward control "notch"
from right culvert wing wall. Elevation of reference
point is 162. 95 feet above mean sea level, datum of
1929. Measurements reduced to elevation above mean
sea level.
Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed, 162.97
feet May 17, 1957; minimum observed 160.95 feet
estimated April 27, 1956.

Remarks: Maximum depth sounded May 26, 1954, at elevation
162. 63 feet above mean sea level, was 9. 1 feet.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Kissimmee River Basin

38. Lake Ida Outlet at Frostproof, Florida

Location: Lat. 27*45'22", long. 81*31'13", in sec. 28,
T. 31 S., R. 28 E., at State Highway 630 crossing
about 0. 8 mile northeast of Frostproof, Polk County.
Records available: January 1947 to June 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: Reference point. Bottom of bevel above center pier
at upstream end of box culvert. Prior to October 19,
1951, reference point was upper concrete handrail
8 feet from west end.
Extremes: 1947-54 Maximum discharge observed, 13 cfs
estimated September 6, 1951; minimum observed 2 cfs
February 2, March 9, and April 18, 1950.
Remarks: Stage-discharge relation affected by backwater
from Reedy Lake.


Peace River Basin

39. Idylwild-Hartridge Canal at Winter Haven, Florida
Location: Lat. 28*03'00", long. 81"45'10", in sec. 18,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of Airport Road to
Gilbert Field, 2. 3 miles northwest of Winter Haven
post office, Polk County.
Records available: April 1946 to September 1947 (periodic
discharge).
Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-47 Maximum discharge observed, 6 cfs
estimated July 15, 1947; no flow observed on several
occasions.

Remarks: Direction of flow has only been observed from
Lake Idylwildto Lake Hartridge. Flowmaybe reversed
occasionally by wind effect or changes in regulation.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

40. Iris Garden Flowing Well Near Bartow, Florida

Location: Lat. 2751', long. 81"49', in sec. 28, T. 30 S.,
R. 25 E., about 300 feet east of Kissengen Spring and
4 miles southeast of Bartow, Polk County.

Records available: May 1938 to October 1955 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1938-55 Maximum discharge measured, 11. 1
cfs December 13, 1938; no flow for long periods.

Observed maximum flow into the well was 5 cfs esti-
mated July 12, 1954.

Remarks: Flowing well re sulted from oil test drilling started
in July 1927.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

41. Lake Jessie Near Auburndale, Florida

Location: Lat. Z8*03'30", long. 8146'03", in SE- sec. 12,
T. 28 S., R. 25 E., at pump house on property of the
late D. H. Morton, on west shore of lake, 11 miles
southeast of Auburndale, Polk County.

Surface area: 0. 30 square mile (192 acres).

Records available: February 1946 to July 1954 (weekly
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum elevation observed, 132. 64
feet October 3, 1948; minimum observed, 130. 30 feet
May 29, 1949.

Remarks: Lake Jessie is in the Winter Haven "Chain-of-
Lakes" and records are equivalent to those for Lake
Howard at Winter Haven.

Maximum depth sounded July 12, 1949, at elevation
131. 1 feet above mean sea level was 13. 6 feet. Vol-
ume of water in lake at this elevation was 528 million
gallons.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

42. Kissengen Spring near Bartow, Florida

Location: Lat. 27 50'32", long. 81 48'39", in sec. 28,
T. 30 S., R. 25 E., on dock at east edge of pool at
head of spring 4- miles southeast of Bartow, Polk
County.

Records available: 1898, 1917, 1929-31 (a single discharge
measurement in each year), March 1932 to September
1957 (discharge measurements only).

Gage: Staff gage read only at time of discharge measure-
ments or inspections of no flow. Prior to April 6,
1937, at datum 1.00 feet lower.

Average measured discharge: 163 measurements (1898-1950)
20.3 cfs (13. 1 million gallons per day).

Extremes: 1932-57 Maximum discharge measured, 43. 6
cfs October 11, 1933;no flow observedfor long periods.

Remarks: Discharge measurements made at outlet of pool.
Discharge measurements or inspections of no flow
made at approximately six-week intervals.





56 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY



Kissimmee River Basin

43. Lake Kissimmee near Lake Wales, Florida

Location: Lat. 2757'05", long. 81 20'15", in NE sec. 34,
T. 29 S., R. 30 E., in northwest end of lake about
400 feet from shore, 1 mile southeast of mouth of
Hatchineha-Kissimmee Canal, and 16 miles east of
Lake Wales, Polk County.

Surface area: 54.7 square miles (35,008 acres).

Records available: March 1942 to September 1957 (daily
stage).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 46.94 feet
above mean sea level, datumof 1929. Prior to May 12,
1950, water-stage recorder at site near southwest
shore at same datum. Gage readings reduced to ele-
vation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1942-57 Maximum elevation, 56.72 feet Octo-
ber 12, 13, 1953; minimum observed, 45.31 feet
September 7, 1956.

Remarks: Maximum depth sounded by U. S. Corps of Engi-
neers during period January 19 to April 7, 1953 at
elevation 51. 0 feet above mean sea level was 18. 3 feet.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Kissimmee River Basin


44. Kissimmee River at Outlet of Lake Kissimmee, Florida

Location: Lat. 2748'20", long. 81*12'10", in SE- sec. 3,
T. 31 S., R. 31 E., in boat basin of fishing campat
west end of bridge on State Highway 60, 25 miles south-
east of Lake Wales, Polk County.

