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Flood of June 9, 1957, at Perry, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 17 )
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 Material Information
Title: Flood of June 9, 1957, at Perry, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 17 )
Series Title: ( FGS: Information circular 17 )
Physical Description: iii, 12 p. : illus., maps. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Musgrove, Rufus H
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1958
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Floods -- Florida -- Perry   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001692739
oclc - 01808686
notis - AJA4813
lccn - a 58008960
System ID: UF00001077:00001

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Rainfall
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 5
    Peak flows
        Page 8
        Page 7
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Copyright
        Main 1
Full Text




STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Ernest Mitts, Director


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Robert O. Vernon, Director





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 17




FLOOD OF JUNE 9, 1957, AT PERRY, FLORIDA







By
Rufus H. Musgrove
Hydraulic Engineer, U. S. Geological Survey





Prepared by
U. S. Geological Survey
in cooperation with the
Florida Geological Survey




Tallahassee, Florida
1958









TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
Introduction... ..... ................. 1
Description of the area .................. 1
Rainfall . . . . .. .. . 5
General features of the flood. . . . 5
Peakflows ............................ 7


ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure
1 Map of Spring and Pimple creeks in Perry,
Florida, showing high-water elevations for
flood of June 9, 1957. .............. 2
2 Flooded area in residential section in Perry,
Florida, June 9, 1957 .............. 3
3 Flooded area along Pimple Creek in Perry,
Florida, June 9, 1957 ........... ... 4
4 Isohyetal map showing total rainfall
June 7-8, 1957, in vicinity of Perry, Florida. 6
5 Flooded area along Spring Creek in Perry,
Florida, June 9, 1957 .............. 8
6 Pimple Creek at Atlantic Coast Line Railroad,
Perry, Florida, June 9, 1957 . . 9
7 Flooding by Pimple Creek at intersections
of Ash and. Jefferson streets, Perry, Florida,
June 9, 1957 ................... 11
8 Pimple Creek at Jefferson Street, Perry,
Florida, June 9, 1957 .............. 12









FLOOD OF JUNE 9, 1957, AT PERRY, FLORIDA

By
Rufus H. Musgrove

INTRODUCTION

Floods occurred on streams in the vicinity of Perry,
Taylor County, Florida, on June 9, 1957, as a result of heavy
rains from tropical disturbance. Serious flooding occurred
in Perry along Spring and Pimple creeks as outlined by the
shaded area in figure 1, requiring the evacuation of about
ZOO families from the lowland area. No loss of life was
reported. The damages to residential and commercial prop-
erties were estimated at several million dollars. Most of
the damage was confined to residential areas (fig. 2); how-
ever, several stores in the area were damaged by flood
waters (fig. 3).

This report presents data pertaining to the rainfall
accompanying this storm andpeakflows of Spring and Pimple
creeks in Perry. It contains flood elevations at several
points, andpeak discharges of the two creeks flowing through
Perry. The report also contains a discussion of the rainfall
associated with the flood and a description of the general
features of the flood.

The rainfallrecords were collected bythe U.S. Weather
Bureau and the Florida Forest Service. The Buckeye Cellu-
lose Corporation furnished a map of the area showing the
location of rainfall stations operated by the Florida Forest
Service. Photographs of the flood were received from Dick
Bryant, Perry, Florida.

This report was prepared in the Ocala office of the
U.S. Geological Survey, Surface Water Branch, under the
direct supervision of A. 0. Patterson, District Engineer.

DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA

Perry is the county seat of Taylor County and is located
in the Big Bend area of Florida in the coastal lowlands. This






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


(z 'I


N~ .


EXPLANATION
39.9'
0 Location and elevation of
floodmark
V Location of peak- discharge
measurement
1000 0 1000
SCALE IN FEET


Figure 1. Map of the Spring and Pimple creeks in Perry,
Florida, showing flooded area, points of peak-
discharge measurement, and high-water eleva-
tions, in feet above mean sea level, for flood of
June 9, 1957.


;. t





















0









Figure Z. Flooded area in residential section in Perry,
Florida, June 9, 1957. (Photo courtesy of R. M.
Bryant)
































Figure 3. Flooded area along Pimple Creek in Perry,
.Florida, June 9, 1957. (Photo courtesy of R. M.
Bryant)






INFORMATION.CIRCULAR' NO. 17


area consists for the most part of nearly level plains, gen-
erally less than 100 feet above mean sea level.

The San Pedro Bay, to the northeast of Perry, is the
headwaters of several streams, including Spring and Pimple
creeks. This bay is heavily wooded and exceedingly flat, and
is 90 to 95 feet above mean sea level. Spring and Pimple
creeks both flow through Perry and join just west of town.

