General map of natural vegetation of Florida Circular S-178 (map)

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Material Information

Title:
General map of natural vegetation of Florida Circular S-178 (map)
Series Title:
Circular (University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station) ; S-178.
Alternate title:
Natural vegetation of Florida
Physical Description:
Map
Language:
|||
English
Creator:
Davis, John Henry, 1901-1978
Publisher:
Agricultural Experiment Stations, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1967

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Maps -- Vegetation boundaries -- Phytogeography -- Florida -- Phytogeography -- Maps -- Florida -- Vegetation boundaries -- Maps -- Florida

Notes

Funding:
Circular (University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station) ;

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002436592
notis - AME1752
System ID:
UF00000505:00001

Full Text





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GENERAL MAP OF


NATURAL VEGETATION


OF FLORIDA


Agricultural Experiment Stations
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville
J. R. Beckenbach, Director
June 1967


By John H. Davis, Botanist


1 M Coastal strand. A zoned vegetation on sand dunes and rock, composed of pioneer herbs
and shrubs near shore with scrub and forest zone more interior. The strand of the
Florida Keys has many tropical forests and scrub.
2 Pine Flatwoods. Open woodlands of one to three species of pine: longleaf, slash, and
pond pines. Many herbs, saw palmetto, shrubs and small trees form an understory.
Included in general flatwoods areas are small hardwood forests, many kinds of cypress
swamps, prairies, marshes, and bay tree swamps.
3 Southern Slash Pine Forests. Open woodlands of Pinus elliottii densa, mostly on rock-
lands. Some herbs, shrubs, and hardwood trees of understory are tropical. Small trop-
ical and subtropical hammock forest areas are included.
4 Forests of Mixed Hardwoods and Pines. Mostly on uplands of clay soils in northwest
section. Many differences in composition and age; some young second growth is mostly
pines. The more mature forests are mostly hardwoods.
5 Sand Pine, Pinus clausa, Scrub Forests. Mostly on excessively drained deep sandy
soils. These occur on old dunes of #1, and on old dunes or dry sands in the interior.
6 Forests of Longleaf Pine, Pinus palustris, and Xerophytic (dry site ) Oaks. Mostly on
well drained uplands. The turkey oak, Quercus laevis, and wire grass, Aristida strict,
are common. Many former areas of this type are now citrus groves in the central
section.
7 Cypress Swamp Forests. Mostly in depressions and bordering rivers and lakes. For-
ests of many shapes, as round domes and long strands. Some have hardwood species
associated. Cypress is also common in #2 and #8, and a scrub form in #14.
8 Swamp Forests, mostly of Hardwoods. Several kinds bordering most rivers and in
basins. Some Bay Tree, Gum, Nyssa. Titi, and cypress zones occur in many of these
hardwood swamps.
9 Mangrove Swamp Forests and Coastal Marshes. Usually there are tidal conditions
which vary from saline to brackish. Tropical mangrove forests in southern area; and
grass, sedge, and rush marshes along more temperate coasts.
12 Hardwood Forests. Mostly on rich soil uplands. These are mixed evergreen and de-
ciduous hardwoods. Some areas are nearly original hardwood stands but many are
old second growth with pines.


PALM 81 SA C


16a 16b

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Grasslands of Prairie Type. Wet Prairies on seasonally flooded lowlands. Dry Prai-
ries on seldom flooded flatlands. Many former areas of these are now improved pas-
tures.
Region of open Scrub Cypress. Mostly on rock and marl soils that are often il...k!.Il.
Small areas in this region are tall domes and strands. Also there are some hardwood
and palm hammocks.


13


14


15 i Forests of abundant Cabbage Palms, Sabal palmetto. Vary from scattered pains to
groves of palms and oaks in hammocks. Cabbage palms are also abundant irn #2,
#3, #8, #13, #14, and #17.
16 -- Fresh Water Marshes. Some are mixed marshes of many kinds of herbs and bushes,
and some are dominated by one plant, such as the Saw Grass Marshes, mainly of
Mariscus jamaicensis.
16a Everglades Region Saw Grass Marshes. Area mostly dense to sparse saw grass, a few
tree islands and sloughs.
16b Everglades Region Marshes, Sloughs, Wet Prairies, and Tree Islands. The tree idiands
vary from Bay Tree type to Tropical Hardwoods. Region now changing.
17 Wet to Dry Prairie-Marshes on Marl and Rockland. Some are mostly thin saw Xrass,
others are bushes and grasses.
)ll_ Water Areas. Only a few of the thousands of lakes and ponds are shown. Thes3 and
rivers are habitats for abundant aquatic plants.


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