Drainage area: 1, 609 square miles (includes area drained by
Lake Weohyakapka and Lake Marian).

Records available: June 1931 to March 1952, July 1952 to
September 1957 (daily stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 1. 25 feet below mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to June 30, 1950,
staff gage at several sites alonghighwaybridge at dif-
ferent datum. Gage readings reduced to elevation
above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1931-57 Maximum elevation observed, 56.81
feet October 11-14, 1953; minimum observed, 44.85
feet September 4, 1935.

Remarks: Prior to March 21, 1934, gage site for discharge
station, Kissimmee River below Lake Kissimmee.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Kissimmee River Basin

45. Kissimmee River below Lake Kissimmee, Florida

Location: Lat. 27*46'13", long. 81'10'45", in sec. 24,
T. 31 S., R. 31 E., on right bank about 3 miles down-
stream from Lake Kissimmee and bridge on State
Highway 60 and 22 miles east of Frostproof, Polk
County.

Drainage area: 1, 609 square miles at State Highway 60 (in-
cludes areas drained by Lake Weohyakapka and Lake
Marian).

Records available: October 1933 to September 1957 (daily
stage and discharge).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 43.48 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929 (levels by Corps
of Engineers). Prior to March 21, 1934, staff gage at
bridge 3 miles upstream at datum 44. 73 feet lower.
March 21, 1934, to September 30, 1950, water-stage
recorder at present site at datum45. 00 feet lower than
present datum. Since March 21, 1934, staff gage at
bridge 3 miles upstream used as supplementary gage.
Gage readings reduced to elevation above mean sea
level.

Average discharge: 24 years, 1, 142 cfs (738million gallons
per day).

Extremes: 1933-57 Maximum discharge, 8, 820 cfs Octo-
ber 5 or 6, 1948; maximum elevation 56. 64 feet Octo-
ber 9, 1953 (from floodmark); maximum reverse flow
measured, 1, 190 cfs October 17, 1956; minimum
elevation, 44. 27 feet September 25, 1956 (affected by
wind).







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

46. Lake Lulu near Eloise, Florida

Location: Lat. 27"59'47", long. 81"42'52", on line between
sec. 33, T. 28 S., R. 26 E., and sec. 4, T. 28 S.,
R. 26 E., at property of J. B. Scott, Jr., on north-
east shore of lake, l1 miles east of Eloise, Polk
County.

Surface area: 0.48 square mile (307 acres).

Records available: February 1946 to September 1952 (weekly
or monthly stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-52 Maximum elevation observed, 132.Z6
feet October 7, 1949; minimum observed, 130. 33 feet
May 26, 1949.

Remarks: Lake Lulu is in the Winter Haven "Chain-of-
Lakes", and records are equivalent to those for Lake
Howard at Winter Haven except for periods during
which connecting canals were blocked by earth dams.

Maximum depth sounded July 12, 1949 at elevation of
131. 1 feet above mean sea level was 12. 8 feet. Vol-
ume of water in lake at this elevation was 762 million
gallons.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

47. Lake Lulu at Outlet at Eloise, Florida.

Location: Lat. 27" 59' 26", long. 81 43' 55", in NE sec. 5,
T. 29 S. R. 26 E. on upstream side of levee along
southwest shore of Lake Lulu at outlet half a mile
southeast of Eloise, Polk County.

Records available: February 1948 to September 1957 (daily
stage).

Gage: Water-stage recorder.. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings
reduced to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1948-57 Maximum elevation, 132.61 feet Sep-
tember 29, 1948; minimum, about 127.6 feet April 6,
1956.

Remarks: The control is a concrete structure with two
mechanically removable stoplogs located about 75 feet
below the gage which was placed in operation April 6,
1954. Prior to December 13, 1953 (when it washed
out), the control was a concrete structure with re-
movable board locked in place and a 10-inch pipe
through the control with a valve at the upstream end.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. Z5


Peace River Basin


48. Lake Lulu Outlet at Eloise, Florida

Location: Lat. 27"59'03", long. 81*43147", in SE' sec. 5,
T. 29 S., R. 26 E., on left downstream abutment of
culvert on State Highway 540A at intersection with old
Rifle Range Road, 2, 200 feet downstream from con-
crete control at outlet of Lake Lulu and 0. 9 mile south-
east of Eloise, Polk County.

Drainage area: 26 square miles, approximately.

Records available: February 1946 to September 1957 (daily
stage and discharge).

Average discharge: 11 years, 8.94 cfs (5.78 million gallons
per day).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 120.00 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to Jan-
uary 8, 1953, at site 1,500 feet upstream at same
datum. Gage readings reducedto elevation above mean
sea level.

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximum discharge, 178 cfs Decem-
ber 14, 1953, caused by failure of control at outlet of
Lake Lulu 2, 200 feet upstream; maximum elevation,
131. 18 feet, at former site, August 25, 1948, from
floodmarks; no flow several days in March, April,
1951 and August, September, 1956.

