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Notes on the upper Tertiary and Pleistocene mollusks of peninsular Florida
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 Material Information
Title: Notes on the upper Tertiary and Pleistocene mollusks of peninsular Florida
Series Title: Geological bulletin - Florida Geological Survey ; 18
Physical Description: 75 p. : incl. illus. (maps) tables. 4 pl. on 2 l. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Mansfield, Wendell C. ( Wendell Clay ), 1874-1939
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1939
Copyright Date: 1932
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Mollusks, Fossil   ( lcsh )
Paleontology -- Tertiary   ( lcsh )
Paleontology -- Pleistocene   ( lcsh )
Paleontology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: "References": p. 59.
Statement of Responsibility: by W. C. Mansfield.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA1656
notis - AKM4767
alephbibnum - 002037006
oclc - 01313261
lccn - gs 39000254 /REVISED
System ID: UF00000449:00001

Full Text



STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

R. L. DOWLING, Supervisor
HERMAN GUNTER, Geologist






GEOLOGICAL BULLETIN No. 18






NOTES ON THE UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE
MOLLUSKS OF PENINSULAR FLORIDA






By
W. C. Mansfield, Ph. D.
Geologist, U. S. Geological Survey


Published for
THE STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


TALLAHASSEE, 1939




*. 5c5*7ISy

F&36 ,
--Lo t 1


Published September 1, 1939







LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL






HONORABLE R. L. DOWLING,
Supervisor of Conservation.
SIR:
i have the honor to transmit a short report entitled: "Notes on the Upper
Tertiary and Pleistocene Mollusks of Peninsular Florida," by Dr. W. C.
Mansfield of the United States Geological Survey. This report presents the
results of Dr. Mansfield's studies of a molluscan fauna near Buckingham, Lee
County, Florida, and its stratigraphic position with respect to the Caloosahatchee
marl and also correlates the Plioccne deposits of the western side of Florida
with those of the eastern side. It also presents a study of certain Pleistocene
deposits associated with the Pliocene deposits. It is a contribution to our knowl-
edge of the formations of the State and the Florida Geological Survey is in-
debted to the United States Geological Survey for this paper of Dr. Mansfield's.
It will form Geological Bulletin No. 18 of our series of reports.


Very respectfully,
HERMAN GUNTER, Geologist,
Assistant Supervisor
State Board of Conservation.


Tallahassee, Florida
June 14, 1939.


109939

































































































































































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CONTENTS

Page
I production ................................................................................. ................................ 7
N ew names for form nations .................................................................................... 8
Buckingham lim estone ................................ ........................... .................... 8
Tamiami limestone ......................................................................................... 8
Upper Tertiary deposits of southern Florida ....................................... ........... 11
Buckingham lim stone ........................................ ......................................... 11
List of species ................................................................................................. 11
Character of m atrix ........................................................................................ 12
Species dredged along Caloosahatchee River ...................................... 12
Geographic distribution ............................................................................... 14
Caloosahatchee m arl ......................................................................................... 16
Interpretation by Dall and Harris of the beds along the Caloosa-
hatchee R iver .............-.......... .. ..... .................... ............. 16
O yster m arl ........................................ ........................................ ... 16
Turritella m arl ..................................... .. ......- -...- ............... 16
L ayers of sand ......................................................................... .............. 17
Planorbis rock ................................................................................... 17
Observations by the writer along Caloosahatchee River .................. 17
Localities near Labelle .......................... ... .......... ......... 17
Localities near Fort Denaud ....................................... .......... 18
Exposure three-fourths of a mile below Fort Denaud ........... 20
O their localities ....................................................... ......................... 20
Interpretation of deposition ........................................... ......... 20
Beds on Shell Creek ................................................................................... 21
Beds on Alligator Creek .................................................................... 22
Species from the upper beds .............................. ............................. 22
Beds on Myakka River ...................................................................... 23
Species from a locality one mile north of Bermont ........................ 24
Tentative correlation of the upper Tertiary deposits of southwest-
ern Florida .................... ............. ....... ............ 27
The more characteristic species of the Pliocene Caloosahatchee
fauna ................................................................................................. 27
Area on the south and southwestern sides of Lake Okeechobee ........ 29
Area along West Palm Beach Canal ........................................................ 29
A rea along St. Lucie Canal ..................................................................... 29
Upper Tertiary faunas on the east side of Florida ............................................... 30
Caloosahatchee marl ......................................... .......................................... 30
Distribution of the Arcinae of the Pliocene of Florida ...................................... 31
Tentative correlation of the upper Tertiary deposits of peninsular Florida 33
Pleistocene deposits ................................................................................................. 33
Pleistocene deposits along Caloosahatchee .River between Fort Denaud
and A lva .......................................................................................... .. 33
Pleistocene fossils of the southwestern and eastern side of the Peninsula
of F lorida .......................................................................................... 36
Localities in southwestern Florida .................................................. ............ 36
Localities on the eastern side of Florida ...................................... ..... 37
Pleistocene deposits near Myrtle Beach and Little River, South Carolina 38
Observations on a few species occurring in the Pleistocene .............. .. 39
List of Pleistocene species ........................................................................ 39
Tentative correlation of Pleistocene deposits .................................. ........... 39
Descriptions and discussions of upper Tertiary species, especially of the
Buckingham limestone, and of Pleistocene species of Florida 46







ILLUSTRATIONS, MAPS, AND TABLES


Page
P latest 1-4 ...................................................................................................................... 61-69
Figure 1. Map of Peninsula Florida .............................................................. 9
Figure 2. Map of the Caloosahatclee River and correlation of the deposits 10
Table 1. Tentative correlation of the upper Tertiary deposits of south-
w western Florida ..................................................................................... 28
Table 2. Distribution of the Arcinae of the Pliocene of Florida .............. 32
Table 3. Tentative correlation of the upper Tertiany deposits of Penin-
sular Florida ..................... ......... ............. .............. ................ ............. 34
Table 4. List of Pleistocene species ........................................ 40
Table 5. Tentative correlation of Pleistocene deposits ................................. 45






NOTES ON THE UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE
MOLLUSKS OF PENINSULAR FLORIDA'


BY W. C. MANSFIELD



INTRODUCTION*

The major purposes of this paper are to present, (1) the results of
a study of a molluscan fauna found near Buckingham, Lee County,
Florida, and of its distribution elsewhere, in order to determine its
stratigraphic position relative to the Pliocene Caloosahatchee marl;
and (2) an attempt to correlate the Pliocene deposits of the western
side of Florida with those of the eastern side. A secondary purpose
of the paper is to present a study of certain Pleistocene deposits as-
sociated with the Pliocend deposits. No attempt is made in this paper
to study or list all of the many species so ably described by Dall3 from
the Pliocene of Florida, but an effort is made to note some of the
characteristic .species in certain beds and to determine their relation-
ship with those of other beds.
Most of the type material of the Caloosahatchee Pliocene marl is
deposited in the U. S. National Museum, and grateful acknowledg-
ment is herewith made to the authorities of this institution for access
to this material for study.
Most of the other fossil material studied in this paper was col-
lected by the writer, F. S. MacNeil, or by C. W. Mumm, all of the
U. S. Geological Survey. This niaterial was obtained in place along
the Caloosahatchee River or from spoil thrown out by the dredge in
deepening the channel or making cutoffs in the river during the recent
work of the U. S. Army Engineers.


* Published with the permission of the Director of the United States Geological
Survey, United States Department of the Interior.
*Dr. Wendell Clay Mansfield passed away July 24, 1939, while this paper was
in press. He had seen the galley proofs, but the page proofs have been read
by others. It is greatly to be regretted that his fruitful labor on the Tertiary
of the southeastern United States is at an end.-EDITOR.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


NEW NAMES FOR FORMATIONS
The correlation of some, of the-later deposits of southern Florida
is somewhat. uncertain. In view of this fact, it seems desirable to
apply local formational names to certain of them in order that they.
may be more readily referred to in this paper, or may be shifted, if
necessary, at a future time to their proper niches. These names are
as follows:
Buckingham limestone.-A new formational name is here proposed
for a limestone cropping out in Lee County, Florida. The type lo-
cality is at a quarry near State Highway no, 25, half a mile west of
Orange River, Lee County, Florida (sec. 5, T. 44 S., R. 26 E.). The
age is believed to be uppermost Miocene. The fossils and other
characteristics pertaining to this limestone will be discussed at another
place in this paper.
STamiami limestone.-A new formational name is proposed for a
limestone penetrated in digging shallow ditches to form the road bed
of the Tamiami Trail over a distance of about 34 miles in Collier and
Monroe Counties, Florida. The character of the matrix and the
included fossils were described elsewhere by W. C. Mansfield."
The matrix of the Tamiami limestone consists mainly of a dirty'-
white to gray, rather hard, porous, nonoolitic 'limestone with inclusions
of' clear quartz grains. The faunas, so far as studied, include 6 genera
of gastropods, 15 genera of pelecypods, and 2 genera of echinoids.
Aside from these, Foraminifera, barnacles, and Bryozoa were observed
at. a few localities. Among the pelecypods the scallops and oysters
are the most conspicuous forms, both in the number of species and
individuals and in the rather large size which some of them attained.
The echinoid, Encope macrophora tamiamiensis Mansfield, was found
at three localities, and the species Cassidulus evergladensis Mansfield
at two localities.
The character of the faunas indicates that they lived near the
shore in comparatively shallow water.
The age was, and still is, assigned to the Pliocene, but the exact
position in the Pliocene has not been definitely determined. Tenta-
tively, it is placed at the base of the Pliocene below the Caloosahatchee
marl.







NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


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Figure 1.-Map lof Peninsular Fldridc.. A rough map of Peninsular Florida
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collections except those along the iCaloosahatchee River, which are shown
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NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


UPPER TERTIARY DEPOSITS OF SOUTHERN
FLORIDA

The fauna of the southwest side of Florida will be considered first.
then that. of south-central and eastern side will follow.


BUCKINGHAM LIMESTONE

A list of species, as then recognized by the writer, from the vicinity
of Buckingham is given by Cooke and Mossom." The limestone in
which these species occur is tentatively classified in the same report
as Choctawhatchee formation.
List of species.-The species listed below and now referred to the
Buckingham limestone have been collected in place. The species fol-
lowed by the letter "A" are from the vicinity of Buckingham. Those
marked "B", "C", "D", and "E" are from several places along the
Caloosahatchee River: "B", about I mile above (station 4997) and
about 2 miles above Caloosa (station 4996) ; "C", at low tide at Alva
(station 11742); 'D", half a mile above Alva (station 14078); "E",
lower bed across from Floweree Grove, about 3 miles above Alva
(station 14184).
Cancellaria cf. C. tabulata Gardner and Aldrich, E
Cancellaria aff. C. venusta Tuomey and Holmes, E
Dorsanum? cf. D.? plicatilnu (B6se), A
Turritella aff. T. cartagenensis Brown and Pilsbry, D, E
Turritella cf. T. pontoni Mansfield, A
Turritella buckingltamensis Mansfield, n. sp., A, C, E
Nuculana sp., A, C, D, E
Navicula unbonata Lamarck?, C
Navicula umbonata Lamarck, C
Arca lienosa Say, A, E
Area (C'uneamra) scalaris Conrad, variety?, A, C, D, E
Ostrea ineridionalis Heilprin, A, B, C
Ostrea disparilis Conrad, A, D
Pecten (Pecten) ochlockoneinsis leinsis Mansfield, n. subsp., A
Pecten (Nodipecten) nodosus floridensis Tucker and Wilson, A
Pecten (Chlaimys) caloosensis Mansfield, n. sp., A, B
Pecten (Chlamys) eboreus buckinghamensis Mansfield, n.
subsp., A, B, C, D, E
Lima (Mantellum) carolinensis Dall, A
Anomia simplex D'Orbigny, A, C, D
Phacoides chrysostoms (Meuschen), A
Dosinia elegans Conrad?, C
'hione ulocyma Dall, A, C, E






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.---BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


The fauna from station 14184, across the river from Floweree
Grove, is considered to come from the uppermost part of the Bucking-
ham limestone.
Tucker and Wilson reported Pccten interlineatus Gabb from
Buckingham, also Ostrea haitcnsis Sowerby (=0. meridionillis Heil-
prin).I'b The molluscan fauna of the Buckingham limestone consists
mainly of Pecten and Ostrea, which are well-preserved; but most of
the other genera are preserved only as casts or molds.
Character of matrix.-The matrix in which the fossils are em-
bedded consists of a chalky limestone that contains a little sand and
tiny small grains of brown phosphorite. The rock hardens on ex-
posure and changes to a brownish color.
Species dredged along Caloosahatchee River.-The species' listed
below were dredged from Caloosahatchee River one mile below Olga
(station 14075). Those followed by the letter "B" strongly indicate
that they came from the Buckingham limestone, the lowest stratum.
11lisoma conanti (Dall)
Cancelltria aff. C. labilata Gardner and Aldrich, B
Oliva sayanla Ravenel
A'arginella eulima Dull
Al-itra lincoilat Heilprin
I'sciolaria tulipa Linnaeus
Cyp'raea problemnaticta Heilprin
Cypraa caroli'nensis floridana Mansfield, B
Strombus pugilis alutus Gmelin
Cerithium ornalissimum i Heilprin
'crithium floridanumi Morch
Potlamides sclaltus Heilprin
7'urritella apicalis Heilprin
Turritella perattenuata leillrin
ITurritella subanlnudatla acroporau Dall
Turritella /tckinghamensis Mansi eld, B
Turritella aff. T. cartagenensis Pilsbry and Brown, B
Turritella cf. 7'. ponloni Manslield, B
Glycymcris pectintla Gmelin
Navieulda umbonata Lamarck
Navicula 'whtgneriana Dall
/lArce rustical Tuomey and llolincs
/,rca'a cl(i(alilts Tuuker and Wilson
Arca catasarca Dall
A rca lienosa Say
Arca (Cunearca) scalaris Conrad, variety?, B
Ostrea neridionalis Heilprin, B
Ostrca disparilis Conrad, B ..
Peelen (Nodipecten) nodosus floride)isis fTiuker..and Wilson?






NOTES ON UPPER TERTtARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOI.LUSKS


Peclen (Pecten) ocllockonelnsis len'sis Mansfield, 1B
Pectehn eborels buickinghatllensis Mansfield, B
Pecten caloosensis Mansfield, it
Sponddylus roliundalus lHeilprin
Anortia simplex D'Orbigny
Lithophagau sp.
Thracia sp., 13
huncrassatella mnansfieldi MacNeil
Cardiit arata Conrad
/enericardia olga Mansfield
Chaina crassa I-eilpriin
Phacoides chlrysosloma (Metscheln) Plililpi
Phacoides 'pensylvaniclus Limnacus
Codakia .lagonia speciosa Rogers
Cardium isocardia Linnacus
Dosinia elegants Conrad
Chione cancelltla Lininaeus
Chione ulocytna Dall, IB
Chlione latilirala atlllela Conrad, B
Cytherea rugatina Heillprin
lMeis biplicula Conrad, 13
Panope floridana Conrad
E.ncope f., E, michelici Agassiz
Corals, 2 or 3 species

All the above material was taken below stream level as the banks
are low here, and no marl was observed in them. Some of the shells
are clean and appear to have come from, a sand (many of the shells
are believed to be Pliocenc); others from an indurated light gray
limtestone (probably also Pliocene); and others from a light tan
argillaceous limestone (probably tBuckingham limestone).
The species listed below were dredged from Caloosahatchee River
a quarter to half a mile above Olga (stations 14190, 14194). A num.-
ber of species indicate that they came from the Pliocene (marked
"P"), some suggest that they came from the Buckingham limestone
(marked "B"), and one from the Tamiami limestone (marked "T").
The matrix with the specimens that resemble Pliocene species may
have been reworked with material from li lower stratum.

Terebra dislocatu Say
Mitra aff. M. lineolaia H-eilprin
I'asciolaria aff. F. gigantea Kiencr
Solenosteira vaughani Dall?
Cerithiumi ornalissimnm Heilprin, P
Turrilella apicalis Heilprin, P
Turritella aff. T. cartagenensis Pilsbry and Brown, B
Turritella buckinglianensis Mansfield, B





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETINN EIGHTEEN


Barbatia candida Gmelin var.
Barbatia irregularis Dall?
Arca lienosa Say
Ostrea cf. 0. tamiiamiensis Mansfield
Pecten wendelli olgensis Mansfield, P
Pecten (Chlanys) fuscopurpureus Conrad, P
Pecten tamainniensis Mansfield, T
Pecten eboreus solaroides Heilprin, P
Pecten evergladensis Mansfield var.
Thracia sp., B
Spondylus sp.
Dosinia elegans Conrad?
Chione cancellata Linnaeus, P
Chione ulocymna Dall, B
Chione lalirlta athlete Conrad
Rangia cuneata Gray
The matrices of the harder material consist of a light gray and a
dark gray indurated limestone differing from the buff-colored Buck-
ingham limestone.
The fauna, taken from the sides and bottom of the river, is inter-
esting because it probably represents two or more horizons. Rangia
cuneata was observed to be farther out from the river than the harder
rock, and it is assumed that it came from a position above it.
Geographic distribution.-Matson and Clapp,'"a in referring to
species collected in place on the Caloosahatchee River, write, "Species
of Pecten eboreus Conrad and Pecten gibbus Linnaeus together with
Ostrea haitensis [0. meridionalis] Sowerby were also found about one
mile above Caloosa on the Caloosahatchee River [station 49971. The
presence of these fossils is believed to indicate that the beds are Mio-
cene; but this conclusion is held subject to revision in case subsequent
investigations should result in finding larger collections which belong
to some other period. This locality is of special interest because,
heretofore, no Miocene has been reported so far south on the Gulf
coast of the State." The top of the Buckingham limestone is about
five feet above water level at Floweree Grove, where it is unconforma-
bly overlain by Pleistocene deposits. It was traced upstream for over
a mile and probably is exposed four or five miles above Floweree
Grove. Only typical Caloosahatchee species were found in the
dredged material near Fort Denaud. It is exposed at low tide at Alva
(station 11742) and one mile (station 4997) and two miles (station
4996) above Caloosa. Between Caloosa and Olga and one mile below
Olga no exposures were seen, only fossils from the dredgings were
obtained.





