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Mollusks of the Tampa and Suwannee limestones of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000448/00001
 Material Information
Title: Mollusks of the Tampa and Suwannee limestones of Florida
Physical Description: 334 p. : incl. 21 pl. 2 fold. tab. (in pocket) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Mansfield, Wendell C. ( Wendell Clay ), 1874-1939
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1937
Copyright Date: 1937
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Mollusks, Fossil   ( lcsh )
Paleontology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Paleontology -- Miocene   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
General Note: At head of title: State of Florida. Department of conservation.
Statement of Responsibility: by W.C. Mansfield of the United States Geological survey.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA1847
ltuf - AKM4747
oclc - 01562408
alephbibnum - 002036987
lccn - gs 37000315
System ID: UF00000448:00001

Full Text
STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

R. L. DOWLING, Supervisor













GEOLOGICAL BULLETIN NO. 15













MOLLUSKS OF THE

TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES

OF FLORIDA


By

W. C. MANSFIELD

of the United States Geological Survey


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TALLAHASSEE, 1937


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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


HONORABLE R. L. DOWLING,
Supervisor of Conservation.
SmR:
I have the honor to transmit a report on the Mollusks of the Tampa and
Suwannee Limestones of Florida by Dr. W. C. Mansfield of the' United States
Geological Survey, to be published as Geological Bulletin No. 15.
It is quite generally known that limestones constitute much of the strata
over large areas within the State. However, these deposits of limestone were not
laid down during a single geological epoch, but during several, in each of which
the sea advanced landward and then withdrew seaward. It is important for
various practical purposes to be able to distinguish the several deposits of lime-
stone from one another. In the past the Tampa and Suwannee limestones have
been confused, and the present paper is intended to supply a basis on which they
may be discriminated.
The most readily available means of interpreting the stratigraphic sequence
of deposits and of interpreting their relative ages is the character of the life,
or fossil remains, entombed within them. It is on this basis largely that the
new formational name of Suwannee was established.
The report describes and figures fossils of the Tampa and Suwannee lime-
stones and clearly shows that the organisms in the Suwannee limestone had
greater antiquity than those in the succeeding Tampa limestone.
In a former report, too, it was shown that of the two limestone the Su-
wannee contained a higher percentage of calcium carbonate and a lower per-
centage of silica than the Tampa, indicating different physical conditions accom-
panying the deposition of the two. A corresponding indication of differing phys-
ical conditions was noted in the study of the faunas.
The report is a distinct contribution to the stratigraphy of the State and it
is a pleasure to acknowledge the generous cooperation of the United States
Geological Survey in transmitting the results of this study without expense
other than limited transportation facilities during the field work and in the prep-
aration of the illustrations and publication.
Let me also express appreciation of the interest you have manifested in the
work of the Geological Survey and the support that you have given.
Very respectfully,
HERMAN GUNTER,
Assistant Supervisor,
State Board of Conservation,
Geological Department.
Tallahassee, Florida,
June 22, 1937.


c/W8O

















































































I.




CONTENTS


PAGE
Introduction -..---.... ......... .............................................. ......................... 7
T am pa lim stone ........................................................................................................ 8
S Previous w ork ---- -......... ..................................................................................... 8
Preservation of the fossils ................................................................. 12
General observations on the Tampa limestone ........................................ ...... 12
Comparison of species of the Tampa limestone with species from other
form nations ............................................. ......... ...... 15
Tropical America .......------............................................... 15
Chipola formation of Florida ............ ..................................... 16
T rent m arl .. ............................................... ................................................... 16
Beds enclosing the Tampa limestone ........................ ---............. ......... 19
L local details .................. .................................................................................... 20
H illsborough County .... .......... ..... ........................... .............................. 20
Polk County -... ........................................... ...... .... .......................... 22
P inellas C county .................................................................................................. 22
Pasco County ---- ---........--- .................................................. 23
M arion C county ...- ............................................ ............................................ 23
Jefferson County ............................................................... .......................... 24
W akulla County ---.......- ........ ... .......................................................... 25
L eon C county .................-- ......... ........... ........ .................................... 26
Sections on the Flint River (Georgia) and the Apalachicola River
(Florida) ................................ .................... .................. 27
Wyley Landing ....................... ... -..................... 29
Old Chattahoochee Landing ............ ................................... 31
R iver Junction ......... ... ..................................... .............................. 32
A spalaga Bluff ..--.....------ ..... ......-- ..-.- ......- ..................... 35
R ock Bluff ........................... ................ ............................. ..... 36
A lum B luff -........................................................................................... 36
Dip of Tampa limestone along the Apalachicola River ............. 37
Calhoun County --------.--------...... -.................. ................... 38
Washington County --.-................................... ........ ..... 38
L ist of stations ---------....... ................................. ..........................- 39
Geographic distribution of the Tampa limestone ..................................... 42
Distribution of species in the Tampa limestone ............ ......... ............ 43
Resume of the Tampa limestone .................................... ................. 43
Suwannee limestone -- ------....................................... ............... 46
G general features ------. .... ......................... ..... .. ............................. 46
Comparison of the fauna of the Suwannee limestone with other faunas .... 48
Flint R iver form action ----...--...... ................................................................... 48
Well near Thomasville, Ga. ...........- .................. ......................... 50
Local details ----.....-- .....--.......................... ............ ....--. 50
Hillsborough County ................................................................................ 50
Pasco County ....... ........................................... ...... .... .. ...................... 51
H ernando County .................- ..... ........................... .............................. 52
A lachua County ...... .... ............................................................................. 55
Columbia County -.... ............................... ....... ................................ 55
Suwannee County ............... ................................ ..................................... 57
Hamilton County ........- .. ------------........- ......-.................... 58
T aylor County ....- .................................................................................... 58
Jefferson County ................. ......................................... ................................. 58
L ist of stations ............................................ ...................................................... 59
SGeographical distribution of the Suwannee limestone ................................. 61
Distribution of species in the Suwannee limestone ................................... 61
SR6sum6 of the Suwannee limestone -.......................................... ........... 61
Descriptions of species of the Tampa and Suwannee limestones .................... 63








ILLUSTRATIONS AND TABLES


Plate A,




Plate B,





Plate C,


Plate D,





Plates 1-2
Figure 1.

Figure 2.

Table Nc
Table N(


Fig. 1. Tampa limestone at eastern end of .Victory bridge over
A palachicola River -........--- ...-- ...-..-......-....-.....--......... 30
Fig. 2. Tampa limestone on Sixmile Creek a quarter of a mile
below the bridge at Orient .......................................... 30
Fig. 1. Contact of Suwannee limestone and a member of the
Vicksburg group in the left bank of the Withlacoochee
River at Ellaville -------------------------------....--------- ---- ..- 45
Fig. 2. Tampa limestone exposed in a sink about 1%/ miles north-
east of Lloyd, Jefferson County -.......------ ..-..---............ 45
Fig. 1. Contact of the Suwannee limestone and the Hawthorn
formation in the left bank of the Suwannee River at
W hite Springs ...---- ..---------- .. ------ --------------.. .---- 54
Fig. 2. Upper surface of the Suwannee limestone in the bed of
Suwannee River three-fourths mile above the old
bridge on White Springs-Lake City road at White
Springs .......---..... .................... ............................................ 54
Fig. 1. Suwannee limestone exposed in old Lyle quarry, 1% miles
north of Live Oak .--..- ..-- ....--.... .......... ..........-..- 56
Fig. 2. A rock specimen taken from the same place as pl. C,
fig. 1, showing the contact of the Suwannee limestone
and the Hawthorn formation -......-...............-............. 56
21. Mollusks of the Tampa and Suwannee limestones ........... 283
Sections on the Flint River, Georgia, and along the Apa-
lachicola River, Florida. ---.. -------..........-- ----.............. 28
Map showing geographical distribution of localities of the
Tampa and Suwannee limestones --....................... 40
o. 1. Distribution of species in the Tampa limestone ........ In pocket
o. 2. Distribution of species in the Suwannee limestone .... In pocket




MOLLUSKS OF THE TAMPA AND SUWANNEE
LIMESTONES OF FLORIDA


By W. C. MANSFIELD"


INTRODUCTION

This paper is a product of an attempt to define more accurately
than has been done in the past the stratigraphic and geographic
scope of the Tampa limestone (lower Miocene) of Florida. As the
delimitation of the formation has to rest in considerable part on
faunal data, it was necessary to examine all the species of mollusks
listed from the type locality, and to compare with them those re-
ported from other localities. Various revisions of species in the
Tampa fauna were found desirable and some new forms were rec-
ognized. Dall' in 1915 described many species from the Tampa lime-
stone. These original descriptions, except for the non-marine species,
are repeated in this paper, but as the species are adequately figured in
Dall's paper the illustrations are not repeated.
Certain beds long confused with the Tampa limestone have been
separated from it as the Suwannee limestone," and a description of
the contained fauna is included.
Many of the specimens studied in the preparation of this paper
were deposited in the U. S. National Museum a number of years ago
(see list of localities on pp. 39-42). Additional material has been added
from year to year by members of the U. S. Geological Survey. During
the years 1931, 1932, and 1936, many more collections were obtained
by Herman Gunter, State Geologist of Florida, and his assistants, and
by F. S. MacNeill, of the U. S. Geological Survey, and the writer.
Miss Helen I. Tucker (now Mrs. R. A. Rowland), of Cornell Uni-
versity, Ithaca, N. Y., kindly lent her collections from Sixmile Creek,
near Orient Station (No. 57) and from Blackwater River at the
crossing of the Seaboard Air Line Railway (No. 17).
1 Published with the permission of the Director of the United States Geological
Survey.
2 Dall, W. H., A monograph of the molluscan fauna of the Orthaulax pugnaz
zone of the Oligocene of Tampa, Florida: U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, January
21,- 1915.-
Cooke, C. W., and Mansfield, W. C., Suwannee limestone of Flotida (abstract):
Geol. Soc. Am., Proc. for 1935, p. 71, 1936.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Grateful acknowledgment is made to the officials of the U. S.
National Museum for the use of collections; to Mr. Herman Gunter
for his close cooperation and interest manifested in the preparation of
this report; especially by furnishing transportation facilities for my
field investigations during the years 1931-1932; to Dr. Henry A.
Pilsbry of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, and to
Mr. Carl Boyer, Director of the Wagner Free Institute of Science,
Philadelphia, for the opportunity to examine type material. The
writer has had the benefit of the advice of L. W. Stephenson, C. W.
Cooke, Julia Gardner, W. P. Woodring, and Ralph B. Stewart of the
United States Geological Survey. F. Stearns MacNeil assisted in the
preparation of the fossils, and in field work in 1936.
The photographs used for illustrations were made by Nelson W.
Shupe, and the prints were retouched by Frances Wieser, both of the
U. S. Geological Survey.
The types of the new species are deposited in the U. S. National
Museum. A duplicate set of named species from the Suwannee lime-
stone, as complete as the collections will allow, is deposited with the
Florida State Geological Survey.


