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Interim report on surface water resources and quality of waters in Lee County, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 7 )
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00001067/00001
 Material Information
Title: Interim report on surface water resources and quality of waters in Lee County, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 7 )
Series Title: ( FGS: Information circular 7 )
Physical Description: ix, 69 p. : illus. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Kenner, William E
Brown, Eugene, 1919-
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1956
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Water-supply -- Florida -- Lee County   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by William E. Kenner and Eugene Brown.
General Note: "Prepared by U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey and the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District."
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001692846
oclc - 12875518
notis - AJA4920
lccn - a 56009887
System ID: UF00001067:00001

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Table of Contents
    Main
        Main
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Part I. Surface water resources of Lee County, Florida
        Page iv
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Part I -- Table of contents
        Page ix
    Part I -- Surface water
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Part II. Quality of surface waters of Lee County, Florida
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Part II -- Table of contents
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Part II -- Quality of surface water
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
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        Page 37
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        Page 40
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Full Text






FLRD GEOLOSk ( IC SUfRiW


COPYRIGHT NOTICE
[year of publication as printed] Florida Geological Survey [source text]


The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of
this electronic resource on behalf of the State of Florida. The
Florida Geological Survey shall be considered the copyright holder
for the text of this publication.

Under the Statutes of the State of Florida (FS 257.05; 257.105, and
377.075), the Florida Geologic Survey (Tallahassee, FL), publisher of
the Florida Geologic Survey, as a division of state government,
makes its documents public (i.e., published) and extends to the
state's official agencies and libraries, including the University of
Florida's Smathers Libraries, rights of reproduction.

The Florida Geological Survey has made its publications available to
the University of Florida, on behalf of the State University System of
Florida, for the purpose of digitization and Internet distribution.

The Florida Geological Survey reserves all rights to its publications.
All uses, excluding those made under "fair use" provisions of U.S.
copyright legislation (U.S. Code, Title 17, Section 107), are
restricted. Contact the Florida Geological Survey for additional
information and permissions.







STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Ernest Mitts, Director

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Herman Gunter, Director



INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 7




INTERIM REPORT

ON


SURFACE WATER
AND

QUALITY OF


LEE COUNTY,


RESOURCES


WATERS


FLORIDA


WILLIAM E. KENNER and EUGENE BROWN







PREPARED BY U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
IN COOPERATION WITH THE FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
AND THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN FLORIDA FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT







Tallahassee, Florida
1956
























CONTENTS


Part I Surface Water Resources of Lee County,
F lorida ........... .............. 1

Part II Quality of Surface Waters of Lee County,
Florida ...................... ..... 15





















42409
iii








PART I


SURFACE


WATER RESOURCES


OF


LEE COUNTY FLORIDA



By
William E. Kenner
U. S. Geological Survey


Prepared by the
U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
In cooperation with the
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
and the
CENTRAL and SOUTHERN FLORIDA
FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT







Tallahassee, Florida
1956


















































'I









PREFACE


This report was prepared in the Surface Water Branch
of the U. S. Geological Survey under the direct supervision
of A. 0. Patterson, District Engineer. Its preparation was
made possible by the cooperation of the Central and Southern
Florida Flood Control District, W. Turner Wallis, Secretary.

Most of the basic water-resources data in this report
have been collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in coopera-
tion with the Corps of Engineers, the City of Fort Myers,
the Florida Geological Survey, and the Florida Division of
Water Survey and Research. Some data were furnished by
the Corps of Engineers.






























































> ', ;\





CONTENTS

Page

Introduction...................... ....... ............ 1
Description of area ............................... 2
Clim ate .......................................... 2
Occurrence of surface water.................. ........ 2
Areal distribution................................. 7
Caloosahatchee River............................ 7
Orange River (Twelvemile Creek). ................ 8
.Imperial River............... .................. 8
Line-A Canal. .................................. 16
Still Lake...................................... 16
Stage stations ................................ 16
Tim e distribution ................................. 17
Basic data requirements ............................. 17
Appendix Descriptions of gaging stations ............. 19


TABLES

Table Page


1. Runoff of Orange River ......................... 13
2. Runoff of Imperial River.................. ........ 14
3. Runoff of Line-A Canal ................................ 15


ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure Page

1. Map of Lee County, Florida, showing surface-
water features ............ . ........... ........... 3
2. Growth in population of Fort Myers ............... 4
3. Climatological data for Fort Myers .............. 5
4. Outflow from Lake Okeechobee .................. 6
5. Hydrograph of Orange River..................... 9
6. Flow-duration curve for Orange River near
Fort M yers.............. .... .................... 10
7. Maximum period of deficient discharge for
Orange River near Fort Myers .................. 11
8. Flow-duration curve for Imperial River near
Bonita Springs ............. ............... 12
9. Average runoff of Orange River near Fort
M years ......................................... 18







SURFACE WATER RESOURCES
of
LEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By
William C. Kenner

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this report is to provide such information
on the surface-water resources of the county as maybe use-
ful in planning for their more intensive use. This report is
not intended to provide final answers to all questions con-
cerning the occurrence of surface water in the county, be-
cause of the paucity of information on the various streams in
the area. However, as an initial step it should prove valuable
in the formulation of plans for the future.

To the author's knowledge, no similar report has been
published, although much of the basic data used in this one
have been released in publications of the U. S. Geological
Survey and the U. S. Weather Bureau.

This report is intended to give the best answers that
are presently available to the following questions:

1. Where within Lee County are surface sup-
plies of water located?

2. What are the variations in this supply?

3. What canbe done to provide better answers.
to questions 1 and 2 than are available at
the present time?





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


DESCRIPTION OF AREA

Lee County is on the west coast of peninsular Florida
opposite the southern edge of Lake Okeechobee (see Fig. 1).
It has a land area of 786 square miles, 35 percent of which
is in farms. Tourist trade, agriculture, and commercial fish-
ing are the main sources of income. Fort Myers, on the Ca-
loosahatchee River and 13 miles from the Gulf of Mexico, is
the principal city and the county seat. Its 1950 population was
13,195. Total population of the county was 23,404. The growth
in population of Fort Myers since 1890 is shown in Figure 2.


CLIMATE

The average temperature at Fort Myers is 73.4 degrees.
January is usually the coolest month, with an average of 63.8
degrees, and August the warmest with an average of 81.5 de-
grees. Frost rarely occurs here. The average yearly rain-
fall is 52.39 inches. Figure 3 shows the variations in tem-
perature and rainfall. The subtropical climate of the area
makes possible the growing of citrus fruits, tropical fruits,
such as mangoes, papayas, and others, as well as truck and
staple crops.


OCCURRENCE OF SURFACE WATER

The surface-water supplies in Lee County obtain from
water falling as rain on its land surface and flowing into the
lakes and streams; from surface streams bringing water into
the county; and from water entering the county through under-
ground formations and making its way to the surface. Of
course, not all of the water entering the county is available
for use since evaporation, transpiration, and seepage into the
ground take a heavy toll.

There are two essential factors to be considered in a
study of the surface water of an area. One is the areal dis-
tribution. In other words, at what geographic locations within
thi area are the supplies located? The second is the time
distribution of the supplies, or, what is the day by day, month
by month, or year by year variation in the amount of water
occurring at the various locations?













































Figure 1. Map of Lee County, Florida, showing surface water features.
.. . .

































1900


Figure 2.


1910


1920


1930


Growth and population of Fort Myers.


1890


1940


1950









z
SU













z
o
-I


i




















2
IL
I->

0





100




2


- 60



-40


-I


J F M A M J J


.. .... ...
.... .... .... ....
.... .... ..=. ... .....///


m et, ml *.q .il... ... ....il ....


A S 0 N D


N n a in 4 r
2 S 2 m a a a
o> o> > o> > o>n


Climatological data for Fort Myers.


...................
. .
... ..4...
... ... ...


LI _


Figure 3.









Total of St. Lucie Canal, West Palm Beech
Canal, North New River Canol, Hillsboro
SCanal, and Coloosahatche Canal
-L______________________


Caloosahatchee CaaI1


Li 1


Outflow from Lake Okeechobee.


10043 I I 4 I I |
S00JFMAMJ JASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASOND
S1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950


D,.mm.m


Figure 4.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 7-1


REAL DISTRIBUTION

The largest single source of surface water in Lee County
is the Caloosahatchee River. It carries the wgter discharged
into it from Lake Okeechobee through the locks at Moore
Haven as well as the runoff from some 1500 square miles of
land area between the Lake and the Gulf. The runoff from
about 35 percent of the land area of Lee County moves to the
Gulf via this stream. The principal tributaries to the Caloo-
sahatchee River, as well as other streams in the county, and a
general picture of the drainage pattern are shown on Figure 1.

CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER

For many years the Caloosahatchee River has been canal-
ized at its upstream end and connected with Lake Okeechobee,
and has served as one of two principal outlets from the Lake.
The 15-mile portion of this stream between Lake Okeechobee
and Ortona Lock is called Caloosahatchee Canal and the por-
tion from Ortona Lock to the Gulf is called Caloosahatchee
River.