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


The information so far obtained indicates that the Buckingham
limestone forms an arch that crosses the Caloosahatchee River, the
highest point of the arch being near Floweree Grove. It is not certain
whether the limestone arch exposed near Buckingham is continuous
with that a little- farther east across the Caloosahatchee River or is a
distinct, parallel arch. It may be the same, as the upper surface of the
limestone, where observed, has been denuded. To the northwest the
Buckingham limestone probably was penetrated in digging pits west
of Acline. In a list of species collected from these pits and published
by Tucker and Wilson"", the following species in their list are reported
not to occur above the Miocene: Cancellaria tabulata Gardner and
Aldrich, Fasciolaria sparrowi Emmons, Dorsanunt? plicatilum (Bose),
and Natica guppyana Toula. The Ostrea identified as 0. haitensis
Sowerby may be the same as that which the writer has identified from
Buckingham and elsewhere as O. meridionalis Heilprin. The pits
were filled with water and inaccessible to the writer in 1938. The
following species that came from some position in the pit were col-
lected,-Ostrea cf. 0. taniamiensis Mansfield, Ostrea gr. 0. trigonalis
Conrad, and Encope macrophora tamiamiensis Mansfield. The upper-
most bed in the area of the pits carries typical Caloosahatchee Plioccne
species, andt there may be, consequently, three horizons represented
here-the Buckingham limestone (upper Miocene), Tamiami lime-
stone (lower Pliocene), and the Caloosahatchee marl (Pliocene).
The distribution of the Buckingham limestone to the southeast has
not been fully determined. The specimens from the limestone now
referred to Tamiami limestone were obtained alopg the Tamiami Trail
within a northwest-southwest distance of about 34 miles in Collier
and Monroe Counties. Trhe nearest locality of this limestone to
Buckingham is about 45 miles distant. The fauna of the Tamniami
limestone appears to have lived at a later time than that of the Buck-
ingham limestone, and the Tamiami was, and still is, regarded as of
Pliocene age, but the exact position in the Pliocene has not been deter-
mined. The Tamiami limestone contains two species of echinoderms,
Encope marruphora tantiamiensis Mansfield and Rhyncholampas ever-
gladensis (Mansfield). The latter species has been reported by
Cooke'" to occur in the Waccamaw formation (Pliocene) of South
Carolina. The writer has not found these two species in the Bucking-
ham limestone. The two subspecies of Pecten, (Nodipecten) pittieri
evergladensis Mansfield (Tamiami limestone) and P. (N.) pittieri
floridenisis Tucker and Wilson (Buckingham limestone), are some-
what similar but appear to have subspecific differences.




FLORIDA' GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-'-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN- '


The fauna of the sand penetrated'in digging a ditch along the
Tamiami Trail, 42 miles west of Miami in Dade County is tentatively
placed in the upper Miocene; it is probably closely related to the fauna
of the Buckingham limestone. The Turritellas in both formations
are similar, and Cypraea carolinensis floridana Mansfield has been
reported at Acline by Tucker and Wilson.'1'


CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL
INTERPRETATION BY DALL IND HARRIS OF THE BEDS ALONG
CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER
Dall and Harris" divided the strata along the Caloosahatchee
River into the "Oyster reef marl beds, conchiferous or Turritella
marl, and layers of sand; which intergrade without distinction and
have no invariable succession, but always grade into the shallow-water
fauna at the top, which is overlain by the Planorbis rock, and this in
turn by post-Pliocene deposits which are seldom of great thickness."
The writer is unable to interpret fully the succession of beds given by
Dall and Harris, because they cite for some of the units no definite
locality along the river where beds may be exposed.
Oyster nmarl.-The type locality of the "Oyster marl" of Dall
and Harris is at a point on the west bank of Peace Creek,
three miles below Mare Branch. The oyster from this place belongs
to the group of Ostrea trigonalis Conrad and probably is the same
species that occurs at Alligator Creek (see p. 22), the horizon of
which is tentatively referred to the Tamiami limestone. The writer
has not seen this species from Peace Creek in the typical Caloosa-
hatchee marl, the oysters occurring in the Caloosahatchee being 0.
sculpturata Say and 0. virginica Gmelin. The latter species is more
abundant in shallow-water deposits. Matson and Clapp 1' state that
a conspicuous oyster bed, about one foot thick, rises above the level
of the stream 3/2 miles below Labelle. As the writer has not seen
this bed, he does not know the name of the species. He has noted,
however, that specimens of Ostrea occur directly above a clay bed in
the section above Fort Denaud, but they are not confined to any posi-
tion in the section.
Tuirritella marl.-The Turritella marl of Dall and Harris is some-
what indefinite, as no section has been found in which they indicate
its position. They may have had in mind the "compact marl" in their
section along the Caloosahatchee River two miles below Fort Thomp-




NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


son.4 The writer assumes that this section is at the locality about
three-fourths of a mile below Labelle where there are many indivi-
duals of Turritella perattenuata, as well as other species of Turritella
in the marl.
Layers of sand.---The layers of marine sand, which may be in part
equivalent to the Chione cancellata bed, are said to overlie the Tur-
ritella-bearing marl.
Planorbis rock.-The Planorbis rock, which contains "Planorbis"
[Helisoma] conanti Dall and "P". [H.] disstoni Dall, is a thin bed
(about three feet thick) of silicified mud which covers the marl beds
near Fort Thompson. These two species of Helisoma ("Planorbis")
appear to belong to the Pliocene, and at this locality are probably near
the top of the Pliocene, but in the section above Fort Denaud, as will
be discussed later, these species occur directly above a marine clay bed.

OBSERVATIONS BY THE WRITER ALONG CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER
In the Pliocene strata between Fort Thompson and a point three-
fourths of a mile below Fort Denaud there appear, as suggested by
Dall and Harris,4' to be gentle undulations, exposing more sediments
above stream level in some places than in others. At Fort Thompson
the Pliocene appears' to dip below stream level.
Localities near Labelle.-At Labelle a gray to yellow sand is ex-
posed one foot or more above stream level; it contains Potanides
scalatus Heilprin, Phacoides anodonta Say, and Cardium medium
Linnaeus. This bed represents the highest part of the Pliocene at
this place and is unconformably overlain by the Pleistocene. Farther
upstream, the Planorbis bed of Dall and Harris occurs. The writer
assumes that it overlies the marine bed, but the assumption has not
been confirmed. About one mile below Labelle a very fossiliferous,
somewhat indurated gray marl containing many individuals of Tur-
ritella (station 11170) rises about 6 feet above stream level. This bed
is believed to be stratigraphically below the 'Pliocene exposed farther
upstream, and to have been deposited in rather deep water. It is in-.
ferred to be the Turritella bed of Dall. Matson and Clapp 1ob report
two feet of fossiliferous, stratified, greenish-gray marl at the base of
a section one mile below Labelle. They also state that the Caloosa-
hatchee marl attains a thickness of 7 feet at a locality l 2 miles below
Labelle and, as mentioned before, that it contains an oyster bed 1 foot
above water level at a point 3y2 miles below Labelle.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL .SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


Localities near Fort Denaud.-The following section was noted on
the left bank of the Caloosahatchee River about three-fourths of a mile
above Fort Denaud, or about five miles below Labelle, near or at the
place described by Matson and Clapp."b

STRATIGRAPHIC SECTION THREE-FOURTHS OF A MILE ABOVE FORT DENAUD
Feet
(1) Calcareous marl with many Chione cancellata and other marine
shells, and a few fresh water shells (station 14189) .................... 4
(2) Calcareous marl with many fresh water and marine shells and a
large number of individuals of Ostrea at the base (station 14188) 3 +
(3) Sticky clay with fragments of shell and brownish pebbles in the
upper part; contains Pecten eborcus solaroides Heilprin (station
14195) ......................................................................................................... 1 -3

The following species were collected: From the second bed (No.
2), indicated by "A"; from the upper bed (No. 1), indicated by "B";
and from station 14193, in place, 1 mile above Fort Denaud, left bank
of the river, indicated by "C." (The relationship of "C" to "A" or "B"
was not determined):
Physa ineigsii Dall, A
Uglandina trunaata Gmelin, C
Vivipara georgiana Lea, A, B
Helisoma conanti (Dall), A, B
Acteocina canaliculata Say, A
Bulla striata Bruguiere?, 1 small spec. A
Cancellaria conradiana Dall, C
Melongena subcoronata Heilprin, A
Cypraea problematica Heilprin, B
Bittium podagrinum Dall, A
Bythinella nickliniana attenuala Haldeman, A
Hydrobia annicoloides Pilsbry, A
Potanides scalatus Heilprin, B
Turritella apicalis Heilprin, A, B
Turritella subannulata Heilprin, A
Galliostoma sp. (young), A
Crepidula aculeata Gmelin, A
Astralinu precursor Dall, B
Neritina edentula Dall, A
Glycymeris pectinata Gmelin, A
Calloarca taeniata Dall, A
Eontia variabilis cf. E. v. quadrata MacNeil, B
iontia platyura (Dall), A
Arca campyla Dall, B
Arca rustica Tuomey and Holmes B
Osirea virginica Ginelin, A, B
Ostrea sculpturata Conrad, A
Pecten (Nodipecten) caloosainsis Dall, B





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


Pecten (Nodipectert) nodosus Linnacus, C
Pecten gibbus gibbus Linnaeus, B
Pecten eboreus solaroides Heilprin, A
Anomia simplex D'Orbigny, A
Spondylus rotundatus Heilprin, B
Union caloosainsis Dall, A
Congeria lamellata Dall, A
Mytilus exustus Linnaeus, A
Venericardia tridentala decemcostata Conrad, A
Cardita cf. C. arata Conrad, 2 small specimens, A
Phacoidcs pensylvanicus Linnaeus, A
Phacoides (Miltha) disciformis Heilprin, B
Cardium isocardia Linnaeus, B
Laevicardium miortoni Conrad, A
Cardium (Fragum) medium Linnaeus, A, B
Cardium oedalium Dall, A, B
(;frarium (Gouldia) metastrialum Conrad, A
Macrocallista maculata Linnaeus, B
Anomalocardia caloosana Dall, B
Chione cancellata Linnaeus, A, B
Cytherea rugatina Heilprin, B
Tellidora cristata Recluz, B
Tellina sayi Dall, A
Abra aequalis Say, A
Rangia cuncata Gray, A
Mulinia sapotilla Dall, A
Tagelus sp. A
Corbula barraltiana Adams, A
Corbula sp., A
Barnea (Scobina) costata Linnaeus, A
Fiom the above list it may be noted that the larger number
of fresh-water shells occur in bed No. 2, directly overlying the clay
bed, and that bed No. 1 contains many more individuals of Chione
cancellata. Ostrea virginica and 0. sculpturata occur throughout both
beds, 0. virginica being abundant and 0. sculpturata very rare.
The following species not included in the above list have been col-
lected in this area:
Conus perversus Linnaeus
Mitra lincolata Heilprin
Pasciolaria scalarina Heilprin
Vasum horridum Heilprin
Pyrula papyratia Say
Strombus Icidyi Heilprin
Navicula wagneriana DolI
Chama crassa Heilprin
Cardium dalli Heilprin
Panope floridana (Heilprin)





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


Exposure three-fourths of a mile below Fort Denaud.-The fol-
lowing species were obtained from an indurated bed, about three feet
thick and about eight feet above stream level, in a cut-off three-fourths
of a mile below Fort Denaud (station 14200):
Helisoma cf. H. disstoni Dall
Turritella sp.
Ostrea sculpturata Conrad?
Pecten gibbus gibbus Linnaeus, with smooth submargins
Pecten (Pecten) aff. P. raveneli Dall
Plhcoides sp.
Anomia simplex D'Orbigny
Other localities.-From a point about one mile below Fort Denaud
downstream (west) to Olga, no characteristic Caloosahatchee Plio-
cene fossils were obtained. About one mile above Olga some dredged
species indicate that they came from the Tamiami limestone; and about
one mile below Olga some typical Caloosahatchee Pliocene shells were
thrown out by the dredge. These Pliocene shells have affinities both
with the faunas in the upper bed at Alligator Creek and that at Shell
Creek (see below), suggesting they were deposited by the same sea.

INTERPRETATION OF DEPOSITION
The writer's interpretation of the deposition of the Pliocene de-
posits between Fort Thompson and a point about one mile below Fort
Denaud is as follows: The sea advanced from the east, and in it was
deposited material, of which the lowest bed exposed, one mile below
Labelle, is the 2-foot bed of greenish, stratified marl reported by Mat-
son and Clapp."' The sea then became deeper in the area around
Labelle, and the Conchiferous or Turritella bed of Dall and Harris
was' deposited. Later, in this same area, the sea became shallower,
and material containing near-shore marine shells was deposited, and
later still material containing fresh water shells.
In the area between Labelle and Fort Denaud, little evidence was
obtained indicative of conditions or of correlation, though among the
dredged fossils examined at localities between the two places, none
were found that indicate an older fauna than that of the Caloosa-
hatchee marl.
Near Fort Denaud the oldest material visible is the clay deposit
containing Pecten eboreus solaroides, a purely marine sediment. Ap-
parently the sea that deposited the succeeding materials was shallower,
for they contain marine, fresh-water, and land shells, the fresh-water.
shells being more abundant in the lower part. This fauna strongly




NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


indicates that the shore line of the Caloosahatchee Pliocene sea was
nearby. Whether or not the stratified marl at the base of the section
near Labelle represents the clay bed at the base of the section near
Fort Denaud is unknown, but the probability is that it does not. Pos-
sibly the clay bed is as old as the Tamiami limestone. Of the near-
shore deposits near Fort Denaud, in the writer's opinion, the lower
part containing fresh-water shells is nearly contemporaneous with
that part of the deposits in the east, near Labelle, containing a deeper
water fauna (Turritella-bearing marl); and the upper part is nearly
contemporaneous with the shallow-water deposits of the area around
Labelle.