TAMPA LIMESTONE
PREVIOUS WORK
The beds here included in the Tampa limestone have long been
noted for their excellently preserved fossils and for the unusual silici-
fication of some of the material. The name "silex beds" was com-
monly used to designate the silicified portions of the formation.1 Opin-
ions have differed greatly as to the relations of the rocks in the vicin-
ity of Tampa and elsewhere, as may be seen in the following review
of the earlier work.
rThe first description of the Tampa limestone was given in 1846
by Allen.' He reports a limestone beneath the.soil in the neighbor-
hood of Fort Brooke at the head of Tampa Bay and other nearby
localities.' He mentions silicified fossils without specific names. No
age determination of the deposit is given.
Later in the same year Conrad" published articles on the geology
of Florida based on a visit in 1842. He described the rock at Tampa,
and described and illustrated 9 species of invertebrate fossils, 8
Allen, J. H., Bome facts respecting the geology of Tampa Bay, Florida: Am.
Jour. Sci. and Arts, 2d ser., vol. 1, pp. 38-42, Jan., 1946.
5 Conrad, T. A., Amer. Jour. Sci. and Arts, 2d ser., vol. 2, pp. 36-48, July; pp.
393-398, Nov.; pp. 399-400, Nov., 1846.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


of which came from Ballast Point. The following species were
described:


Bulimus floridanus
"Bulla" petrosa
Nucula tellinula
Venus penita
Venus floridana


Cytherea floridana
Balanus humilis
"Nummulites" floridanus
"Cristellaria" rotella


Conrad referred this fauna to the upper Eocene.
At a later date Prof. J. W. Bailey, United States Army, visited
Ballast Point, and described what he thought to be a deposit of in-
fusorial earth." Since then this material has been determined to be
merely a part of the limestone sequence containing diatoms and Foram-
inifera and not a separate deposit.
In 1887, Heilprin' described and figured 47 species of mollusks
from Ballast Point, and the study of them convinced him that the
"silex beds" were of lower Miocene age. He8 described two distinct
rocks from the Tampa Bay and Hillsboro regions: a "hard siliceous
blue rock or Cerithium rock without any traces of the 'Orbitolite,' "
and overlying it a "highly fossiliferous yellow limestone carrying a
large number of the singular foraminifera, 'Numulites floridanus.'"
The species Ccrithium hillsboroensis, is reported to occur in the "under-
lying cherty-rock" of the Hillsboro region and in the "tough blue
rock" at Ballast Point, and to be absent from the rock with Orbitolites.
W. H. Dall was the next to study the Tampa region. His work
began in the winter of 1886-1887. and resulted in a series of publica-
tions.
In 1892, Dall' recognized divisions which he designated the "Or-
thaulax bed" and the "Tampa limestone." Because of the presence
of the gastropod genus Orthaular the name "Orthaulax bed" was in-
troduced to replace the local name, "Tampa silex bed."c Dall stated
that he found the same rock on Sixmile Creek near Orient Station,
about 6 miles east of Tampa. At Ballast Point the fossils of the
Orthaulax bed were reported to be chiefly marine with a minor ad-
mixture of land shells, the latter becoming more abundant toward the.
top of the bed. The name Tampa limestone was applied to the lime-
stone overlying the Orthaulax bed. Dall stated that an examination
of the rock in the Hillsboro River from Tampa to the falls showed

e Smithsonian contributions to knowledge, vol. 2, art. 8, p. 19, 1850.
7 Heilprin, Angelo, Explorations on the West Coast of Florida: Wagner Free
Inst. Set. Trans., vol. 1, pp. 105-119, 1887.
8 Idem, pp. 61-62.
Dall, W. H., The Neocene of North America: U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 84,
PP. 112-119.




FLORIDA -GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


that what Heilprin called "Cerithium rock" and mistook for the lower
(Orthaula,) bed was merely a cherty layer of the Tampa limestone,
characterized by an abundance of Cerithium hillsboroensis and every-
where overlying the Orthaulax bed. In a section of the bank of the
Hillsboro, near Lapenotieres Spring,'1 the Tampa limestone of Dall
is 10 to 15 feet in thickness. In other places" the maximum thick-
ness of Tampa limestone is said to be 25-30 feet. In referring to the
Cerithium rock of Heilprin, Dall writes:1 "From these observations
[along Hillsboro River and around Tampa] it appears that, while the
existence of a Cerithium rock under the Orthaulax bed is a prior
probable, sufficient evidence of its existence is still to be collected, and
the rock identified as such by Heilprin may very possibly have been
a portion of the Tampa limestone."
In 1903, Dall" briefly discussed the "Tampa silex beds" and gave a
list of species from Ballast Point, from dredgings presumably at the
same horizon in the ship canal near Ballast Point, and from a locality
15 miles south of Tallahassee, near Wakulla. He stated that 193
species were then known from the "silex beds."
In the same publication, pages 1570 to 1572, Dall briefly discussed
his Tampa limestone, or "Orbitolite bed," and- gave a list of fossils
from a number of localities at which he thought the limestone to
occur. In this list he included species collected at Sixmile Creek and
near Orient. Fifty-nine species are identified, of which 37 are com-
mon to the "silex beds."
In 1909, Matson and Clapp" obtained additional information con-
cerning the rocks in the vicinity of Tampa, and their report offers a
classification that approaches the modern concept. VThey included the
"silex bed" and the Tampa limestone of Dall in a single formation-
the Tampa formation. I 'They wrote:" "The upper member of the
Tampa formation comprises a well stratified greenish clay containing
some calcareous nodules and thin beds of limestone near the base.
Scattered throughout the clay are many silicified corals, some of them
having a diameter of two or three feet. The clay is very plastic and
hence is valuable for the manufacture of brick. Beneath the clay is
the light-gray to yellow limestone which was formerly called the
"Tampa limestone." The "silex bed" represents a silicified zone in
10 Idem, p. 118. ...
't Idem, p. 119.
"2 Idem, p. 119.
n Dall, W. H., Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 6, pp. 1564-1568.
*4 Matson, G. C., and Clapp, F. G., Florida Geol. Survey 2d Ann. Rept., pp. 84-91.
1' Idem, pp. 86, 87.




MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


this limestone and is, therefore, a zone of replacement. i This is well
shown by some of the fossils which have been only partially silicified;
and by the presence of more or less unaltered carbonate of lime in
the original rock. * Resting upon the "silex" at. some localities is a
siliceous residual material which was formerly thought to be infu-
sorial earth, but is now known to be weathered material derived from
the underlying rock." The log of a well drilled at Tampa" shows 14
feet of rock assigned to the Tampa limestone, 4 feet assigned to
the "silex beds," 6 feet of soft limestone, and 41 feet of tough, plastic,
greenish, sandy clay. The base of the clay is considered by Matson
and Clapp to be the base of the Tampa formation, making the total
thickness of the formation in this well 65 feet. The same authors".-
reported some "silex" near the base of a 6-foot bed of gray to yellow
limestone that crops out at the railroad bridge at Orient.
In 1915 Dall's final paper" on the Tampa area appeared. In this
paper the name "Orthaulax pugnax zone" is proposed for the old
name "Orthaulax bed" or the colloquial name "Tampa silex bed,"
although Dall uses the name "Silex beds" throughout his paper. Dall
wrote (p. 16): "The number of species and varieties of mollusks
now known from the [Orthaulax pugnax] zone is 312. Of these
nearly two-thirds are peculiar to the zone and have chiefly been ob-
tained from the siliceous layer. Of the total molluscan fauna, 219
species were new to science when first explored by the United States
Geological Survey, and 95 of these are described in this monograph.
Of the previously known species 15 were named by Conrad and 29
by Heilprin, while 36 were first described from other horizons by
various writers. * Above the Orthaulax zone we find 51 of its
species surviving in the Cardium cestum zone [Chipola formation],
but only 14 reach the zone of Scapharca dodona [Alum Bluff group]."
In referring to the limestone Dall" wrote: "The molluscan fauna of
the limestone immediately above the silex beds has not been thoroughly
studied, but it is notable for the number of Cerites contained in it and
for the profusion of Orbitoides floridanus Conrad (?complanatus La-
marck), and it seems allowable to apply the name of the latter species
as a designation of this zone, with the type locality at Ballast Point."
In referring to the Cerithium rock of Heilprin, Dall'" wrote: "Cu-
riously enough the layer called Cerithium rock, by Heilprin, which
Idem, p. 89.
Idem, pp. 90-91.
Dall, W. H., A monograph of the molluscan fauna of the Orthaulax pugnax
zone of the Oligocene of Florida: U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, 1915.
Idem, p. 15.
2 Idem, p. 3.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


he thought to be below the horizon of the silex beds, but which has
since proved to be part of the "Tampa limestone" overlying the silex
beds, he placed as forming the "transition ground" between the Mio-
cene and Oligocene."
In 1929 Cooke and Mossom"2 included in the Tampa limestone
[called Tampa formation in some citations] not only the Tampa of
earlier workers but most of the Chattahoochee formation and part of
the Hawthorn formation of Matson and Clapp. They also included in
the Tampa what has since been named the Suwannee limestone by
Cooke and Mansfield2.

PRESERVATION OF THE FOSSILS
The attention of naturalists was early attracted to the excellently
preserved fossils found along the northwest shore of Tampa Bay,
especially at Ballast Point. The shells, which were deposited in a
limestone matrix, have been replaced by pure silica, and converted
into pseudomorphs that preserve in a remarkable manner the orig-
inal shape and delicate sculpture of the shells. This change in compo-
sition appears to be due to the exposure of the fossil-bearing lime-
stone to surface waters charged with silica in solution. Fossils ex-
posed on the surfaces that are exposed between tides, in the cliffs
along stream channels, or in crevices in the rock are most affected by
this type of replacement; those in more deeply buried limestones and
in rock from newly opened quarries are less completely replaced. Fos-
sils that have not been silificied are preserved as external or internal
molds. Casts or squeezes of these external molds usually reveal the
delicate sculpture of the original shells.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE TAMPA LIMESTONE
In 1936 a number of species were collected by F. S. MacNeil and
the writer from dredgings taken at a depth of 32 to 36 feet below
water-level off Hooker Point, Sparkman Bay, inlet of upper Hills-
borough Bay (station 13848). The matrix consists of an indurated,
speckled material containing medium-sized sand grains throughout.
The following species were collected:

Conus sp. mold.
Solenosteria quinquespina (Dall).
Urosalpinx? inornata Dall, abundant.
Potamides hillsboroensis (Heilprin) common.
21 Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida State Geol.
Survey 20th Ann. Rept., pp. 78-96.
22 Cooke, C. W., and Mansfield, W. C., The Suwannee limestone of Florida (ab-
stract): Geol. Soc. Am. Proc., p. 71, June, 1936.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


Potamides campanulatus Heilprin.
Rapana? sp.
Vermetus sp.
Turritella litharia Dall?
Ampullina (Ampullinopsis) amphora (Heilprin).
Anadara hypomela Dall?.
Ostrea vaughani Dall.
Modiolus blandus Dall.
Cyrena floridana (Dall).
Diplodonta? sp.
Cardium pinellasense Mansfield.
Antigona shepardi Dall?.
Macrocallista ? sp.
Macoma? sp.
No foraminifera were noted.
The rock corresponds to the "hard siliceous blue rock or Cerithium
rock" of Heilprin, which he placed underneath a highly fossiliferous
yellow limestone carrying a large number of Foraminifera.
Another collection of fossils preserved as molds was obtained in
1936 by F. S. MacNeil and the writer from material thrown out in
constructing a road near the new quarantine station at Gadsden Point,
about 4 miles south of Ballast Point (station 13847). The matrix
consists of buff to dirty-white limestone containing a minor amount
of quartz sand grains. The following species were found:
Cerion? sp.
Morurn chipolanum tampanum Mansfield.
Strombus cf. S. liocyclus Dall.
Potamides campanulatus Heilprin.
Turritella cf. T. pagodaeformis Heilprin.
Arca sp. (mold).
Venericardia serricosta (Heilprin).
Phaeoides wacissanus Dall.
Anomalocardia penita (Conrad).
Antigona glyptoconcha Dall.
Semele silicata Dall.
Panope aff. P. goldfussii Wagner.
Bryozoa and Foraminifera.