Remarks: Records include small amount of waste water
diverted by Polk Packing Companyfrom ground-water
supplies during packing season. Some regulation by
Lake Lulu.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

49. Lake Mariana near Auburndale, Florida

Location: Lat. 2804'10", long. 81*45'20", in SW{ sec. 6,
T. 27 S., R. 26 E., on dock at property formerly
owned by C. E. Heath, on southeast shore of lake, 2. 2
miles east of Auburndale, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.79 square mile (506 acres).

Records available: February 1946 to September 1957 (weekly
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximum elevation observed, 137.80
feet October 1, 1948; minimum observed, 133. 90 feet
July 1, 1956.


Peace River Basin

50. Mariana-Jessie Canal near Auburndale, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*03'50", long. 81 45'45", in NE- sec. 12,
T. 28 S., R. 25 E., at control in canal about 500 feet
south of U. S. Highway 92, about 1 miles east of
Auburndale, Polk County.

Records available: March 1946 to July 1954 (periodic dis-
char ge).

Gage: Reference point on control abutment.

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum discharge observed, 11.5
cfs March 11, 1948; no flow observed on several oc-
casions.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

51. Mirror Lake at Lakeland, Florida
Location: Lat. 28*0Z'40", long. 81"57'11", in SW- sec. 18,
T. 28 S., R. 24 E., on northwest shore of lake about
100 feet east-southeast of East Main, Iowa and Cedar
Streets in Lakeland, Polk County.
Surface area: 0.03 square mile (19. 2 acres).

Records available: May 1954 to September 1957 (periodic
stage).
Gage: Reference point. Chiseled square of top of lakeward
side of concrete handrail above retainer wall on north-
northwest shore of lake. Elevation of reference point
is 183.42 feet above mean sea level, datum of 1929.
Measurements reduced to elevation above mean sea
level.

Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed, 178.72
feet above mean sea level May 17, 1957; minimum ob-
served, 178.28 feet October 28, 1954.

Remarks: Maximum depth sounded May 27, 1954, at elevation
178. 65 feet above mean sea level was 14. 8 feet.


Peace River Basin
52. Mirror-Cannon Canal at Winter Haven, Florida
Location: Lat. 28*02'15", long. 81*44'50", in sec. 19,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of 17th Street NW, in
Winter Haven, Polk County.
Records available: March 1946 to September 1947 (periodic
discharge).
Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-47 Maximum discharge observed, 5 cfs
estimated July 15, 1947; no flow observed on many
occasions.

Remarks: Normal flowis from Lake Mirror to Lake Cannon.
Flow may be reversed occasionally by wind effect.





64 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Peace River Basin

53. Lake Morton at Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. Z8*02'ZZ", long. 81*57'08", in NW- sec. 19,
T. 28 S., R. 24 E., on north side of lake in line with
an unnamed street one block long located between Iowa
and Indiana Avenues in Lakeland, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.07 square mile (44.8 acres).

Records available: May 1954 to September 1957 (periodic
stage).

Gage: Reference point. Chiseled square in center of concrete
headwall of 24-inch culvert in Lake Morton about 15 feet
lakeward from shoreline. Elevation of reference point
is 179. 16 feet above mean sea level, datum of 1929.
Measurements reduced to elevation above mean sea
level.

Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed, 179.25
feet above mean sea level May 17, 1957; minimum ele-
vation, 176. 30 feet March 10, 1955.

Remarks: Maximum depth sounded May 27, 1954 at elevation
177.46 feet above mean sea level was 21.9 feet.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 65

Peace River Basin

54. Mountain Lake near Lake Wales, Florida

Location: Lat. 27056'01'", long. 8134'59", in sec. 26,
T. 29 S., R. 27 E., on the northeast corner of dock
supporting pump intake at Mountain Lake Estates on
east side of lake, northwest of Bok Tower, and 2 miles
north of Lake Wales, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.21 square mile (134 acres).
Records available: April 1945 to September 1957 (weekly
stage).
Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is at 107.76 feet above
mean sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced
to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1945-57 Maximum elevation observed, 116.80
feet October 8, 15, 1948; minimum observed, 107. 30
feet June 21, 1957.


Peace River Basin

55. Lake Otis at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat. 28 01', long. 8142', inSW sec. 27, T. 28 S.,
R. 26 E., on northeast shore on dock of Lamar Beau-
champ, 1 miles east of Winter Haven, Polk County.
Surface area: 0.2 square mile, approximately (128 acres).

Records available: August 1954 to September 1957 (daily
stage).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 120.00 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings
reduced to elevation above mean sea level.
Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation, 128. 37 feet Sep-
tember 30, 1957; minimum, 123.93 feet May 24, 1956
(wind affected).





66 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

56. Lake Parker at Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*02'59", long. 81"55'22", in NW* sec. 16,
T. 28 S., R. 24 E., on east side of pier at Lakeland
power plant on southeast shore of lake, 2 miles east
of Lakeland business district, Polk County.

Surface area: 3.58 square mile (2, 291 acres).

Records available: May 1949 to September 1957 (weekly
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 126. 50 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1949-57 Maximum elevation observed, 131.78
feet October 1Z, 1953; minimum observed, 127.92 feet
May 24, 1949.