BEDS ON SHELL CREEK

Shell Creek is a south fork of Prairie Creek, which enters Peace
Creek north of Cleveland, Charlotte County. Dall and Harris,4' in
referring to the section on Shell Creek, write: "The banks are higher
here than on the Caloosahatchee, being 25 feet at the highest point, but
the difference is chiefly of unfossiliferous marine sand 12 feet deep.
Then comes about 2 feet of shallow water fauna with some Pliocene
species, below which is a hard limestone stratum 2 or 3 feet thick,
beneath which is a bed of conchiferous marl, like that of the Caloosa-
hatchee. There are slight differences in the fauna, such as might be
expected at points 20 miles apart." Dall reports, after an exhaustive
study of the fauna at Shell Creek, a total of 256 species, of which 59
percent are Recent and 7 percent are peculiar. In comparison, the
fauna on the Caloosahatchee River he reports to include 639 species,
of which 48 percent are Recent and 28 percent are peculiar.
Helisoma conanti (Dall), and 'H. disstoni (Dall) occur at both
places as well as Ostrea virginica Gmelin. An excellent collection ob-
tained by the late Frank Buris from Shell Creek is deposited in the
U. S. National Museum under the U. S. Geological Survey station
no. 3300. These were collected along Shell Creek over a distance of
about six miles. This collection probably includes fossils from more
than one bed, though, if so, the fossils from the individual beds
have not been isolated.
As a whole the Pliocene faunas at Shell Creek and along the
Caloosahatchee River are similar, and there seems to be no reason for
separating them stratigraphically. Probably the same horizons are
represented at both places.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL 'SURVEY- BULLETIN EIGHTEEN'


BEDS ON ALLIGATOR CREEK
Dall and Harris'" write: "Near the north end of Charlotte harbor
a small creek comes in from the east called Alligator Creek. Here
Mr. Willcox found an extension of the Caloosahatchee beds. The
banks are about 12 feet high, the upper half being pure sand; the
lower half contains fossils of Pliocene age, mollusks, barnacles, and
flat Echinidae. They differ from the Caloosahatchee deposits in being
in pure sand instead of marl as a matrix. The upper half of 'the
fossiliferous stratum shows the shallow-water fauna, with its usual
partial admixture of strictly Pliocene extinct species. Some parts of
the bed are united by silicious cementation into a hard rock." Da~ll"
records for Alligator Creek a total of 73 species, of which 63 percent
are Recent and none peculiar.
There appear to be at least two and perhaps three horizons repre-
sented in this area-the Buckingham limestone, the Tamiami limie-
stone, and an upper bed containing Caloosahatchee Pliocene fossils.
A collection was made by the writer and F. S. MacNeil from Alligator
Creek above the highway bridge near Acline. Most of the species
previously reported from Alligator Creek were found, except Ostrea
of the group of 0. trigonalis Conrad and Encope mtacrophora
tamiamiensis Mansfield.
Species from the upper beds.-The following species were collected
from Alligator Creek about half a mile above the railroad bridge
(station 13975) :
Terebra protexta Conrad
Cancellaria aff. C. agassizii Dall
Oliva sayana Ravenel
Fasciolaria gigantea Kiener
Flasciolaria apicina Dall
Melongena subcoronata Heilprin
S Strombus pugilis Linnaeus
Ccrithiimn floridanum Morch
Modulus modulus Linnaeus
Turrilella subannulata Hleilprin
Hydrobia amnicoloides Pilsbry
Natica canrena Linnaeus
Neritina merida Dall
Nucula proxima Say
Nuculana acuta Conrad
Glycymeris pectinala Gmelin
Glycyneris americana Defrance
Arca campyla Dall
Barbatia adamsi Dall
Arca lienosa Say





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


Arca catasarca Dall
Eontia platyura (Dall)
Pecten (Pecten) ziczac Linnaeus
Pecten fuscopurpureus Conrad
Pecten gibbus gibbus Linnaeus
Plicatula marginata Say
Anomia simplex D'Orbigny
Crassinella acuta Dall
C'rassinella lunulata Conrad
Crassatcllites gibbesii Tuomey and Holmes
Cardita arata Conrad
Echonochama arcinella Linnaeus
Phacoides waccamawensis Tuonicy and Holnecs
Phacoides multilinealus Tuomey and Holmes
Phacoides nassula caloosana Dall
Phacoides pensylvanicus Linnaeus (came from the highest bed)
Phacoides chrysostoma Philippi
Cardium robustum Solander
Cardium isocardia Linnaeus
Dosinia elegant Conrad
Gafariumi (Gouldia) metastriatum Conrad
Macrocallista maculata Linnaeus
Anomalocardia caloosana Dall
Chioine cancellata Linnaeus
Chione atlleta Conrad
Venus campechiensis Gnielin
Tellina sayi Dall
Telling alternate Say
Semele bellastriata Conrad
Abra aequalis Say
C'orbula barrattiana Adams
Corbula caloosae Dall
Psammosolen, cumingianus Dunker
Rangia cuneata Gray (came from the highest bed)
The above list of species represents the latest Pliocene fauna in
this area and may be nearly equivalent to the Pliocene fauna around
Fort Denaud, or perhaps a little later than it. A few species collected
from the top of the section a little farther up the stream appear to be
a little younger than those in the bed below.

BEDS ON MYAKKA RIVER
Dall and Harris write:'" "The Myakka or Miacca River comes into
the Charlotte harbor from the northwest parallel with the Gulf Coast,
and its estuary is nearly at right angles to that of Peace Creek. Here
Mr. Willcox found a bed of lime rock at the sea level with uncharac-
teristic species poorly preserved. Above the lime rock are beds of


,23




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


shell marl considerably mixed with sand. 'In this deposit was collected
about 40 species of shells of which about 10 per cent were extinct Plio-
cene species. This bed seems to have fewer extinct species than the
Caloosahatchee marls and may be regarded as a little younger, perhaps
corresponding to the Planorbis rock, which seems to be absent on the
Myakka." Dall writes that the fauna of the Myakka River has a
total of 73 species, of which 72 percent are Recent and none peculiar
to the locality.
The exact place at which Mr. Willcox obtained his fossils is un-
known. It is also not known with certainty that all the species re-
corded came from a single bed, and the fossils are, consequently, un-
satisfactory as horizon markers. Pleistocene fossils are found on
North Creek, near Osprey, which locality is nearer the coast but not
far away from Myakka River and a number of the species are com-
mon to both places. The following species reported from Myakka
River indicate Pliocene age (those with an asterisk were not found in
the U. S. National Museum collection):
Aetaeon myakkanus Dall, Mitra willcoxii Dall*, Potamides scalatus
Heilprin, Turritella perattenuata Heilprin, Collonia elegantula Dall
(young specimen), Arca rustica Tuomey and Holmes*, Navicula
wagneriana Dall (young), Gafarium Ietlastriatum Conrad*, Mactra
willco.vii Dall (not known elsewhere), Corbula caloosae Dall.
The following species, and perhaps others, indicate a Pleistocene
age: Fasciolaria distans Lamarck, Cerithium muscarum Say, Modulus
floridanus Conrad.

SPECIES FROM A LOCALITY ONE MILE NORTH OF BERMONT.
The following species were collected from a bed of sand in a marl
pit one mile north of Bermont, Charlotte County, and about three
miles south of Prairie Creek by the writer and F. S. MacNeil (station
13835):
Gastropods
Hydrobia amnicoloides Pilsbry
Acteocina canaliculata Say
Atys cf. A. sandersoni Dall
Ringicula floridana Dall
Terebra protexta Conrad
Terebra dislocata Say
Conus floridanus Gabb
Conus pygnaeus Reeve
Conus proteus Hwass
Mangelia cf. M. melanitica oxia Bush
Mangelia aff. M. eritimna Bush






NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


Mangelia n. sp.?
Olivella mutica Say
Oliva sayana Ravenel
Marginella ovuliformis D'Orbigny
Marginella precursor Dall
Turbinella scolymoides Dall
Fasciolaria apicina Dall
Fasciolaria gigantea Kiener
Busycon perversum Linnaeues
Melongena subcoronata Heilprin
Alectrion vibex Say
Astyris cf. A. multilineata Dall
Pyrula papyratia Say
Strombus pugilis Linnaeus
Bittium adamsi Dall
Cerithium algicolum C. B. Adams
Cerithiu glaphyreum litharium Dall
Potamides scalatus Heilprin
Caecum cooper S. Smith
Caecum regular Carpenter
Turritella subannulata Heilprin
Turritella subannulala acropora Dall
Assiminea sp.
Crepidula fornicala Say
C'rucibulnu auriculum Gmelin
Tectonatica pusilla (Say)
Polynices duplicatus Say
Neritina merida Dall
Diodora alternate (Say)
Scaphopods
Cadulus quadridentatus Dall
Dentalium sp.
Pelecypods
Nuculana acuta (Conrad)
Glycymeris pectinata Gmelin
Barbatia adamsi Dall
Eontia platyura (Dall)
Arca lienosa Say.
Arca campyla Dall
Arca aequalitas Tucker and Wilson
Ostrea sculpturata Conrad
Pecten gibbus gibbus Linnaeus
Plicatula n. sp.
Anomia simplex D'Orbigny
Mytilus exustus Linnaeus
Crassinella acuta Dall
Crassinella duplinia Ra ~I al : .
Cardita arata .Cnr', ,,


'C 1




S- FLORIDA (GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


Venericardia tridentata Say
Echinochama. arcinella Linnaeus
Phacoides anodonta Say
Phacoides pensylvanicus Linnacus
Phacoides waccamawensis Tuoimey and Holmes
Phacoides multilineatus Tuonmey and H-olmcs
Phacoides trisulcatus Conrad
Phacoides radians Conrad
Diplodonta acclinis Conrad
Bornia sp.
Cardium isocardia Linnaeus
Cardium robustum Solander
Laevicardium mortoni Conrad
Dosinia elegans Conrad
Macrocallista nimbosa Solander
Parastarte triquetra Conrad
Chione cancellala Linnaeus
Anomalocardia caloosana Dall
Transennella caloosana Dall
Tellina sayi Dall
Tellidora cristata Recluz
Corbula barrattiana Adams
Mulinia lateralis Say
Gastrochaena cuneiformis Spengler
Chione cancellata is very abundant, and the fauna appears to have
been deposited in comparatively shallow water near a former shore
line. Most of the species also occur in the highest bed at Alligator
Creek (station 13975). The sand bed near Bermont may have been
deposited by the same sea as that in which the bed at Alligator Creek
was laid down but appears to be a little younger. About 46 percent of
the species occur in recognized Pleistocene faunas.
The following species occurring above Fort Denaud were not
found at Bermont: Cypraea problematic Heilprin, Arca rustic
Tuomey and Holmes, Pecten (Nodipecten) caloosainsis Dall, Pecten
(Nodipecten) nodosus Linnaeus, Spondylus rotundatus Heilprin,
Phacoides (Miltha) disciformis Heilprin, Cardium oedalium Dal,
Cardium (Fragun) medium Linnaeus, Macrocallista maculata Lin-
naeus, Cytherea rugatina Heilprii and others. The absence of these
forms' indicates that the fauna at Bnrmont lived in cooler water than
that suited to the fauna found on the Caloosahatchee River near Fort
Denaud, and suggests that the Bermont fauna probably lived at a
little later time.





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND'PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


TENTATIVE CORRELATION OF THE UPPER TERTIARY DEPOSITS OF
SOUTHWESTERN FLORIDA
Table 1 presents a tentative correlation of the Tertiary deposits of
southwestern Florida, which are discussed in the preceding pages of
this paper. As is noted at various' places, the correlation of some of
these beds is uncertain, but it seems desirable to offer an interpreta-
tion and leave to future time the adjustments that may he needed.

THE MORE CHARACTERISTIC SPECIES OF TIE PLIOCENE
CALOOSAHATCHEE FAUNA
Forty of the more characteristic species of the Pliocene Caloosa-
hatchee fauna arc recorded in the list below. Of these, 8, or 20 per-
cent, occur in the living fauna. All occur in the Shell Creek fauna.
Nearly all the species were collected by the writer from the left bank
of Caloosahatchee River about 1 mile below the highway bridge at
Labelle (station 11170).
Comns proteus Hwass
Cancellaria conradiana Dall
Mitra lineolata Heilprin
Scaphella floridana Heilprin
Iasumn horridum Heilprin
Fasciolaria tulipa Linnaeus
Pasciolaria apicina Dall
Strombus Icidyi l-Heilprin
Niso willcoxiana Dall
Cypraea problematica -leilprin
Turritclla perattenuata Heilprin
Turritella subannulata Heilprin and var. acropora Dall
Natica canrena Linnaeus
'issuridca carditella Dall
Arca aguila Heilprin
Arca campyla Dall (typical)
Arca rustic Tuonncy and Holmes
Arca scalarina Heilprin
Navicula wagneriana Dall
Pecten eborecus solaroides Heilprin
Pecten evergladensis charlottensis Mansfield = "P. gibbus con-
centricus Say
Pecten exasperatus Sowerby
Pecten anteamplicostatus Mansfield
Peclen (Nodipectet) caloosaiesis Dall
Chama crassa Heilprin
Chama willcoxii Dall
Phacoides amabilis Dall
Phacoides caloosaensis Dall







TABLE


TENTATIVE


CORRELATION


OF THE


UPPER


TERTIARY


DEPOSITS


SOUTHWESTERN


CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER ALLIGATOR BERMONT MYAKKA RIVER
Near Labelle Near Fort Denaud CREEK
Beds on
SMyakka River
S_ (in part)
Beds at
Bermont

r S Planorbis .
g rock and Upper bed (c) Highest bed
S" marine
O sand (a)
O ada________________--
S Turritella-bearing
P bed Lower bed (d)
S< (Deeper water
og phase)

marl (b)Clayey Clay bed (e)
UI marl (b)
Tamiami limestone .Tamiami
Slimestone


Buckingham limestone Buckingham (?)
B limestone
2-
a _______


Probably


below


Planorbis-bearing


may represent the same bed,


are near-shore


fully


confirmed


deposits
but is


assume


to the


but this
equivalent
;d to be


east,


has not


but this has not been fully confirmed.


been


fully


confirmed.


ce of the lower bed to the
little higher stratigraphically


Turritella-bearing bed is


I





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


Phacoides pensylvanicus Linnaeus
Phacoides (Miltha) disciformis Heilprin
Cardium willcoxi Dall
Cardium medium Linnaeus
Cardiun dalli Heilprin
Cardiun emmonsi Conrad
Cytherea rugatina Heilprin
Semcle leana Dall
Mulinia sapotilla Dall
Mulinia caloosainsis Dall
Corbula wTillco.vr) Dall
Corbula caloosae Dall

AREA ON THE SOUTH AND SOUTHWESTERN SIDES OF LAKE
OKEECHOBEE
Many species of Pliocene shells have been thrown out by the dredge
along the south and southwestern shores of Lake Okeechobee espe-
cially above Clewiston to Moorehaven and between Moorehaven and
Lake Hicpochee. The dredge probably penetrated two horizons in
places. The lower horizon has' characteristic Pliocene shells like those
in the lower strata on Caloosahatchee River and Shell Creek. An
Arca aff. A. plicatura grading toward A. transversa was obtained 6V2
miles northwest of Clewiston. Eontia variabilis clewislonensis Mac-
Neil b was picked up in the same area. MacNeil concludes that this
variety came from an upper stratum in: this' area. Morum floridantt
Tucker and Wilson, the holotype from Prairie Creek, was found at
Ortona Lock, Caloosahatchee River. Fusinus waterman Maxwell
Smith, the holotype from Belle Glade, a town on the Hillsborough
Canal, was dredged from St. Lucie canal, 9 miles from Lake Okeecho-
bee.
AREA ALONG WEST PALM BEACH CANAL
Fossils from the spoil bank have been collected on the West Palm
Beach Canal as far east as Loxahatchee. Turritella subanmndala
Heilprin, Ostrea sculpturata Say, Phacoides caloosaensis Dall, as well
as' other species, indicate that the Pliocene. stratum was penetrated in
digging the canal.

AREA ALONG ST. LUCIE CANAL
The St. Lucie canal cuts into. the Pliocene from its entrance at Port
Mayaca to a few miles east of the Seaboard Air Line Railway bridge
at Indiantown. The holotype of Arca acqualitas Tucker and Wilson
came from Port Mayaca (probably from the spoil bank). This species
has been collected in place near Bermont and from the spoil bank


29





SFLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


along the West Palm Beach Canal, 2 to 3 miles above Loxahatchec
Post Office (station 11152) and two miles west of the railway bridge
on the St. Lucie canal. Two to three miles west of St. Lucie Lock a
small collection was obtained from a bed at water level (station
11145). The bed in which the fossils occur may be a little younger
than or about the same age as that which yielded the shells dredged
from the Pliocene at Port Mayaca. The fossils' indicate a close rela-
tionship to those in the Caloosahatchee marl at DeLand and to the
Waccamaw formation of the Carolinas. The following species were
collected: Area near /. plicalura Conrad; Eontia cf. E. tillensis
MacNeil, a species from the Pliocene from Tilly's Lake, South Caro-
lina; Area subsin.ata Conrad; Ostrea virgin -a Gmelin; Ostrea
sculptirata Conrad?; Cardium robustumn Solander; Mulinia lateralis
Say (heavy form); and Mulinia contract (Conrad).


UPPER TERTIARY FAUNAS ON THE EAST SIDE OF
FLORIDA
Caloosahatchec marl of Volusia County.-For the Pliocene de-
posits of Volusia County the name Nashua marl was proposed by
Matson and Clapp, who described the characteristics of the formation
and listed the contained species."' Later, Mansfield studied the
faunas. These deposits are now included in the Caloosahatchee
marl.2*
The fauna of the Caloosahatchee marl in Volusia County may be
separated into two zones, as follows:
1. Fauna near Nashua (basal) and fauna around Orange City
and DeLand (lower part), Volusia County.
2. Fauna at DeLeon Springs (upper part), Volusia County.
The more characteristic forms of the two horizons are:
1. Conus 7waccomawensis B. Smith, Arca delandensis Mansfield
(very abundant), Pccten. eboreus solaroides Heilprin (common),
Area rustica Tuomey and Holmes. Chionc cancellata. Linnaeus is
probably absent.
2. Aurinia obtusa Emmons (present), Arca. plicatura C6nrad
(common), Prcten eboreus solaroides Heilprin (very rare), Chione
cancellata. Linnaeus, (common), Corbula. n. sp. (common). The last
occurs also in the Shell Creek fauna, but the bed in which it occurs is
unknown.
The following species not formerly reported from DeLeon Springs






NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS .


were collected half a mile southwest of the Golf Club there by the
writer and F. S. MacNeil:
Terebla dislocata (Say)
Marginella limatula Conrad
Aurinia obtusa Emmons
Busycon canaliculatum Linnacus
Busycon caricum Linnaeus
11yanassa irrorala (Conrad)
Nucula proxima Say
Nuculana acuta Conrad
(;lycymeris americana Defrance
A.rca (Possularra) adainsi Dall
Ostrea virginica Gmelin?
Pecren cboreus solaroides H-lcilprin (1 valve)
Modiolus demissus Dillwyn
'hacoides nassnlhs caloosanus Dall
Phacoidcs trisulcatus multistriatus Conrad
Pharoides anodonta Say
Divaricella quadrisulcata (D'Orbigny)
Sportella constricta Conrad
Telhna sayi Dall
Corbula n. sp., also at Shell Creek and at Neills Eddy Landing
The above species appear to be rather characteristic of the upper-
most part of the Caloosahatchee marl of Volusia County.