The position of this fauna appears to be in the uppermost part
of the Tampa limestone and may correspond to the Orbitolites flor-
idanus zone of Dall.
The faunas collected at the above two localities, indicate strongly
that the Cerithium rock of Heilprin is stratigraphically below the
Orthaulax pugnax zone of Dall, and that the Orbitolites floridanus
zone of Dall is equivalent to his Orthaulax pugnax zone, perhaps the
upper part of it. In general, Dall considered that all silicified fossils
came from his Orthaulax pugnax zone, or "silex bed," and those that
are preserved as external molds came from the overlying Orbitolites
floridanus zone. He placed the Cerithium rock of Heilprin above his




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Orthaulax pugnax zone. The species Potamides hillsboroensis Heil-
prin, a species characteristic of the Cerithium rock of Heilprin, has
not been found outside of the Tampa area.
In the study of the faunas from localities outside of the Tampa
area, the writer has not been able to determine with assurance whether
they should be correlated with the Cerithium zone of Heilprin, the
Orthaula.r pugnaax zone of Dall, or with the Orbitolites floridanus
zone of Dall. Consequently he has viewed these localities, formerly
regarded as distinct, as a single formation, the Tampa limestone. In
partial support of this view, Orthaulax pugnax is now known to occur
in the youngest beds of the- Tampa limestone, as well as in the
Orthaulax zone. Doubtless there are faunal zones in the Tampa lime-
stone, but present conditions for observing the relationships of the
beds at Ballast Point and up the Hillsborough River are not as favor-
able as they once were, and divisions are not advisable.
The lowest bed exposed at Old Chattahoochee Landing is tenta-
tively placed at the base of the Tampa limestone, though it appears
to be a little lower stratigraphically than the lowest bed exposed
around Tampa.
There is no conclusive evidence to show that the "tough, plastic,
greenish sandy clay," 41 to 64 feet thick, penetrated beneath a lime-
stone in wells at Tampa, belongs to the Tampa limestone, as thought
by Matson and Clapp.2 However, there is a possibility that the
upper bed exposed on Blackwater Creek at the crossing of the Sea-
board Air Line Railway, 2y miles south of the Pasco County line,
which carries Tampa limestone species, may represent this clay bed
in part.
The thickness of the Tampa limestone in the Tampa area, as in-
dicated by well borings, is about 65 feet. This thickness does not in-
clude the tough plastic clay found in the well. at Tampa. The thick-
ness, as shown in the bluffs at Old Chattahoochee Landing. and at
River Junction, is about 88 feet.
The Tampa limestone, as defined in this paper, includes the beds
in Hillsborough County, Florida, which are exposed at Ballast Point
and the vicinity; along the Hillsborough River above Tanmpa; at Six-
mile Creek near Orient; and beds carrying a similar fauna elsewhere;


"' Matson, G. C., and Clapp, F. G., Florida Geol. Survey 2d Ann. Rept., p. 89,
1909.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


COMPARISON OF SPECIES PROM THE TAMPA LIMESTONE WITH
SPECIES PROM OTHER FORMATIONS
Tropical America.-The following list shows species of the Tampa
limestone identical with or closely related to species from tropical
America:

TAMPA LIMESTONE SPECIES TROPICAL AMERICAN SPECIES
Lyria musicina Heilprin ....................Lyria vaughani Cooke, Anguilla formation,
Anguilla.
Xancus polygonatus (Heilprin) ........Xancus rex Pilsbry and. Johnson, Baitoa
formation, Dominican Republic.
Vasum subcapitellum Heilprin --.-------Vasum aedificatum (Guppy), (Middle Mio-
cene Gurabo formation, Domincan Re-
public.
Potamides hillsboroensis Heilprin ....Potamides herculeanum (Cooke), Anguilla
formation, Anguilla.
Turritella tarponensis Mansfield .....Turritella ceibana Cooke, Antigua forma-
tion, Antigua.
Globularia solidula (Dall) ....-....-.....-- Globularia anguillana (Cooke), Anguilla
formation, Anguilla; also Sta. 3474,
Cuba.
Ampullina amphora (Heilprin) ..--......Ampullina spenccri (Cooke), Anguilla and
Antigua formations.
Orthaulax inornatus Gabb ----... ......... Orthaulax inornatus Gabb, Baitoa forma-
tion, Dominican Republic.
Anadara latidentata ballista
Mansfield .....-................................Anadara perplura (Woodring), Bowden
marl, Jamaica, middle Miocene.
Chlamys crocus Cooke ......................Chlamys crocus Cooke, Anguilla formation,
Anguilla.
Chlamys anguillensis Guppy ............ Chlamys anguillensis Guppy, Anguilla and
Antigua formations.
Pholadomya sp. .................................... Pholadomya walli Maury, Machapoorie
beds, lower Miocene, Trinidad.
Chione cf. C. spenceri Cooke .......-----Chione spenceri Cooke, Antigua formation,
Antigua.

The species from the Tampa limestone in this list indicate a closer
affinity with the Anguilla formation than with the Antigua formation
The Baitoa formation contains Orthaula.r inornatus (Gabb), and also
Xancus re.x Pilsbry and Johnson, a species closely related to X. polygo-
natus Heilprin, of the Tampa limestone. Woodring" listed a few
species of mollusks characteristic of the Baitoa formation, among them
"Phos" costatus Gabb, a.species clbsely related to "Phos" chipolanus
Dall, a Chipola formation species. Some of the species listed from the
Baitoa formation by Woodring'" range upward into the Cercado and
Gurabo formations. One of these, Pachycrommium guppyi (Gabb),
(Baitoa, Cercado, and Gurabo) is the same as, or closely allied to,
P. floridana Dall, a Tampa limestone species. According to Wood-

2' Woodring, W. P., Miocene mollusks from Bowden, Jamaica; Carnegie Inst.
Washington, Pub. 385, Pt. 2, p. 51, 1928.
Idem.




16 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BJLLETIN FIFTEEN

ring": "The fauna of the Baitoa formation is clearly recognizable
and it is considered of lower Miocene age, the upper one of the two
lower Miocene zones now recognized in this region." He" placed this
zone above the Anguilla formation. As the Tampa limestone is con-
sidered equivalent, or nearly equivalent, to the Anguilla formation,
the Baitoa formation would be a little higher stratigraphically .than
the Tampa limestone and perhaps more nearly equivalent to the Chipola
formation.
An undetermined species of Pholadomya from the Tampa lime-
stone appears to be closely related to P. walli Maury from the lower
Miocene (Machapoorie beds) of Trinidad.
Chipola formation of Florida.-The following species of the Tampa
limestone are the same as or closely related to the species from the
Chipola formation (lower Miocene) of Florida:

TAMPA LIMESTONE SPECIES CHIPOLA LIMESTONE SPECIES
Marginella intense Dall ....................Marginella eleutheria dasa Gardner (MS.).
Marginella mollitor Dall -...........-.......Marginella brithia Gardner (MS.).
Lyria musicina Heilprin ........................Lyria musicina subsp.
Vexillum myrum (Dall) --------.......----Vexillum amblipleura Gardner (MS.).
Cypraea ballista Dall ...........................Cypraea heilprinii Dall.
Diodora chipolana (Dall) -............---... Diodora chipolana (Dall).
Arca umbonata Lamarck ....................Arca umbonata Lamarck.
Barbatia marylandica Conrad ............Barbatia marylandica Conrad.
Arcopsis adamsi (Dall) ..........------.......Arcopsis adamsi (Dall).
Anadara hypomela Dall ....................Anadara hypomela Dall.
Chlamys burnetti Tucker --..............Chlamys acanikos Gardner.
Plicatula densata Dall ........................... Plicatula densata Dall.
Pseudochama draconis Dall .........---.. Pseudochama draconis Dall.
Cardium berberum Dall ................... Cardium aliculum Dall.
Dosinia chipolana Dall ....................-- Dosinia chipolana Dall.

The Trent marl, as exposed at Silverdale, Onslow County, N. C.,
was carefully studied by Kellum.28 He wrote (p. 13) : "The conclu-
sion is therefore reached that the Trent marl is of approximately the
same age as the "silex beds" of the Tampa of Florida. The collec-
tion of more material from this horizon and the study of the micro-
scopic element of the fauna may show the Trent to be somewhat older
or younger than the Tampa, but the evidence presented by the frac-
tion of the fauna studied indicates the Tampa as the closest known
formation." A number of specimens from the Trent marl, some col-
lected after the publication of Kellum's paper, are still unstudied,
and more exact data concerning the relationship of the Trent fauna
* Idem, p. 52.
Idem, table facing p. 41.
2 Kellum, L. B., Paleontology and stratigraphy of the Castle Hayne and Trent
marls in North Carolina: U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 143, 1926.




MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


to those of outside areas may be expected when this material is
examined.
Kellum has pointed out that a few species, such as Oliva posti
Dall, Lyria carolinensis Kellum, Turritella fuerta Kellum and Antigona
lamellacea Kellum, are closely allied to species in the Tampa limestone,
whereas other species, such as Conus postalveatus Kellum, Busycon
spiniger onslowensis Kellum, Crassatellites mississippiensis silverdal-
ensis Kellum, and Macrocallista tia Kellum are more closely related
to species in the Oligocene Vicksburg group. The writer agrees with
Kellum that the evidence now available shows the Trent marl to oc-
cupy about the same horizons as the Tampa limestone.
The following lists indicate the relationship of the species at Silver-
dale to those in other deposits .


2-G. Survey

























































[18]




MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


SPECIES FROM SILVERDALE RELATED SPECIES
(Mansfield and MacNeil, collectors) (Mansfield)
Terebra sp. ............. ............................... T. divisura Conrad, Vicksburg; T. uni-
lineata, Calvert and Duplin.
Siphonalia sp. -------------------------..........--- S. migrans Conrad, Calvert.
Cancellaria sp. -.....-- -----...... ...-.........------C. aff. biplicata Conrad, Calvert and Chop.
tank.
Ecphora sp. ..------------------------------.--.....Genus in Calvert and later formations.
Rapana sp. ... .------.......------ ..-----.--........R. biconica Dall, Tampa limestone.
Rapana vaughani Mansfield ----...........Rapana vaughani Mansfield, Tampa lime-
stone.
Rapana sp. ....------..........................---- R. tampaensis Dall, Tampa limestone.
Coralliophila sp........ ----------.............. C. cumberlandiana (Gabb), Calvert.
Turritella sp. ......................................Turritella aequistriata Conrad, Calvert; T.
alcida Dall, Oak Grove sand, but more
slender than either.
Arcopsis adamsi (Dall)
var.?, (slightly lower than
typical form). -............................Arcopsis adamsii (Dall) lower Miocene to
Recent.
Glycymeris sp. .........- --.................--..... Aff. G. intercostata Gabb, Oligocene.
Pododesmus sp ...................................Cf. P. scopelus Dall, Chipola.
BEDS ENCLOSING THE TAMPA LIMESTONE
The beds that underlie the Tampa limestone are discussed in con-
nection with the Suwannee limestone (see pp. 46-63). The Tampa
limestone is overlain by either the Hawthorn formation or the Chipola
formation.
In certain areas in Marion County, according to Cooke and
Mossom,2 remnants of the Hawthorn formation rest upon the Tampa.
The southernmost outcrop of Tampa limestone in Wakulla County
is along the highway about 3 miles south of Crawfordville (stations
12294 and 12296). At a locality one mile farther south (station
12295), rock containing Chipola fossils was excavated in constructing
the highway, apparently from horizons above the Tampa. The fossils
collected are: Turritella dalli Gardner (Ms.) (Chipola formation),
Turritella subgrundifera Dall (Chipola and Oak Grove), Arca stami-
nata Dall (Chipola), Ostrea haitensis Sowerby (Chipola to Shoal
River), Modiolus sp. This fauna appears to be a little older than that
of the Hawthorn at Sopchoppy (Sopchoppy limestone of Dall) and is
here referred to the Chipola formation. The top of the Tampa lime-
stone has been placed by Ponton at a depth of 72 feet in an excavation
for a pump pit at the Tallahassee Water Works." In this excavation
a few species of mollusks were found, at depths of 50 to 55 feet, that
are considered diagnostic of the Hawthorn formation, especially that