In October 1948, gages were installed on the Caloosa-
hatchee River at Alva and Olga and daily stage records were
obtained until their discontinuance in December 1950. The
datum of eachof these gages was at mean sea level, datum of
1929. The flow was measured at Alva on October 1, 1948, and
was 12,600 cubic feet per second. This extremely high flow
came as a result of heavy rains accompanying a hurricane.
Information from local residents indicates that the highest
stages known occurred in 1924, reaching 13.3 feet at Alva and
8.2 feet at Olga. Records of the Corps of Engineers show the
minimum stages known to have been 1.88 feet below sea level
atAlva and 2.68 feet below sealevelat Olga. These occurred
on October 18, 1944. Because in some years considerable
water is released from Lake Okeechobee to flow down the Ca-
loosahatchee Canal, ahydrograph showing the flow through the
locks at Moore Haven for the years 1941 to 1950 has been in-
cluded (Fig. 4). Not included in the values shown is the leak-
age and lockage, which amounts to about 10 cubic feet per
second. To indicate the total amount of water that may be
available at Moore Haven, a hydrograph of the total flow out
of Lake Okeechobee through all its outlets during the years
1941 to 1950 is also shown in Figure 4.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


ORANGE RIVER (TWELVEMILE CREEK)

Orange River is one of the larger tributaries to the Ca-
loosahatchee River. It flows into the Caloosahatchee River
from the south about 8 miles upstream from Fort Myers. Its
drainage area is 83.4 square miles. From November 1935
to October 1946, records of its stage and discharge were
obtained by the U. S. Geological Survey. The datum of the
gage was 1.71 feet above mean sea level, datum of 1929. Dur-
ing this period the maximum discharge was 5,300 cubic feet
per second, with a corresponding gage height of 13.40 feet, on
June 15, 1936. At times flow in this stream ceases. In April
1939 the stage fell below 0.02 foot. As an example of the dis-
tribution of flow throughout the year, Figure 5 shows a hydro-
graph for 1937, a year during which the mean runoff equaled
the average for the 10-year period. The monthly and annual
runoff for Orange River is listed in Table 1. It is of note that
the average yearly runoff for this basin is 7.83 inches per year,
or slightly less than 15 percent of the rain that falls. A flow
duration curve is shown on Figure 6. This curve shows how
much of the time during the period of record (1935-46) various
flows were equaled or exceeded. For example, the flow was
at or higher than the rate of 9 cubic feet per second for 40
percent of the time. This curve represents the behavior of
this stream in the past and, barring significant changes in the
drainage basin or climatic pattern, can reasonably be expected
to represent the future behavior.

The curve shown on Figure 7 is a very useful tool in the
analysis of stream flow and shows the maximum period of
deficient discharge of Orange River for the period of record,
1935-46. It shows that the flow of Orange River at the gaging
site near Fort Myers was less than 3 cubic feet per second
(1 cfs = 0.646 mgd) for as long as 6 consecutive months.

IMPERIAL RIVER

The Imperial River flows westward near the south bound-
ary of the county to empty into the south end of Estero Bay
and thence into the Gulf near the town of Bonita Springs. Since
May 1940 the Geological Survey has operated a gaging station
on the Imperial River about 1 miles east of Bonita Springs.
The datum of this gage is at mean sea level, datum of 1929.






















z



w 0




















a
a o--- -------------------------------







Figure 5. Hydrograh o Orange River.


I0
a __ ___ _____ ______ ___ J ___ __________


2 1 f \ I r *


a e0







January February March April May June July August September October November December
1937



Figure 5. Hydrograph of Orange River.





1.000


,D \ 1 'KI 271-


rT


200oo

100

50


2o

I0

5
20 ---- -_ ---- -- r- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- ---













0.2 ____ - -
o. Ei== == !=== =


0.1 0.2 0.5


2 5 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 95 98
PERCENT OF TIME DISCHARGE EQUALLED OR EXCEEDED THAT SHOWN


99 99.5 99.899.9


99.99


Flow-duration curve for Orange River near Fort Myers, 1935-46.


1,000


0.1


01


--+-~f


1 I 1 I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I II I I l I I I


Figure 6.






INFORMATION. CIRCULAR NO. 7-I


S2 5 10 20 50 1 1o0
CONSECUTIVE MONTHS


Figure 7. Maximum period of deficient discharge for

Orange River near Fort Myers, 1935.46.


1,000

500


200

100

.50


I1







______ :rq


0.1 0.2 0.5


2274


-i


5,000


2,000

1,000


AO.Oo0


2 5 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 95 98
PERCENT OF TIME DISCHARGE EQUALLED OR EXCEEDED THAT SHOWN


r I --r- r--T --


~I~t~EEE~


I{J


99 99.5 99.899.9


99.99


Figure 8. Flow-duration curve for Imperial River near Bonita Springs, 1940-52.


-~-1-~


20


0.1
0.


-.


T


7-4i-i T.T.
.... T T-- -..
,--- .. T T .... ..


-+ --- --
--C-- -----


r--- ---


='1


~t_


I

----i
1


01












TABLE 1

RUNOFF OF ORANGE RIVER NEAR FORT MYERS


Monthly and annual runoff, in inches


Year Jan Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Annual

1935 0.0007
1936 0.05 0.59 0.08 0.0005 0.0003 10.26 2.50 0.54 0.40 0.69 0.03 0.0006 15.14
1937 .0003 .0004 .02. .18 .26 .85 2.01 2.73, 1.35 .33 .08 .01 7.82
1938 0.006 .0003 .0001 .00001 0 .49 2.24 .82 .25 .35 .02 .0003 4.18
1939 .0003 .0002 .0001 .24 .08 3.24 2.40 3.85 2.30 .25 .05 .01 12.42
1940 .15 .40 .16 .13 .00007 .04 .52 1.68 4.27 .11 .0007 .002 7.46
1941 .12 .59 .35 1.29 .06 .46 3.21 .65 2.12 .20 .04 .005 9.09
1942 .13 .03 .08 .40 .03 .42 .33 .22 1.26 .07 .008 .006 2.98
1943 .005 .002 .008 .01 .08 1.59 3.46 .69 .98 .95 .11 .05 7.93
1944 .06 .04 .04 .05 .09 .13 .54 1.47 .19 .27 .04 .04 2.96
1945 .04 .02 .008 .002 .009 .85 4.13 1.20 .99 .84 .16 .03 8.28
1946 .02 .01 .02 .01 .03 .10 .38 1.86 .81

Mean .05 .15 .07 .21 .06 1.68 1.97 1.43 1.36 .41 .05 .01 7.83

Max. .15 .59 .35 1.29 .26 10.26 4.13 3.85 4.27 .95 .16 .05 15.14
Min. .0003 .0002 .0001 .00001 .00007 .04 .33 .22 .19 .07 .0007 .0003 2.96


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TABLE 2
RUNOFF OF IMPERIAL RIVER NEAR BONITA SPRINGS
Monthly and annual runoff, in thousands of acre-feet

Year Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Annual
1940 0.39 2.64 6.36 55.23 6.59 0.68 0.21
1941 5.31 7.81 3.08 12.29 3.40 3.54 21.05 14.64 12.06 6.61 1.86 .48 92.13
1942 4.43 .48 1.54 .21 .11 7.63 10.09 1.28 10.66 1.00 .10 .09 37.62
1943 .09 .07 .07 .07 .07 5.57 19.39 14.81 9.10 4.43 .20 .12 53.99
1944 .09 .08 .07 .07 .07 .13 .11 7.22 6.37 5.79 .90 .13 21.03
1945 .11 .06 .06 .05 .05 .10 17.63 24.82 19.80 7.66 1.19 .14 71.68
1946 .11 .07 .07 .05 .06 .47 5.56 12.09 12.29 7.95 10.49 1.37 50.58
1947 .17 .10 2.82 .66 .15 19.71 16.83 24.73 60.75 24.97 6.73 4.55 162.2
1948 2.36 1.36 .13 .09 .07 .08 6.00 7.67 21.79 23.03 1.26 .15 63.99
1949 .10 .04 .05 .04 .08 7.87 10.51 15.08 12.91 24.13 3.77 .25 74.84
1.950 .10 .07 .86 .07 .04 .05 7.76 2.34 11.37 .43 .13 .11 22.53
1951 .08 .06 .06 .05 .05 .04 7.82 14.50 6.93 49.72 2.62 .19 82.12
1952 .08 .09 .10 .06 .06 .14 6.41 7.26 10.33

Mean 1.09 .86 .68 1.14 .35 3.52 10.14 11.75 19.20 13.53 2.49 .65 66.61

Max. 5.31 7.81 3.08 12.29 3.40 19.71 21.05 24.82 60.75 49.72 10.49 4.55 162.2
Min. .08 .06 .05 .04 .04 .04 .11 1.28 6.37 1.00 .10 .09 21.03





















TABLE 3

RUNOFF OF LINE-A CANAL NEAR FORT MYERS

Monthly and annual runoff, in thousands of acre-feet


Year Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Annually


1944 20 15 32 82 71 5,560 2,180 3,330 468 29

1945 49 12 2.6 0 0 4,360 14,900 6,210 6,290 1,430 189 15 33,460


ft




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


During the time from May 1940 to December 1951 the maxi-
mum discharge observed was 2,890 cubic feet per second on
September 12, 1940. The water elevation at the time was
12.45 feet above mean sea level; however, during the flood of
June 15, 1936, a stage of 13.4 feet was reached, as evidenced
by floodmarks. Low flows are not uncommon; however, the
only time during the period mentioned above when there was
no flow was from June 28 to July 3, 1940. A table of runoff
in thousands of acre feet (Table 2) and a flow-duration curve
(Fig. 8) have been included.

LINE-A CANAL

This canal runs south from Fort Myers to Mulock Creek,
a distance of some 10 miles, and intercepts the flow out of
Six Mile Cypress Slough on the east. A gaging station was
operated on the canal from June 1942 to July 1948. Only stage
information was collected except from February 1944 to
December 1946, when flow data were also obtained. The datum
of the gage was at mean sea level (levels by Corps of Engi-
neers). During the period covered by discharge records the
maximum flow was 567 cubic feet per second, on September
19, 1947. Extended periods of zero flow were recorded. A
minimum gage height, on June 16, 1945, was 2.14 feet. Listed
in Table 3 is the runoff in thousands of acre feet for Line-A
Canal.