RAINFALL

A tropical disturbance on June 7 and 8 brought heavy
rains to this area from the Gulf of Mexico. This disturbance
was weak in terms of its general wind circulation but was a
major storm in terms of rainfall. The recording rain gages
in the area showed that the heaviest rainfall began about
6 p.m. on June 7 and-lasted for a 36-hour period. Reports
indicate scattered showers occurred in the area prior to
June 7. The greatest amount of rain reportedwas at a Florida
Forest Service fire tower 20 miles northeastof Perry, where
18.9inches was measuredfor the 2-dayperiod. The heaviest
rainfall (over 18 inches) occurred northeast of Perry and
covered an area of about 15 square miles. A total storm
rainfall of 12 inches or more, covering an area of 1000 square
miles, was computed from the isohyetal map (fig. 4). A
total rainfall of 16. 31 inches was recorded during June 1957
at the Perry station. This was the second highest monthly
totalof record for that station, exceeded onlyby 16.86 inches
in June 1934. A rainfall of 11. 7 inches was recorded for the
2-day period, June 7-8, 1957, at the Perry station.

Rainfall records for the storm were collected at three
recording and eight daily stations operated by the U. S.
Weather Bureau, and-at 14 daily stations operated by the
Florida Forest Service. No record from a recording gage
was available for the area of heaviest rainfall. Isohyetal
lines shown on the map (fig. 4) were based on all available
records.

GENERAL FEATURES OF THE FLOOD

Though there are no records on file of previous floods
in Perry, this flood is vividly remembered by some long-
time residents as being the most outstanding. Residents of





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Figure 4. Isohyetal map showing total rainfall June 7-8,
1957, in the vicinity of Perry, Florida.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 17


the area remember two previous floods of noteworthy mag-
nitude, one in 1948, and the other, probably in 1934. The
flood of June 9, 1957, is by far the most outstanding in the
history of the community, in terms of damage. This area
has greatly increased in population during the past few years
with a consequent increase in development. Much of the
recent development has been adjacent to the channels of
Spring and Pimple creeks in Perry.

Spring Creek, flowing in a westerly direction through
Perry, overflowed its banks, inundated several streets, and
caused considerable damage to homes and business property.
The floodwater rose to a depth of one foot inside the super-
market andlaundryjust east of Center Street (fig. 5). Homes
were flooded all along the creek from the northeast edge of
town down through the Brooklyn area. Spring Creek reached
a peak stage during the night of June 9.

Flood waters from Pimple Creek damaged homes and
stores in the northern section and in the Tidewater Cypress
Company area before joining Spring Creek just west of town.
Several streets were flooded along Pimple Creek, and a sec-
tion of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad bridge was torn out
to help relieve flooding upstream (fig. 6). Local residents
at the scene reported that the floodon Pimple Creek crested
about noon on June 9.

PEAK FLOWS

An indirect measurement of peak discharge was made
on Spring Creek at point downstream from U. S. Highway 19
and U. S. Highway 27 (fig. 1) where the entire flow was con-
fined by high banks. The peak discharge of 1, 360 cubic feet
per second was computed by Manning's formula from data
collected after the flood waters had subsided. A channel
roughness (n) of 0. 045 was selected for this section and a
water-surface slope of 0.0011 foot per foot was measured
from high-water marks. A mean velocity of 3.2 feet per
second was computed for this section of channel.

Spring Creek drains an area of about 24 square miles
above the point of the peak-discharge measurement. The
valley slope of this streams about seven feet per mile from






INFORMATION.CIRCULAR' NO. 17


area consists for the most part of nearly level plains, gen-
erally less than 100 feet above mean sea level.

The San Pedro Bay, to the northeast of Perry, is the
headwaters of several streams, including Spring and Pimple
creeks. This bay is heavily wooded and exceedingly flat, and
is 90 to 95 feet above mean sea level. Spring and Pimple
creeks both flow through Perry and join just west of town.

RAINFALL

A tropical disturbance on June 7 and 8 brought heavy
rains to this area from the Gulf of Mexico. This disturbance
was weak in terms of its general wind circulation but was a
major storm in terms of rainfall. The recording rain gages
in the area showed that the heaviest rainfall began about
6 p.m. on June 7 and-lasted for a 36-hour period. Reports
indicate scattered showers occurred in the area prior to
June 7. The greatest amount of rain reportedwas at a Florida
Forest Service fire tower 20 miles northeastof Perry, where
18.9inches was measuredfor the 2-dayperiod. The heaviest
rainfall (over 18 inches) occurred northeast of Perry and
covered an area of about 15 square miles. A total storm
rainfall of 12 inches or more, covering an area of 1000 square
miles, was computed from the isohyetal map (fig. 4). A
total rainfall of 16. 31 inches was recorded during June 1957
at the Perry station. This was the second highest monthly
totalof record for that station, exceeded onlyby 16.86 inches
in June 1934. A rainfall of 11. 7 inches was recorded for the
2-day period, June 7-8, 1957, at the Perry station.