DISTRIBUTION OF THE ARCINAE OF THE
PLIOCENE OF FLORIDA
Table 2 shows the distribution of most of the species of Arcinac
of Florida. The presence of certain species, especially when repre-
sented by many individuals, has been helpful in correlating the de-
posits.
The specimens, from DeLeon Springs which I have placed under
Rontia platyura show a gradation toward E. variabilis MacNeil. It
has been pointed out by me in a previous' study of the Caloosahatchee
marl of eastern Florida that its faunal affinities are as close if not
closer to the Waccamaw formation of the Carolinas than to the typical
Caloosahatchee marl. The specimen which Dall figured under the
name "Arca (Noetia) limula Conrad" was obtained at some horizon,
perhaps the Turritella-bearing bed, along the Caloosahatchee River.
This specimen probably should be referred to another species or sub-
species. A similar form occurs in the lower part of the exposures in
Volusia County.








TABLE


2-DISTRIBUTION


THE


ARCINAE


THE


PLIOCENE


FLORID


Barbatia
Navicula
Na vicula


caloosahatchiensis


cwagnernana


aquila


Heilprnn


Area campy la Dall


Arca
Arca


Arca aequalitas
Arca scalarina


Area lienosa
Arca alcina


Euomey al


Dall


Sheldon


... .............. .....a. -...


..........a.**......as. *C** ...


d* a o..m a...e f........- a. .. .* C .
nd Holmes ..............


...~..1..................... I~I(Ia....


Tuckei
Heilprin


Say
Dall


Wilson


- a-a


.p............a....p.aaaaa..paaa.. a.S. a.. ..*.ae..


Calloarca millfila Dall .........................................
Calloarca taeniata Dall ..-............................. ...


Eontia platyura (Dall) .
Eontia "limula (Conrad)"
Eontia variabilis cf. E. v.


Eontia


variabilis


fide Dall .................
quadrata MacNeil..
lacNeil ............ .... ....


.A.. *......
A


X.........

....... a.a. 1


S.........
1..........


?
* ..... -..
...... -..al


X
A

x
XA
A


x
x
X


OI

U
U


*.... -a a -... -
......... a. S
... a -...... a
*a.e.a..... a
1((11)(1
rlr~rOr


L

UO


A
A
G
X
A
?


T
X
X
L.........


X
*.a. ..........
. a. a .. ... ..
X
G
AT


"........*...
T
*. -..........
.... ........ -


* .a.-.... .....


a... ..... ..a- --...a.


E
*. .... . .. . .
F
R

*-....C........
1..... .. ...- C.


-Ca. -a .. -... -
* a.-....a.a...


p...p...... a.


. ......... i


X


X

A




G


. .........

..........


DREDGED


C CO C.

~ CU

ud~i4 01 -
S
-" >^JS^
ps~b -^h"
S^ c _c
5P) ^


.... ........
. ... .... .. -
........ -....
..... .....O.
. a . .. .. *
0 X 1
r 'I ,DlrOr

WO WeIDQ *Oe


........ p.....
a. C .......
............
............
...........-. I
........ ....
-. a -------


.... ----


Cs)


Ctl
U,

-( -
-Q


oo
t u
O E


........ V -
X

............
..... .......


X
X

...........


-S
Ct




I
S!C
Cu
"5 I
(c
S


u.1
U'
..... -

'LI


A
p
-..* ..
X



a *.a p.

X
". .


I- -....
--- ... p


abundant
type locality
also dredged 3 miles west of Clewiston


type from Po
reported here


rt Mayaca
but not I


found


by writer


one small specimen


reported


here


one specimen
occurrence
lower bed


= A.


collected in


transversa


Say


upper


specimens


CALOOSAHATCHEE
RIVER


(Dall)


rustica '1
catasarca


............

- a -
- a-. -.........
- a a - ae

* t


.... a. ..- -
a.........a~...


- p .....


- ... .......

--pa a...~.*..


M


$





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


The occurrence of Navicula wagneriana; (Dall), which appears to
be more abundant in the early part of the, Caloosahatchee marl, was
reported by Mansfield and MacNeil to occur among fossils from
the s'poil bank 3 miles west-southwest of Little River, South Carolina.


TENTATIVE CORRELATION OF THE UPPER
TERTIARY DEPOSITS OF PENINSULAR
FLORIDA
Table 3 shows a tentative correlation of the upper Tertiary de-
posits of southern and eastern Florida. The correlation of some of
the deposits is not yet fully determined, and it will no doubt be neces-
sary at some future time to make adjustments. It seems to the writer
desirable, however, to present the views that are best justified by
present data.

PLEISTOCENE DEPOSITS
It is not the purpose in this paper to include all the .localities in
Florida at which Pleistocene faunas occur nor to discuss fully their
significance and distribution in time. However, in the study of the
deposits along the Caloosahatchee River and elsewhere, it was neces-
sary to examine the fauna from each fossiliferous deposit in order to
determine the epoch to which it belongs, and a record of the infor-
mation obtained is offered here. In the study of the Pleistocene
faunas more information is still needed to interpret fully their signi-
ficance as to origin, distribution, and correlation. This may perhaps
be accomplished eventually by careful differentiation of the beds along
the individual rivers and canals, by following these beds as closely as
is possible over their horizontal extent, and by comparing the contained
faunas with the living fauna in order to interpret their ecological
significance and probable origin.
Pleistocene deposits along Caloosahatchee River between Fort
Denaud and Alva.-The species of mollusks from the Pleistocene de-
posits along the Caloosahatchee River between Fort Denaud and Alva
have not been reported previously. During the writer's work three
collections were made, of which a record is given below.
About 3 miles below Fort Denaud (station' 14081), in place on the
left bank of the river in a rather coarse-grained sand, occurs the fauna
listed below. The river bank here is 6 to 8 feet high.
Helisoma duryi (Wetherby)
Helisoma duryi intercalare Pilsbry
Physa sp.









TABLE


TENTATIVE


CORRELATION


THE


UPPER


TERTIARY


DEPOSITS


PENINSULAR


FL(


OKEECHOBEE LAKE AREA
WESTERN FLORIDA AND SOUTH OF EASTERN
SBeds on Myakka River (in part)
S Material dredged in northern area at
C < Bed at Bermont Port Mayaca and St. Lucie Canal

i g Planorbis rock and probably Beds with
marine sand below it Material dredged at Ortona Lock -s fauna

o- a and
Deposits ne
STuriteella-bearing bed in Clewiston area DeLand, an
Clayey marl (a) & Orange Cit

Tamiami limestone Tamiami limestone I I


0 Buckingham limestone Sand in Dade County


Reported


here


Matson






NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


Acteocina canaliculata (Say)
Marginella sp.
Melongena corona Gmelin
Cerithium muscarum Say
Amnicola? sp.
Nucula sp.
Pecten gibbus gibbus Linnaeus
Anomia simplex D'Orbigny
Laevicardium mortoni Conrad
Transennella conradiana Dail
Macrocallista sp. (young specimen)
Parastarle triquetra Conrad
Anomalocardia hendriana Mansfield, n. sp.
Chione cancellata Linnaeus
Cumingia tellinoides Conrad
Tellina sayi (Deshayes)

On the left bank of the River at Turkey farm, Hendry County,
2.7 miles above Floweree Grove (station 14198), a small fauna occurs.
The Pleistocene sediments at this place consist mainly of sand, in all
about 5 feet thick, the upper 2 feet containing more shells than the.
lower 3 feet. A 2-foot bed below the Pleistocene deposit is referred
to the Buckingham limestone. The species found are:
Melongena corona Gmelin
Cerithium muscarium Say
Parastarte triquetra Conrad
Chione cancellata Linnaccus
On the right bank of the River at Floweree Grove, Lee County,
about 3 miles above Alva (station 14197), a few species of mollusks
are found in a sandy matrix that rests unconformably on 4 feet of
material \referred to th.e Buckingham limestone (Miocene). The
upper surface of the Buckingham has been eroded, as indicated by
pockets of the Pleistocene material within the lower bed. The species
found are:
Helisoma scalare (Jay)
Helisoma duryi (Wetherby)
Pivipara georgiana Lea
Bythinella? sp.
Amnicola floridana convexa Pilsbry
Rissoa? sp.
Cyrenoida aff. C. floridana Dall
Chione cancellata Linnaeus
The Vivipara was obtained directly above the contact, whereas
the Helisoma came from one foot above.
No fossiliferotis Pleistocene deposits were noted below Floweree





.I )HRII)A E)lGO(UAI?4 *SIrRVM'--I3(JLLRTT 1TGII'1'EFt~


Grove, but they may be present. If the Caloosah:tchee Pliocene was
formerly present, it has been removed by erosion. It mIay' be noted
on figure 1 that the river takes a southwestern cottuse a mile pr more
below Fort DIcnaud, a change that may have been caused by the former
presence of shoreline deposits of the Caloosahatchee Pliocete, sea.
The three localities above probably should be referred to the
Fort Thompson formation.
IPl'istoccne fossils of the .soinlhveslern and eastern sides of the
Peninsula of Florida.-T'able 4 shows the species from .a number of
localities on the western and eastern sides of" the Peninsula: of Florida;
also the extent of occurrence of the same species at two localities in
South Carolina.
Localities in southllwestern Florida.-Flossils were noted at live
localities in southwestern Florida. These are:
North Creek near Osprey, Little Sarl.sota Bay, Manatee County. Collected
by Joseph Willcox and W. I. Dall.
Station 14202, dump from a shallow ditch along highway, Naples to lort
Myers, 6 miles from Feoit Myers, I.ec County. Collected by W., 'C.
ManIslicld' and I:. S. MacNeil. Probably the same as II. G. Richards'
locality no. 3.5."' I
Station 14160, marl pits at Charlotte Cotuty stockade, .2. miles northeast
of Punta Gorda, Charlotte Comity. Collected by W. C. Mansfield
and F. S. MacNeil.
Sections 11169, 14082, highest fossilifereous hed in hank of Caloosahatchee
River one-fourth mile below the bridge at Labelle, llendry County.
Collected by W. C. Manslield and C. W. Mutn11i.
Station 11166, left hank of Caloosahatchee River, about one-third! mile abdve
Labelle, lendry County, highest bed in the exposure carrying:'a mixed
fauna. Collected by C. W. Cooke, Stuart Mossom, and W. C, Mans-
field.
A brief discussion of the fauna from each of the above 'localities
follows.
A list of species from North Creek is given by )Dall,"t of which
species live are said to be extinct, s'o far as known. Some of these
species were not found by the writer and are indicated ini.,Table 4 by
"R". This fauna appears to be.of ,late Pleistocene age.
Seventeen species were collected at station 14202, 6 miles south of
iFort Myers, and others likely could be obtained. Of these, 10 or
more occur at North Creek. This fauna is also of late Pleistocene
age.
Around 50 species were collected from the material thrown out in.
digging pits near Punta Gorda (stations 14160, 14191). About 30






NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOI.LUSKS


of' these species occur, or have been reported to occur, at North Creek.
Jlowever, lie fauna as a whole indicates'the presence during its epoch
ofi.water a little warmer than that at North Creek, and thus suggests
that it probably lived at a somewhat earlier time. The horizon in
the Pleistocene may be about the same or a little higher than that of
the bed at Sanford discussed later in this paper.
Approximately 50 species of mollusks have been collected at station
11169, one-fourth of a mile below Labelle, and about 15 species at
station 11166, one-third of a mile above Labelle. Both exposures are
illustrated on plate 22, A and B, of Cooke and Mossom."2' The de-
scription of illustration "B," however, is wrong, as it illustrates a
Pleistocene locality instead of Pliocene. The fauna at the upper lo-
cality is definitely referred to the Fort: Thompson formation by Cooke
and Mossom."' The fauna at this place, where the contaiinig bed
rests unconformably upon the Plioccne is similar to that at the locality
below Labelle, except that it contains many more individuals of
Helisoima scalare (Jay) and the species Kangia cuncala Gray. I have
not seen the latter species at the lower locality. The fauna at the
locality below Labelle is probably a little younger than that of the
locality above Labelle, but probably should be referred to the Fort
Thompson formation.

Localities on the eastern ide of Florida.-F our localities on the
eastern side of Florida were examined. These are:
Station 14201, about 8 miles southwest of Melbourne, Brevard County. The
fossiliferous bed was reported to lie below the bone bed in this area.
The writer did not confirm this report. Collected )by W. C. Mans-
field and F. S. .MacNeil.
Station 14192, Buffalo Bluff, right bank of the St. Johns River, one-half
mile, 'more or less, above Atlantic Coast Line Railway bridge, Putnam
County. Collected by W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil.
Station 14196, walls of a dredge cut on the north shore of Lake Monroe,
about one-fourth of a mile east of highway bridge across the west end
of the lake at the outlet of St. Johns River, Volusia County. Collected
by W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil.
Station 11138, from -dump of West Palm Beach Canal at 7-Mile Post out
of West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County. Te uppermost fossiliferous
stratum is exposed 4 or 5 feet above water level. Collected by C. W.
Cooke and W. C. Mansfield.

Thirty species of mollusks were collected at station 14201, 8 miles
southwest of Melbourne.. Nearly all of the species occur in the Foit
Thompson formation.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--UL.LETIN EIGHTEEN


The faunas at station 14196, Lake Monroe, and station 14192,
Buffalo Bluff, will be considered together, as they are believed to
represent nearly the same zone. The fauna at Buffalo Bluff suggests,
however, that it might have lived at a little earlier time. About 31
species of mollusks have been collected from these two localities. On
the basis of .the fossils, the writer previously "' referred them to the
late Pliocene or early Pleistocene. The fauna is now referred to the
Pleistocene and for convenience is designated the "bed at Sanford."
The fauna at station 14196 is regarded as typical. The same fauna
as that at station 14196 occurs in the left bank of the St. Johns River,
about 5 miles northwest of Sanford. It may be noted in table 4 that
the fauna is represented by a few species with many individuals. No
species of Turritella, so far noted, is present, though the Pliocene
usually has them. The following species indicate a Pleistocene age
rather than Pliocene: Anachis obesa C. 13. Adams, Eontia ponlderosa
(Say) and var., Alrina. rigida D)illwyn, Cardita floridana Conrad,
Cardium muricatunm. Linnaeus, Semele pro/icnua Poulteney (probably
only Pleistocene and Recent). 11 is fauna appears to be early
Pleistocene age and lived about (he same time as that on the west side
of Florida at Charlotte County stockade (station 14160). A similar
fauna was obtained from material dredged in digging the canal 2 miles
south of Okeechobee City.
The species from station 11138, West Palm Beach Canal are re-
corded in table 4. The fauna is similar to that of the Fort Thompson
formation, except that some of the species indicate the presence of
slightly warmer water during its deposition, which condition may be
accounted for by its more southern latitude.
Pleistocene deposits near Myrtle Beach and Little River, South
Carolina.-T'he occurrences of Florida Pleistocene species at two lo-
calities in South Carolina, station 13858, 2Y2 miles northwest of
Myrtle Beach, and station 13424, 3 mile west-southwest of Little
River, are recorded in table 4.
'The South Carolina fauna has been referred to the Pleistocene
Pamlico formation. It contains the following species not reported at
Florida Pleistocene localities: Olivella nitudula Dillwyn, Ilyanassa
obsoleta (Say), Busycon caricum Gmelin, Argina pexata (Say),
Dona.x variabilis Say. On the other hand, the following species' were
not found at station 13858 nor station 13424: Alectrion vibex (Say),
Melongena corona Gmelin, Cerithium muscarum Say, Modulus flor-
idanus Conrad, Cardium isocardia. Linnaeus, Laevicardium mortoni
Conrad.





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


Observations on a few species occurring in the Pleistocene.---
Helisonma scalare (Jay) probably appeared in the Pleistocene. I have
not found it associated with known Pliocene faunas. Bulla striata
Bruguiere is present, at some localities abundantly. Olivella mutica
Say is a common species in Florida. Marginella apicina Menke is
present at most localities as are also Fasciolaria distans Lamarck,
Busycon pyrum Dillwyn, and B. perversum Linnaeus. The follow.
ing species probably appeared in the Pleistocene:-Melongena corona
Gmelin, Cerithium muscarum Say, Atrina rigida Dillwyn, Cardita
floridana Conrad, Cardium muricatum Linnaeus, and Semele proficua
Poultency. Diodora alternate (Say) occurs at a few localities.
Area transversa is usually present, and Lucina floridana is a common
species. Anomalocardia caloosana Dall is much smaller than the
form in the Pliocene. Macrocallista nimbosa Solander, the elongate
form, is much more common than M. nuwculata Linnaeus, the shorter
form.
List of Pleistocene species.-A list of Pleistocene species from a
few localities on the eastern and western sides of Peninsular Florida
and also from near Myrtle Beach and Little River, South Carolina, is
given on table 4.
Tentative correlation of Pleistocene deposits.-A tentative cor-
relation of the Pleistocene deposits discussed in this paper is presented
in table 5. The relations of some of the beds are not certainly known.
For instance, the fauna near Punta Gorda (station 14160) may be
younger than indicated. However, the correlations are offered as
the best now available.









TABLE


4-LIST


PLEISTOCENE


SPECIES


FL


Helisomo
Physa sI
Acteocinc
Acteon p
Bulla sti
Terebra
Terebra


scalare


(Jay)


canaliculata


)unctostria


riata


dislocate
protexta


(S


:tus C.
guiere
(Say)
Conrad


Terebra concava (Say)


Mangelia cerina


"Drillia"
Conus pA
Conus p
Conus f
Olivella


ygmaeu
roteus


H,


tloridanus
mutica S


Oliva sayana Ravenel .....-......................