STILL LAKE

Still Lake, 15 miles east of Fort Myers, is a circular,
water-filled, sinkhole 600 feet in diameter and 208 feet deep.
It was investigated in May 1943 by the U.S. Geological Survey
and determinations of water temperature, stage, and depth at
various locations-were made.

STAGE STATIONS

In addition to the records already discussed, records of
stage have been collected on the Estero River at Estero,
Mulock Creek near Estero, and Billy's Creek at Fort Myers.
For station descriptions of all stations that have been operated
in Lee County by the U.S. Geological Survey, see the appendix




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 7-


TIME DISTRIBUTION

It is frequently as important to have information concern-
ing the time distribution of the flow of streams as it is to
know where the water is to be found. Even though the total
yearly runoff for two particular streams may have been equal
or nearly equal, the time at which various amounts of runoff
occurred do not necessarily coincide.

The most important factor in producing the pattern of
runoff is the seasonal distribution of the rainfall. In Florida
the streamflow pattern follows the seasonal changes in rain-
fall more closely than in areas where snow is a factor. Fig-
ure 9 shows the seasonal variations in the average runoff of
Orange River. The correlation may be noted by comparison
with the variation in rainfall shown in Figure 3.



BASIC DATA REQUIREMENTS

In view of the rapid economic growth of Lee County, it is
evident that more information on surface water resources is
needed. The value of the records collected thus far would be
increased by their continuance and by the operation of a pro-
gram on a broader scope.

Essential to such a program would be the operation of
additional index gaging stations on several of the larger
streams and the periodic determination of the flow of the
smaller streams. Periodic observations as well as the col-
lection of daily stage and discharge data would contribute
materially to knowledge of the hydrology of the county and at
the same time provide information of economic value.




























J F M A M J J A S 0 N D


Fig. 9.


Average runoff of Orange River near Fort Myers.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO.7-I


IMPERIAL RIVER NEAR BONITA SPRINGS

Location--Lat. 26*20', Long. 81*45', in Sec. 36, T. 47 S.
R. 25 E., 1 1/2 miles east of Bonita Springs.

Records Available--May 1940 to December 1951, daily stage
and discharge (continuing).

Gage--Water-stage recorder and wooden control. Datum of
gage is at mean sea level, datum of 1929. Prior to
Sept. 10, 1941, staff gage at same site and datum read
once or twice daily.

Extremes--Maximum discharge observed, 2,890 cfs Sept. 12,
1940 (gage height, 12.45 ft.); no flow June 28 to July 3,
1940.

Flood of June 15, 1936, reached a stage of 13.4 ft.,
from floodmark.


MULOCK CREEK NEAR ESTERO

Location--Lat. 2628'. Long. 81 50', in Sec. 18, T. 46 S.,
R. 25 E., 30 ft. upstream from U. S. Highway 41, 3
miles northwest of Estero.

Records Available--June 1942 to July 1948, daily stage (dis-
continued).

Gage--Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is at mean sea
level (levels by Corps of Engineers).

Extremes--June 1942 to July 1948: Maximum gage height,
6.98 ft. Sept. 18, 1947; minimum observed, -0.22 ft.
Feb. 15, Mar. 8, 1943.

Flood of June 1936 reached a stage of about 9.0 ft.,
from information by local residents.

Remarks--Local residents state there is always some flow
in stream. Stage affected by tide at low and medium
flows.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


ESTERO RIVER AT ESTERO
Location--Lat. 26031', Long. 8151', in Sec. 34, T. 46 S.,
R. 25 E., 230 ft. upstream from highway bridge, 0.8
mile east of Estero.

Records Available--June 1942 to July 1946, daily stage (dis-
continued).

Gage--Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is at mean sea
level (levels by Corps of Engineers).

Extremes--June 1942 to July 1946: Maximum gage height,
8.01 ft. Oct. 18, 1944; minimum observed, -0.88 ft.
Dec. 14, 15, 1942.
Flood of June 1936 reached a stage of about 14.0 ft.,
from floodmark.


CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AT ALVA

Location--Lat. 26*43', Long. 81 36', in Sec. 27, T. 43 S.,
R. 27 E., 110 ft. downstream from highway bridge at
Alva, 12.8 miles downstream from State Highway 29
at La Belle.

Records Available--October 1948 to December 1950, daily
stage, occasional discharge (discontinued).

Gage--Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is at mean sea
level, datum of 1929.

Extremes--October 1948 to December 1950: Maximum gage
height, 6.71 ft. Sept. 30, 1949; minimum -1.68 Dec. 24,
1949.

A stage of 13.3 ft. was reached in 1924, from informa-
tion by local resident. A stage of -1.88 ft. occurred
on Oct. 18, 1944, from records of Corps of Engineers.
A discharge of 12,600 cfs was measured Oct. 1, 1948.

Remarks--Stage affected by tide. Regulation by Ortona Lock,
22 miles upstream from station, and by lock at Moore
Haven.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 7-I


LINE-A CANAL NEAR FORT MYERS

Location--Lat. 26 31', Long. 81 51', inSec. 6, T. 46 S.,
R. 25 E., 1/4 mile upstream from U. S. Highway 41,
9 miles south of Fort Myers.

Records Available-- June 1942 to February 1944, daily stage;
February 1944 to December 1946, daily stage and dis-
charge; January 1947 to July 1948, daily stage (dis-
continued).

Gage--Water-stage recorder and concrete control. Datum
of gage is at mean sea level (levels by Corps of Engi-
neers). Concrete control completed Feb. 5, 1944.

Extremes--Maximum discharge, 567 cfs Sept. 19, 1947 (gage
height, 9.71 ft.); no flow at times; minimum gage
height, 2.14 ft. June 16, 1945.


ORANGE RIVER NEAR FORT MYERS
(Previously published as Twelvemile Creek near Fort Myers)

Location--Lat. 26 40', Long. 81 43', in Sec. 9, T. 44 S.,R.
26 E., 1 1/2 miles southeast of Buckingham and 8
miles northeast of Fort Myers.

Drainage Area--83.4 square miles.

Records Available--November 1935 to October 1946, daily
stage and discharge (discontinued).

Gage--Staff gage read once or twice daily. Datum of gage is
1.71 ft. above mean sea level, datum of 1929.

Extremes--Maximum discharge, 5,300 cfs June 15, 1936
(gage height, 13.40 ft., from floodmarks), from rating
curve extended above 2,800 cfs; no flow at times;
minimum gage height, less than 0.02 ft. Apr. 18-22,
1939.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BILLY'S CREEK AT FORT MYERS

Location--Lat. 26 39', Long. 81 51', in Sec. 13, T. 44 S.,
R. 24 E., at First Street bridge in Fort Myers.

Records Available--February 1944 to December 1951, daily
stage (continuing).
Gage--Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is at mean sea
level, datum of 1929.


Extremes--February 1944 to December
gage height, 4.8 ft. Oct. 8, 1946,
minimum, -1.77 ft. Oct. 18, 1944.


1951:
from


Maximum
floodmark;


Flood in 1936 reached a stage of 4.5 ft. A low tide of
-3.8 ft. occurred during a hurricane in 1935.

Remarks--Stage affected by tide with an average range of
about 0.7 ft.


CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AT
NEAR FORT MYERS


OLGA,


Location--Lat. 26 43',
R. 26 E., 120 ft.
0.45 mile north
from Alva.


Long. 8143', in Sec. 21, T. 43 S.,
downstream from State Highway 31,
of Olga, and 6.5 miles downstream


Records Available--October 1948 to December 1950, daily
stage, occasional discharge (discontinued).

Gage--Water-stage recorder. Datum of gage is at mean sea
level (levels by Corps of Engineers).

Extremes--October 1948 to December 1950: Maximum gage
height, 4.60 Sept. 29, 1948; minimum -1.58 Dec. 24,
1949.

A stage of 8.2 ft. was reached in 1924, from informa-
tion by local resident. A stage of -2.68 ft..,occurred
on Oct. 18, 1944, from records of Corpsof Engineers.

Remarks--Stage affected by tide. Regulationby Ortona Lock,
28 miles upstream from station, and by Moore Haven
Lock.
















PART H


QUALITY OF SURFACE WATERS

OF

LEE COUNTY, FLORIDA



By
Eugene Brown
U. S. Geological Survey


Prepared by the
U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
In cooperation with the
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
and the
CENTRAL and SOUTHERN FLORIDA
FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT







Tallahassee, Florida
1956









































































i' :















































1








CONTENTS


Page

Introduction...........................................27
Purpose and scope ................ ............... 28
Acknowledgments ................................. 28
Previous investigations ............................ 28
Quality of surface waters ................... ........ 29
Caloosahatchee Canal at Moore Haven................ 29
Caloosahatchee Canal at Ortona Lock ............... 33
Caloosahatchee River ............................. 34
Orange River ..................................... 34
Miscellaneous surface supplies ..................... 34
Conclusions......................................... 35


APPENDIX

Table Page

1. Chemical analyses, Caloosahatchee Canal ........ 38
2. Chemical analyses, Caloosahatchee River ........ 60
3. Chemical analyses of miscellaneous surface
w waters .................................. ...... 62
4. Chemical analyses of ground waters .............. 69


ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure Page

1. Map of Lee County, Florida, showing type
and location of sampling stations ................. 30
2. Average monthly chloride concentration and
flow of Caloosahatchee Canal at Moore Haven,
Florida, 1941................................... 31
3. Annual mean discharge of Caloosahatchee Canal
at Moore Haven, Florida ........................ 32









QUALITY OF SURFACE WATERS
of
LEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By
Eugene Brown

INTRODUCTION

GENERAL

The history of the development of public water supplies
in Lee County parallels that of many other coastal areas in
southern Florida. In the early years, when the population
was small, an ample supply of ground water was easily avail-
able from the artesian formations located at various depths
between 100 and 1,200 feet below the land surface. Prior to
1935 the City of Fort Myers obtained its water supply from
deep artesian wells penetrating the Hawthorn and Ocala for-
mations. The water produced by these wells had a hardness
of about 850 ppm, with high chloride, sulfate, hydrogen sul-
fide, and dissolved solids.