Remarks: Continuous record from a water-stage recorder
maintained by the Ground Water Branch of the U. S.
Geological Survey was also obtained subsequent to
July 21, 1954.

Maximum depth sounded May 25, 1954 at elevation
126. 56 feet above mean sea level was 9. 5 feet.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

57. Lake Parker Outlet at Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28 03'34", long. 81*54'52", in SE sec. 9,
T. 28 S., R. 24 E., at center of downstream side of
bridge of Lake Parker Drive at lake outlet, 0.9 mile
northeast of Lakeland power plant and 2- miles north-
east of Lakeland post office, Polk County.

Records available: August 1955 to September 1957 (periodic
discharge).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 126. 50 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1955-57 Maximum discharge measured, 12.2
cfs May 2, 1957 (elevation, 130. 33 feet); no flow ob-
served-on many occasions.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

58. Peace Creek Drainage Canal near Alturas, Florida

Location: Lat. 2755'Z3", long. 81*42'28", in NE sec. 34,
T. 29 S., R. 26 E. near left bank at upstream side of
highway bridge, half a mile north of State Highway 60,
3. 5 miles north of Alturas, Polk County, and 8- miles
east of Bartow.

Drainage area: 150 square miles, approximately.

Records available: October 1946 to September 1957 (daily
stage and discharge).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 97. 67 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929 (State Road De-
partment bench mark). Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Average discharge: 11 years, 111 cfs (71.7 million gallons
per day).

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximum discharge, 1, 740 cfs Aug. 28,
29, 1949; maximum elevation, 109. 34 feet August 28,
1949; minimum discharge, 2.4 cfs August 12, 1956;
minimum elevation, 100. 28 feet May 26-28, 1949.

Maximum elevation known, 111.0 feet in 1928, from
information by local resident (discharge, 2, 540 cfs,
from rating curve extended above 1, 600 cfs).






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 69

Peace River Basin

59. Peace Creek Drainage Canal near Dundee, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*01', long. 81*38', in sec. 29, T. 28 S.,
R. 27 E., on right bank at upstream side of bridge on
State Highway 542, 1.2 miles west of Dundee, Polk
County, and 1. 4 miles downstream from Lake Hamilton
Outlet.

Drainage area: 50 square miles, approximately.

Records available: October 1946 to September 1957 (daily
stage and discharge).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 114.08 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to Jan-
uary 25, 1950, at same site and datum and January 25,
1950, to July 26, 1951, at site 150 feet downstream at
same datum. Gage readings reduced to elevation above
mean sea level.

Average discharge: 11 years, 30.5 cfs (19.7 million gallons
per day).

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximum discharge, 231 cfs Sept. 22,
1948 (elevation, 121.45 feet); no flow at times in some
year s.

Remarks: Slight regulation at low flow by Lake Hamilton
control.





70 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Peace River Basin

60. Peace Creek Drainage Canal near Lake Hamilton, Florida

Location: Lat. Z8 01' 50", long. 81" 39' 35", in sec. 19,
T. 28 S., R. 27 E., at bridge on county road near
south shore of lake, 0. 6 mile southwest of Lake
Hamilton control, and about 2 miles southwest of city
of Lake Hamilton, Polk County, in Peace River Basin.


Records available: January 1947 to June 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: Several reference points at various points on the
bridge.

Extremes: 1947-54 Maximum discharge measured, 55.4
cfs December 28, 1953 (reference point to water sur-
face, 5.94 feet, reference point then in use); minimum
less than 0. 1 cfs March 29, 1949.


Peace River Basin

61. Peach Creek Marsh Inlet south of Lake Gordon near
Lake Wales, Florida

Location: Lat. 270 50' 19", long. 81 37' 17", in sec. 28,
T. 30 S., R. 27 E., at crossing of State Highway 640,
4.6 miles southwest of Lake Wales, Polk County.

Records available: April 1947 to October 1950 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1947-50 Maximum discharge observed, 7 cfs
estimated April 18, 1947; no flow on several occasions.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 71

Peace River Basin

62. Peace River at Bartow, Florida

Location: Lat. 27054'07", long. 8149'03", in NE sec. 4,
T. 30 S., R. 25 E., near center of span on downstream
side of bridge on State Highway 60, 500 feet down-
stream from McKinney Branch and 0. 6 mile east of
Bartow, Polk County.

Drainage area: 390 square miles, approximately.

Records available: October 1939 to September 1957 (daily
stage and discharge).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 90. 56 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to July 12,
1940, staff gage, and July 12, 1940, to November 5,
1948, water-stage recorder, at site 200 feet down-
stream at same datum. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.
Average discharge: 18 years, 282 cfs (182 million gallons
per day).

Extremes: 1939-57 Maximum discharge, 4, 140 cfs Sep-
tember 24, 1947 (elevation, 97.01 feet), from rating
curve extended above 2,900 cfs; minimum, 1.4 cfs
June 2, 1945 (elevation, 90. 61 feet).


Peace River Basin

63. Peace River near Fort Meade, Florida

Location: Lat. 27*45'05", long. 81046'56", in SE- sec. 26,
T. 31 S., R. 25 E., at bridge on U. S. Highway 98,
1. 2 miles east of Fort Meade, Polk County.