.Aarginella .~pic
Marginella mint
Marginella bella
Fasciolaria distf


Fasciolaria
Fasciolaria


ina
ia


Conrad


mns


er ............................... ...............


Lamarck
ea Kiener
Linnaeus


Cantharus cancellarius


Cantharus


(Cot


Conrad


11


ra -.


, r,, ..S.S....*g...* I.......... .l
..s...e..............S....a...........o..e....


Kurtz and


-dam s ..-........................


Stimpson


S. .......
X


I X


X
R

- R -
R


..... .........
X


WESTERN


.. ..... ........
I.-~ oD owm
K. - S......i


..............
.. 0**-- ...
yl. 51- .* 0-l


0*


.... S- .....


- ............


..............
...............


X


" X "



X
.............S.




....... ....... S
xi
x
x
- ..............
....*... *55...
K
...............


'""X""
...... .........


IDE


A

a..... .**.*....


........o..... -.. .......


- X


X


-.......... .....
X


x
x
X-
X
X'
.. .. .. .


..I.I.... .....


* -. . --


* ..I... .....I.


TERN


A


X


X

............

S..............


........a-....


.............. -
* ...........
((11So
.... .... ... S


......... -a.


e.*!fflbt


8
1
0
a







...............
.... ....
...... 0..






......... .....


..
..
fel


a

*........ .5....

....... S..~..
* C 0 passes -


av)
B. A


Brul


Green .... ............ .................-.
wass ...........................................
Gabb .......................... ................


Meni
Pfeiff


giganta
tulipa


tinctus


*


-


Mangelia plicosa Adams -,............. ..........................
Mangelia cerinella Dall ..................................... ....






Busycon p.
Bu&ycon p
Meldngena


yrii Dil
erversum
corona


Iwyn
(Lir


Smelin


Alectrion acuta Say ......-..................................................
Alectrion vibex (Say) ...................................
Columbella rusticoides Heilprin .............................
Anachis avara Say ..................................................,
Anachis obesa C. B. Adams ................................
Mirella lunata (Say) ............ .....................................

Muricidea ostrearum Conrad ..................... .............
Urosalpinx perrugatus Conrad .-....-........................
Urosalpinx tampainsis Conrad .....................................
Eutpleura caudata Say ........................................
-Cymatium aquatilis Reeve .............................................
Cerithiopsis subulata Montagu .....................................
Pyramidella, I or more sp. ..........................................*****
Turbonilla, 1 or more sp. ........... .......................
Odostomia, 1 or more sp. ... .....................................
Strombus pzigilis Linnaeus .....................................
Scala frielei Dall ......................................................
Cerithium muscarum Say ........................................
Cerithilum algicolum C. B.' Adams ...........................


Modulus
Caecum r
Rissoina
Rissoina
Rissoa ((
Crepidula
Crepidula
Polinices
Natica ca
Diodora c
Tectonatic
Teinoston
Nucula pf
Nuculana


floridanus Conrad .......................................
,egulare Carpenter .........................................
chesnelii Michaud ..........................................
laevigata (C. B. Adams) ................
Onoba) callistrophia Dall var .....................


c onvexa


plana Say ..............
duplicatus Say ........
nrena (Linnaeus) ..
zlternata (Say) ......
:a pusilla (Say) ....
a cryftospira Verrill


rox
ac


..


I


I


t


m aeus) ................................


X
X
X
x


X
x
x
X
X
- ......... .... a
X


..... ..... x x
S...... ..... .......... .. ...... ........ ................


S............... ................ x ................


X
x
x
X
R
X
X


............... x
. .....*......a...


X


....---....-. ....... .-.. ....


.---..a-a-; --.- -I


X


X
....--....................... ax
-..-a. ~...... ......- ...........a -x
-......... aa- .... ... .... a .... x


a. a ......... a .... ...- .......a......
..............- .................. -a- ..... -.
. .... ... .. -. .. .... . ... ..... a. .. .. .. .. C. -


imCa Say ............................................
-uta (Conrad) .............................................


X
)r


* .a..- ...........


*.-a.*--a ............


... ... .. S .. -





-- -....-.........


I....... x -
X
x


* - a a . a. - .



"X"
* .................

x
-.aaa..------
N


.. .. .. .I...... .. I.. .....a... .. I..a...... ...


i. ........ aa......- -.aaa....-..


.:......... .
*.............-.a


E::::"x:::::
* .....~nq.. ce a.


*5***.*.**..... n

- X. .


S......... .....


* ~a.. aa a -


X X
X X

............... X


.."C"........... -. ......


-.-..-. ..... I.....a...- ..a..........


.X"" IX -


X
x


Y


I .........


............


aaa.."...a..... a .*.***a*


....-...........


. . .. I . ...
""X ""i^i;^


..... ..


* a a a. a.. a. a a a.-... a
*. **. ... .. ..a ..a.. *a.... *....aa.a.a..a........a... .. a.. .


-a. -a a
* - -............ - a
- - .-----------.... -
- - ------------------. a
-- a a. a a a C *


......-..-......


.... .a. a .... ..............
* a....-.* ..-----------.---.-*..*.****..*


........... ............ .............


.....a.a ..-..-- .. ......a..*....a.a a...'


........----------a................


1.... .-..... ..... ........a .. X
............... ............... X


_


..... .....
KX


4
hi


I


I...............


.1


1


I]


|


!


V


I
I

\









TABLE


4-LIST


PLEISTOCENE


SPECIES- (Continued)


Glycymeris pectin
SArca secticostata


Arca transverse Say
Eontia ponderosa (


a


iata Gmelin
Reeve ......


Say)


Eontia ponderosa (Say
Atrina rigida Dillwyn
Ostrea virginica Gmeli
Ostrea gr. 0. equestris
Pecten (Chlarnys) gibb
Anomia simplex D'Orl


Modiolaria


Mytilus s
Modiolus


lateralis


exustus L;
dem issues


Polymesoda


Plicatula gibbosa La
Cardita floridana Co
Cardita dominguensis


.?r -


r .k. ....a.a..a....-....a* a... -a-...


Linnaeus


m ......a..................... ..-...-....


amarck
Dillw)


rI...~r~r~rl...... a Ca... ...etn.....t.....n...tt -tS-


mark


D'


Phacoides multilineatus
Phacoides amiantus Dall


: Pkacoides
Phacoides


Phacoides


nassulus


...Sa.a............a.. aa.......... a a *


'Orbigny
Tuomey


Conrad


Pensylvanicus
pecrinatus Gn


SI


nrad ................. ..*.a ...... ..........


Holmes


Linnaeus


elien
pengle


TER


X
...............
X


.. R...... ... -
R


* .............
X
R
X


- U)
E
$4


T-l (0
`O 4,
q.4=
9.Y


......*
.. ... a.a....
X


-.-... ... a .......
a. a. a. aa ........
*........... a. -


I.....


... ........ ...
X
a... ....aa...a.

* aaa------- -----


S-.
rt r
co~
E "
O~o



ua
-
cnS^
-U)-


X
x
x
X
X


X
x


a......-...... -......-.......... ... a -^ ... *- .- --- -. I S -- -- .... a .a-


r a--..........---------- a... .---a-aa
r-......... ............... ---------- -


Phacoides radian Conrad ........-............ ................ -...-.


----------f".
............ a


--------------
- ..-.... a -a .....
.... ....... -


ID E


S- -
V
oo<
?'-

-E g


Illw J Bl)ln
* a X ... -. .....
-. a. ....a .. a.. a
X
- *............. a
......aa..a. a......
*a* ... ...e. a....


X
..............
X
**aaa.a...... -
X


-- a a


V
I 3 -l


* a ... a. -......- -
............S...

a........-... ....
..... .. .. .


...a..... .......
* a.a ..... .... -
... S. - ..... - -


. X..... ...
x.... .....


-------..--
.... ......


A S T


-I-

*0 -
I-I



0% -f
'tO

-CM
Cu 0
d- U3


a. ......


X
X............


X


---.-----------
..... a - a
** **-**0...-'


0

So!I
-q


X



X
X
X
w~X oobo


.-.-............
II.IIIII OoO O
111(g


X
...............


- a.- a a a S a -.-


(
t


O..
\o
0
~I-.
CT


.. ^r -**


x
x
.. .... aa..
X
......-..


X
X.........
X


... .....a. ...


S......


a


......... aas
a..a-......-...
... ..... -...
a.......
..........a..
X
... .....-. C.
a .. a-- a e.
a a. .
-aa- --.a- --a---*
- a ... ... a a.
- e a S -. a .a


muricatus


---------------


. \







Lusina chrysostoma (Meuschen) ........ ................ ...
uina floridana Conrad ............-......................... X
Codakia orbicularis- Conrad ..-.-----...... -.......... ....................--..
Sportella constricta Conrad .....-........................-.. R
S portella protexta Conrad ............-............................. ...............
DiPlodonta aff. D. caloosaen sis Dall ....................... .......-
Divaricella quadrisulcata D'Orbigny ....................., ..............


Cardium
Cardium
Cardium
Laericar


Smuricatum Linnaeus ........................ ...
robustum Solander ...................
isocardia Linnaeus ..................................,....
"dium mortoni Conrad .................................


Dosinia elegans tConrad ................................................
Dosinia discus Reeve ....a......-..... .-....-............ -
Anomalocardia caloosana Dall .............*....................
Anomalocardia cuneimeris Conrad ...............................
Transennella conradiaa Dall .......................................
Callocardia cf. C. sayana Dall -...........*............-...........
Parastarte friquetra Conrad .................. ....-.................


Gemma gemma purpurea Lea ....
Macrocallista nimbosa Solander
Chione canccllata Linnaeus ........
Venus campechiensis Gmelin ....
Tellina alternate Say ....................
TelUna sayi (Deshayes) ............
Angulus versicolor Cozzens ......
Tellina similis Sowerby ..........
Tellna mera Say -...........1.........
Tellina suberis Dall .....................
Angulus sybariticus Dall ............
Semele proficua Poulteney ........
Tellidora cristata Recluz ........
Tagelus divisus Spengler .........
Spisula fragilis Gmelin ............
Mulinia lateralis Sav .....................


- a ad ...a C a .... a a......... a ..


............. a. ...........
a.................... a -a. a-. -....


* a ...1.... -a .. aa.a .a


X
x
x
x
x
x

x
Ix



x
x


X
X
Rx
x

R


...............
x


" ...... .I a


... -


...... I.....


... ... ....
x


...*..a.. . ..a a.a.-. .aa- a


-......-a..-....a..


x
'C


x
x


X
x


x
X
X
.X


x
x
x
'C


""I "" --l, b 11- - i
. a. a *.aa..... ...... ......
a- a. *a a..a- .. 'a..... a aaa


* .... -.. -...
XI
*** ** ** f W


...... ...


X


x
x1
xr


X
X


X
x
x
x
x
x
x


..... .......
*A


S. .......a....
... a aa a a .. a a


*.... .... a ..a
... .... a... a
* a a- a a -a ...
... -- .. a.- ..


..a... a
r


a ... a.
X


... ........


I


X
* .a aa a- a a


1.......-a...
... -....-.a.a .a...


....... .....
A


I... ............



X





. .. .. .. . .. .. a -
x
x
x
x
X



"X


A
X


'X "


X
X


I.......................


a--..*... i..a*...
.......aaa.*.a...


a. a a.aa .-..a....


x













X
X


......-- .


a. ... ... .- a

* a a - -


xl


x
....a.... .a.-a*,


.... Oa**

........
X


*I -.........-
x
x
X
A


X
x
N
x
....--...






. .. ... -



X
X
.........


- -a.....


X
X

- a ... ...... ...
* a-aaaa.a a a a..
.. aaaSaa..


111111*
* a a a a aa -a a


::::::::::::::::::::::::--::::.:::::.................*.* ** .:


a
*


x
x


t


--








TABLE


4-LIST


PLEISTOCENE


SPECIES


(Continued)


MtdEiia
Erviw


lateralis cc
conzcntrica


,rbuloides
Gould


Corbula barrattiana C.


Rangia cuneata


Barnea


Gray


(Scobina)


c


Anatina canlicuzlata


Dentalium sp
Acanthochites


Reeve


s.at.-.a...._5*.-..a..e..a.. e.a.....t..


B. Addams -----...


e^o


FL


TERN


X
-t e


*u


S5

3- 0


* a .-- - e

-------- a -a


S- s ..a a.........aa..as... aa.... -e -. -- a e. -~ a a.... .. .


ostata
Say


spiculosus


(Linmaeus)


Reeve


IDE


-- -
S -r
yl0
^j


X as.. as - .ss .as-. -. a
X a a -
. : ...... I X


X
x
x
X
1


A S


a,

-S -
-'to
o-U ,


1..-. ...

........ 5af a.
-


T E R


X I
a X. -


a-- s ---5.. -- -.- a a


d "S
rl j-j


....... .a
an - a -


Abundant
Occurrence


seen-


cited


* - - - -'I a s s .a s a 5 ~ a a s s a 0 5
............ .. -.-aa -a aa a..a a as a - .
I~I
* a.* ass-son. i.- -* .-.ta .- .a a caaesssaa. a..e.... etaa as see as.ae.a..a..
....... --- --------- ------- - - --- -- -


ft
>





TABLE


.--TENTATIVE-


CORRELATION


THE


PLEISTOCENE


DEPOSITED


FLORIDA


Pamlico


and
beds


formation


equivalent


Fort Thompson
formation


Bed at
Sanford


WEST


Beds


on North


SIDE


Creek
r ^t A l


Beds


exposed


6 miles south of Fort Myers
(station 14202); probably contempo-


raneous.


Beds exposed


aind
beds


between
exposed


younger than


Exposures 2
Punta Gorda


below and
Fort Denau


Sf

(


below Label
those above.


miles
(stati(


above
d and
lie ma


Labelle
Alva;
.v be


northeast
on 14160).


EAST


Beds expo
Melbourne
West Palr
(station 11


)sed


n


SIDE


8 miles


(station 14201)
Beach Canal


southwest


and along


1138).


Beds -exposed


typical.
14196);
.probabl-


bed of
Buffalo
y nearly


kT


lear La4
Sanford
Bluff (


Monroe
(station


:station .14192)


contemporaneous.


(
L
5(,


S(


:e


n





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-IBULLETIN EIGHTEEN


DESCRIPTIONS AND DISCUSSIONS OF UPPER TER-
TIARY SPECIES, ESPECIALLY OF THE BUCK-
INGHAM LIMESTONE, AND OF PLEISTOCENE
SPECIES OF FLORIDA
CANCELLARIA (OANCELLABIA) of. C. TABULATA Gardner and Aldrioh
Plate 1, figure 11
The material consists of an incomplete external mold showing only
the upper part of the original shell.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buickingiham limestone, station 14184,
lower bed, right bank of the Caloosahatchee River, about 3 miles above
Alva.
Cancellaria tabulata is restricted to the upper Miocene.
CANCELLARIA (OANOELL.ARIA?) aff. 0. VENUSTA Tuoiney and Holmes
The material consists of an internal mold and an incomplete
external mold. The external mold is larger than that of Cancellaria
venusta, a Pliocene species, and in that feature may indicate a closer
relationship to C. propevenusta Mansfield, an upper Miocene species.
Occurrence.-B-uckingham limestone, station 14184, lower bed in
right bank of Caloosahatchee River, about 3 miles above Alva.
DORSANUM? of. D. ? P-ICATILUMI (B'se)
Plate 1, figure 4
Dlorsanmi? plicalilun (Bise) is believed to occur in beds not
younger than upper Miocene. The material consists of an incomplete
external mold.
Horizon and occurrence(.-Iiuckingham limestone, station 13927,
Buckingham.
TURRITEILLA aff. T. CARTAGENENSIS Pilabry and Brown
Plate 1, figures 2, 12
Turritella 'cartagenensis Pilsbry and Brown"" came from the
neighborhood of Cartagena, Colombia, South America. The speci-
mens' at hand may have coarser sculpture than T. cartagenensis, but
evidently they show some relationship to it. The spiral sculpture
consists of fine lines alternating witti secondary threads.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone, station 14078,
in place, one-half mile above Alva; station 14184, in place, right bank
of Caloosahatchee River across from Floweree Grove, about three
miles' above Alva; station 14194, dredged from the Caloosahatchee
River 200 yards, more or less, above Olga bridge; station 14075,
dredgings from Caloosahatchee River, one mile below Olga.