With a steady growth in population came a demand for
more and better water. This demand has been caused not
only by a rapidly increasing population, but also by greatly
expanded industrial and agricultural enterprises. The trop-
ical location of FortMyers and Lee County is well suited for
the growth of winter produce and citrus; many acres of glad-
ioli have been planted within recent years. Also during the past
few years the cattle industry has become of ever-increasing
importance to this area and will contribute greatly to the
future growth and development of the county.

Faced with the sometimes divergent requirements of the
various interests concerned with the consumption, disposal,
and regulation of water within the county, interested individ-
uals, in cooperation with the Central and Southern Florida
Flood Control District, organized the Lee County Water Re-
sources and Conservation Committee. Members of this com-
mittee met in January 1953 and discussed at some length the
county-wide problems of water supply and conservation, as
well as certain local problems of special interest. It was the





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


conclusion of this committee that a report be prepared pre-
senting all available data relating to the hydrology of Lee
County and also setting forth deficiencies in hydrologic data
and recommendations for remedial action. The following
material has been assembled to assist in the preparation of
its county-wide report.

PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This report does not attempt to do more than present very
briefly the results of previous investigations of the chemical
quality of surface waters in, or contributory to those of, Lee
County, Florida. The quality of ground water is referred to
only with respect to the possible contamination of surface
waters by highly mineralized water from artesian aquifers.

On the basis of the analytical data presented, together
with a limited discussion of the various surface water supplies
included, certain recommendations are made which are be-
lieved necessary for an accurate appraisal of the hydrologic
conditions in Lee County.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This report was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in
cooperation with the Central and Southern Florida Flood Con-
trol District, W. Turner Wallis, Secretary. It was prepared
under the general supervision of S.K. Love, chief of the Qual-
ity of Water Branch, Washington, D.C. and the direct super-
vision of Eugene Brown, district chemist, Ocala, Florida.

The analytical data presented have been collected over a
period of years by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation
with the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District,
the cities of Fort Myers, Miami, Miami Beach, and Dade
County.

PREVIOUS INVESTIGATIONS

In order to obtain information about the chemical quality
of surface waters in and near Fort Myers, this city entered
into a cooperative study with the U.S. Geological Survey in






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 7-II 29

early 1944. This study provided for the collection and labora-
tory examination of a series of water samples collected at
selected points in and near the city of Fort Myers, as well as
from most of the more important surface water supplies avail-
able to the county. Accordingly, from 1944 to 1946 samples
were collected from the Caloosahatchee River, Orange River
(Twelvemile Creek) Line-A Canal, Billy's Creek, Manuel's
Branch, and other small creeks and drainage ditches. The
results of chemical examination are given in tabular form in
the appendix. Also included in these tables are results of
chemical analyses of daily samples from the Caloosahatchee
Canal at Moore Haven, and of other surface water supplies
pertinent to this study. The location and type of sampling
stations are shown in Figure 1.

Since there are no known published analyses of surface
waters in Lee County, the following discussion of surface
water quality is based entirely on the analytical data included
in the appendix.


QUALITY OF SURFACE WATERS

CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN

The Caloosahatchee Canal is generally considered to be
the canalized portion of the Caloosahatchee River system
from Lake Okeechobee to Ortona Lock, while the portion from
the latter point to the Gulf is known as the Caloosahatchee
River.

Daily samples were taken from the Caloosahatchee Canal
at Moore Haven from February 1941 to March 1942 and ana-
lyzed for alkalinity, specific conductance, and chloride. These
daily samples were then composite at 10-day intervals for
comprehensive chemical analysis. The results of these
analyses are given in Table 1, appendix.

The minimum chloride value of 7.0ppm was observed on
Sept. 13, 1941 and the maximum of 53 ppm on Apr. 2, 1941.
The average chloride concentration during this period was 30
ppm and the average hardness was 113 ppm. The analytical
data obtained during this period indicate a water entirely






CHARLOTTE COUNTY
LEE COUNTY -J Rver


La Bell*


MEMORY COUNTY


till
Still


I

I


eL- Daily Sampling Station
A- Periodic Sampling Station


COLLIER COUNTY
I
oI
Immokolee
1


L- --


Figure 1. Map of Lee County, Florida, showing type and location of sampling stations.


Hicpochee


i A







OU Y." A ,ra


-- Streaflow, in H ousand a re feet -.
Chloride ,in parts per mil ion



-


Jan.


Feb.


Mar.


Apr.


June July


Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.


Figure 2. Average monthly chloride content and Ilow of Caloosahatchee Canal at Moore
Haven, Florida, 1941.


Tn-


200


lO


120



100


80


1100


70





10
60









30



20



10


Dec.


aJ n I 1 hr


rr Mav


T.1.,


nO+-


Nnlf


r~r


cA






1,a -- ---- ----- -- -- --- --- -- -- -- --- -- -_ ---







O0 / \.
1.2-----n-------------
1.0 y- -- - -- -- _\-
tea F \ I r




-- -v--- -- --L

60-- -- - -- -- -- -
600-------

2001 __ __ .__ _...............__ __ __ __ __


/


9g0 I 19i 192 I 19ir IoL 9UC 19S 19n I 19a7 I 1 .19i9
Figure- 3..- Annual mean discharge of Caloosahatchee Canal at Moor-e Haven, Florida.


_1





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 7-II


suitable for agricultural use, but requiring color removalfor
domestic and most industrial purposes.

The annual variation in chemical quality is illustrated in
Figure 2, which shows the average monthly chloride concen-
trations for the year 1941, as well as the streamflow in acre
feet for the same period. Since the flow through the canal is
regulated by the lock and dam structures at Moore Haven the
quality of water discharged into the canal bears little relation
to the flow. The rather uniform quality shown results from
the "smoothing" effect of the large reservoir storage afforded
by Lake Okeechobee. The chloride concentration is shown to
be somewhat lower during the period June to October, as a
result.of dilution caused by heavy rainfall at this time of the
year. Although Figure 2 presents a fairly good picture of the
monthly variation in chloride content for a givenyear, it does
not show how the concentration of this constituent may vary
from year to year. It may be seen from Figure 3 that the
year in which the analyses were made was one of high dis-
charge through the canal. To the extent that this high dis-
charge indicates a relatively "wet" year among those shown,
an estimate maybe made of the possible variation in chem-
ical quality from year to year.

CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT ORTONA LOCK

During the period February 1945 to April 1946 samples
were taken from both upstream and downstream sides of the
lock and analyzed for specific conductance and chloride. In
addition periodic samples were taken for more complete
chemical analysis. The results are given in Table 1 of the
appendix. The chloride concentrations at both sides of the
lock indicate that the water was not contaminated with sea
water at the time the samples were collected.

It is impossible to compare the quality of water at Ortona
Lockwith that at Moore Haven on the basis of available data,
since samples were not taken from the two locations during
the same year. It is significant, however, to note that although
the samples at Ortona Lock were taken during a relatively
"dry" year, water of acceptable quality was observed. The
average hardness at this location for the period February
1945 to April 1946 was 174 ppm and the average chloride was
36 ppm.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER

As previously stated, the Caloosahatchee River proper is
considered that portion of the river system between the Ortona
Lock and the Gulf. The Caloosahatchee River is tidal at least
as far inland as the Hendry County line and, as a result, con-
tains varying amounts of salt water from the Gulf of Mexico,
depending on the discharge of the river, tide stage and other
climatic conditions, and the distance from the Gulf. There
was, therefore, little incentive to conduct exhaustive chemical
quality studies west of Ortona Lock, but rather to confine the
study to periodic sampling at various points between the lock
and Fort Myers. As would be expected, low chloride values
were obtained during periods of high discharge through the
Caloosahatchee Canal and high values during periods of low
discharge. Table 2 in the appendix includes results of analy-
ses of periodic samples collected at various points between
Ortona Lock and the Gulf.

ORANGE RIVER

Orange River,or Twelve Mile Creek, as it is sometimes
called, is the most important tributary to the Caloosahatchee
River. The partial analyses of samples from Orange River,
given in Table 3, indicate that this water is rather hard but
would in all probability be quite suitable for public supply
purposes if softened. Contamination by salt water was not
indicated by any of the samples analyzed.

The period of sampling was not sufficiently long to indi-
cate how the composition of the water would change during
the year or from year to year, however, it is observed that
considerable variation does occur depending on streamflow.

MISCELLANEOUS SURFACE SUPPLIES

Also included in Table 3 are results of analyses of sam-
ples taken from Billy's Creek, Line-A Canal, and other small
creeks and ditches in Fort Myers;the analyses were made in
order to determine the extent of contamination of surface
waters by sea water and ground water. In most instances
both top and bottom samples were taken to indicate the maxi-
mum chloride concentration present.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 7-11


Wells in the Fort Myers area penetrating the artesian
aquifers generally yield water containing in excess of 1,000
ppm chloride, while those withdrawing from the shallow un-
confined aquifers usually yield water containing less than 50
ppm of chloride. The hardness of water from these shallow
wells, generally less than 50 feet deep, approximates 300
ppm, and the iron content is apt to be quite high, as much as
3 ppm. A typical analysis of water from shallow wells in the
Fort Myers area is given in Table 4 of the appendix. In gen-
eral, the chloride content of water from the non-artesian
aquifers differs very little from that of most uncontaminated
surface waters found in the area. The occurrence of chloride
contamination is readily apparent from an examination of the
analyses for the miscellaneous surface water sources tabu-
lated in Table 3. The large chloride concentrations found in
samples collected near the Gulf and the Caloosahatchee River
result most likely from sea-water penetration during high
tides as well as from wind-blown spray. Sources more re-
mote, such as Line-A Canal, probably owe their relatively
high chloride values to drainage of areas irrigated by water
from wells penetrating the deeper artesian aquifers. It is
quite probable that the unconfined ground water in areas adja-
cent to these drainage canals may become contaminated by
seepage from the canals during low ground-water levels.