Records available: May 1931to March 1949 (occasional dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1931-49 Maximum discharge measured, 1,600
cfs June 19, 1947; minimum, 76. 5 cfs May 13, 1939.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Kissimme River Basin

64. Reedy Creek near Frostproof, Florida

Location: Lat. 27"43'13", long. 8128'40", in SW sec. 1,
T. 32 S., R. 28 E., on left bank 15 feet upstream from
highwaybridge, 100 feet downstream from Reedy Lake,
and 3- miles southeast of Frostproof, Polk County.

Drainage area: 62. 2 square miles.

Records available: October 1946 to September 1957 (daily
stage and discharge).

Gage: Water-stage recorder and concrete control with re-
movable boards. Datum of gage is 76. 05 feet above'
mean sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced
to elevation above mean sea level.

Average discharge: 11 years, 39.6 cfs (25.6 million gallons
per day).

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximumdischarge, 166 cfs October Z-
6, 1948; maximum elevation, 80.42 feet October 5,
1948; minimum daily discharge, 0.1 cfs March 21-23,
29, April 22, 1956; minimum elevation, 77. 35 feet
May 21, 1955 (wind affected).

Remarks: Record of stage comparable to thatfor Reedy Lake
near Frostproof.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Kissimmee River Basin

65. Reedy Lake near Frostproof, Florida

Location: Lat. 27*44'00", long. 8131'00", in sec. 34,
T. 31 S., R. 28 E., on southeast side of dock on prop-
erty of L. A. Scorgie on southwest shore of lake, 1. Z
miles southeast of Frostproof post office, Polk County.

Surface area: 5.41 square miles (3,462 acres).

Records available: April 1945 to October 1948 (weekly stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 66. 12 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1945-48 Maximum elevation observed, 80.49
feet October 5, 1948; minimum, 77. 30 feet May 13,
1945.

Maximum elevation known, about 80. 6 feet September
1934, from information by L. A. Scorgie.

Remarks: Record of stage at Reedy Creek near Frostproof
comparable to that for Reedy Lake.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

66. Lake Rochelle near Lake Alfred, Florida

Location: Lat. 2804'10", long. 8143'40", in SE4 sec. 5,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., on southwest shore 1- miles south
of Lake Alfred, Polk County, and 3p miles north of
Winter Haven.

Surface area: 0.8 square mile, approximately (512 acres).

Records available: March 1946 to September 1957 (weekly
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-57 Maximum elevation observed, 129. 86
feet September 27, 1948; minimum observed, 125. 24
feet August 9, 1956.


Peace River Basin

67. Rochelle-Fannie Canal near Lake Alfred, Florida

Location: Lat. 28 04'00", long. 8142'20", in NW* sec. 10,
T. 28 S., R.26 E., at crossing of State Highway 544,
2. 1 miles southeast of Lake Alfred, Polk County, and
2. 1 miles northeast of Florence Villa.

Records available: March 1946 to October 1953 (periodic
discharge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-53 Maximum discharge measured, 10. 3
cfs August 27, 1948; no flow observed on a few oc-
casions.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Kissimmee River Basin

68. Lake Rosalie near Lake Wales, Florida

Location: Lat. 270 57', long. 81 25', near corner of sec-
tions 15, 16, 21, 22, T. 29 S., R. 29 E., at north-
west shore of lake 12 miles northeast of Lake Wales,
Polk County.

Surface area: 7. 18 square miles (4, 595 acres).

Records available: December 1941 to February 1942 (weekly
stage). March to July 1942, (daily stage), August 1942
to August 1943 (occasional stage).

Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 49.41 feet
above mean sea level, datumof 1929. Prior to March 5,
1942 and subsequent to July 27, 1942, staff gage at
same site and datum. Gage readings reduced to ele-
vation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1941-43 Maximum elevation, 55.04 feet
March 19, 1942; minimum observed, 52.44 feet
April 30, 1943.






76 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Peace River Basin

69. Roy-Lulu Canal near Eloise, Florida

Location: Lat. 27*59'47", long. 81 42'41", on line between
sec. 33, T. 28 S., R. 26 E., and sec. 4, T. 29 S.,
R. 26 E., at crossing of State Highway 540, 11 miles
east of Eloise, Polk County.

Records available: June 1946 to July 1948 (occasional dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-48 Maximum discharge observed, 0.4 cfs
estimated September 11, 1947; no flow observed on
many occasions.

Remarks: Normal flow is from Lake Roy to Lake Lulu.
Maximum discharge from Lake Lulu to Lake Roy ob-
served as 0.5 cfs estimated August 27, 1946 and
July 13, 1948 from wind effect.


Peace River Basin

70. Saddle Creek near Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28 02' 52", long. 81" 52' 35", in sec. 14,
T. 28 S., R. 24 E., near center of channel on down-
stream side of bridge on U. S. Highway 92 about 4.9
miles east of Lakeland post office, Polk County.

Records available: September 1955 to September 1956
(periodic discharge).

Gage: Staff gage.