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


TURAITELLA of. T. PONTONI Mansfield
Plate 1, figures 3, 8
Turritella pontoni Mansfield was described from a sand of upper
Miocene age at a locality 42 miles west of Miami, Florida. The
material consists of rather poorly preserved large specimens. A
carina is present on the lower third of each whorl and the whorl is
less depressed medially than the specimen referred to T. aff. 7'. carla-
genensis Pilsbry and Brown.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone; quite common
at Buckingham; station 14075, dredged from the Caloosahatchee
River, one mile below Olga.
TURRITELLA BUOKRINGHAMENSIS Manfiteld, n. sp.
Plate 1, figure 1
Shell large, moderately slender, and strongly sculptured spirally.
The sculpture consists of 5 primary nodulated spirals. The upper
two spirals and the one above the basal spiral are of about equal
strength and stronger than the others; the medial one, which lies at
the constriction of the whorl, and the basal one are also of about the
same strength. A secondary spiral lies between the posterior two
and the medial one. The species is described from a silicified anterior
end of a shell.
Holotype (U. S. Nat. 'Mus. No. 497966) measures: length of frag-
ment, 40 millimeters; diameter, 17 millimeters.
Type locality.-Station 11175, Buckingham, Lee County, Florida.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone, upper Miocene;
fairly common at type locality; station 11742, Alva, Caloosahatchee
River, in place in the river bank; poorly preserved molds but probably
belong to this species; station 14075, dredged from Caloosahatchee
River, one mile below Olga; station 14184, lower bed across' from
Flowerec Grove, about three miles above Alva; station 14190, dredged
from Caloosahatchee River, about half a mile above Olga bridge.
The new species is related to Turritella burden Tuomey and
Holmes from the Duplin marl and to 7'. apicalis tensa Dall, reported
as a Pliocene Caloosahatchee species. In size it more closely re-
sembles the upper Miocene species. The figured holotype of Turri-
tella apicalis tensa, (Cat. No. 113461) is unlike other specimens in the
Pliocene Caloosahatchee marl and may have come from a somewhat
lower horizon. It is reported to occur on Caloosahatchee River, but
no place on the river is given. The specimens from station 14184,
across the river from Floweree Grove, are more closely related to T.
apicalis tensa, but in the new species the medial constriction is deeper.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN'I


TURRITELIJA APOALIS Heilprin
Plate Il,: ligtres 9, 10
Tu:rritella apicalis HeilpritVy occurss alibundantly 'in the Plio'cene
along Calodsahatchee River and at Shell Creek.
A number of 'specimens of Turritella apicalis Heilprin were
dredged from the Caloosahatchee River a quarter to a half mile
(stations 14194 and 14190) above Olgla. T'le matrix in which the
external m1olds occur consists of a dark gray, porous limestone having
a few miolds of Chione ulocyma.
The occurtrence of 'this Turrilella strongly indicates a Pliocene
fauna associated with reworked upper Miocene species.

NUOULANA, ap. indetorminate
'The material consists of internal molds. The molds' represent
larger shells than species referred to Nucilana acula. Conrad from the
Pliocene Caloosahatchee. The preservation of the material does not
warrant speccilic determination, but apparently only one species is
represented.
Horizon and occurrence.--1uckinghani limestone, station 11792,
exposed at low tidel at Alva, Caloosahatchee River; station 13927,
Buckingham; station 14184, across the Caloosahatchee River fromii
Floweree Grove; station 14078, in place in bank of Caloosahatchee
River half a mile above Alva.
NAVICUI.A OCCIDENTALIS Philippi?
The material consists of one poorly preserved internal mold whose
specific determination is questionable.
Horizon and occurrence.-c 3uckinglhami limestone; station 13927,
Buckingham.
NAVICULA UMBONATA Lamarok?
The material consists of four internal molds of soft argillaceous
limestone with phosphlatic grains.
Horizon and occurrence.-lBuckingiham limestone; station 11742,
exposed at low tide in bank of Caloosahatchee River at Alva.
AROA LIENOSA Say
Arca lienosa Say ranges in time from upper Miocene to the Plio-
cene.
Horizon and occurrence.-lBuckingham limestone; station 13927,
Buckingham; station 14184, lower bed in the section on Caloosahatchee
River across from Floweree Grove; station 14190, dredged from
Caloosahatchee River half a mile above bridge at Alva.




NOTES ON UPIER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOkLUSKS


AROA (OUNEAROA) 60ALARIS Conrad, variety?
Plate 3, figure 6
Area. (Cincairca) scalaris Conrad is believed to occur in;- beds not
younger than upper Miocene.
The material consists of internal and external molds. All the
molds' represent a much smaller shell than /Irca (Cunearca) scalarina
I-.eilprin, a Pliocene species. The form appears to be the same as
that occurring in an upper Miocene sand along the Tamiami Trail at
a locality 42 miles west of Miami, listed by Mansfield."
HJoriaon (and occurrence. tl- uckingham limestone; station 13927,
Buckingham; station 14184, lowest bed exposed in right bank of
Caloosahatchee River across from Floweree Grove; station 14078,
right bank of Caloosahatchee River half a mile above Alva; station
11742, exposed at low tide at Alva; station 14075, dredged from the
Caloosahatchee River one mile below Olga.
ABCA DELANDENSIS Mansfield, n. ep.
Plate 4, figures 4, 8
Shell thin, elongate, rather low, ne.irly equivalve, inequilateral;
posterior end slightly more expanded than anterior end. Beaks low,
medially depressed, and situated at about the anterior third of hinge
line. Ribs 35 to 37, including 2 finer ribs adjacent to the anterior
a11rgin, slightly wider than interspaces, nearly flat on right valve and
slightly rounded on left valve, and weakly crenulated on anterior side.
Cardinal area narrow, marked by 2 angular grooves which meet under
the beak. Hinge line nearly straight. Base widely rounded.
Cotypes (U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 352281) measure: Right valve,
length 31 millimeters; height, 20 millimeters; diameter, 8 millimeters.
Left valve, length 27 millimeters; height, 18 millimeters; diameter,
8 millimeters.
Type locality.-DeLand, Volusia County, Florida.
1Iorizon.-Pliocene, Caloosahatchee marl.
Other occurrences.-Florida: Sta. 5010, DeLeon Springs (1
Valve); ?Sta. 5019, Orange City, North Carolina: Sta. 3931, Cronley;
Sta. 13156, Walkers Illuff, Cape Fear River (this form appears closer
to the new species than to A. plicatura Conrad).
Area delandensis has been referred previously to A. transvcrsa
Say,! a Pleistocene and Recent species. It differs from the latter,
however, in having a thinner and lighter shell, a less expanded
posterior end, a more rounded base line, a longer hinge line, and a
leys anterior beak. The thinness of. the shell of the new species


149




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


approaches that of specimens from Simmons Bluff, S. C., a Pleisto-
cene species referred to A. transversa.
A. "subsinutita" Conrad, /A plicatura Conrad, and A. delandensis
i:. sp., all from the Pliocene, are closely related. A comparison of
these species indicates that A. subsinuala is usually larger and more
elongate; A. plicatura shorter and more rounded with a rather high
beak; and A. delandensis thinner with a rather low beak. However,
at sonc localities, the forms appear to intergrade and it is uncertain
where to place them.

OSTREA MERIDIONALIS Heilprln
Ostrea meridionalis Heilprin, Trans. Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Philadelphia, vol.
1, pp. 100, 101, figs. 35, 35a, 1887.
The type locality of Ostrea meridionalis Heilprin is believed to be
in the "marl" banks below Thorpe's, probably somewhere above or
below Alva. Dall considered 0. mneridionalis a synonym of 0.
sculpturata Conrad. 1 am unable to decide to which of these species
some of the small specimens should he assigned. Osireea meridionalis
is a very large and heavy shell and resembles 0. haitensis Sowerby,
and for that reason has been, in some instances, mistaken for it.
Horizon and occurrence.-IluckinghaiIj limestone; station 13927,
Buckingham; also along the Caloosahatchee River at the following
places:-station 4997, in place about 1 mile above Caloosa; station
11742, exposed at low tide at Alva; station 11173, in place about 2.8
miles cast of Alva; station 13928, dredged half a mile below Alva.
OSTREA DISPABILIS Conrad
Ostrea disparilis Conrad, in localities outside of Florida, is be-
lieved not to occur above the upper Miocene.
Horizon and occurrence.-Bttuckingham limestone; station 13927,
Buckingham. The following localities are along the Caloosahatchee
River: station 14076, one mile above 'Olga (dredged); station 14077,
two miles above Olga (dredged); station 14075 (dredged), one mile
below Olga; station 13928, a half mile below Alva (dredged); station
14078, half a mile above Alva (in plate).

PECTEN (PECTEN) OOCL00G1KOEEiNSIS LEENSIS Mansfield, nt. sub.p
Plate 2, figures 3; Plate 4, figure 9.
Left concave valve rather deeply concave throughout except for
the lateral margins, which are bevelled. Ears large, equal, bent back-
ward in harmony with the convexity of the disk; marked by one
incised radial, and crossed by closely spaced lamellae. Submargins




NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


rounded and without radials. Ribs 13 to 16 (15 on the cotype) in
number, all lying in the concavity, nearly flat over the early and mid-
die part of the disk and very gently concave distally, with flat inter-
spaces twice as wide as the ribs. Whole surface marked by very
closely spaced concentric lamellae.
Right convex valve not entire, evenly rounded. Ears bent down-
ward, marked only by growth structures. Disk with about 19 nearly
flat, smooth ribs, (the three on the lateral side being weaker), distally
widening, separated by narrower spaces.
Cotypes (U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 497982) measure: Left valve,
length 63 millimeters; height, 56 millimeters. Right valve, height 44
millimeters; convexity about 12 millimeters.
Type localily.-Station 13927, Buckingham, Lee County, Florida.
The new subspecies is closely related to Peceln (Pcctcn)'ochlock-
oneensis Mansfield from the upper Miocene of Florida. The left
valve of the new subspecies has a deeper convexity than the species,
and the right valve has wider ribs, which show a little less tendency
to bifurcation. The concentric lamellae on the new subspecies are
also finer.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone, upper Miocene.
Abundant at type locality; Station 14075, dredged from Caloosa-
hatchee River one mile below Olga. The specimen from the follow-
ing stations are related but may not be the same. Station 13409, 16
to 18 miles south of Immokalee, Collier County (2 left valves, less con-
cave); Station 12923, 18 miles south of Immokalee (1 left valve less
compressed); Station 11180, Tamiami Trail at Carnestown, Collier
County (fragment); Station 11176, about 11 miles east by north of
Marco, Collier County (fragment).
PBOTEN (PECTEN?) WENDELLI OLGENSIS Mansfield, n. subsp.
Plate 2, figures 1, 2, 4
Shell small, low, nearly equivalve and equilateral. Ears large, the
right being deeply sinuate. Right valve with 15 rounded, roughened
ribs of nearly uniform size; left valve slightly higher in the umbonal
area than right valve, with 14 rounded ribs; two weaker ribs alternate
with a single stronger rib.
Holotype with attached valves (U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 497970)
measures: length, 22 millimeters; height, 22 millimeters; diameter, 7.4
millimeters'.
Type locality.-Station 14077, dredged from the Caloosahatchee
River, 2 miles above Olga.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL 'SURVEY--IULLETIN EIGHTEEN "


Horizon and occurrence.-Pliocene?; station 14076, dredged one
mile above Olga and station 14194 a quarter of a mile above Olga.
The new subspecies is closely allied to Peccen wendelli Tucker
from the Pliocene Caloosalatchee marl at Fort Denaud and at Shell
Creek, but is larger than the latter species and has more rounded ribs.
The right valve of P. wendelli has sharper primary ribs', which are
usually intercalated with a finer rib, whereas the left valve usually
has three instead of two weaker ribs between a stronger rib oil either
side.
Both PecIen wendeClli and the new subspecies differ from. P.
leonensis Manslield, a known Miocene species, in having a less inflated
right valve and a higher left valve and in the character of the radials.
The new subspecies appears to intergrade the known Miocene and
Pliocene species.
The original of figure 8, plate 4 of Tucker probably should be
referred to Peelen wendelli and not to P. leonensis, and( her figure 9.
plate 4 appears to be incorrectly identified. The illustration of this
form indicates that it may be closely related to the new subspecies P.
wendelli olgensis.
One small right valve collected at Walkers Bluff," Cape Fear River
(station 13156) appears also to be more closely related to the new
subspecies olgensis than to Pecien leonensis. The matrix adhering
to the new subspecies consists of a limey clay and phosphatic grains.
This group may be nearer the sublgenus Chlamys than the subgenus
Pecten.
PECTEN (CHLAMYS) CALOOSENSIS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 3, figures 1, 3
Chlamys (I'laWioctenium) comlarilis (Tuomey and H-lolies) partt, Tuckcr.-
Rowland, Mus. royale historic nat. Belgique Md6., Dcuxicmie sdrie, 'asc. 13,
p. 43, pl. 4, fig. 14 Lnot pl. 3, fig. 11]. 1938.
Shell rather small, suborbicular, nearly equivalve and slightly in-
equilateral; posterior region more produced. Both valves with about
20 high, narrow, flat-topped, squarish ribs, separated by spaces a little
wider than the ribs. Ears rather large, marked by 4 to 5 faint radials.
Submargins without radials. Concentric sculpture of fine, closely
spaced lamellae.
Cotypes (U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 479979) measure: Right valve,
length 48 millimeters; height, 49 millimeters; diameter, 15 millimeters.
Left valve, length 47 millimeters'; height, 47 millimeters; diameter, 14
millimeters.
Type locality.-Station 14075, dredged. from Caloosahatchee River,
1 mile below Olga.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone, upper Miocene.




NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


Section 13927, Buckingham, Lee County; station 13928, dredged,
from Caloosahatchee River a half mile below Alva; station 14077, 2
miles above Olga; station 14076, 1 mile above Olga; station 4997, in
place 1 mile above Caloosa.
This species is related to Pecten comparilis Tuomey and Holmes,
a known Miocene species, differing from the latter in having 2 or 3
fewer ribs and sculptured with finer concentric lamellae. It differs
from P. everglculensis Mansfield in having a less expanded shell and
narrower and higher ribs.
The new species from the Buckingham limestone at Buckinghan
and elsewhere, as noted above, is somewhat similar to but not identical
with specimens from South Carolina that I consider typical of
"Chlamys (Plagiocteniutm) comparilis (Tuomey and Holmes)."
Tucker-Rowland ""' designated a left valve from Buckingham,
Fla., as the neoholotype of "Chlamys (Plagioctenium) comparilis
(Tuomey and Holmes)."
The present practice is to select a neoholotype front the original
locality of the species, and it would conform more nearly with the
rules of zoological nomenclature to select a specimen from South
Carolina rather than from Florida. Therefore, I designate a right
valve in the U. S. National Museum under the Catalogue No. 11447
from South Carolina identified by R. P. Whitfield as "Pecten com-
parilis Tuomey and Holmes." The matrix on this specimen is the
same as on other fossils from "Smiths Goose Creek," Berkeley
County, S. Car. Although no specific locality is recorded for the
specimen n by Tuomey and Holmes it probably came from the Goose
Creek locality. It agrees in detail with the original illustration of a
right valve of Tuomey and Holmes species.

PECTEN (OHLAMYB) EBOREUS BUOKINGHAMENSIS Mansfield, n. mubp.
Plate 3, figures 4, 5, 8
Shell rather large, moderately inflated, nearly equivalve and nearly
equilateral. Left valve weakly depressed in its posterior area. Ribs
about 18 in number on each valve, nearly flat or very slightly rounded,
smooth except for moderately coarse concentric growth lines, rather
wide-about as wide as interspaces. Ears with faint radials crossed
by fine, closely spaced lamellae.
Holotype, attached valves, (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 497972) measures:
Length, 90 millimeters; height, 84 millimeters; diameter, 25 milli-
meters.
Type locality.-Station 13927, Buckingham, Lee County, Florida.
Some topotypes are larger than the holotype. This subspecies





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


differs from Pecten (Chlamys) eboreus solaroides Heilprin in lacking
interradials, which are present especially on the left valve of the
Pliocene species.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone, upper Miocene;
type locality (abundant); station 11742, Alva, in place; station 4996,
2 miles above Caloosa, in place; station 13928, dredged half a mile
below Alva; station 14078, half a mile above Alva, in place; station
14077, dredged 2 miles above Olga; station 14075, dredged 1 mile
below Olga; station 14184, right bank of Caloosahatchec River, lower
bed, across' from Floweree Grove, about 3 miles above Alva.
PECTEN (NODIPECTEN) NODOSUS rPLORIDENSIS Tucker and Wilson
Pecten (Lyropeclen) lititeri floridensis Tucker and Wilson, Bull. Am.
Paleontology, vol. 18, p. 43, pl. 8, fig. 6, 1932.
Type locality.-Buckingham, Florida.
A number of specimens were collected by the writer and F. S.
MacNeil from the type locality. The subspecies floridensis appears
to be more closely related to Pecten (Nodipecten) nodosus Linnaeus
than to Pecten pittieri Dall. The ribs are wider, more quadrate in
section, and usually less' nodose than on P. nodosus, but some left
valves show quite strong nodes on the ribs.
Pecten (Nodipecten) pittieri collierensis Mansfield from the
Tamiami limestone is more closely related to P. pittieri than to P:
nodosus.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone; Buckingham
station 14075, dredged from the Caloosahatchee River, one mile below
Olga, fragment which may "be the subspecies floridensis.
.IIMA (MANTE-LL.M) CAROLINENSIS Dall
Plate 2, figure 6,
Linw (Mantellum) carolinensis Dall occurs in the Duplin marl of
the Carolinas and in the Cancellaria zone of Florida, both of upper
Miocene age.
'Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone, station 13927,
Buckingham, Florida (two valves).

ANOMIA SIMPLEX D'Orbigny
Anomia simple. D'Orbigny occurs in deposits ranging from the
upper Miocene to the Recent.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckinghanm limestone, Buckingham,
Florida, and at a number of localities' along the Caloosahatchee River
referred to the Buckingham limestone.