23 Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
20th Ann. Rept., p. 131, 1929.
30 Ponton, G. M., quoted by Colbert, Edwin H., Aphelops from the Hawthorn
formation of Florida: Florida State Geol. Survey Bull. 10, p. 57, 1932.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


part of the Hawthorn included in the Sopchoppy limestone. The lime-
stone in this well immediately above the Tampa limestone, between
the depths of 60 to 72 feet, is also referred to the Sopchoppy.
At Ponto Springs in the northeast corner of Gadsden County (see
section drawn up by Ponton and Mansfield in Bulletin 9, p. 21, Florida
Geol. Survey, 1932), a hard, compact, gray to buff limestone consti-
tutes the lower 10 feet of the section. Although no determinable
fossils were found in this limestone, it probably should be referred to
the Tampa limestone. The section here closely duplicates the section
at Rock Bluff on the Apalachicola River, both as to lithology and as to
the character of the overlying beds. These, although referred to the
Hawthorn formation, are probably nearly the age equivalent of the
Chipola formation. The following species of mollusks were collected
by Ponton and Mansfield from beds overlying this limestone at Ponto
Springs: Pleurodonte sp., Scaphander sp., Mitra sp., Melongena sculp-
turata Dall, Cerithium cf. C. chipolana Dall, Turritella dalli Gardner
Ms., var., Turritella subgrundifera Dall, Glycymeris sp., Arca stami-
nata Dall?, Ostrea normalis Dall, Chione near C. burnsii Dall, Chlamys
acanikos Gardner, Pododesmus scopelus Dall (also at Rock Bluff) and
Lithophaga sp.
Unfossiliferous beds above the Tampa limestone in the section at
Old Chattahoochee Landing, Gadsden County, are referred to the
Hawthorn formation by Cooke and Mossom.3
The strata above the Tampa limestone along the Apalachicola
River are shown in the sections drawn up for that area.
At Baileys Old Ferry, on the Chipola River, Calhoun County, the
Tampa limestone is overlain by the Chipola.

LOCAL DETAILS
HILLSBOROUGH COUN-TY-Y
The following species iave been collected on Sixmile Creek, near
Orient:
*Cepolis direpta (Dall).
*Pleurodonte haruspica Dall.
Pleurodonte cunctator (Dall).
*Bulimulus americanus (Heilprin).
Cerion anodonta (Dall).
*Humboldtiana? tuckerae Mansfield.
*Conus illiolus Dall.
Conus planiceps Heilprin.
*Olivella eutorta Dall.
*A-ncilla shepardi Dall.
*Marginella ballista Dall.
s Idem, p. 94.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


*Marginella gregaria Dall.
*Lyria heilprini Dall.
Conomitra angulata (Heilprin)
S*Busycon perizonatum Dall.
Melongena sculpturata Dall?.
*Alectrion ethelinda Dall.
*Urosalpinx? hillsboroensis Mansfield.
*Rapana tampaensis Dall.
Cypraea tumulus Heilprin.
*Strombus liocyclus Dall.
*Potamides transecta Dall.
Potamides campanulatus Heilprin.
*Turritella atacta Dall.
Turritella tampae Heilprin.
Globularia streptostoma (Heilprin)
Ampullina amphora (H-eilprin).
Pachycromnium floridana (Dall).
*Helicina tampae Dall.
*Nerita tampaensis Dall.
*Yoldia cf. Y. frater Dall.
*Glycymeris lamyi Dall.
*Arca umbonata Lamarck.
*Barbatia marylandica Conrad.
Anadara hypomela Dall.
Chlamys crocus Cooke.
Chlamys burnetti Tucker.
*Modiolus blandus Dall.
*Modiolus cinnamomeus (Lamarck).
*Celliforma nuda (Dall) Brown.
Cardita tegea Dall.
Venericardia serricosta (Heilprin)
*Cyrena pompholyx Dall.
Chama tampaensis Dall.
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.
Phacoides hillsboroensis (Heilprin)
*Cardium gadsdenense Mansfield.
Cardium phlyctaenum Dall.
*Macrocallista floridana Conrad.
Antigona glyptoconcha Dall.
Antigona shepardi Dall.
Anomalocardia penita (Conrad)
*Venus halidona Dall.
*Tellina merula Dall.
*Tellina halidona Dall.
Panope aff. P. goldfussii (Wagner).

The species preceded by an asterisk were collected by Miss Helen
I. Tucker (her locality no. 57), a number of them being previously
unrecorded at the locality.
Of the 57 species in the list 52 occur in the Tampa limestone in
the Tampa area, the 5 species not identified from the' Tampa area
being Humboldtiana? tuckerae Mansfield, Urosalpinx? hillsboroensis
Mansfield, Chlamys crocus Cooke, Chlamys burnetti Tucker, and
Cardium gadsdenense Mansfield. Dall" referred the fauna to his

82 Dall, W. H., Wagner Free Inst. Scl. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 6, pp. 1571-1572, 1903.





SFLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN

Tampa limestone or orbitolite bed, and it is very similar to that which
occupies a position in the uppermost part of the Tampa limestone
(of the writer) at station 13847, Gadsden Point, 4 miles south of
Ballast Point.
The rock along Sixmile Creek is calcareous, but silicified shells are
found in the bed of the creek, and also at or near the contact of the
limestone with the overlying Pleistocene bed.

POLK COUNTY
The following species have be~en ndermined from station 2470,
/ Phosphate mine, 1 mile west oxBartow. G. H. Eldridge, collector,
about 1894.
Conus planiceps Heilprin.
Turritella tampae Heilprin.
Turritella litharia Dall.
Chlamys crocus Cooke.
Chlamys burnetti Tucker?.
Spondylus chipolanus tampaensis Mansfield.
Crassatella deformis (Heilprin)
Venericardia serricosta (Heilprin)
Antigona glyptoconcha Dall.

PINELLAS COUNTY
The following species have been determined from stations 7358
(C. W. Cooke) and 12763 (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfied
Anclote-River about 300 yards above the wagon bridge at Tarpo
Springs:)
Conus designatus Dall.
Xancus polygonatus (Heilprin)
Lyria heilprini Dall (cf. L. tampensis Mansfield).
Busycon perizonatum Dall?.
Solenosteria quinquespira (Dall).
Urosalpinx? inornata (Dall).
(Referred by Dall to his Tampa limestone.)
Murex trophoniformis Heilprin.
Rapana vaughani Mansfield.
(Occurs also in the lower bed at River Junction.)
Orthaulax pugnax (Heilprin).
Strombus liocyclus Dall.
Cerithium praecursor Heilprin?.
Potamides campanulatus Heilprin.
Potamides cornutus Heilprin.
Serpulorbis granifera (Say) ?.
Turritella tarponensis Mansfield.
Globularia solidula Dall.
Ampullina amphora Heilprin.
Sinum imrperforatum Dall?.
Area umbonata Lamarck.
\ Anadara tarponensis Mansfield.
\ Amusium sp.
\ Plicatula densata Conrad.
\Y




MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Lithophaga bisulcata D'Orbigny.
Cardita anclotensis Mansfield.
Cyrena floridana (Dall).
Diplodonta anclotensis Mansfield.
Cardium anclotense Mansfield.
Cardium pinellasense Mansfield.
Ct.clAntig rhodia Dall.

This fauna includes species that were supposed to characterize
both the Orthaula. pugnax zone of Dall and the overlying Tampa
limestone of Dall.
PASCO COUNTY
The following species have been determined from station 12760,
one-half mile west of New Port Richey:

Potamides cornutus Heilprin.
Although this species occurs in the so-called Orthaulax pugnax
zone of Dall, it appears to be more often associated with Potamides
hillsboroensis Heilprin, of the Cerithiumn zone of Heilprin.

MARION COUNTY
The species listed below have been determined from one or more
of the following localities: station 11115, Cummer Lumber Company
lime pit at Kendrick; station 7353, Road from Anthony to Martin,
just east of crossroads midway between them; station 11186, pits on
old Raysor property near hilltop, midway between Lowell and Sparr:


Pleurodonte cf. P. cunctator (Dall).
Pleurodonte kendrickensis Mansfield.
Mitra silicata Dall?.
Mitra cf. prodroma Gardner (MS.), a Chipola species.
Xancus polygonatus (Heilprin).
Alectrion aff. A. harrisi Maury.
Murex trophoniformis Heilprin.
Turritella tampae Heilprin.
Calyptraea trochiformis Lamarck?.
Arca kendrickensis Mansfield.
Chlamys crocus Cooke.
Chlamys marionensis Mansfield.
Chlamys burnetti Tucker.
Venericardia nodifera Kellum.
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.
Phacoides hillsboroensis Heilprin?.
Cardium hernandoense Mansfield?.
Dosinia chipolana Dall?.
Clementia sp.
Callocardia albofonte Gardner, a Chipola species.
Antigona cf. A. tarquinia Dall.
Venus halidona Dall.
Venus marionana Mansfield.
Tellina silicata Mansfield?.
Panope aff. P. goldfussii (Wagner).





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


The assemblages at the three localities are very similar. Most of
'the species in the above list appear to have lived in late Tampa time.
However, the presence of two or more species identical with or
closely allied to species of the Hawthorn formation indicates a mix-
ture (mechanical or otherwise) of the earlier and later faunas. Cooke
and Mossom3" believed that "A thin bed of Tampa Limestone was found
between the Hawthorn formation and the Ocala limestone in the test
pits on the old Raysor property midway between Lowell and Sparr"
(station 11186).
JEFFERSON COUNTY
The species listed below have been determined from one or more
of the following localities: station 6830 (C. W. Cooke and E. H.
Sellards) and station 12300 (H. Gunter, G. M. Ponton and W. C.
Mansfield), at and above a disappearing stream, 114 miles northeast
of Lloyd.- Clay. overlying a limestone at Baileys Mill Creek sink,
three-fourths mile northeast of Lloyd (L. C. Johnson), Wacissa
(G. H. Eldridge) :
Pleurodonte cf. cunctator Dall.
Bulimulus americanus patulinus Dall?.
Helicina ballista Dall?.
Planorbis? sp.
Conus planiceps Heilprin.
Fusiturricula lapeonotierei (Dall).
Olivella entorta Dall?.
Marginella bellula Dall.
Lyria musicina Heilprin.
Latirus floridanus Heilprin.
Cypraea tumulus Heilprin.
Strombus liocyclus Dall.
Orthaulax pugnax (Heilprin).
Bittium adela Dall.
Cerithium precursor Heilprin.
Potamides transecta *Dall.-
Potamides campanulatus Heilprin.
Turritella megalobasis Dall.
Hipponix tampaensis Mansfield.
Helicina ballista Dall?.
Glycymeris cf. G. lamyi Dall.
Barbatia domingensis (Lamarck).
Ostrea vaughani Dall.
Chlamys crocus (Cooke).
Crassatella deformis (Heilprin).
Venericardia serricosta (Heilprin).
Cyrena floridana (Dall).
Cardium gadsdenense Mansfield.
'Hippopus? gunteri Mansfield.
Chione spada Dall?.
Anomalocardia penita (Conrad).
Venus halidona Dall?.
3 Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida State Geol
Survey, 20th Ann. Rept., p. 89, 1929.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


These fossils probably all came from the same horizon. Baileys
Mill Creek sink may be the same locality as station 6830. Dall"
briefly discussed the geology in the vicinity of Lloyd. At a place
said to be 2Y miles east of Lloyd (probably the same place as station
6830), Dall states that the limestone appears to be Tampa, as it con-
tains many specimens of Orbitolites floridanus Conrad and other
fossils.
WAKULLA COUNTY
The species listed below have been determined from one or more
of the following localities: Station 3420, on the railroad to St. Marks,
15 [probably 16] miles south of Tallahassee (T. \W. Vaughan). Sta-
tion 12293, 200 yards south of Wakulla Railroad Station, 16 miles
south of Tallahassee (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield). Station
12292, Cherokee sink, about 2 miles west of Wakulla Spring or about
5 miles west of Wakulla Station (G. M. Ponton and WV. C. Mans-
field). Station 12732, along a drainage ditch of highway from Wa-
kulla Station to St. Marks, 3.7 miles south of Wakulla Station. Sta-
tion 12294, along Florida State Highway No. 10, 2.5 miles south of
Crawfordville; from pieces of rock thrown out in constructing the
highway (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield). Station 12296, "The
Swirl," 3 miles southeast of Crawfordville (G. M. Ponton and W. C.
Mansfield).
Pleurodonte cf. P. cunctator (Dall).
Bulimulus americanus wakullae Mansfield.
Bulimulus americanus patulinus Dall?.
Cerion anodonta (Dall).
Scaphander ballistus Mansfield.
Conus princeps wakullensis Mansfield.
Fusiturricula condomina (Dall).
Lyria heilprini Dall?.
Conomitra angulata (Heilprin).
Xancus polygonatus Heilprin.
Murex tritonopsis Heilprin.
Coralliophaga magna Dall.
Cypraea tumulus Heilprin?.
Strombus liocyclus Dall.
Orthaulax pugnax (Heilprin).
Cerithium praecursor Heilprin.
Cerithium aff. C. georgianum Lyell and Sowerby.
Potamides transecta Dall.
Potamides campanulatus Heilprin.
Potamides cornutus Heilprin.
Turritella tampae Dall.
Turritella pagodaeformis Heilprin.
Turritella megalobasis Dall?.
Calyptraea trochiformis Lamarck?.
Globularia streptostom He1eilprihb?.,
Dall,: W. H., U. S. Geol' Suv.ey, Bull. 64, p. '12, 1352.'





. FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Ampullina amphora Heilprin.
Nuculana flexuosa (Heilprin).
Glycymeris cf. G. lamyi Dall.
Area umbonata Lamarck.
Area grammatodonta Dall.
Barbatia arcula Heilprin.
Anadara hypomela Dall.
Ostrea vaughani Dall.
Chlamys crocus (Cooke).
Chlamys burnetti Tucker?.
Chlamys sp. a.
Modiolus blandus Dall?.
Modiolus cinnamomeus (Lamarck).
Celliforma nuda (Dall) Brown?.
Crassatella deformis (Heilprin) var.?.
Venericardia serricosta (Heilprin).
Cyrena pompholyx Dall.
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.
Phacoides hillsboroensis Heilprin?.
Cardium gadsdenense Mansfield.
Cardium parile Dall.
Cardium phlyctaenum Dall.
Cardium hernandoense Mansfield?.
Chione cf. spenceri Cooke.
Antigona glyptoconcha Dall.
Tellina silicata Mansfield?.
Tellina merula Dall.
Semele sardonica Dall?..
Panope aff. P. goldfussii Wagner.
Pholadomya species.
Gastrochaena aff. G. cuneiformis Spengler.

The assemblages at the several localities are very similar. The
fauna is believed to represent the latest fauna of the Tampa lime-
stone. The horizon is overlain by beds containing fossils of the
Alum Bluff group.
LEON COUNTY
The species listed below were collected at station 12735, W. K.
Cooke and Sons property, about 11 miles slightly southwest of Talla-
hassee (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield):

Turritella tampae Heilprin.
Anadara hypomela Dall.
Venericardia serricosta (Heilprin) ?.
Phacoides silicatus Mansfield.
Cardium gadsdenense Mansfield.
Anomalocardia penita (Conrad) ?.

This locality is the nearest to Tallahassee at which near-surface
fossils have been collected from the Tampa limestone. About 15 feet
of limestone is exposed; the lower part is rather dense, white to gray;
the upper part contains more fossils.
A nearby locality, locally called,"Dismal Sink," is 300 to 400 feet
in diameter and is at a, higher' level tlhn `thb- surrounding area. On





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


March 18, 1932, the level of the water in the sink was about 35 feet
below the rim. A collection of fossils of Hawthorn age, obtained
about 10 feet below the rim, included an interesting species, "Anomia
suwanneensis" Gardner, which occurs in the Hawthorn formation at
White Springs, on the Suwannee River. These Hawthorn species lie
at a higher elevation than the place from which the Tampa fossils
were collected.

SECTIONS ON THE FLINT RIVER, GEORGIA, AND THE APALACHICOLA
RIVER, FLORIDA
Figure 1 shows a series of sections exposed on the Flint River,
Georgia (no. 1), and along the Apalachicola River, Florida (nos. 2-6).
The sections exposed along the Apalachicola River are classic in
the study of the geology of western Florida. Since their discovery by
Langdon in 1887 they have been visited and studied by many geolo-
gists and a number of papers have been written about them. These
are listed in the "Bibliography of Florida Geology," published in the
First Annual Report, pp. 73-108, 1908. The excellent reports of
Sellards and Gunter"' are the most recent. They describe the litho-
logic rather than the faunal character of the beds. The sections at
Aspalaga Bluff, Rock Bluff, and Alum Bluff given in this paper are
mainly adapted from these reports.
In figure 1 stratigraphic sections of the bluffs from Wyley Land-
ing, Ga., to Alum Bluff, Fla., have been drawn up with the river stage
of March 5, 1909, as a datum. The distances between the sections
may not be exact but are in accord with the most reliable information
at hand. The names of a few characteristic fossils have been inter-
calated at the proper levels in these sections, and an attempt has been
made to correlate the faunas of the Tampa limestone from one
section to another. Most of the fossils in the limestones are preserved
as molds and in some instances it is difficult to make specific determi-
nations from the imprints taken from these molds. This is, however,
the first attempt to correlate the beds and any errors will doubtless
be corrected in future work.
The sections and their faunal content will be discussed in order
beginning with Wyley Landing on the Flint River at the north and
proceeding down the Apalachicola River.
S Sellards, E. H., and Gunter, Herman, The fullers earth deposits of Gadsdei
County, Fla.; Florida State Geol. Survey 2d Ann. Rept., pp. 257-291, 1909.
(Especially the "Apalachicola River Section," pp. 265-285.) Geology between
the Apalachicola and Ocklocknee Rivers in Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
10th and 11th Ann. Repts., pp. 11-54, 1918.

















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MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA 'AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES

Wyley Landing.-Wyley Landing is on the south bank of the
River about 5 miles northeast of Old Chattahoochee Landing.
section here (figure 1, no. 1) follows:


Flint
The


Section at Wyley Landing, Georgia, after J. O. Veatch and L. W. Stephenson.
Pliocene? [Mansfield] : Feet
3. Bright-red sand, capping the bluff --.--.........--- ...........-- ............................... ?
Lower Miocene, Tampa limestone (part):
2. Massive-bedded, weathered grayish or white limestone ......-- ---...............40
Oligocene; probably Flint River formation:
1. Greenish or bluish clay containing rock fragments ...................................10

The details of the sequence are obscured by debris from the bluff,
and the exact positions in the bluff at which collections have been made
are not definitely known. However, the fossils collected indicate that
both the Tampa limestone and the Flint River formation are present.
The basal 10 feet of the section, consisting of greenish or bluish clay,
probably belongs to the Flint River formation. Perhaps the Tampa
limestone of this exposure is the same as the Wileys Landing Bed of
Foerste," but no fossils were listed by Foerste, and the correlation
is uncertain.
The species collected from Wyley Landing, station 3403 (T. W.
Vaughan), station 7077 (Vaughan, Cooke, and Mansfield), station
13845 (Cooke, Mansfield, and MacNeil), are listed below. Those
preceded by an asterisk probably came from the Tampa limestone and
those by the letter "F" from the Flint River formation.

*Bulimulus sp. (7077).
*Potamides campanulatus Heilprin (13845, 7077).
*Potamides cornutus Heilprin (3403, 7077).
*Cerithium cf. C. praecursor (Heilprin) (3403).
*Rapana vaughani Mansfield (3403).
*Turritella cf. T. tampae Dall (7077).
Calyptraea sp. (7077).
*Ampullina amphora (Heilprin) (3403).
Tegula? (3403).
*Barbatia (Acar) cf. B. (A.) domingensis (Lamarck) (7077).
?*Ostrea sp. (3403).
Lithophaga sp. (3403, 7077).
F, Lima cf. L. halensis Dall (7077).
*Crassatella deformis (Heilprin) (7077).
*Cyrena floridana (Dall) (3403, 13845).
Venus sp. (3403).
Corbula sp. (7077).

Pa Foerste, August F., The upper Vicksburg Eocene and the Chattahoochee Mio-
cene of Southwest Georgia and adjacent Florida: Am. Jour. Sci., 3d ser.,
vol. 48, p. 51, 1894.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Fig. 1. Tampa limestone at eastern end of Victory bridge (Old Chattahochee
Landing) over Apalachicola River. Photo by N. B. Davis, 1925. (See Florida
Geol. Survey, 16th Ann. Rept., p. 85, 1925.)


Fig. 2. Tampa limestone on Sixmile Creek, a quarter of a mile below the
bridge at Orient. Photo by Florida Geol. Survey. (See pl. 9[a], Florida Geol.
Survey, 20th Ann. Rept.)
[30]


BULLETIN FIFTEEN, PLATE A





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Old Chattahoochee Landing, Florida.-This is the type locality of
the Chattahoochee formation, now included under the Tampa lime-
stone. The section (figure 1, no. 2) was taken by Ponton and Mans-
field along the road on the east side of Victory bridge, about one-half
mile south of the Florida-Georgia state line.

Section at Old Chattahoochee Landing, by WV. C. Mansfield, G. M. Ponton, and
C. \W. Cooke.
Feet
Miocene, Alum Bluff group, Hawthorn formation (fide Cooke):
13. Alternating beds of sand, clay, sandy clay, and clayey sand -......--.- 42.5
Unconformity.
Lower Miocene, Tampa limestone:
12. Limestone with Sorites, Anomialocardia penita -----------------.--------------.--- .. 8.2
11. Limestone with Venericardia and Lithophaga ....-....................... 7.4
10. Concealed --...-...................-.............................................. .... .... .......... 12.2
9. White chalky limestone containing some quartz sand ------------....--------........ 27.0
8. Limy clay (fide Sellards and Gunter) -------...--... ....----- .....-......... 4.0
7. Same as no. 9 --........-. -----..... ......... ............-- 19.0
6. Concealed, probably clay ----........--....----... --.---....--- .......... 5.0
5. Ledge with calcite crystals ----------... ----...-- ............--------. ......... 1.0
4. Dirty white limestone --.---------.---.. .... ---- ---................... ... ......... 2.0
3. Ledge ...........-...................- .......... ....... ........... ............. 1.0
2. Same as no. 4 --- --............................................ 2.0
1. Echinoderm bed, dominantly sand ----------..---...--....----------............. 1.0
Concealed to river .......------ ....-... ..... .. .. .................................... 20.0

Four fossiliferous horizons were recognized in this section, the
first at the base (bed 1), the second about 37 feet above (bed 9), the
third (bed 11), and fourth (bed 12) near the top. The fossils col-
lected from each of these horizons are listed below.
Maury"' states that a layer of Helices was noted by Professor Harris
at an elevation of 43 feet in the section. The position of this bed
appears to be about 18 feet above the echinoderm bed, or in the lower
part of bed 7.
The following species have been collected from bed 1, the lowest
zone in the section, the bed carrying "Echinocardiumin" depressum Clark
(elevation 77.4 to 78.4 feet above sea level); station 2565 (Dall and
Stanley-Brown, 1893), station 3405 (Vaughan, 1900), station 4836
(F. G. Clapp and others, 1913), station 6185 (L. W. Stephenson,
1908), station 7168 (T. W. Vaughan, 1914), station 12282 (G. M.
Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931; W. C. Mansfield and F. S.
MacNeil, 1936) :

Scaphander ballistus Mansfield?.
Epitonium sp.
Arca umbonata Lamarck?.
Ostrea aff. 0. antiguensis Brown.
37 Maury, Carlotta Joaquina, Bull. Am. Paleontology No. 15, pp. 52, 53, 54, 1902.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Chlamys crocus (Cooke).
Chlamys sp. b.
Modiolus blandus Dall.
Divaricella sp.
Protocardia sp.
Cardium gadsdenense Mansfield.
Venus? sp.
Semele silicata Dall?.
Panope aff. P. goldfussii (Wagner).
"Echinocardium" depressum Clark.