Rainfall records for the storm were collected at three
recording and eight daily stations operated by the U. S.
Weather Bureau, and-at 14 daily stations operated by the
Florida Forest Service. No record from a recording gage
was available for the area of heaviest rainfall. Isohyetal
lines shown on the map (fig. 4) were based on all available
records.

GENERAL FEATURES OF THE FLOOD

Though there are no records on file of previous floods
in Perry, this flood is vividly remembered by some long-
time residents as being the most outstanding. Residents of



































Figure 5. Flooded area along Spring Creek in Perry,
Florida, June 9, 1957. (Photo courtesy of R. M.
Bryant)






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 17


the area remember two previous floods of noteworthy mag-
nitude, one in 1948, and the other, probably in 1934. The
flood of June 9, 1957, is by far the most outstanding in the
history of the community, in terms of damage. This area
has greatly increased in population during the past few years
with a consequent increase in development. Much of the
recent development has been adjacent to the channels of
Spring and Pimple creeks in Perry.

Spring Creek, flowing in a westerly direction through
Perry, overflowed its banks, inundated several streets, and
caused considerable damage to homes and business property.
The floodwater rose to a depth of one foot inside the super-
market andlaundryjust east of Center Street (fig. 5). Homes
were flooded all along the creek from the northeast edge of
town down through the Brooklyn area. Spring Creek reached
a peak stage during the night of June 9.

Flood waters from Pimple Creek damaged homes and
stores in the northern section and in the Tidewater Cypress
Company area before joining Spring Creek just west of town.
Several streets were flooded along Pimple Creek, and a sec-
tion of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad bridge was torn out
to help relieve flooding upstream (fig. 6). Local residents
at the scene reported that the floodon Pimple Creek crested
about noon on June 9.

PEAK FLOWS

An indirect measurement of peak discharge was made
on Spring Creek at point downstream from U. S. Highway 19
and U. S. Highway 27 (fig. 1) where the entire flow was con-
fined by high banks. The peak discharge of 1, 360 cubic feet
per second was computed by Manning's formula from data
collected after the flood waters had subsided. A channel
roughness (n) of 0. 045 was selected for this section and a
water-surface slope of 0.0011 foot per foot was measured
from high-water marks. A mean velocity of 3.2 feet per
second was computed for this section of channel.

Spring Creek drains an area of about 24 square miles
above the point of the peak-discharge measurement. The
valley slope of this streams about seven feet per mile from

























I.

vI,.
il I.

.~~~ I


Figure 6. Pimple
Perry,
of R. M.


Creek at Atlantic Coast Line Railroad,
Florida, June 9, 1957. (Photo courtesy
Bryant)


~







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


the point of origin in San Pedro Bay. The normal low-water
channel ends in an area of sinkholes about a mile east of town
and the creek flows only as an intermittent stream to a point
near Center Street.

An indirect measurement of peak discharge was made on
Pimple Creek at the North Jefferson Street crossing (fig. 1).
Jefferson Street was flooded (fig. 7) to a depth of half a foot
for a distance of 500 feet and a fall across the street of 1. 0
foot was measured from high-water marks (fig. 8). Flow
over the street was computed using U. S. Geological Survey
procedures developed from Yarnell and Nagler data. Flow
through the bridge opening was computed by two methods,
flow-through-culvert and contracted-opening, with compar-
able results. The peak discharge through the bridge opening
was 1,610 cubic feet per second, and over the street, 250
cubic feet per second, giving a total peak discharge of the
stream of 1, 860 cubic feet per second.

Pimple Creek has a drainage area of about 12 square
miles above the Jefferson Street crossing. This creek flows
in a more direct route from San Pedro Baythan Spring Creek,
and has a valley slope of about 10 feet per mile.

The drainage system of Spring and Pimple Creeks is
rather complexin that theyhave a common origin, San Pedro
Bay. The greater unit peak discharge of Pimple Creek (155
second-feet per square mile)over Spring Creek (57 second-
feet per square mile) is accounted for by the greater valley
slope and the more direct route it takes from San Pedro Bay.
It is also noted that the peak flood on Pimple Creek was
reached some 8 to 10 hours prior to the flood on Spring Creek.

The peak discharge of either stream greatly exceeded
the discharge that could be carried without danger of flood-
ing. At the time this flood occurred, sections of these
streams had a heavy growth of vegetation which reduced, to
some extent, their maximum conveyance capacity.

Elevations in feet above mean sea level of high-water
marks were measured at several points along the streams
and are given in figure 1.
















O














Figure 7. Flooding by Pimple Creek at intersection of Ash
and Jefferson streets, Perry, Florida, June 9,
1957. (Photo courtesy of R. M. Bryant)

















0


0
0t4














Figure 8. Pimple Creek at Jefferson Street, Perry, Florida,
June 9, 1957. (Photo courtesy of R. M. Bryant)










FLRD GEOLOSk ( IC SUfRiW


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