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


PLACUNANOMIA PLICATA Tuomey and Holmes
Plate 3, figure 9, 10
Placunanom.ia plicata Tuomey and Holmes occurs in the upper
Miocene in the Carolinas and in Florida.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone, station 14194,
dredgings from Caloosahatchee River, 200 yards more or less above
Olga bridge, Lee County, Florida. Only one specimen with attached
valves was collected. The matrix consists of a light-colored lime-
stone containing impressions of Chione ulocyma Dall.
Tucker and Wilson 3" described a new species of Placunanomia,
P. aclinica, from Acline, Florida. As there are at least two different
horizons of fossiliferous deposits in the vicinity of Acline, the exact
horizon of their species is unknown. The plications on the figured
valve of Tucker and Wilson indicate that it is' closely related to P.
plicata Tuomey and Holmes.
PODODESMUS BURNS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 4, figures 1, 3, 5, 6
Shell large, thick, elongate-ovate, subequilateral and equivalve.
The right valve being weakly inflated and the left weakly concave
medially. Exterior of valves not plicated but marked by faint radials
on the middle part of the valves, these radials' becoming very obscure
distally. The left valve has stronger radials than the right. Byssal
scar on right valve large; byssal area on left valve nearly flat and
marked with faint radials which are bounded below by a strong knob.
Auricular crura on right valve large, elongate, weakly curved, and
medially sulcated; byssal and adductor scars large,
Holotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 164569) measures: right valve,
length, 69 millimeters (lower margin broken); height, 94 millimeters;
left valve, length 69 millimeters; height 73 millimeters.
Type locality.-Station 3300, Shell Creek, Florida.
Horizon.-Probably Pliocene.
I have not seen this species outside of its type locality. Podo-
desmus decipiens Philippi, a living species, is much smaller and has
finer radial sculpture. The species is named after the collector, Frank
Burns.
THRACIA (CYATHODONTA) sp.
Two incomplete impressions of the interior of the original shells
were collected from dumps dredged from the Caloosahatchee River,
one from a small island half a mile above the bridge at Olga (station
14190), and the other one mile below Olga (station 14075). The





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--BULLETIN EIGHTEEN .


matrices of both are the same and contain exterior molds of Chione
ulocyma Dall. The unnamed form may be related to Thracia
(Cyathodonta) gatunensis Toula, from the Gatun formation of the
Panama Canal zone, but it had a much larger shell than Toula's
species. This may be an undescribed form.
Horizon.-Buckingham limestone.

VENEZIOADIZA OLGA Mansfield, n. ap.
Plate 2, figure 5; Plate 3, figures 2, 7
Shell solid, robust, obliquely oblong, of, moderate size, equivalve
and inequilateral. Beaks full, high and strongly prosogyrate. Ribs
on right valve of cotype 17 in number, strong, elevated, weakly under-
cut, a little wider than the interspaces and strongly transversely
nodulated; the fourth rib counting from the dorsal margin on the
posterior side is weaker than the others and lies close to the posterior
one. Left valve of cotype immature, ormanented with 18 ribs; the
third and fourth, counting from the dorsal margin, are closely spaced,
and the rib in front of it is a little weaker than the others; the other
ribs over the disk are of the same strength.
Dimensions of cotypes (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 497976).-Right valve,
length 43 millimeters; height, 39 millimeters; diameter 24 millimeters;
left valve, posterior margin broken away; height, 28 millimeters; dia-
meter, 15 millimeters.
Type locality.-Station 14075, dredged from Caloosahatchec
River, one mile below Olga, Florida.
Horizon.-Probably Pliocene.
Altogether six valves were collected, of which five indicate that
they were taken from a sand and the other from an indurated lime-
stone similar to that on another piece from this place having a Chione
cancellata on it.
Venericardia. olga n. sp. is related both to Venericardia hadra Dall,
a species from the Chipola formation, and V. himerta Dall, a species
from the Oak Grove sand, but differs from both of these species in
having wider and stronger ribs, especially over the earlier part of the
shell. The new species somewhat resembles a varietal form of V.
laticostata Sowerby, a living species from Panama, but the posterior
side is less truncate and the ribs are higher than those of the varietal
form of laticostata.




NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


PHACOOI S OHBYTOSTOMA (Meouohen) Philppi
Phacoides chrysostowua (Meuschen) ranges in time from Mioceine
to the Recent.
Horizon and occurrence.-Buckinghani limestone; station 11175,
Buckingham. There are a few distorted internal molds from Buck-
ingham which are more elongate than others, but probably represent
the same species.
ANOMALOCARDIA HENDBIANA Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 1, figures 5, 6, 7
Shell small, thin, low elongate, equivalve and very inequilateral.
Anterior margin broadly rounded, posterior margin short and nar-
lowly rounded. Disk gently depressed radially in front of the
posterior shoulder, being more so distally. 'Umbo smooth, followed
by closely spaced, thin, nearly erect concentric lamellae. Distally
these lamellae are less closely but rather uniformly spaced. These
lamellae are subdued in the'depress'ed area idr: front of the rounded
posterior shoulder and intercalated by fine concentric threads over this
shoulder. Inner margin finely crenulate:
Holotype, left valve (U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 497980) measures:
Length, 15 millimeters; height, 10 millimeters; diameter, 2 milli-
meters.
Type locality.-Station 14081, left bank of Caloosahatchee River,
about 3 miles below Fort Denaud, Hendry County, Florida.
Horizon.-Pleistocene, Fort Thompson(?) formation.
The sculpture on Anomalocardia hendriana, n. sp. somewhat re-
sembles that on A. leptalea Dall, a species inhabiting salt lagoons in
the Bahamas, but in Dall's species the concentric sculpture is less
closely spaced, and the posterior end has a different shape.
The new species has a thinner shell, finer sculpture, and a lower
shell than the species occurring in place in the Pleistocene (Fort
Thompson formation) one-third mile above Labelle (station 11166)
or one-eighth of a mile below Labelle (station 11169).
Other occurrence: Station 11028, from bank of the canal one-
fourth mile above Goodno's Landing at Fort Thompson.
CHIONE CAN( ELLATA Linnaeus
Chione cancellata Linnaeus ranges from the Pliocene to the Recent.
Four valves of Chione cancellata were collected at Buckingham,
Florida, but the matrix adhering to these specimens consists of a
coarse sand, a matrix unlike that with other specimens from the main





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


part of the quarry. Consequently, these Chione came from the Plio-
cene or a later epoch. No specimens of Chione canccllata were col-
lected (only C. ulocyma Dall) at station 14184, in place, on the right
bank of the Caloosahatchee River, across from Floweree Grove, a
fauna referred to the Buckingham limestone. Chione cancellata and
C. ulocyma Dall were dredged from the Caloosahatchee River about
half a mile above Olga (station 14190), the former probably from
the Pliocene and the latter from Buckingham limestone.

CHIONE UVOoYMA Dall
Plato 4, figures 2, 7
Chione ulocyma Dall occurs in deposits' not younger than the upper
Miocene.
Horizon oan occurrence.-Buckinghamn limestone, station 13927,
Buckingham; quite common; station 14184, in place, in bank of
Caloosahatchee River across from Floweree Grove, quite common;
station 11742, exposed at low tide at Alva; station 14190, dredged
from Caloosahatchee River half a mile above Olga (station 14190),
;nd one mile below O(lga (station 14075).
ORIONE LATILIRATA ATHLETE Conrad
Chione latilirama ahllcta Conrad ranges' from the upper Miocene
to the Recent.
Horion and occurrence.-Buckingham limestone, station 14184,
Caloosahatchee River, across from Floweree Grove (1 fragment);
Buckingham limestone?, station 14194, dredged from Caloosahatchee
River, 200 yards more or less above Olga.





NOTES ON UPPER TERTIARY AND PLEISTOCENE MOLLUSKS


REFERENCES
1. Cookc, C. W., Geology of the Coastal Plain of Smoth Carolina: U. S.
Gcol. Survey Bull. 867, pp. 1-189, 19 pis., 1 fig., 1936. (a) p. 126.
2. ......................... and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida State
Geol. Survey 20th Ann. Rept., pp. 29-227, pls. 1-29, including geologic map
of Florida, 1929. (a) p. 152. (b) p. 161. (c) p. 212. (d) p. 147.
3. Dall, W. II., Contributions to the Tertiary fauna of Florida with especial
reference to the Miocene silex beds of Tampa and the Pliocene beds of
the Caloosahatchee River: Trans. WVagner Free Inst. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. 3,
6 pts., 1620 pp., 60 pis., 1890-1903. (a) pt. 6 p. 1604. (b) pt. 4 pl. 31,
figs. 14, 141. (e) pt. 6, pp. 1615, 1616. (d) pt. 6, p. 1604. (e) pt. 4, p. 686.
4. ...................., and Harris G. D., Correlation papers-Neocene. U. S. Geol.
Survey Bull. 84, pp. 1-349, 1892. (a) p. 147. (b) p. 132. (c) p. 143.
(d) p. 147. (e) p. 148. (f) p. 144.
5. MacNeil, F. Stearns, Species and genera of Tertiary Noctinac: U. S.
Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 189-A, 49 pp., 6 pls., 2 figs., 1938. (a) p. 22.
6. Mansfield, W. C., Pliocene fossils from limestones in southern Florida.
U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 170-D, pp. 43-56, pls. 14-18, March 23, 1932.
7. Manslield, W. C., A contribution to the late Tertiary and Quaternary
Paleontology of northeastern Florida: Florida State Geol. Survey 151h
Ann. Rept., pp. 25-51, 1924. (a) pp. 29-35. (b) pp. 37-40.
...................., and MacNeil, F. Stearns, Pliocene and Pleistocene mollusks
from the Intracoastal Waterway in South Carolina: IW/ashinton Acad.
Sci. Jour., vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 5-10, 1937. (a) p. 9.
9. Mansfield, W. C., Some Tertiary mollusks from southern Florida: U S.
Nat. Mus. Proc., vol. 79, art. 21, pp. 1-12, pis. 1-4, Oct. 9, 1931. (a) p. 6.
pl. 2, figs. 4, 5, 7; (b) p. 2.
10. Matson, G. C., and Clapp, F. G., A preliminary report on the geology of
Florida: Florida State Geol. Survey 2d Ann. Rept. for 1908-9, pp. 28-231,
1909. (a) p. 122. (h) p. 126. (c) pp. 128-133.
11. Pilshry, 11. A., and Brown, A. P., Oligocene fossils from the neighbor-
hood of Cartagena, Colombia, with notes on Haitian species: Acad. Nat.
Sci. Philadelphia Proc., pp. 32-41, pls. 5, 6, March 27, 1917. (a) pp. 34, 35.
pl. 5, fig. 13.
12. Tucker, H. T., and Wilson Druid, A list of species from Acline, Florida:
Indiana Acad. Sci. Proc., vol. 41, p. 357, 1932. (a) p. 357.
13. Tucker, 1H. 1., and Wilson, Druid, A second contribution to the Neogene
paleontology of south Florida: Bull. Am. Paleontology, vol. 18, pp. 65-76,
pls. 10-13, 1933. (a) p. 67, pl. 13, figs. 8, 9.
14. Tucker, 1-. I., The Atlantic and Gulf Coast Tertiary Pectinidac of tile
United States: Am. Midland Naturalist, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 471-490, pls. 1-4,
1936.
15. Tucker, H1. I., and Wilson, Druid, Some new or otherwise interesting
fossils from (the Florida Tertiary: Bull. Am. Paleontology, vol. 18, pp.
41-53, pls. 5-9, 1932. (a) p. 43, pl. 8, fig. 7. (b) p. 43.
16. Tucker-Rowland, H. T., The Atlantic and Gulf. Coast Tertiary Pectinidae
of the United States, pt. 3: Mus. royale histoire nat. Belgique Min.,
Duexieme serie, Fase. 13, pp. 76, 6 pls., 1938. (a) p. 43, pl. 4, iig. 14.
17. Richards, H. G., Marine Pleistocene of Florida: GeoL Soc. America Bull.,
vol. 49, pp. 1267-1296, 4 pls., 1 fig., 1938. (a) p 1289.





























































































I





















PLATES 1 4


Notes on the Upper Tertiary and Pleistocene
Mollusks of Peninsular Florida


[61.


__~_ _~






EXPLANATION OF PLATE 1

FIGURE 1. Tu:irritclla buckingthamensis Mansfield, n. sp.. holotype, x2.
Page 47.
FIGURES 2, 12. Tu"rrictlla aff. T. cartagencnsis Pilsbry and Brown, squeezes.
2, Station 14075, dredging from Caloosahatchee River, I
mile below Olga. U. S. Nat. Mus. 497962. xl. 12,
Station 14078, Caloosahatchee River, in place, one-half
mile above Alva. x3. U. S. Nat. Mus. 497963. Page 46.
FIGURES 3, 8. Turritclla aff. T. cartagenensis Pilsbry and Brown, squeezes.
14075, dredged from Caloosahatchee River, 1 mile below
*Olga. U. S. Nat. Mus. 497965. x3. 8, internal mold,
Station 13927, in the vicinity of Buckingham. U. S. Nat.
SMus. 497964. xl. Page 47.
FIGURE 4. Doirsantum? cf. D.? plicalilnm (Bose). Squeeze. Station
13927, vicinity of Buckingham. U. S. Nat. Mus. 497961.
x2. Page 46.
FIGUREs 5, 6, 7. Anomalocardia hendriana Mansfield, n. sp. 6, holotype. x2.
5, 7, paratypes, U. S. Nat. Mus. 497981. x3. Page 57.
FIGUREs 9, 10. Turritella apicalis Heilprin. Squeezes. Station 14190,
dredged from Caloosahatchee River, one-half mile above
Olga. U. S. Nat. Mus. 497967. 9, x2; 10, xl. Page 48.
FIGURE 11. Cancellaria (Cauccllaria) cf. C. labulata Gardner and
Aldrich. Squeeze. U. S. Nat. Mus. 497960. x3.
Page 46.


[62]





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


[63]


BULLETIN EIGHTEEN, PI.ATE1





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


[ 64]


BULLETIN EIGHTEEN, PLATE 2


















EXPLANATION OF PLATE 2


FIGURES 1, 2, 4. Pecten (Pecten?) wendelli olgensis Mansfield. n1. subsp. 1,
4, holotype. x3. 2, paratype, Station 14194, dredged from
Caloosahatchee River, one-fourth mile above Olga. U. S.
Nat. Mus. 497971. x2. Page 51.
FIGURE 3. Pcc/en -(Peclen) ochiockoNieC sis Iciensis Mansfield, n. subsp.
Right valve. xl. Page 50.
FIGURE 5. Vcnericardia olga Mansfield, n. sp. Left valve. x2.
Page 56.
FIGURE 6. Limna (Mannfellurn) carolinensis Dall. U. S. Nat. Mus. 497974.
xl. Page 54.


[65]














EXPLANATION OF PLATE 3

iIr;uES 1. 3. Pecten (Chlanys) caloosensis Mansfield, n. sp. Cotypes. xl.
Page 52.
FIURES 2, 7. 'lnericardia olga Mansfield, n. sp. Right valve. x2/3.
Page 56.
I(i;t'pr.s 4. 5, 8. P'ct'il' (Chlanvys) eboreus buckinyhaumensis Mansiield, n.
suibsp. 4, 5, holotype. x2/3. 8, paratype, x2/3. Page 53.
FIGURE 6. .-Ar'* (Ctte'arfa) scalaris Conrad, var.? Squeeze. Station
14184, U. S. Nat. Mus. 497968. xl-1/3. Page 49.
Fic;tR. S 9, 10. 'lactuanomia plicata Tuomey and Holhes. U. S. Nat. Mus.
497975. x2/3. Page 55.


[66]





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


[671


BULLETIN EIGHTEEN, PLATE 3





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


[68]


BULLETIN EIGHTEEN, PLATF 4











FIGURES 1, 3, 5, 6.
FIGURES 2, 7.


FIGURES
FIGURE


4, 8.
9.


EXPLANATION OF PLATE 4

Pododesmuts burns Mansfield, n. sp. x2/3. Page 55.
Chione ulocyma Dall. 2, internal mold. Station 13927,
vicinity of Buckingham. U. S. Nat. Mus. 497977. xl. 7,
squeeze. Station 14184, in place, in bank of Caloosahatchee
River across from Floweree Grove. U. S. Nat. Mus.
497978. xl. Page 58.
Arca delandensis Mansfield, n. sp. xl. Page 49.
Peclen. (Peclen) ochlockoineinsis leinsis Mansfield, n. subsp.
Left valve. x2/3. Page 50.