The echinoderm bed is provisionally placed at the base of the
Tampa limestone, although there is a little evidence for placing it in
the upper part of the Flint River formation. The Ostrea preserved
as a mold resembles also O. vicksbu'rgensis Conrad from the Oligo-
cene, as well as 0. antiguensis. The rest of the fauna, however, ap-
pears to be more closely related to that of the Tampa limestone.
The following species occur in bed 9, the second zone, at station
13844, 37 feet above the echinoderm bed:
Conus sp.
Potamides campanulatus Heilprin.
Xenophora sp.
Ampullina cf. A. amphora (Heilprin).
Glycymeris sp.
Chlamys crocus (Cooke) ?.
Lithophaga bisulcata D'Orbigny.
Venericardia sp.
Cyrena cf. C. floridana Dall.
Antigona shepardi Dall.

It may be noted that the genera Potamides, Ampullina, and Cyrena
occur in this zone.
The following species occur in beds 11 and 12, the highest fossilif-
erous zones; station 7169, bed 6 of Vaughan, elevation 122.5-124 feet
(Vaughan); station 12283, elevation 155-165 feet, beds 11 and 12 (G.
M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield); station 13846, elevation 155 feet, bed
11 (W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil); station 13854, elevation
165 feet, bed 12 (W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil):
Turritella pagodaformis Heilprin? (7169).
Chlamys crocus (Cooke) (7169, 12283).
Chlamys burnetti Tucker? (12283).
Lithophaga bisulcata D'Orbigny (13846).
Lithophaga antillaria (D'Orbigny) (7169).
Venericardia sp. (13846).
Anomalocardia penita Conrad (12283, -13854).

River Junction.-This section (figure 1, no. 3), about 1 mile south-
east of Old Chattahoochee Landing and about the same distance from
the Apalachicola River, is as follows:





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Section at River Junction, by W. C. Mansfield and G. M. Ponton.
Feet
Miocene, Alum Bluff group, Hawthorn formation:
7. Clay and fuller's earth (Vaughan) ............................... ................ 10
6. Unexposed, probably argillaceous sands (Vaughan) .......................... 17
Unconformity.
Lower Miocene, Tampa limestone:
5. Layers of harder and softer limestone ..-........................................ .. 10
4. Ledge with many Trigoniocardia .......... .......................... .............. 2
3. Soft white limestone .............................................................. 5
2. C concealed .......... ................ ...... ......... .............. ...................................... 65
1. Very siliceous limestone with Ampullina and Cyrena ....................... 12

The species listed below were collected from bed 1 at localities in
the vicinity of River Junction; station 3407, west end of roadyard
(T. W. Vaughan, 1900) ; station 3408, ditch on south side of the rail-
road, east of crossing (T. W. Vaughan, 1900); station 3413, north
side of creek on road from River to Chattahoochee, one-half mile
north of River Junction (T. W. Vaughan, 1900); station 3414, River
Junction (T. W. Vaughan, 1900); station 7172, north side of creek,
outskirts of River Junction (T. W. Vaughan, 1914); station 7173,
west of River Junction, north side of L. & N. R. R. west Y, about
10 feet below level of railroad tracks (T. \W. Vaughan, 1914) ; station
7174, east side of Y, south side of L. & N. R. R. tracks, ditch along
railroad, 8-10 feet below level of railroad tracks (T. W. Vaughan,
1914) ; station 7175, west of River Junction, east side of Y, north of
L. & N. R. R., 9-10 feet below level of railroad tracks (T. W. Vaughan,
1914); station 7176, north of L. & N. R. R., west of Y, elevation
about 74 feet (T. WV. Vaughan and others, 1914). The elevation of
tracks is about 82 feet above sea level.

Rapana vaughani Mansfield (7175).
Modiolus cinnamomeus (Lamarck) (7172).
Cyrena floridana (Dall) ? (3407, 7174, 7175).
Cardium hernandoense Mansfield? (3408).
Cardium brook-svillense conjunctionense Mansfield?
Antigona shepardi Dall? (7172).
Corbula kaghriana Dall? (7172).

The species found in bed 1 at station 13851, about one-fourth mile
north of railroad station at River Junction, at an elevation of about
80 feet, are:

Solenosteria quinquespina Dall?.
Turritella tampae Dall?.
Ampullina amphora Heilprin?.
Area umbonata Lamarck.
Anadara tarponensis Mansfield?.
Chlamys crocus (Cooke).
Venericardia sp.
Cardium hernandoense Mansfield?.


3-G. Survey






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Cardium brooksvillense conjunctionense Mansfield?.
Venus halidona Dall?.
Antigona shepardi Dall.
Semele sardonica Dall?

The horizon of these fossils is a little higher in the section than
that of the localities below the railroad tracks (station 3407 and other
localities). The matrix in both assemblages is very sandy, more so
than at station 13844, at Old Chattahoochee Landing, and they may be
a little lower stratigraphically than station 13844, although the faunas
are similar.
The species listed below have been collected from an abandoned
quarry, one-half mile south of River Junction at an elevation around
150 feet, at several localities: Station 3409, above cement bed
(Vaughan, 1900); station 3410, cement quarry (Vaughan, 1900); sta-
tion 3411, above cement horizon (Vaughan, 1900); station 7080,
cement quarry (Vaughan and others, 1914); station 12285 (Ponton
and Mansfield, 1931). They are mainly from bed 4 of the section.

Scaphander ballistus Mansfield.
Conus illiolus Dall?.
Conus planiceps Heilprin.
Corallophila magna Dall?.
Cypraea tumulus Heilprin.
Orthaulax pugnax (Heilprin) ?.
Siliquaria tampaensis Mansfield?.
Turritella pagodaeformis Heilprin?.
Turritella megalobasis Dall.
Calyptraea trochiformis Lamarck?.
Globularia streptostoma Heilprin.
Nucula gadsdenens#SMansfield.
Glycymeris gadsdenensiSMansfield.
Arca umbonata Lamarck?.
Barbatia marylandica Conrad?.
Modiolus cinnamomeus (Lamarck)
Lithophaga antillar/um D'Orbigny.
Venericardia serricosta Heilprin.
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.
Phacoides silicatus Mansfield.
Diplodonta catopotium Dall?.
Cardium gadsdenense Mansfield.
Cardium brooksvillense conjunctionense Mansfield.
Hippopus? gunteri Mansfield?.
Antigona shepardi Dall
Anomalocardia penita Conrad.
Tellina silicata Mansfield?.

This fauna is high in the Tampa limestone. It seems to cor-
respond to the Anomalocardia bed (No. 12) at Old Chattahoochee
Landing. No specimens of Trigoniocardia, which is common at River
Junction locality, were collected here.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


Aspalaga Bluff.-Aspalaga Bluff is in Gadsden- County, about 5S
miles southwest of River Junction. The section (figure 1, no. 4)
follows:

Section at Aspalaga Bluff, after Sellards and Gunter, 1909.
Pliocene, Citronelle formation (Mansfield) : Feet
12. C covered ........... ..... ........ ........................... .......................................... 60
Probably Miocene, Hawthorn formation (Mansfield):
11. Mostly covered with few outcrops of impure limestone with fossil
casts ................. ....... .... .... ................................................... 51
Unconformity (Mansfield).
Lower Miocene, Tampa limestone:
10. W hite granular limestone with fossils ...................................... ........ 2
9. W white limestone ......................---- --. ----............-.... ...-............... 4
8. Light-colored impure limestone (where exposed) with clay in-
clusions ................... .............. ................................ ....... ......................... 23
7. W hite granular limestone with fossils ........................ ..................... 1
6. W hite limestone ....... .... ...... .. ....................... 2.5
5. Light-colored lim estone ----------------------- ------------------------------------------------------- 2
5. Light-colored lim estone ................................................ ........ ................... 2
4. W hite lim estone ........ ................-.. ....- ---................... ........ .. ...... 6
3. Sandy light to pale yellow limestone ................................................... 2.75
2. Gray to bluish calcareous clay .................................. ..... ................. 4
1. Yellowish and sandy limestone with fossils ...................................... 15.75

The following species occur at station 13841, about 10 feet above
a 4-foot clay bed in beds 5 and 6:

Conomitra angulata Heilprin.
Solenosteria quinquespina Dall.
Rapana sp.
Cerithium cf. praecursor Dall.
Potamides aspalagensis Mansfield.
Ampullina amphora Heilprin.
Turbo sp.
Modiolus cinnamomeus (Lamarck).
Lithophaga antillar~A(D'Orbigny).
Phacoides sp.
Cyrena floridana Dall.
Anomalocardia penita Conrad.

The matrix is a porous, nearly white, pure limestone containing the
foraminifer, Archais floridanus Conrad. The fauna is somewhat
similar to that of the "Cerithium rock" of Heilprin but may be a little
younger. Potamides aspalagensis, described from here, is closely re-
lated to Potamides hillsboroensis Heilprin.
This part of the section corresponds to the Madrepora bed of
Harris (see Maury, op. cit., p. 54, .1902.)
Station 3406, elevation in the bluff not known (Vaughan) has
yielded: Turritella tampae Heilprin.
Chlamys sp. b.
Cyrena floridana (Dall) ?
Phacoides silicatus Mansfield.
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


At station 12287, at estimated elevation 45 to 50 feet Above the
river level, in bed 9 of section, Ponton and Mansfield collected a large
form of Anomalocardia penita Conrad.
At an estimated elevation of 80 feet above the river Ostrea rugi-
fera and Pecten acanikos Gardner, Chipola formation species, were
collected by Mansfield and MacNeil from bed 11 of the section.
Prof. G. D. Harris, who made a section of this bluff in 1901, re-
ports Pecten and Placuna in place at an elevation of 145 feet above the
base of the cliff. This may be an error, as this elevation appears to
be too high to be in the Alum Bluff group.
Rock BIuff.--Rock Bluff, Liberty County, is on the left bank of
Apalachicola River, about 5y miles south southwest of Aspalaga
Bluff, or about 12/ miles from the state line. The section here (fig-
ure 1, no. 5) is as follows:

Section at Rock Bluff, after Sellards and Gunter, 1909.
Miocene, Alum Bluff group, Hawthorn formation: Feet
10. Fuller's earth (exposed) -.......-----..---- .. ..................------------------- 3
9. Ledge with shells (Ostrea normalis fide Cooke) .-......---- .................---- 1
8. Gray sand ----------------------------........... --. ----...-- --- --- ........ 5
7. Ledge with shells (Pecten acanikos fide Cooke) .--.............-..........------ 2
6. Gray sand with lime inclusions -------...-.... .... ......... ........ -------- 5
5. Covered ............................................................................... ...... ....... 2
4. Light-gray calcareous sand (Pecten acanikos fide Cooke) --...-----.......-- 30
3. Bluish-green to gray sands (Pododesmus scopelus, Pecten acanikos,
M ansfield) ................................................................ ...................... 34
2. Compact sandy marl with concretions near the base and an Ostrca
layer 6 feet above the base -.........--------- .. .........---------- 8
Unconformity.
Lower Miocene, Tampa limestone:
1. Limestone -... ---------------.-...... ....-...... .... 10

The lower part of the section (bed 1)., about 10 feet exposed,
belongs to the Tampa limestone. Above the Tampa limestone about
90 feet of the strata have been referred to the Alum Bluff group by
Sellards and Gunter," but this amount appears to be excessive. Cooke
and Mossom6 follow Sellards and Gunter in this respect, though
choosing their own limits. The part referred to the Alum Bluff group
closely duplicates the section above the Tampa limestone at Ponto
Springs (the species occurring in the Alum' Bliff group at Ponto
Springs are given in the discussion of the section at that place).
Alum Bluff.-Alum Bluff, in Liberty County, is on the left side
of Apalachicola River about 6y miles in a direct line from Rock Bluff.