CONCLUSIONS

Chemical examination of various surface water supplies
in Lee County indicates the availability of water of sufficiently
good quality to satisfy the requirements of agricultural, indus-
trial, and domestic use after suitable treatment. The type and
duration of sampling upon which this report is based was too
limited to evaluate the supplies examined for any longer period
than that actually included within the sampling period. Such
an evaluation would require the initiation of a water analysis
program in Lee County.

The number, type and location of sampling stations should
be selected after a proper evaluation of the water require-
ments of the county, and should be maintained for as long a
period of time as necessary to reflect the changes in water
quality from year to year.



































































































































































































S *


.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 7-11


APPENDIX



r/


TABLES OF CHEMICAL ANALYSES






TABLE 1

CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, Feb. 12, Mar. 4-20, 1941

SHardness L

Date k O 1 ks NCHd L; a C
of 046 aa v0 s 0 0 u
Collection i o % tU -N 1O 4 0O Mg N& M I
Feb. 12, 1941 3,990 30 6.3 13 76 16 35 101 140

Mar. 4, 1941 4,030 112 33 321
Mar. 5 3,950 a133 30 337
Mar. 6 3,860 116 33 336
Mar. 7 3,680 ____ 119 34 336
Mar. 8 3,780 121 y 33 341
Mar. 9 4,110 116 i: 31 326
Mar. 10 3,930 ___112 33 342
Mar. 4-10,Composite 3,910 36 9.0 19 118 26 31 0.6 180 127 335 90

Mar. 11 3,710 9.5 40 11 23 130 34 37 .5 256 145 375 95
Mar. 12 4,040 7.5 39 11 16 120 29 35 .3 245 143 340 90
Mar. 13 3,720 14 38 10 14 114 26 32 .3 240 136 327 95
Mar. 14 4,000 16 39 11 20 128 27 37 .3 255 143 349 80
Mar. 15 3,120 17 38 9.4 17 114 30 32 .3 235 13T 1495
Mar. 16 3,980 16 37 11 16 116 33 31 .3 240 138 318 90
Mar. 17 3,810 11 37 9.6 15 114 26 31 .3 225 132 310 100
Mar. 18 4,120 10 37 10 15 110 30 32 .3 223 133 310 105
Mar. 19 3,620 19 35 9.1 19 112 27 32 .3 231 125 315 100
Mar. 20 3,610 14 38 9.4 14 112 25 33 .3 240 133 320 100
Mar. 11-20, Composite 3,773 13 38 10 17 117 29 33 .3 >198 136 328 95


Includes equivalent of 16 parts per million Carbonate (CO3).
Value reported is sum of determined constituents; other entries


are residue on evaporation.


In
r
0


0

0
r
0

m
I-
r-


oV
C

m
<









TABLE 1-- Continued

CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, Mar. 21 to Apr. 10, 1941

v 7 Hardness S
Date as CaCO3


Collection 2 Mg NCH 1
Mar. 21, 1941 2,610 124 33 337
Mar. 22 3,490 112 31 312
Mar. 27 --- 116 33 320
Mar. 28 --- 115 31 320
Mar. 21-22, 27-28
Composite 32 10 21 118 23 32 0.2 b176 121 322 95

Apr. 1 724 190 47 556
Apr. 2 --- 192 53 554
Apr. 3 --- 189 51 __ 546
Apr. 4 -- 169 41 460
Apr. 5 --- 136 35 374
Apr. 6 --- 136 36 374
Apr. 7 --- 185 48 524
Apr. 8 -- 85 24 242
Apr. 9 --- 81 24 233
Apr. 10 --- 90 23 218
Apr. 1-10, Composite 47 10 24 144 35 39 .6 b227 158 414 100


Note.--Days for which no discharge is shown, flow consists
b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.


of leakage and lockage (about 10 cfs).






TABLE I -- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in pars per million, Apr. 11-30, 1941

a d Hardness B
I I


Date aaA o0 a d 0 h


Apr. 13 2,380 126 29 287


Apr. 14 3,970 120- -3 --- 335
Collection A x NCH


Apr. 15 3,820 102 28 289
Apr. '12 2,660 66 23 200
Apr. 13 2,380 126 29 287

Apr. 15 3,820 102 28 289
Apr. 16 3,660 121 30 326
Apr. 17 3,730 115 28 316
Apr. 18 3,470 108 23 301

Apr. 20 3,980 113 31 323
Apr. 11-20, Composite 35 7.5 14 104 22 28 0.4 b158 118 299 120

Apr. 21 4,040 122 32 315
Apr. 22 4,320 87 26 237
Apr. 23 3,820 117 33 337
Apr. 24 3,930 120 33 --
Apr. 25 3,920 126 35 358
Apr. 26 3,770 127 37 362
Apr. 27 4,160 120 36 -30
Apr. 28 4,160 115 36 333
Apr. 29 4,380 ____ 120 36 335
Apr. 30 4,120 132 36 350
Apr. 21-30, Composite 4,062 34 9.8 24 118 29 34 2.0 b191 1251 331 120
b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.


In
r
0


0
m
0

r
I-

0


C
-C
m

r-



mn
.<








TABLE 1--.Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, May 1 to May 20, 1941

SHardness
Dat ac

Collection 3 .' AM & N "
a as CaC03 14 -
Date .3 *3?o Ca -9




oMay 6 3,720 132 39 366 M
May 1941 4,890 137 37 368
May 8 1,400 91 27 261
May 9 1,900 1 ___1 30 285
May 10 3,870 118 35 3 2



May 1- 10, Composite 3,503 ....- -.
May 11 2,680 118 34 333




May z 3,820 "118 34 331
May 13 3,720 118 33 332
May 14 3,400 137 43 4093




*May 15 --- 99 33 ... 299
May 16 3,070 71 25 220
May 9 1,900 101 30 285



*May 17 3,750 126 38 363
May' 1-;-10, Composite 3,503



May 18 3,930 118 35 336
May 12----58 0 -- -- -----ZT -- 5-- -- --- -331 -



May 19 3,730 125 37 358
Miy 14 3,4001 137 43 409
May 15-99 33 -299

'May 17 3,750 ________126 38 363
May 18 3,930 118 35 336
May 19 3,730 125 37 358
May 20 3,970 118 36 343
May 11-20, Composite -. 35 9.2 19 114 24 33 0.3 b177 1251 335 70
b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.






TABLE I -- Coatimaed
CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, May 21 to June 10, 1941

6 1 Hoaness a ]
Date A *J ... S k
S0--w I..0 1 c% coI i A

May 21, 1941 3,450 121 37 36
May 22 3,930 120 37 354
May 23 3,870 ___ 126 37 365
May 24 3,900 122 37 3
May 25 3,840 124 37 354
May 26 3,620 112 34 334
May 27 3,490 124 38 355
May 28 3,350 124 37 362
May 29 1,810 ____ 101 33 304
May 30 -- 01 33- 305 --
May 31 --- 101 34 306
May 21-31,Composite 34 8.7 21 116 21 35 0.3 177 121 342 60

June 1 --- 104 33 308
June 2 -- 105 34 308
June 4 ...- __ 103 __ 330 308
June 5 --- 104 35 314
June 6 112 35 337
June 7 ... 112 36 331
June 8 --- 107 34 319
June 9 -- 107 34 313
June 10 -- 106 34 307
June 1-10, Composite 32 8.7 19 108 20 34 .3 b167 116 316 50
b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.







TABLE 1 -- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, June 11-30, 1941

Hardness |
0 as CaCO


Collection 2 0 0 OU 0 68 coMg NCHn0 a U
June 11, 1941 --- 113 33 318
June 12 --- 113 33 317
June 13 --- _110 34 1 3322
June 14 --- 111 33 316
June 15 --- 105 33 312
June 16 --- __116 36 321
June. 17 --- 112 33 313
June 18 --- 112 33 317
June 19 1,010 110 33 314
June 20 820 122 34 316
June 11-20, Composite 30 8.6 22 110 20 33 0.2 b168 110 316 45

June 21 -- 112 32 319
June 22 -- 110 34 316
June 26 --- 100 33 297
June 27 --- 99 33 301
*June 28 --- 101 34 305
June 29 --- _102 34 308
June 30 --- 104 33 306
June 21-22,
June 26-30, Composite 28 8.1 21 103 17 33 .2 b158 103 305 50


b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.






TABLE 1 -- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, July 1-20, 1941

SHardness
E 14 ?" as CaC03 u ^
Date N .2 | a "
of go *%- 3 -^ s-.O & .
Collection J a0 2Z C C SMg NCH ui U
July 1, 1941 --- 1 31 311
July 2 --- 97 26 273
July 3 --- 91 23 261
July 4 --- 86 26 251
July 5 --- 63 21 194
July 6 --- 49 17 145
T'uly 7 --- 40 13 117
uly 8 --- 46 13 121
July 9 --- 51 11 128
July 10 ---1 13 133
July I-10, Composite 21 4.2 11 68 9.1 20 0.7 blO0 70 192 140

July 11 --- 56 13 139
3uly 12 --- 59 14 144
July 13 --- 60 13 149
July 14 840 3 12 154
July 15 1,560 165 41 489
July 16 880 70 15 193
July 17 742 46 9 116
July 18 1,790 30 7 78
July 20 2,690 100 20 270
July 11-20,Composite 23 3.6 11 72 13 16 .8 b104 72 193 200

b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.