Extremes: 1955-56 Maximum discharge measured, 45. 2
cfs September 15, 1955 (gage height, 2.80 feet); mini-
mum measured, 0.38 cfs March 8, 1956 (gage height,
1.05 feet).







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 77


Alafia River Basin

71. Scott Lake near Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 2757'20 ", long. 81 56'00", in NW- sec. 17,
T. 29 S., R. 24 E., at dock on property of Walter
Buehler on southeast shore of lake, 3 miles south of
city limits of Lakeland, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.45 square mile (288 acres).

Records available: Mairch 1953 to March 1954 (twice-weekly
stage), June 1954 to September 1957 (daily stage).

Gage: Water stage recorder. Datum-of gage is 159.68 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to
March 30, 1954, staff gage at same site and datum.
Gage readings reduced to elevation above mean sea
level.

Extremes: 1953-57 Maximum elevation, 168.25 feet Sep-
tember 28-30, 1957; minimum observed, 163. 84 feet
May 31, 1953.

Remarks: Maximum depth sounded May 26, 1954 at elevation
167. 51 feet above mean sea level was 14. 8.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

72. Lake Shipp at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat. 2800', long. 81 45',. in sec. 31, T. 28 S.,
R. 26 E., on northwest shore about li miles southwest
of junction of State Highway 542 and U. S. Highway 17,
at 1600 Lake Shipp Drive in Winter Haven, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.4 square mile, approximately (256 acres).

Records available: February 1946 to November 1952 (peri-
odic stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929. Gage readings reduced to
elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: Maximum elevation observed, 132. 35 feet Sep-
tember 26, 1947; minimum observed, 130. 34 feet
May 26, 1949.

Remarks: Lake. Shipp is in the Winter Haven "Chain-of-
Lakes", and records are equivalent to those for Lake
Howard at Winter Haven.

Maximum depth sounded July 1949, at elevation 131. 1
feet above mean sea level was 13. 7 feet. Volume of
water in lake at this elevation was 731 millions of gal-
lons.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 79

Peace River Basin

73. Shipp-Lulu Canal at Eloise, Florida

Location: Lat. 2759'54", long. 81*44'13", in SE) sec. 32,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of old Winter Haven
to Bartow Highway 0.3 mile northeast of junction of
State Highways 555 and 540A in Eloise, Polk County.

Records available: March 1946 to May 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: None.
Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum discharge observed, 60 cfs
estimated December 1, 1953; no flow observed many
time s.

Remarks: Normal direction of flow is from lake Shipp to
Lake Lulu. Directionis often reversed by wind effect.
Maximum reverse flow observed, 23 cfs April 5, 1954
(caused by strong upstream wind).


Peace River Basin

74. Lake Silver at Winter Haven, Florida

Location: Lat. Z8*01'45", long. 81"43'45", in SE* sec. 20,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., on dock of Francis P. Smith, at
139 Lake Silver Drive, on south shore of lake in Winter
Haven, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.1square mile, approximately (64.0 acres).

Records available: December 1947 to November 1951 (oc-
casional stage).

Gage: Staff gage.
Extremes: 1947-51 Maximum gage height observed, 4.40
feet January 25, 1948; minimum observed, 2.13 feet
May 26, 1949.

Remarks: Connected to Lake Martha by underground culvert.





80 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Peace River Basin

75. Lake Smart near Florence Villa, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*03', long. 81*43', in sec. 15, T. 28 S.,
R. 26 E., on south shore 1- miles northeast of Florence
Villa, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.4 square mile, approximately (256 acres).

Records available: March 1946 to January 1954 (occasional
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level, datum of 1929.

Extremes: 1946-54 Maximum elevation observed; 129.62
feet September 11, 1947; minimum observed, 128.33
feet April 28, 1946.


Peace River Basin

76. Smart-Fannie Canal near Florence Villa, Florida

Location: Lat. 28*03'15", long. 81042'15", in sec. 10,
T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at dam formed by road fill across
canal between Smart Lake and Lake Fannie 1.7 miles
northeast of Florence Villa, Polk County.

Records available: March 1946 to January 1954 (periodic
observations).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-54; no flow observed (canal blocked byroad
fill).






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

77. Wahneta Farms Drainage Canalnear Eagle Lake, Florida
(Formerly referred to as Lake Lulu Outlet at Rifle Range
Road near Eagle Lake)

Location: Lat. 2756'21", long. 81"43'36", on line between
sec. 20 and sec. 21, T. 29 S., R. 26 E., at Rifle Range
Road crossing, 1.6 miles north of intersection of Rifle
Range Road with State Highway 60 and 3.2 miles south-
east of Eagle Lake, Polk County.

Records available: January 1947 to June 1954 (periodic dis-
charge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1947-54 Maximum' discharge measured, 75.7
cfs August 18, 1948; minimum, 0.5 cfs estimated
March 28, 1949.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Kissimmee River Basin

78. Weohyakapka Creek near Lake Wales, Florida
(Formerly referred to as Weohyakapka-Rosalie Canal near
Lake Wales)

Location: Lat. 2752'24", long. 81*23'52", in NW sec. 14,
T. 30 S., R. 29 E., near left bank on downstreari side
of bridge on State Highway 60, 11 miles east of Lake
Wales, Polk County.