3 Sellards, E. H., and Gunter, Herman, The -fullers earth deposits of Gadsden
County, Fla.: Florida State Geol. Survey, 2d Ann. Rcpt;; pp. 265-286, 1909.
0 Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Florida Geol. Survey 20th Ann. Rept.,
p. 118, 1929.




MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


The section (figure 1, no. 6) is drawn up to show the relation of the
Alum Bluff group to the exposures upstream. The Tampa limestone
goes under near the mouth of Sweetwater Creek, 2fr to 3 miles below
Rock Bluff.
Section at Alum Bluff, modified from that of Berry, Sellards, and Gunter, by
Cooke.
Miocene, Choctawhatchee formation: Feet
6. Brown, sandy micaceous, pyritiferous clay aluminouss clay of Dall) .... 25
5. Brown or dirty-green fine sand mixed with clay (Ecphora zone) ........ 15
Erosional unconformity?
Miocene, Alum Bluff group?:
4. Medium-fine white or greenish micaceous sand -.....-- ---.. ....------..--......... 3
3. Leaf-bearing bed --- ...............---....... .............................. 3
Unconformity.
Miocene, Alum Bluff group; Chipola formation:
2. Light-gray tough calcareous sand with typical Chipola fossils in lower
part, but casts alone in the upper part (Alum Bluff sands of Dall)....... 16
1. Very fossiliferous fine quartz sand in a yellow calcareous clay, above
water level of M arch 5, 1909 ................ .................. ... ........... 10
The top of the Tampa limestone would appear to be about 15 or
more feet below the lowest exposed part of bed 1 of the section at
Alum Bluff. The Ostrea bed (bed 2 at Rock Bluff) would also lie
below bed 1 at Alum Bluff.
Dip of the Tampa limestone along the Apalachicola River.-
Foerste'4 assumed a rate of dip of the Tampa limestone of about 9
feet per mile. Sellards and Gunter" estimated the rate of dip from
Aspalaga Bluff to Rock Bluff to be 10 feet per mile. The same
authors, using a calcareous clay bed that crops out at Aspalaga Bluff
(bed 2 of section), at the locality 3 miles southwest of River Junction,
and at Old Chattahoochee Landing, estimated a dip of 7 feet or more
per mile.
As the writer has used the sections constructed by Sellards and
Gunter along the Apalachicola River, except those at Old Chatta-
hoochee Landing and at River Junction, his estimate of the dip of
the strata naturally conforms with theirs. The average rate of dip
over the whole distance along the Apalachicola River appears to be
7 to 10 feet per mile. Small folds in the Tampa limestone in the
vicinity of Old Chattahoochee Landing and a small syncline near the
middle of Aspalaga Bluff are reported by Sellards and Gunter."
These folds appear to be of a local and minor character and probably
do not involve large areas.

,0 Foerste, Aug. F., Am. Jour. Sce. (3), vol. 48, p. 54, 1894.
'~ Sellards, E. H., and Gunter, Herman, Florida State Geol. Survey 2d Ann.
Rept., pp. 277-279, 1909.
3 Idem, pp. 270, 277.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


At a later date Gunter and Sellards" concluded that "the actual
average dip is probably close to the estimate formerly given of 7 feet
per mile" for the Tampa limestone along the Apalachicola River.
The same authors" wrote: "These measurements [between Apa-
lachicola and Ocklocknee Rivers] which are consistent with others
previously obtained indicate that the Chattahoochee formation dips to
the east from River Junction and rises somewhat again at the Ock-
locknee River."
From the information so far obtained it seems that the Tampa\
limestone in western Florida was deposited in a wide embaymentt
whose waters entered from the south and extended northward into'
Georgia. This area slowly sank during Tampa time and sediments
accumulated in a shallow sea. An uplift of the area possibly ended
Tampa time. If so, it was soon followed by a subsidence which per-
mitted the invasion of the Alum Bluff sea. None of the movements
seem to have been of large amplitude and the resulting dips are gentle.

CALHOUN COUNTY
The species listed below were collected by G. M. Ponton and W. C.
Mansfield from the following localities on the Chipola River: Station
12725, Baileys old Ferry at the mouth of Tenmile Creek. Station
12728, Hamilton Spring, about ly~ miles below Willis bridge over
Chipola River. Station 12727, Willis bridge. Station 12726, about 2.2
miles above Willis bridge.
Pleurodonte cunctator Dall? (12726).
Morum chipolanum tampanum Mansfield (12727).
Calyptraea trochiformis Lamarck? (12726).
Glycymeris lamyi Dall (12728)
Chlamys crocus Cooke (12725)
Chlamys burnetti Tucker? (12727)
Venericardia serricosta Heilprin (12727).
Phacoides silicatus Mansfield (12725).
Cardium gadsdenense Mansfield (12725)
Antigona glyptoconcha Dall (12727).
Antigona shepardi Dall (12727).
Anomalocardia penita (Conrad) (12728).

WASHINGTON COUNTY
The following species have been collected from bed 2 at Falling
Water in the NWY4 sec. 27, T. 4 N., R. 13 W., 4 miles south of
.Chipley, at station 10111 and station 7244:
l" Sellards, E. H., and Gunter, Herman, Geology between the Apalachicola and
Ocklocknee Rivers: Florida Gool. Survey 10th and 11th Ann. Repts., p. 34,
1918.
Idem, p. 37.




MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Cerithium aff. C. precursor Dall.
Ostrea rugifera Dall?.
Ostrea caducaqua Mansfield.
Chlamys crocus Cooke.
Chlamys anguillensis Guppy.
Chlamys aff. C. crucianus Cooke.
Chlamys gardnerae Cooke.
Amusium sp.
Modiolus blandus Dall.
Chione aff. C. spenceri Cooke.

The Ostrea identified as 0. vicksburgensis Conrad by Cooke and
Mossom" from bed 2, may be closer to 0. rugifera Dall.
The fauna listed above appears to be similar in some features to
that in the lowest bed exposed at Old Chattahoochee Landing, although
it may have lived at a little later time.

LIST OP STATIONS
The positions of U. S. Geological Survey Stations on the Tampa
limestone are indicated on the map, figure 2, by circles numbered to
correspond to the numbers in parentheses at the left of the station
numbers in the list below. The numbered squares indicate stations
on the Suwannee limestone (pp4).~'f- /

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
As most of the specimens in the older collections from Ballast
Point, Tampa Bay, and surrounding areas are designated by U. S.
National Museum numbers which are mentioned with the descriptions
of species in the text, the station numbers for these are omitted.

(1), 13847. Gadsden Point, about 4 miles south of Ballast Point. Thrown
out in constructing a road near new quarantine station. W. C. Mansfield and
F. S. MacNeil.
(2), 13848. Hooker Point, Sparkman Bay (inlet of upper Hillsborough
Bay). Dredgings said to have been taken at a depth of 32-36 feet below water
level. W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil.
(3), 4998 (F. G. Clapp, 1908); 5000, 5002 (G. C. Matson, 1908); 11117 (C.
W. Cooke, 1926); 11150 (C. W. Cooke and Stuart Mossom, 1927); 12765 (G. M.
Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932); 57 (H. I. Tucker). Sixmile Creek, near
Orient Station.
POLK COUNTY
/ (4), 2470. Phosphate mine, 1 mile west of Bartow. G. H. Eldridge, about
1894.
PINELLAS COUNTY
(5), 7358 (C. W. Cooke, 1915); 12763 (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield,
1932). Right bank of Anclote River at Tarpon Springs, 300 yards above high-
way bridge over river.

Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
20th Ann. Rept.. p. 70, 1929.





*0 0


[40]





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


PASCO COUNTY
(6), 7359. Limestone quarry at Port Richey. C. W. Cooke, 1915.
(7), 12760. One-half mile west of New Port Richey. G. M. Ponton and
W. C. Mansfield, 1932.
MARION COUNTY
(8), 11115 (C. W. Cooke, D. S. Mossom, 1915); 12314 (H. Gunter and W.
C. Mansfield, 1931); 12753 (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932). Cum-
mer Lumber Company quarry at Kendrick, 4.8 miles north of Ocala. From a
bed about 3 feet thick in places overlying the Ocala limestone (upper Eocene).
(9), 7353. Just east of crossroads midway between Anthony and Martin.
C. W. Cooke, 1915.
(10), 11186. Pits on old Raysor property, hilltop midway between Lowell
and Sparr. Elevation approximately 128 feet. C. W. Cooke and S. Mossom,
1927.
JEFFERSON COUNTY
(11), 6830 (C. W. Cooke and E. H. Sellards, 1913); 12300, 12736 (H.
Gunter, G. M. Ponton, and W. C. Mansfield, 1931-1932). At and above a dis-
appearing stream, 1% miles northeast of Lloyd.
(12). Baileys Mill creek sink, Y mile northeast of Lloyd, clay overlying
a limestone. L. C. Johnson.
"Wacissa," G. H. Eldridge.
WAKULLA COUNTY
(13), 3420. On the railroad to St. Marks, 15 miles south of Tallahassee.
T. W. Vaughan, 1900.
(14), 12293, 200 yards south of Wakulla Railroad Station, 16 miles south
of Tallahassee. G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931-1932.
(15), 12292. Cherokee sink, about 2 miles west of Wakulla Spring and
about 5 miles west of Wakulla Station. G. M. Ponton, Clarence Simpson, and
W. C. Mansfield, 1931, 1932.
(16), 12732. Along a drainage ditch of highway, Wakulla Station to St.
Marks, 3.7 miles south of Wakulla Station. G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mans-
field, 1932.
(17), 12294. Along Florida State Highway No. 10, 2.5 miles south of
Crawfordville. From pieces of rock thrown out in constructing the highway.
G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931.
(18), 12296, "The Swirl," 32 miles southeast of Crawfordville. G. iM.
Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931.
LEON COUNTY
(19), 12735. W. K. Cooke and sons' property, about 11 miles slightly south-
west of Tallahassee. G. M. Ponton, Clarence Simpson and W. C. Mansfield,
1932.
GADSDEN COUNTY
(20), 3406. Aspalaga Bluff, Apalachicola River. Elevation in bluff not
given. T. W. Vaughan, 1900.
(20), 12287. Aspalaga Bluff, highest fossiliferous bed, estimated 45 to 50
feet above the river level. G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931.
(20), 13841. Aspalaga Bluff, Apalachicola River, about 10 feet above a
4-foot clay bed. W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil.
(21), 3409 (just above cement bed, T. W. Vaughan, 1900); 3410 (cement
quarry, Vaughan, 1900); 3411 (just above cement horizon, Vaughan, 1900);
7080 (cement quarry, Vaughan, et al., 1914); 12285 (mainly an indurated 1-foot
bed, G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931). Abandoned quarry at an ele-
vation around 150 feet aboye sea level, one-half mile south of River Junction.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


(21), 3407, 3408, 3413, 3414 (T. W. Vaughan, 1900); 7172, 7173, 7174, 7175,
7176 (T. W. Vaughan, 1914). Lower beds at and in the vicinity of River
Junction.
(21), 13851. About 1' mile north of railroad station at River Junction
at an elevation 75 to 80 feet above sea level. W. C. Mansfield and F. S. Mac-
Neil.
(22), 2565 (W. H. Dall and Stanley-Brown, 1893); 3405 (T. W. Vaughan,
1900); 4836 (F. G. Clapp, et al., 1908); 6185 (L. W. Stephenson, 1908); 7168
(T. W. Vaughan, 1914); 12282 (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931).
Lower part of section or from bed carrying "Echinocardium" depressum Clark
at an elevation of 77.4-78.4 feet above sea level at old Chattahoochee Landing.
(22), 13844. Old Chattahoochee Landing, 37 feet (Lock level) above echi-
noderm bed. W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil.
(22), 13846. Old Chattahoochee Landing 74 feet (Lock level) above echi-
noderm bed. W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil.
(22), 7169 (bed no. 6, elevation 122-124 feet, T. W. Vaughan, 1914). Old
Chattahoochee Landing, Apalachicola River.
(22), 12283. Elevation 155-165 feet above sea level. G. M. Ponton and W.
C. Mansfield, 1931. Old Chattahoochee Landing, Apalachicola River.