TABLE 1 -- Continued

CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, July 21 to Aug. 10, 1941

E Hardness
Date :3 as CaC03 Q
Date .4 k I v C 4 '
of -" & Ca g N -t
Collection 0" W z S 1 g g Mg NCH l 0
July 21, 1941 2,950 98 21 262
July 22 4,720 98 19 256
July 23 4,050 ___ 48 11 126
July 24 2,420 94 21 257
July 26 2,890 84 19 230
July 27 4,880 96 21 256
July 28 4,090 88 19 230
July 29 3,930 96 23 272
July 30 4,120 ____ 89 21 254
July 31 4,040 107 26 302
July 21-31,Composite 3,809 28 5.8 13 90 18 21 0.4 b130 94 246 170

Aug. 2 4,150 101 26 292
Aug. 3 3,930 110 29 .326
Aug. 4 4,040 100 27 290
Aug. 5 3,810 109 27 313
Aug. 6 4,230 94 26 272
Aug. 7 4,140 99 26 283
Aug. 8 4,030 113 31 326
Aug. 9 3,820 102 26 :9.6.
Aug. 10 3,820 113 28 320
Aug. 2-10, Composite 3,996 32 7.8 18 105 25 27 .4 b162 112 302 180

b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.






TABLE 1-- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million. Aug. 11-31, 1941

- a -
H Iardness =
as CaCO3 E "
Date A a



Aug. 12 4,270 104 26 301
A 13 4,350 110 28 320
Aug. 17 2,250 92 23 263
Aug. 18 --- 98 25 276
Aug. 19 --- ___51 15 152
Aug. 260 --- 50 14 150
Aug. 11-20, Composite 26 6.9 12 85 17 22 0.4 b126 93 247 100

Aug. 21 --- 57- 15 160
Aug. 22 --- 59 15 160
Aug. 23 --- 47 I 3 142
Aug. 24 --- 45 14 13
Aug. 25 --- 38 12 112
Aug. 26 --- __ 39 12 115
Aug. 27 -F-- 4T1 12 117
Aug. 28 --- 41 12 121
Aug. 29 --- 45 12 129
Aug. 30 --- 42 11 119
Aug. 31 --- 40 12 120
Aug. 21-31,Composite 14 3.1 6.1 45 5.2 13 .4 b 64 48 130 140


b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.







TABLE 1-- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN,
Ohem cal anal see in a ts r illi S t 1-20


FLA.
1 OA1


a Hardness
S9 0 W l as CaCO3
S Date V; 0 ; -0
of .^ o| 3 U^ | 5 &|.
Collection I.' U-, cS" --' .. go5U M0 NCH Uo J, L

Sept. 51, 1941 --- 40 11 113
Sept. 2 --- 37 9 104
Sept. 3 --- 31 10 91
Sept. 4 -- 28 9.5 80
Sept. 5 --- 22 9.0 70
Sept. 6 --- -- 22 9.0 g 69
Sept. 71 -- 22 .0 3
Sept. 8 --- 24 8.5 68
Sept. 13 --- 24 9.5 71
Sept. 14 --- 24 9.5 6
Sept. 1-10, Composite 8.1 1.8 4.3 27 1 9.5 0.5 b38 28 80 240

Sept. 15 --- 22 8.0 63
Sept. 16 --- 283 7.5 67
Sept. 13 --- ___l ______ 21 7.0 ,, 63
Sept. 14 --- 4 7.5 65
Sept. 15 --- 25 7.5 68
Sept. 16 ___ -- ____ _28 7.5 70 -
Sept. 17 --- 22 7.0 65
Sept. 18 2,850 26 8.0 64
Sept.' 19 4,280 __42 10 117
Sept. 20 3,560 86 22 Z40
Sept. 11-20, Composite ____1 32 3.9 10 92 180
aue report is sum of determined constituents.





TABLE 1 -- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, Sept. 21-29, Oct. 5-20, 1941

E Hardness

Date U "1. 0 0i a 14 S
.. S as CaCO3 9 ^
o.o .c n U 'Q C
Collection b iz ij l i Nc a .l
Sept. 21, 1941 2,830 76 23 233
Sept. 22 3,090 76 18 209
Sept. 23 2,440 ____ 78 18 212
Sept. 24 2,800 75- 18 09
Sept. 25 2,910 92 22 260
Sept. 26 3,460 93 22 247
Vept. 27 3,940 88 24 244
pt. 27------ Z- -..-.-.-
Sept. 28 4,430 87 23 233
Sept. 29 3,520 ______87 23 236
Sept. 21-29, Composite 3,268 24 6.4 9.8 81 12 20 0.6 bl13 86 233 IT

Oct. 5 1,640 ___92 25 257
Oct. 14 --- 46 15 107
Oct. 15 --- 34 15 114
Oct. 16 --- 40 16 131
Oct. 17 --- 44 16 136
Oct. 18 --- 38 14 125
Oct. 19 --- __44 18 128
Oct. 20 -- 36 14 110
Oct. 5-20, Composite 14 3.4 6.9 45 1.4 18 .2 b 66 49 138 190

b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.




TABLE 1 -- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE. HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, Oct. 21 to Nov. 10, 1941

i 6 2 Hardness 9
t o 0 W. as CaC03
Date ^ *. 3 I~ -
of 10 O g Z i NS 38i &
Collection ,Z- _- -~U -- $- Mg NCH Lo0 c -
Oct. 21, 1941 2,650 35 14 111
Oct. 23 4,400 98 24 276
Oct. 24 3,280 ___104 29 301
Oct. 25 3,090 108 29 304
Oct. 26 4,250 108 29 315
Oct. 27 4,150 102 28 292
Oct. 28 4,300 101 28 292
Oct. 29 4,440 108 27 295
Oct. 30 4,170 ___103 28 __ 282
Oct. 31 4,590 106 29 306
Oct. 21-31, Composite 3,932 30 7.5 13 98 16 26 0.4 b141 106 279 110

Nov. 1 3,630 106 29 297
Nov. 2 4,260 118 31 329
Nov. 3 4,090 ___122 32 342
Nov. 4 3,970 118 34 337
Nov. 5 3,930 112 31 325
Nov. 6 4,090 118 35 339
Nov. 7 3,830 110 29 313
Nov. 8 4,270 116 33 : 340
Nov. 9 3,890 112 32 333
Nov. 10 13,800 122 34 358
Nov. 1-10,Composite 3,976 36 9.2 16 114 23 32 .4 b173 128 334 80

b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.






TABLE I --Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, Nov. 11-30, 1941

E E Hardness 0
a as CaC03 u-$a
Date S 6 asA CaC3
of 5? ..o 0 3 V. r MS3.
Collection P .. U2 04 9_ W Z 2 Mg. NCH < U
Nov. 11, 1941 4,270 104 32 314
Nov. 12 3,910 103 31 304
Nov. 13 4,180 108 33 328
Nov. 14 4,120 106 33 307
Nov. 15 3,900 106 31 301
Nov. 16 4,500 ___ 116 33 328
Nov. 17 4,240 102 31 3
Nov. 18 4,060 81 26 243
Nov. 20 --- 111 32 319
Nov. 11-20, Composite 31 7.9 19 104 20 31 0.4 bTb0 110 306 1- T

Nov. 21 --- 110 32 316
Nov. 23 --- 77 26 23
Nov. 26 -- 154 38 411
Nov. 28 I --- 152 42 435
Nov. 29 --- 152 43 445
Nov. 30 --- 151 45 436
Nov. 21-30, Composite 40 9.9 23 133 28 37 .5 b204 141 381 90




b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.


I"
r
0
0



0
r

n'
r

c
C
xl







TABLE 1-- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, Dec. 2-20, 1941

Hardness
Sv as CaCO3 -as C


Collection $Q O U. P -. U.- ^ g c Mg NCHC& c U O

Dec. 3 --- 158 41 427
Dec. 4 --- __ 156 39 428
Dec. 5 --- 157 43 ..430
Dec. 6 --- 157 41 430
Dec. 7 --- 154 39 420
Dec. 8 --- 152 38 410
Dec. 9 --- 152 41 432
Dec. 9 -- 152 41 432
Dec. 10 --- 152 40 422
Dec. 2-10, Composite 46 12 22 154 30 39 0.4 b225 164 424 70

Dec. 12 --- __ 152 40 419
Dec. 13 --- 145 38 394
Dec. 14 --- 153 41 425
Dec. 15 --- ___172 44 462
Dec. 16 --- 161 42 445
Dec. 17 -- 153 42 427
Dec. 18 --- __154 41 __427
Dec. 19 --- 168 44 460
Dec. 20 --- 172 44 462
Dec. 12-20, Composite 47 12 25 159 32 41 .5 b236 167 437 70


b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.


z
-4




r


z
0
o












U,







TABLE : -- C,,rtir.,.-d

CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts pur million, Dcc. 21, 1941 to Jan. 19, 1942

P Hardness 2
So 3 Q -as CaC03
I., C a
Date z O xI Z
Uof 8 o m s 8 & ICH U
Collection 2 .': u2 22 U. 1 0 E 22 QMg NCH "1 u 3
Dec. 21, 1941 --- 163 41 458
Dec. 22 -- 144 37 399
Dec. 23 --- 150 1 39 419
Dec. 24 --- 164 44 457
Dec. 25 --- 145 38 399
Dec. 21-25, Composite 45 12 26 153 33 41 0.4 b233 162 430 70

Jan. 7, 1942 -- 146 35 390
Jan. 8 --- 145 37 389
Jan. 9 --- 146 37 392
Jan. 10 --- 141 39 399
Jan. 7-10,Composite 41 13 20 143 30 36 .4 b211 156 397 70

Jan. 11 --- 139 39 399
Jan. 12 --- 138 39 398
Jan. 13 --- 142 38 389
Jan. 14 --- 144 38 387
Jan. 15 -- 140 40 382
Jan. 16 --- __ 140 39 381
Jan. 18 --- 140 36 378
Jan. 19 --- 143 39 383
Jan. 11-19,Comnposite 38 11 27 143 25 39 .4 b211 140 389 60
SValue reported is um of eterrined constituents.