Records available: May to July 1942 (discharge measure-
ments only), August 1942 to June 1948 (monthly dis-
charge measurements and daily stage), April 1956
(one discharge measurement).


Gage: Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is 55. 23 feet
above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to Au-
gust 3, 1942, staff gage at same site at datum 0. 99
feet higher. Gage readings reduced to elevation above
mean sea level.


Extremes: 1942-48, 1956 Maximum discharge measured,
574 cfs September 24, 1947; maximum elevation, 61. 44
feet September 26, 1947; minimum discharge measur-
ed, 12. 5 cfs April 24, 1956; minimum elevation, 55.26
feet June 18, 1945.

Remarks: Maximum elevation known is 62. 8 feet September
1933, from floodmarks and information from local
residents.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25 83


Peace River Basin

79. Lake Winterset near Eloise, Florida

Location: Lat. 27" 58' 18", long. 81* 40' 27", in sec. 12,
T. 29 S., R. 26 E., on dock at property of Brady L.
Vogt, near east shore, 4 miles southeast of Eloise,
Polk County.

Surface area: 0.86 square mile (550 acres).

Records available: February 1946 to January 1948 (weekly
stage).

Gage: Staff gage. Datum of gage is 120. 00 feet above mean
sea level. Gage readings reduced to elevation above
mean sea level.

Extremes: 1946-48 Maximum elevation observed, 132.21
feet January 28, 1948; minimum observed, 130. 36 feet
May 2, 8, 17, 1946.

Remarks: Lake Winterset is in the Winter Haven "Chain-of-
Lakes" and records are equivalent to those for Lake
Howard at Winter Haven except for periods when
Eloise-Lulu Canal was blocked by earth dam.

Maximum depth sounded July 12, 1949 at elevation
131. 1 feet above mean sea level was 29. 2 feet. Vol-
ume of water in lake at this elevation was 3,113
millions of gallons. Lake Winterset is the deepest
lake in the "Chain-of-Lakes".






84 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Peace River Basin

80. Winterset-Eloise Canal near Eloise, Florida

Location: Lat. 27058'35", long. 8141'37", on line between
sec. 10 and sec. 11, T. 29 S. i R. 26 E., at crossing
of county road connecting State Highway 540 and State
Highway 540A, 3 miles southeast of Eloise, Polk
County.

Records available: March 1946 to January 1948 (periodic
discharge).

Gage: None.

Extremes: 1946-48 Maximum discharge, observed, 4 cfs
estimated January28, 1948; no flow observed on a few
occasions.

Remarks: Normal direction of flow is from Lake Winterset
to Lake Eloise. Flow is often reversed by wind effect.
Maximum reverse flow observed, 2 cfs estimated
February 21, 1947.








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


Peace River Basin

81. Wire Lake at Lakeland, Florida

Location: Lat. 28002'42", long. 8157'43", in SE- sec. 13,
T. 28 S., R. 23 E., on southwest shore of lake, di-
rectly across Wire Lake Drive from Borden's Dairy,
about 100 feet northwest of Dakota Avenue and Wire
Lake Drive in Lakeland, Polk County.

Surface area: 0.05 square mile (32.0 acres).

Records available: May 1954 to September 1957 (periodic
stage).

Gage: Reference point. Chiseled square onlakeward end of
northwesternmost of three identical brick and concrete
storm drains. Elevation of reference point is 197. 27
feet above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Measure-
ments reduced to elevation above mean sea level.

Extremes: 1954-57 Maximum elevation observed, 197.41
feet May 17, October 7, 1957; minimum observed,
194.0 feet May 1, 1956.

Remarks: Maximum depth sounded May 27, 1954 at elevation
195. 66 feet above mean sea level was 21.4 feet.






86 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Additional Locations in Polk County for Which Fragmentary
Record is Available

82. Lake Alfred Outlet at Lake Alfred, Florida

Sec. 5, T.28 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of U.S. High-
way 92.

Dec. 9, 1947 2 to 4 cfs estimated


83. Blue Jordan Swamp near Frostproof, Florida-

SE- sec. 20, T.31 S., R. 29 E., at State Highway 630.

Sept. 16, 1942 No flow
Oct. 1, 1946 No flow
May 30, 1947 Less than 0. 1 cfs estimated
Apr. 24, 1956 0.07 cfs


84. Bowlegs Creek near Fort Meade, Florida

SW sec. 2, T. 32 S., R. 25 E., at county road about
600 feet above Peace River.

Apr. 25, 1938 13.0 cfs
May 13, 1939 12.6 cfs
Apr. 25, 1956 3.63 cfs


85. Doc Branch near Frostproof, Florida

Sec. 6, T. 32, S., R. 28 E., at crossing of Alternate
State Highway 630, 1,400 feet south of Lake Clinch.

Mar. 13, 1947 Less than 0. 1 cfs estimated





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


-86. Gibson-Parker Canal near Lakeland, Florida

Sec. 30, T. 27 S., R. 24 E., at crossing of State High-
way 33, 4. 3 miles north of Lakeland post office.


Sept. 15, 1955
Feb. 15, 1956


4.63 cfs R.P. to W.S. 5. 76 ft.
0. Z8 cfs R.P. to W.S. 6.20 ft.