[69 J























































`II





INDEX


A
PAGE
Abra aequalis ...................... 19, 23
Acline, Buckingham limestone west.
of .....................- 15
Caloosahatchee marl west of .... 15
Tamiami limestone west of ...... 15
Actacon myakkanus .............-----.-.... 24
Acteocina canaliculata .......... 18, 24, 35
Alectrion vibex .........- .......--- 25, 38
Alligator Creek, Pliocene beds
on .. ........... ...........22 2 8
Alva, Buckingham limestone at 11, 14
Buckingham limestone, one-half
mile above ............ ........ 11
Buckingham limestone, 3 miles
above ...........------------ 11, 35
Pleistocene deposits, 3 miles
above .......... .. ... .. 35
Amnicola floridana conve.ra ............ 35
Amnicola? sp., .................... 35
Anachis obesa ........................- ... 38
Anomalocardia caloosana 19, 23, 26, 39
hendriana ......... ............ 35, 57, 62
leptalea .................--................-...... 57
Anomia simple ....................
11, 13, 19, 20, 23, 25, 35, 54
Area (Fossularca) adamsi ...........- 31
acqualitas ............. 12, 25, 29, 32
aguila ....................... .... ..... 27
alcina ....................... ................ 32
campyla .............. 18, 22, 25, 27, 32
catasarca ............... 12, 23, 32
delandensis ................ 30, 49, 50, 69
lienosa .. 12, 13, 14, 22, 25, 32, 48
Arca (Noetia) limula ........... 31
Plicatura .................... 29, 30, 49, 50
rustica .. 12, 18, 24, 26, 27, 30, 32
scalarina ....................... 27, 32, 49
(Cunearca) scalaris var.? ......
................. ...... 11, 12, 49, 66
subsinuata ........... .....--- ... 30, 50
transversa ........... 29, 39, 49, 50
Arcinae, distribution of ................ 31, 32
Argina pexata .....................----- .......-- .- 38
Assimlnea sp. .......-----------------------------.. 25
Astraliun precursor .......................... 18
Astyris cf. A. multilineata ............... 25
Atrina rigida .................................. 38, 39
Atys cf. A. sandersoi ............... 24
Aurinia obtusa ..... ................... 30, 31
1Barbatia adamsi ............................ 22, 25
caloosahatchiensis ........................ 32
candida var; .,........................... 14
irregularis .................... .............. 14


PAGE
Barnea (Scobina) costata ................ 19
Bermont, correlation of Pliocene
beds near ........................ 28, 34
Pliocene beds 1 mile north of 24
Bitlinim adamsi ................................... 25
podagrinum .................................. 18
Bronia sp. ........................................ 26
Buckingham, Buckingham limestone
at .......................................... 11
Buckingham limestone, character of 12
correlation of ................ 11, 28, 34
list of species ............... ..... 11, 12
new name ..................................... 8
Buffalo Bluff, Pleistocene fossils at
........................................ 37, 38, 40-45
Bulla striala ................................ 18, 39
Busyrcon canaliculatu ...................... 31
caricunt .................................. 31, 38
perversum .............................. 25, 39
pyrum n ............................................. 39
Bvthinella nickliniana attenuata .... 18
Bvlyhinella? sp ..................-----.............- 35

C
Cadulus quadridentalus .................. 25
Caecum coopcri ................................ 25
regular ........................................ 25
Calliostoma sp. ...................................... 18
Calloarca millifila .............................. 32
taeniata .................................. 18, 32
Caloosa, Buckingham limestone, 1
mile above ........................ 11, 14
Buckingham limestone, 2 miles
above .............................. 11, 14
Caloosahatchee marl, characteristic
species of ......................... 27
correlation of ..................... 28, 34
deposition of ............................... 20
description of .............................. 16
Volusia County ........................ 30
Cancellaria aff. C. agassizii ............. 22
conradiana ............................... 18, 27
propevenusta .............................. 46
tabulaa .............. 11, 12, 15, 46, 62
venusta .................................... 11, 46
'Cardita arata ................ 13, 19, 23, 25
floridana ................................ 38, 39
Cardium dalli .............................. 19, 29
emmonsi .......................................... 29
isocardia .............. 13, 19, 23; 26, 38
medium .................... 17, 19, 26, 29
nmuricatum .............................. 38, 39
oedalium .................................. 19, 26
robustum ........................ 23, 26, 30
Swillcoxi .................................... 29






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--IULLET1N EIGHTEEN


PAGE
Cassidulus evergladensis .................. 8
Cerithium algicolumn ........................ 25
floridanum ... ............ 12, 22
glaphyreum lithariu ................ 25
muscarun ................ 24, 35, 38, 39
ornatissinumi ........................ 12, 13
Chama crassa ....... ...... ...- 13, 19, 27
w illco.ii .........................----.--... 27
Chione athlete ..................... ........... 23
cancellata ............ 13, 14, 17, 18
19, 23, 26, 30, 35, 56, 57, 58
latilirata athlete ............ 13, 14, 58
uIlo y a ..... .......................
11, 13, 14, 48, 55, 56, 58, 69
Chlamys (Plagiocteniinu) compar-
ilis ............................. ............. 52, 53
Codakia (Jagonia) speciosa ............ 13
Collonia elegantul a ................. .........- 24
Congeria lamellata ........... .....------- 19
Conus floridanus .........--............ 24
perv'rsus ........ ...................- 19
prolcus .......................- ....- 24, 27
pygmacus .................--......... .---------- 24
E'accamaacensis .................... 30
Corbula barraliana ............ 19, 23, 26
caloosac .....----------------------- 23, 24, 29
n. sp. ..............- ... ......----------- 30, 31
sp. ................ ---......... 19
waillco.xi ..............------------------- 29
Crassatellites gibbsi ................... 23
Crassinella acula ............-- ....- 23, 25
dupliniana ... ................ 25
lhnuata ......................... 23
Crepidula aclceata ...........-- .....--- 18
fornicata ....................... 25
Crucibulumi auriculum ................ 25
Cumingia tellinoides ......... .......... 35
Cypraca carolinensis floridana .. 12, 16
problematica ........ 12, 18, 26, 27
Cyrenoida aff. C. floridana ............ 35
Cytherea rugatina ........... 13, 19, 26, 29

D
Dade County, sand in ................ 28, 34
DeLand, correlation of Pliocene
beds near .............................. 34
fauna from ............................. 30
DeLeon Springs, correlation of Pli-
ocene beds near .................... 34
fauna from ............................. 30
Dentalium sp., ................................ ....... 25
Diodora alternate .............. 25, 39
Diplodonta ac inis .............................. 26
Divaricella quadrisulcala .................. 31
Donax variabilis ................................ 38
Dorsanum? plicatilum .... 11, 15, 46, 62
Dosinia elegans ........ 11, 13, 14, 23, 26


E PAGE
Echinochama arciell ................ 23, 26
Encope macrophora tamiamiensis....
................................................ 8, 15, 22
cf. E. michelini .................. 13
Eontia. "limula (Conrad)" ................ 32
Platyura ............ 18, 23, 25, 31, 32
ponderosa ..................................... 38
cf. E. tillensis .......................... 30
variabilis .............................. 31, 32
variabilis clewisfonen.sis ............ 29
variabilis cf. E. variabilis quad-
rala .................................. 18, 32
Eucrassatella mansfieldi ................ 13

F
Fasciolaria apicina .............. 22, 25, 27
distans .................................... 24, 39
giganlea .......................... 13, 22, 25
scalarina .......................... ..... 19
sparrowi. ................................. 15
lt lip a ...................................... 12, 27
Fissuridea cardilella .......................... 27
Floweree Grove, Pleistocene depos-
its 2.7 miles above ............. 35
3 miles above Alva, 11, 12, 14, 15
Fort Denaud, localities near ............ 18
Pleistocene deposits 3 miles be-
low ......................................... ... 33
Fort Myers, Pleistocene fossils 6
miles south of ........ 36, 40-45
Fort Thompson formation, locali-
ties in ........................ 36, 37, 45
Fusinus ?aterltai ............................ 29

G
Gafrarium melastrialmn .... 19, 23, 24
Gaslrochaena cunciformis ................ 26
Glycyneris americana ................ 22, 31
eclinata .................... 12, 18, 22, 25

H
H'clisoma conati ................ 12, 18, 21
disstoni .................................. 20, 21
duryi ........................................ 33, 35
duryi intercalarc ...................... 33
scalare ............................ 35, 37, 39
Hydrobia amnicoloides ........ 18, 22, 24
I
Ilyanassa irrorala ............................ 31
obsoleta ..................................... 38

L
Labelle, fossil localities near ............ 17
Pleistocene fossils one-fourth
mile below ........ 36, 37, 40-45
Pleistocene fossils one-third
mile above ........ 36, 37, 40-45
Laevicardium mortoni .... 19, 26, 35, 38




INDEX


I'A(;I
Lake Monroe, Pleistocene fossils
on the north shore of, 37, 38, 40-45
Lake Okeechobec, correlation of
Pliocene beds near .............. 34
Pliocene beds along south shore
of .................. .... ............. ... 29
Lina (Mantellunt) carolinensis ....
..... ..... ... ... .............. 11, 54, 65
Lithophaga sp. ................................. 13
Little River, S. C., Pleistocene fos-
sils 3 miles west-southwest
of .................................. 38, 40-45
Loxahatchee, Pliocene beds near .... 29
Lucina floridana ........................... 39

M
Macrocallista macualal .. 19, 23, 26, 39
ni bosa .................................... 26, 39
sp. ................................ ...... 35
Mactra willco.rii ............................. 24
Mangelia aff. M. eritima ................ 24
cf. Al menchulitica o.ia ............ 24
n. sp.? ....................................... ..... 25
Marginella apicina .......................... 39
clliina .............................................. 12
li at la ......................................... 31
ovuliformis ................................ 25
precursor ..................................... 25
sp ......................................... 35
Melbourne, Pleistocene fossils 8
miles southwest of .. 37, 40-45
Melongena corona ................ 35, 38, 39
subcoronata ...................... 18, 22, 25
Melis biplicala .................................. 13
Mitra lincolata .................. 12, 13, 19, 27
Modiolus denmissus .......................... 31
Modulus floridanus .................. 24, 38
m odulus ........................................ 22
Morum floridatnum .......................... 29
Mulilnia caloosainsis ........................ 29
contract ..................................... 30
lateralis .............................. 26, 30
sapotilla .......................... 19, 29
Myakka River, Pliocene beds on ....
.......................... 23, 28, 34
Myrtle Beach, S. C., Pleistocene
fossils at .................. 38, 40-45
Pleistocene fossils 2V2 miles
northwest of ............ 38, 40-45
Mytilus exustuss .......................... 19, 25

N
Nashua marl ........................................ 30
Natica canrena ............................ 22, 27
guppyana ..................................... 15
Navicula aquila .................................. 32
occidentalis .................................. 48
umnbonata ........................ 11, 12, 48
wagneriana .. 12, 19, 24, 27, 32, 33


N erilina edentula ................................ 18
rida ..................................... 22, 25
N iso w illco.iana .................................. 27
North Creek, Pleistocene fossils at
.......... ................ ...... 36, 40 45
Nutcula pro.vima ........................ 22, 31
sp ........................... ... ................... 35
Nuculana aculda .............. 22, 25, 31, 48
sp. .......................... .................. 11, 48

0
Olga, Buckingham limestone, one-
fourth to one-half mile
above ................................ .... 13
Buckingham limestone, 1 mile
below .................... ............... 12
Pliocene, one-fourth to one-
half mile above ................ 13
Tamiami limestone, one-fourth
to one-half mile above ............. 13
Olia sayana .......................... 12, 22, 25
Olivella mutica .......................... 25, 39
nitid ila ......................................... 38
Oshrea disparilis .................... 11, 12, 50
hatnsis .................... 12, 14, 15, 50
meridionalis ...... 11, 12, 14, 15, 50
sculp rata ..... .........................
16 18, 19, 20, 25, 29, 30. 50
cf. O. faniamiensis .............. 14, 15
trigonalis .................... 15, 16, 22
virgin cra ...... 16, 18, 19, 21, 30, 31
Oyster marl, discussion of ............ 16

P
Pamlico formation .......................... 45
Panope floridana ........................ 13, 19
Paraslarte triquetra .................. 26, 35
Pecte anteaplicostatus ...................... 27
(Nodipecten) caloosai'nsis, ........
....................*................ 18, 26, 27
caloosensis ................ 11, 13, 52, 66
com p/arilis ................................. 53
eboreus ......................................... 14
eboreus buckitnghantensis ..........
............. ........ 11, 13, 53, 66
eboreus solaroides ...................
14, 18, 19, 20, 27, 30, 31, 54
evergladensis ........................ 14, 53
Evergladensis charlottensis ...... 27
e.vasperatus ................................ 27
fuscopurpureus ...................... 14, 23
gibbus ........................................... 14
gibbus concentricuts ................ 27
gibbus gibbus .... 19, 20, 23, 25, 35
intcrlineatus .............................. 12
leonensis ...................................... 52
(Nodipccten.) nodosus .... 19, 26, 54
(Nodipecten.) nodosus floriden-
sis ............................... 11, 12, 54







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN EIGHTEEN


PAGE
(Pecten) ochlockonlensis ........... 51
ochlockon.einsis lcnsis ...........
...................... 11, 13, 50, 65, 69
pittieri ........................................ 54
(Nodipecten) pittieri collieren-
sis .............................................. 54
(Nodipecten) pittieri everglad-
ensis 15
(Lyropecten) pittieri floriden-
sis ....................................... ... 54
(Nodipecten) pittieri floriden-
sis ........................................ 15
(Pecten)c aff. P. raveneli ........ 20
taiianiensis .................................. 14
Pecen endelli .................................. 52
'wendelli olgeensis .... 14, 51, 52, 65
(Pecten) ziczac ........................... 23
Peninsular Florida, correlation of
upper Tertiary deposits
of ........................ ...................... 33, 34
Phacoides amabilis .............................. 27
anodonta ........................ 17, 26. 31
caloosacnsis ............................ 27, 29
chrysostoma ........... 11, 13, 23, 57
(Miltha) disciformis .... 19, 26, 29
riltilincatus ....................... 23, 26
nassulus caloosans .............. 23, 31
pensylvanicus .... 13, 19, 23, 26, 29
radians .......................................... 26
trisuicatlus ..................................... 26
trisulcatus multistriatus ...........: 31
waccanma ensis ...................... 23, 26
Physa eigsii ...................................... 18
sp. .................... ................ .......... 33
Placunanomia aclinica ...................... 55
plicata ........................................ 55, 66
"Planorbis" (Helisoma) co-
nanti ....................................... 17
(Helisoma) disstoni ............... 17
Planorbis rock, correlation of .. 28, 34
discussion of .................................. 17
Pleistocene deposits .... ................... 33
correlation of ........................ 39, 45
Pleistocene species, check list of 40-44
Plicatnila marginaa ......................... 23
n. sp. ............. ........................... 25
Pododesumus burnsii .................... 55, 69
decipins ................................. 55
Polynices duplicates .......................... 25
Potamides scalatus .. 12, 17, 18, 24, 25
Psammosolen cumingianus ........ 23
Punta Gorda, Pleistocene fossils, 2
miles northeast of ....36, 40-45
Pyrula papyratia ..........................19, 25


R PAGE
Rangia cuneata .................... 14, 19, 37
Rhyncholanmpas evergladensis ......... 15
Ringicula floridana .......................... 24
R issoa? sp. ........................................... 35

S
St. Lucie Canal, Pliocene beds in .. 29
Sanford, bed at ............................38, 45
Scaphella floridana ........................ 27
Semele bellastriata .......................... 23
leana ............................................. 29
Profimua .................................. 38, 39
Shell Creek, Pliocene beds on ..... 21
Solenosteira vaughani ........................ 13
Spondylus rotundatuis ........ 13, 19, 26
sp ............. ...-................... .. 14
Sportella constricta ............................ 31
Strombus leidyi .......................... 19, 27
pugilis .................................... 22, 25
pugilis alatus .............................. 12

T
Tagelus sp. ........................................... 19
Tamiami limestone, age of ................ 15
correlation of ..................... 28, 34
new name .................................... 8
Tectonatica pusilla .............................. 25
Tellidora crislata ...................... 19, 26
Tellina alternate .................................. 23
sayi ................... 19, 23, 26, 31, 35
Terebra dislocata ................. 13, 24, 31
prolexa .................................... 22, 24
Thracia (Cyathodonta) gatunensis 56
(Cyathodonta) sp. ................... 55
sp. ............................................. 13, 14
Transennella caloosana .................... 26
conradiana .................................... 35
Turbinella scolymoides .................. 25
Turritella apicalis -- 12, 13, 18, 48, 62
apicalis tensa ............................... 47
Turritella-bearing bed, correlation
of ........................................ 28, 34
Turritella buckinghamensis ............
......... .......... 11, 12, 13, 47, 62
burden ..................................... .. 47
aff. T. cartagenensis ...............
........................ 11, 12, 13, 46, 62
Turritella marl, discussion of .......- 16
Turritella perattenuata 12, 17, 24, 27
cf. T. pontoni .......... 11, 12, 47, 62
subanulata ............ 18, 22, 25, 29
subannulata acropora .... 12, 25, 27

U
Uglandina truncata ........................ 18
Unio caloosainsis .............................. 19




INDEX


v PAGE
Vasum horridum .................................. 19
Venericardia hadra ........................ 56
himerta ...................................... 56
laticostata var. .......................... 56
olga ............................ 13, 56, 65, 66
tridentata .................................... 26
tridentata decemcostaa .......... 19
Venus campechiensis ...................... 23


PAGE
Vivipara georgiana ...................... 18, 35
Volusia County, Caloosahatchee
m arl in ................................. 30

W
West Palm Beach Canal, Pleisto-
cene fossils at 7-mile Post,
................................ 37, 38, 40-45
Pliocene beds in ....................... 29