TABLE 1 -- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, Jan. 22 to Feb. 10, 1942

SE S Hardness g
M .w 0 a w < D as CaCO3 3 ^
Date C o a 0

Collection W II 0r 6
I "' I NCH U -cu
Jan. 22, 1942 1,530 142 38 388
Jan. 23 2,800 141 36 384
Jan. 24 2,280 __ 142 38 397
Jan. 25 3,290 117 35 333
Jan. 26 3,270 96 30 283
Jan. 27 2,100 98 30 280
Jan. 28 1,890 97 31 281
Jan. 29 2,750 108 31 307
Jan. 30 3,560 ___ 85 28 261
Jan. 31 3,740 115 30 325
Jan. 22-31,Composite 2,721 30 7.6 25 114 19 34 0.2 b172 106 324 90

Feb. 1 1,690 124 33 348
Feb. 6 2,890 90 29 269
Feb. 8 2,770 __ 100 31 287
Feb. 9 2,120 88 29 262
Feb. 10 --- 38 24 158
Feb. 1-10,Composite 26 6.1 18 88 16 29 .1 b138 90 266 110




b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.






TABLE I-- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT MOORE HAVEN, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million, Feb. 11-27, 1942


E Hardness 0
Sw as CaCO



Feb. 11, 1942 --- 43 23 150

Feb. 12 --- 38 23 147
Feb. 13 --- 111 31 308
Feb. 14 -- 113 30 309



Feb. 15 --- 109 30 302
Feb. 16 --- 110 30 306
Feb. 17 --- 10 30 291


Feb. 18 -- 104 29 289
Feb. 13 --- 111 31 304
Feb. 20 -- 123 32 317




Feb. 11-20, Composite 28 7.1 18 97 15 30 0.1 bl46 99 274 90
Feb. 21 --- 123 31 318
Feb. 226 --- -- 1231 33 -- -320
Feb. 23 --- 121 31 315
Feb. 248 --- 121 32 315
Feb. 25 --- 11128 31 -- 304



Feb. 206 --- 128 32 332
Feb. 21 1_7- 123 31 318
Feb. 2 ---2 123 33 -
Feb. 23 --- 121 31 315
Feb. 24 _____ 121 32 315
Feb. 25 --- 128 35 327
Feb. 26 1,470 128 32 332
Feb. 27 4.220 133 35 -.1 -1 355
Feb. 21-27, Composite 33 8.2 23 128 15 33 .1 b175 116 326 60
For period Mar. 4, 1941
to Feb. 27, 1942
Maximum. 4,890 47 13 27 192 35 53 2.0 b236 167 556 240
Minimum 724 8.1 1.8 4.3 21 1 7.0 .1 b -38 28 63 45
Average 32 18 8.0 107 20 30 .4 d160 113 _297 111
b Value reported is sum of determined consti uents.
d Values for Mar. 4-10, 1941 composite and Mar. 11-20, 1941 dailies not included in average.


*n
I-
0



m
0
r
I-
0





0
C
m







TABLE 1-- Continued

CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT ORTONA LOCK, NEAR FORT MYERS, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million

S Hardness u
D ', 0 Q as CaC i
Collection ...I I IJ U I N 4



Upstream side of lock
Feb. 22, 1945 0.02 47 15 58 222 38 59 1.2 b328 179 608 7.3 55
(Integrated) .

Mar. 28 (Integrated) 49 15 46 204 34 58 .1 b.303 184 576 7.1 50
Mar. 28 212 57 .8 576 7.4 50
May 3 5 9 534


Aug. 9 21 284
Aug. 14- 26 3 b

Aug. 22 (Integrated) _62 11 26 192 40 39 .4 b273 200 492 7.2 320
Aug. 22 38 506
Aug. 29 24 341

Sept. 4 27 325
Sept. 12 21 321
Sept. 21 6.0 109

Nov. 21 (Integrated) 44 7.6 13 140 17 26 1.0 b178 41 346 7.1 120
Nov. 21 26 338
Nov. 28 ____30 427
b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.


n
0

-I




r
z

n
>


z
0

' 1
I4





TABLE 1 -- Continued

CALO(SAHATCHEE CANAL AT ORTONA LOCK, NEAR FORT MYERS, FLA.

Chemical analyses, in parts per million

E E Hardness a
as CaCO3
D v E I IAI .0 0
Date .. j 0 c Ca
of tU o Do 0 0J -- 0
Collection M- Z NCH 0 E
Upstream side of lock continued
Dec. 5, 1945 34 492
Dec. 12 30 364
Dec. 19 (Integrated) 48 10 20 155 25 36 0.8 161 421 7.2 100
Dec. 19 36 -452-
Dec. 26 38 498

Jan. 3, 1946 28 336
Jan. 9 '30 353
an. 16 (Integrated). 40 9.9 21 137 26. 33 .7 b198 140 372 7.2 .120.
an.-16 l 30 374--
Jan. 22 34 375
Jan. 29 34 404

Feb. 5 36 436
Feb. 12 (Integrated) 56 11 23 192 21 38 .6 184 499 90
Feb. 12 ____38 "v484
Feb. 19 39 486
Feb. 26 41 514

ar. 5 43 525
ar. 13 (Integrated) -60 -12 30 204 32: 45 .5 199 525 82
ar. 13 44 510
ar. 19 1 36 389
Mar. 26I 36 400
b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.


0
o




0
r
I-
r


I-

C

m
*<










TABLE 1 -- Continued


CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT ORTONA LOCK, NEAR FORT MYERS, FLA.


Chemical analyses, in parts per million

S Hardness 0

wte 0 5 > asCaCO3 .
Date w P nN NaCa



Apr. 2 1946 38 413
Apr. 10 36 411

For period Feb. 22,
1945 to Apr. 10, 1946
Maximum. 62 15 58 222 40 59 1.2 b328 200 608 7.5 320
Minimum 40 7.6 13 137 17 6.0 .1 b178 140 1 09 7.1 50
Average 51 11.4 30 184 29 36 .7 b256 174 426 7.3 110

Mar. 31, 1953 39 9.7 28 131 39 35 1.0 b216 137 30 376 7.6 30









b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.


0
-n





C
r-
O
Z




0




%4
n
r
o





TABLE 1 -- Continued
CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT ORTONA LOCK, NEAR FORT MYERS, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million
I I
SE Hardness
Date o W asCaC

o0 1 k, oi g I o s8 ^ | 4
Collection S c 2 oa o cg | t g y A NI a oS
SB U a N a E
Downstream side of loc all bo tom samples)

Aug. 9, 1945 22 334
Aug. 14 25 351
Aug. 22 34 497
Aug. 29 26 353

Sept. 4 24 318
Sept. 12 23 363
Sept. 21 7.0 124

Nov. 21 28 353
Nov. 28 42 477

Dec. 5 34 493
Dec. 12 30 381
Dec. 19 ___36 466
Dec. 26 40 51

Jan. 3, 1946 __ 42 395
Jan. 9 30 350
Jan. 16 32 392
Ian. 22 34 424
Jan. 29___ 34 424










TABLE 1-- Continued

CALOOSAHATCHEE CANAL AT ORTONA LOCK, NEAR FORT MYERS, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million

4 Hardness
0a a e ) as CaCO3
Date 0 1 l 1" 0; a
."0 0, U2
of w-. U 0 0- -#
Collection Mb O c O; c Mg NCH 5 c U3
Downstream side of lock (all bottom samples)
Feb. 5, 1946 34 448
Feb. 12 ___37 484
Feb. 19 39 501
Feb. 26 40 520
Miar. 5 ____ ___42 537
Mar. 13 44 534
Mar. 19 36 385
Mar. 26 36 394

Apr. 2 37 409
Apr. 10 37 415

Mar. 31, 1953 40 9.3 28 133 39 35 .9 b217 138 29 375 7.6 35

For period Aug. 9,
1945 to Apr. 10, 1946
Maximum 44 537
Minimum 7.0 124
Average 33 416


z
03


-I

z
C,
C,
C

I-
z




TABLE 2


CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER NEAR FORT MYERS, FLA.
Chemical analyses, in parts per million

Date Hardness Q
D ate Vu E < o
S. a as CaC03
of u. 0 I a
OU 0- W 0 0 1 & 0
Collection ti> t I 2 l f 5 Mg NCH2 ;.; 1 Z.
AT LABELLE
May 8, 1945 a 1/2 c 50
Aug. 9 24 388
Nov. 27 34 561
AT DENAUD
May 8, 1945 c 50
Aug. 9 28 388
Nov. 27 38 562
Mar. 31, 1953 40 9.3 30 136 41 35 0.9 b223 138 27 378 7.6 45
AT ALVA
SMay 8, 1945 c 4,500
Aug. 9 33 400
"Nov. 27 52 591
Mar. 31, 1953 41 9.2 30 137 40 36 .9 b224 140 28 384 7.6 50
AT OLGA
May 8, 1945 1/4 c 8,800
Aug. 9 ___________32 363
Nov. 217- 561 597
Mar. 31, 1953 40 '98 29. 135 40 36 1.8 b222 140 30 382 7.6 28
a Direction of flow was upstream, all other flows given are downstream.
b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.
c Approximate chloride content, in parts per million, from conductivity measurements.