87. Lake Haines Inflow near Lake Alfred, Florida

SE- sec. 28, T. 27 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of U. S.
Highway 92, 1. 1 miles northeast of Lake Alfred.


Apr.19,1945
June 3, 1945
July 30, 1945
May 6, 1946
Mar. 12, 1947
Apr. 17, 1947
Oct. 9, 1947
Nov. 24, 1947
Feb.19, 1948
Aug. 15, 1949
Sept. 22, 1949


2 cfs estimated
2 cfs estimated
2 cfs estimated
1 cfs estimated
0. 6 cfs estimated
1 cfs estimated


R. P. to
R. P. to
R. P. to
R. P. to
R. P. to
R. P. to


W. S.
W. S.
W. S.
W.S.
W. S.
W. S.


5.20 ft.
5. 88 ft.
3. 65 ft.
4. 63 ft.
4.46 ft.
4. 04 ft.


R. P. to W. S. 3.87 ft.


88. Idyl-Buckeye Canal near Florence Villa, Florida

On line between sec. 15 and sec. 16, T. 28 S. R. 26 E. ,
1 mile east of Florence Villa.


Jan. 28, 1952
Apr. 17, 1952


0.2 cfs estimated
0.2 cfs estimated


89. Idylwild-Cannon Canal near Winter Haven, Florida

Sec. 18, T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of State High-
way 544, Z miles northwest of Winter Haven post office.


July 15, 1947
Sept. 10, 1947


5.9 cfs
No flow





88 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


90. Lake Julian Outlet near Polk City, Florida

NE- sec. 15, T. 27 S., R. 25 E., at crossing of State
Highway 559, 31 miles southeast of Polk City.

Apr. 17, 1947 2 cfs estimated


91. Lake Drain at Medulla, Florida

SE- sec. 14, T. 29 S., R. 23 E., at crossing of old
State Highway 37, 0. 6 mile south of Medulla.

Apr. 25, 1956 No flow


92. May-Shipp Canal at Winter Haven, Florida

NW sec. 32, T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of Lake
Shipp Drive in Winter Haven.

July 15, 1947 22.6 cfs


93. Lake Moody near Frostproof, Florida

SE- sec. 17, T. 31 S., R. 28 E., on west shore of lake
about 2.2 miles north of Frostproof.

June 1, 1945 R. P. to W. S. 3.08 ft
Jan. 3, 1947 R. P. to W. S. 2.28 ft
Mar. 13, 1947 R. P. to W. S. 1.95 ft
Apr. 18, 1947 R. P. to W. S. 1. 66 ft
May 30, 1947 R. P. to W. S. 1. 68 ft
Nov. 25, 1947 R. P. to W. S. 1. 23 ft
Apr. 15, 1948 R. P. to W. S. 1. 25 ft
June 30, 1948 R. P. to W. S. 1.71ft






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 25


94. Lake Parker Inflow near Lakeland, Florida

NWW- sec. 6, T. 28 S., R. 24 E., at crossing of State
Highway 33, between Granada and Robson Streets, 1l
miles north of Lakeland post office.

Sept. 15, 1955 1. 67 cfs
Feb. 14, 1956 1.00 cfs


95. Lake Parker Inflow near Lakeland, Florida

NW sec.31, T. 27 S., R. 24 E., at junction of State
Highway 33 with old Polk City Road, 3. 4 miles north
of Lakeland post office.

Sept. 15, 1955 0. 54 cfs
Feb. 15, 1956 0. 22 cfs


96. Peace Creek Drainage Canal near Bartow, Florida

SE- sec. 27, T. 29 S., R. 25 E., at Gandy Bridge on
road connecting State Highway 60 and U. S. Highway 17,
31 miles northeast of Bartow.

Apr. 13, 1945 21. 1 cfs


97. Reedy Lake Inflow near Frostproof, Florida

NE- sec. 26, T. 31 S., R. 28 E., at crossing of State
Highway 630, 2.8 miles northeast of Frostproof.

Apr. 18, 1947 3 cfs estimated
Oct. 9, 1947 5 cfs estimated






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


98. Lake Rochelle Inflow near Lake Alfred, Florida

SE1 sec. 5, T. 28 S., R. 26 E., at crossing of U. S.
Highway 17, 1.7 miles south of Lake Alfred.


Jan. 28, 1948


15 cfs estimated


99. Saddle Creek near Highland City, Florida

SW- sec. 30, T. 28 S., R. 25 E., 1 mile above Lake
Hancock and 31 miles northeast of Highland City.


Sept. 16, 1955
Feb. 15, 1956


116 cfs
14. 0 cfs


100. Saddle Creek near Lakeland, Florida

SE- sec. 2, T. 28 S., R. 24 E., at crossing of Burnt
Bridge Road, about 5 miles northeast of Lakeland post
office.


Sept. 15, 1955
Feb. 15, 1956


9.96 cfs
14.0 cfs


101. West Branch Saddle Creek near Lakeland, Florida

SW- sec. 14, T. 28 S., R. 24 E., at crossing of U. S.
Highway 92, 4. 3 miles east of Lakeland.


Sept. 15, 1955
Feb. 15, 1956


15.3 cfs
3.0 cfs