TABLE 2 --.Continued
CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER NEAR FORT MYERS, FLA.


Chemical analyses, in parts per million


o, V > as 1aC a O Ea
of a' e -.s 1,
Date E 0 .,1 i. 1o
Collection G. 3 2. .. n~ g c nMg NCH < L

AT U.S. HWY. 41 IN FORT MYERS
May 8, 1945 slight c15,000
Mar. 31, 1953 42 12 47 143 45 65 0.9 b282 154 38 496 7.8 32


















b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.
c Approximate chloride content, in ppm, from conductivity measurements.





TABLE 3


MISCELLANEOUS SURFACE WATERS IN LEE COUNTY
Chemical analyses, in parts per million

Hardness g 0
S. asCaC03 u E
Date ... 0 SS d a

Collection c__ 2 wE 0 U 2 0 Mg NCH 00oUi a0 UU
ORANGE RIVER NEAR FORT MYERS
Dec. 16, 1939 0.08 93 20 27 351 18 47 --- b378 314 684 -- --
Feb. 3, 1944 4.2 82 14 7.1 262 13 35 0.2 b280 262 574 7.9 37
Mar. 4 2.0 34
Apr. 6 4.2 38
May 5 3.6 84 13 16 277 14 37 .6 b301 263 662 7.6 38
June 7 4.9 -35
July 4 4.9 37
Aug. 22 38 __36 5.5 4.6 116 5 16 .1 b124 112 245 7.0 70
Oct 11 3.5 31 535
Nov. 16. 3.1 31 539
Jan. 10, 1945 5.0 1 3 36 535
Feb. -Z- .95 33 482
Mar. 28 .38 35 456
May 3 01 ____ 40 361
hor period Feb. 1944
to May 1945
Maximum 84 14 16 277 14 40 .6 )301 263 662 7.9 70
Minimum 3 36 5.5 4.6 116 5 16 .1. 124 112 245 1.0 37
Average_____ 67 10.8 9.2 218 11 34 .3 >252 212 488 5 .5 48
Mar. 31, 1953
(at State Hwy. 80) 42 10 38 138 42 50 .7 >247 166 53 434 R.8 45
b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.







TABLE 3-- Continued


MISCELLANEOUS SURFACE WATERS IN LEE COUNTY


Chemical analyses, in parts per million

Hardness U

^ ... 3. 1 .L i s i ^ .o,
tw W Q Ias C CO E


.4 -4n
Collection M- -. NCH- 0 k.
BILLY'S CREEK (b)
at Nuna Ave.
Feb. 3, 1944 126 28 222 330 55 415 1,010 430 1,240 7.7 35

at Palmetto Ave.
Feb. 3, 1944 128 52 224 256 149 465 1,140 534 2,110 7.5 37
Mar. 3 990 .
Apr. 5 422
May 5 (top) 152 116 657 199 305 1,280 2,610 856 4,730 7.2 30
June 6 360_
SJuly 6 690
SAug. 24 (bottom) 136 847
Oct. 12, (botto1m);4,. ______ 480 -_ 2,140
Nov. 16 (bottom) 560 2,410
Jan. 12, 1945 (bottom) 455 2,120
Feb. 24 (top) ---825 3,250
Feb. 24 (bottom) 855 3,380
Mar. 30 (top) ___ 650 2.770
Mar. 30 (bottom) 1,190 4,310
May 5 (bottom) 4,850 13,800


b Values reported are sum of determined constituents.


'2

-n






z
-1




z



0
r
>








TABLE 3-- Continued
MISCELLANEOUS SURFACE WATERS IN LEE COUNTY


Chemical analyses, in parts per million,

SHardness u
Sa asCaCO ga
Date I .
rof 2 O O- l" O 0 1 & 0| 0 o
collection .5. i 3 2- S 5 &. E- A- g, ft-. 5 Mg NCH A..Eu 3
BILLY'S CREEK (Continued)
at 1st Street
Feb. 3, 1944(top) ____174 10,200 29,500 7.3 32
Feb. 3 (bottom) 164 11,800 -33,600 7 4 2
Mar. 3 (top) 12,100
Mar. 3 (bottom) ____ 13,800
Apr. 5 (top) 9,810
Apr. 5 (bottom) 11,400
.May 5 (top).. ___ 150 15,100 41,400 7.3 24
May 5 (bottom) 148 15,000 41,400 7.4 5
'June 7 (top) 3,920
Jume 7 (bottom) __ 13,700
.. JTUy. jltop) 1--0,1006
SJuly 6 (bottom) 10,200
Aug. 24 (top) 1,540 5,430
Oct. 12 (top) 4,420 14200
Oct. 12 (bottom) 6,050 19,000
Nov. 16 (top) _________5.250 16,300
.vv.. bottomi .. .. .. 8,950 6- -,300
Jan. 12, 1945 (top) 3,400 11,100
Jan 12 (bottom) 10,900 31,500
I l i -n-,-,







TABLE 3--Continued


MISCELLANEOUS SURFACE WATERS IN LEE COUNTY


Chemical analyses, in parts per million

w aE 4 Hardness
S. .2 asCaCO3 u,

dof to^ o a ^ ^ 0^ ,O 0 o 0 O & | U
Collection 22 E Q M Mg NCH a 0
BILLY'S CREEK (Continued) (b)
at 1st Street (Continued)
Feb. 24, 1945 (top) 5,930 18,100
Feb. 24 (bottom) .. .11,600 33,100
Mar. 30 (top) 9,620 23,400
Mar. 30 (bottom) 13,900 30,500
May 5 (top) 9,270 22,800
May 5 (bottom) 14,200 31,300
DITCH AT MICHIGAN AND PAL ETTO AVE.
Feb. 3, 1944 132 91 146 186 286 405 1,150 704 3,290 7.1 33
May 5 (top) 136 93 449 189 304 870 1,950 722 3,410 7.2 27
CREEK AT MICHIGAN AVE. AND CEMETERY
Feb. 3, 1944(bottom) 130 29 143 262 75 328 834 444 1,580 7.5 30
May 5 (top) 126 31 172 259 92 360 0.1 909 442 1,670 7.3 30
Mar. 3 (top) 460
Apr. 5 (top) 550
June 6 (top) 310
"July 6 (top) 305
Aug. 24 (top) 330 1,640


b Values reported are sum of determined constituents.





TABLE. 3--Continued


MISCELLANEOUS SURFACE WATERS IN LEE COUNTY


Chemical analyses, in parts per million
I v U
w Hardness U o
E as CaCO3 ug E6



Oct. 12, 1944 (top) 385 1,830

Nov. 16 (top) 412 1,980
Inw .IV



tan. 12, 1945 (top) 570 2,480


Feb. 24 (top) 328 1,580
Mar. 30 (top)_ 355 1,660
May 5 (top) 385 1,800
A.C.L. RAILROAD DITCH AT 2ND STREET
Feb. 3, 1944 95 51 233 166 216 420 1,100 446 1,950 7.2 112
May 4 97 58 277 132 256 502 0.0 1,260 480 2,220 7.0 75
LINE A CANAL NEAR FORT MYERS
at Page Field
Feb. 3, 1944 126 104 442 164 335 865 1,950 742 3,430 7.4
Apr. 5 ____ __ 850
May 4 123 108 450 149 345 885 1,980 751 3,520 7.7 12
June 6 855
July 8 890



b Values reported are sum of determined constituents.







TABLE 3-- Continued


MISCELLANEOUS SURFACE WATERS IN LEE COUNTY


Chemical analyses, in parts per million

Q < Hardness
Sa as CaC03
Date as -aC




at Page Field (Continued)
Aug. 23, 1944 152 747 7
Oct. 11 650 2,7404
Nov. 17 670 2,850
Jan. 11, 1945 860 3,450
3/4Mile So. of Page Field
Feb. 3, 1944 128 104 447 172 337 870 1,970 747 3,460 7.8 10
at U.S.G.S. control (1/4 mi. upstream from U.S. 41)
Feb. 3, 1944 105 54 232 200 171 458 1,120 484 1,990 8.2 32
Mar. 3 222
Apr. 5 462
May 4 93 38 186 all2 135 398 0.1 905 388 1,680 8.1 35
June 6 ___ 208
July 5 215
Aug. 23 40 259
Oct. 12 _________ 220 1,330
Nov. 17 178 1,020
Jan. 11, 1945 450 2,040

a Includes equivalent of 5 parts per million Carbonate (C03).
b Values reported are suri of determined constituents.




TABLE 3--Continued


MISCELLANEOUS SURFACE WATERS IN LEE COUNTY


Chemical analyses, in parts per million

Q E Hardness
.E > 0o
o f e B asCaCO e -


Collection g. 22 0 c5 oz ox Mg NCH .U. Zu 0
gz 04--l o -w W Z 1l'l NCHI w o "
STILL LAKE NEAR FORT MYERS
May 11, 1943 6.7 .03 52 9.9 30 1.4 192 6.3 52 0.1 0.0 b253 170 7.1 22
MANUEL'S BRANCH AT MCGREGOR ILVD.
Feb. 3, 1944(bottom) 172 10,100 29,000 7.3 29
May 5 (top) 194 14,100 39,000 7.1 30
IMPERIAL RIVER NO. DF BONITA SPRINGS
Dec. 16, 1939 .29 76 4.8 11 241 1.0 25 236 209 444












b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.








TABLE 4
GROUND WATERS IN LEE COUNTY
Chemical analyses, in parts per million


E Hardness 2

Dale 0 .; sa CUq



Composite of 10 wells,
of to -0 & -




Fort Myers, Fla. Approx
Apr. 1i, 1953 25' 3.1 147 7.1 34 367 87 55 0.7 b506 268 0 842 7.2 28




















b Value reported is sum of determined constituents.