CALHOUN COUNTY
(23), 12725. Baileys old ferry, Chipola River, at the mouth of Tenmile
Creek. G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932.
(24), 12728. Hamilton Spring, about 1V miles below Willis bridge over
Chipola River and about 2/2 miles above the mouth of Tenmile creek. G. M.
Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932.
(25), 12727. Willis bridge, Chipola River. G. M. Ponton and W. C.
Mansfield, 1932.
(26), 12726. About 2.2 miles above Willis bridge, Chipola River. G. M.
Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932.

WASHINGTON COUNTY
(27), 7244 (C. W. Cooke and W. C. Mansfield, 1914); 10111 (C. W. Cooke
and Julia Gardner, 1921). Bed 2 at Falling Water in the N. W. '/4 sec. 27, T.
4 N., R. 13 W., 4 miles south of Chipley.

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION O TAMPA LIMESTONE
The accompanying map (figure 2) shows the localities of both the
Tampa and Suwannee limestones. The numbered circles refer to
localities on the Tampa limestone and the numbered squares to local-
itie on the Suwannee limestone.
[The Tampa limestone in Pasco, Pinellas, Hillsborough, and Polk
Counties, as indicated by figure 2, strikes northwest and apparently
dips southwest, the limestone at Port Richey (no. 6) being near the
base and that at Gadsden Point (no. 1), at or near the top of the
formation. In Marion County at Kendrick (no. 8) and to the north
(nQs. 9, 10), the Tampa rests on the Eocene Ocala limestone and may
have been deposited by a sea that advanced from the east or south-
east at a time near the end of the Tampa epoch. In western Florida,
in Wakulla County, the Tampa is exposed at the present-day surface
and is at a lower level than that near Lloyd, Jefferson County (nos.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


11, 12). The easternmost exposures are between the St. Marks and
the Wacissa Rivers. The Tampa underlies later deposits in the western
half of Jefferson County and all of Leon and Gadsden Counties. On
the Apalachicola River it disappears below stream level near the
mouth of Sweetwater Creek, in Liberty County, and rises to an ele-
vation around 100 feet above stream level at Old Chattahoochee Land-
ing, Gadsden County, about 15 miles farther north. Along the Chip-
ola River in Calhoun County, the Tampa rises only a few feet above
the surface of the stream at normal stages. In Washington County,
at Falling Water (no. 27), 4 miles south of Chipley, the base of the
Tampa limestone (bed no. 2) is 65 feet above the bottom of the sink,
using the section measured here by Cooke." The fauna at this place,
as noted before, is similar in some features to that at the base of the
section at Old Chattahoochee Landing, 40 miles east of Falling Water.
If so this would indicate that the Tampa limestone in the area of Fall-
ing Water has been elevated to a higher position than that in the area
of Chattahoochee Landing.

DISTRIBUTION OP SPECIES IN THE TAMPA LIMESTONE
The following list includes the species and subspecies of mollusks
(land, fresh-water, and marine Gastropoda, and marine Pelecypoda)
from the Tampa limestone.
In the column headed "Ballast Point and vicinity" are included all
species from this area whether they were formerly referred to the
Orthaulax pugnax zone of Dall, or to the Tampa limestone of Dall,
or to the Cerithium zone of Heilprin. The column headed "13848,
Hooker Point" includes the species known from the Cerithium zone
of Heilprin and that headed "13847, 4 miles south of Ballast Point"
includes the species high in the Tampa limestone.

(See table of distribution, inserted on back cover page.)

RESUME OF THE TAMPA LIMESTONE
In the revision of the mollusks of the Tampa limestone the follow-
ing approximate results have been obtained:
Number of determined species and subspecies .... ............................................. 279
Number of determined species and subspecies ----------------------- --------------- - 279
N um ber of undeterm ined species .................................................................................. 27
T total ................................. .... ....... ............................... .................. 306
Number of Tampa limestone species and subspecies in the Chipola formation 8
Number of Tampa limestone species and subspecies in the Recent fauna ........ 6
Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
20th Ann. Rept., p. 70, 1929.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


The Tampa limestone fauna probably is more closely related to
that of the Chipola formation than the above figures would indicate,
as a number of other species in both horizons are closely related and
were united by earlier workers. A comparison of some of the mol-
luscan species from the Trent marl, as exposed at Silverdale, N. C.,
with those of the Tampa, indicates that the two faunas lived at about
the same time. The Tampa is believed also to be of about the same
age as the Anguilla formation, Anguilla, and a little older than the
Bait a tornation_ Dominican- _Republic.
The Tampa limestone has a smaller content of calcium carbonate
and a greater content of silica than the underlying Suwannee lime-
stone. The high percentage of silica and the character of the fauna,
which includes land and freshwater gastropods and the pelecypod
Cyrcna, a genus now living in fresh and brackish water in Florida,
indicate that the Tampa limestone was deposited in shallow water
near-the shore line.
'The lithologic and the faunal difference between the Tampa lime-
stone and the succeeding Alum Bluff group seem too great to attribute
solely to shifting of shore-line currents and therefore strongly suggest
a period of uplift at the end of Tampa time, followed by subsidence
and depositionof-the Alum.Bluff group.
SFrom observation of beds overlying the Tampa limestone, it ap-
pears that the fuller's earth deposits at Quincy, Midway, and elsewhere
and the "Sopchoppy limestone" lie stratigraphically above the Chipola
marl, which includes the very fossiliferous basal bed and the overlying
"Alum Bluff sands" of Dall, as exposed at Alum Bluff, Apalachicola
River, Fla., and that these beds represent in part at least, the Haw-
thorn formation and are equivalent in part to the Oak Grove sand,
middle Miocene.




:LORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


lig. 1. Contact of the Suwannee limestone (above) and a member of the Vicks-
b;urg group (3Byram marl?) in the left bank of the \ithlacoochee River near its
junction with the Suwannee River at Ellaville, Florida. The man is sitting on
lthe upper surface of the lower bed. Photograph 1y 1 lerman Giunter, April 22, 1932.


--.

d r--


Iig. 2. Tampa limestone exposed in a sink about 1,/ miles northeast of Lloyd.
Jefferson County. At the time. April 27, 1932, the photograph was taken no
\water was draining, owing to a very dry season, from Lake Aliccosukce, from
which the sink receives its water. Photograph by Herman Gunter.


BJULLE~TIN F;TFTEE-N, PLA.\T B


7- ,~?






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


SUWANNEE LIMESTONE

GENEbAI PE ATUES
The Suwannee limestone was named in 1936 by Cooke and Mans-
field" from exposures on the Suwannee River, in northern peninsular
Florida. The formation is well exposed along the Suwannee at va-
rious places from the mouth of Withlacoochee River at Ellaville
(where it is the highest fossiliferous stratum) to White Springs, a dis-
tance of about 40 miles.
The stratigraphic unit to which Cooke and Mansfield applied the
name Suwannee has been assigned in the past to several formations.
In 1892, Dall and Harris" referred it to the Tampa limestone (Mio-
cene). In 1909, Matson and Clapp'4 placed it in the Hawthorn forma-
tion (Miocene). Hopkins" referred to it in 1920 as Chattahoochee
limestone which was then and still is regarded as of Tampa age. In
1925 Mossom" put it in the Glendon (Vicksburg), but in the following
year" restored it to the Tampa. Cooke and Mossonm" in 1929 in-
cluded it with the Tampa limestone.
The formation consists almost entirely of limestone. The un-
weathered rock is a granular to dense, compact, usually cream-colored.
rather pure limestone. The lower part is at many places more gran-
ular than the upper. Mossom"i gives the following analysis of Su-
wannee limestone for the quarry of the Florida Hard Rock Products
Co., Brooksville, Fla.:

"Silica (SiO ) .............................................................. ........ 6.54
Iron and alumina (Fe+AI) ........--------...........................--. 1.44
Calcium carbonate (CaCOa) -............. ...-...................--------- 91.09
Magnesium carbonate (MgCO,) ................. ....................... trace
U ndeterm ined ................................................ ................ ..93

100.00"
4 Cooke, C. W., and Mansfield, W. C., Geol. Soc. Am. Proc., p. 71, June, 1936
(Abstract).
4' Dall, W. H., and Harris, G. D., Correlation papers; Neocene: U. S. Geol.
Survey Bull. 84, p. 121, 1892.
4 Matson, G. C., and Clapp, F. G., A preliminary report on the geology of
Florida: Florida Geol. Survey 2d Ann. Rept., p. 74, 1909.
w Hopkins, O. B.. U. S. Geol. Survey Press Bull. 442, April 21, 1920; Florida
Geol. Survey 13th Ann. Rept., p. 18, 1921.
"' Mossom, Stuart, A preliminary report on the limestones and marls of Florida:
Fla. Geol. Survey 16th Ann. Rept., pp. 73-77, 1925.
5: Mossom, Stuart, A review of the structure and stratigraphy of Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey 17th Ann. Rept. (1926), p. 182. These correlations of
Mossom's were based on recommendations of C. W. Cooke.
3 Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
20th Ann. Rept., pp. 78-98, 1929.
Mossom, Stuart, A preliminary report on the limestones and marls of Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey 16th Ann. Rept., p. 140, 1925.






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


The limestone in the Brooksville quarry as well as the limestone in other
nearby quarries has a higher percentage of calcium carbonate and a
lower percentage of silica than the Tampa limestone at Sixmile Creek,"
the latter containing 24.2 per cent of silica and 74.12 per cent of
calcium carbonate. o
The Suwannee is overlain at some places by the Tampa limestone,
at others by the Hawthorn formation. On Blackwater Creek a mix-
ture of Tampa and Suwannee fossils on the spoil bank appears to in-
dicate that the Tampa is in contact with the Suwannee, but neither
formation appears above water level. An unconformable contact of
the Suwannee limestone with the Hawthorn formation, the interven-
ing Tampa being absent, is visible at low-water stages in the bank of
the Suwannee River about three-quarters of a mile above White
Springs.
The Suwannee limestone rests on the Eocene Ocala limestone or
some part of the Vicksburg group. At High Springs, Alachua County,
it lies between the Eocene Ocala limestone and Miocene Hawthorn
formation. At Ellaville, Suwannee County, the Suwannee limestone
lies unconformably on a thin bed of white limestone containing molds
of many Vicksburg fossils. Some of these fossils are .listed in the
'Geology of Florida,"" and in addition the Lepidocyclina sp. in this list
has recently been identified by T. W. Vaughan as L. supera (Conrad),
a species very common in the typical part of the Byram marls and per-
haps restricted to deposits of that ----------------
The Suwannee contains many fossils, most of which are preserved
only as molds, although a few are preserved as siliceous pseudo-
morphs scattered through the weathered surface material. In gen-
eral the faunal characteristics of the Suwannee limestone are as fol-
lows: No land or fresh-water shells have been observed. Among
the Gastropoda Conus is very rare, if present; Strombus is present in
the Brooksville area but the species are not determinable; Orthaulax,
which is represented by a new subspecies of 0. pugnax, is quite com-
mon; among the Cerithiidae a few genera are rather common, some
of the species being too poorly preserved for determination; Turritella
is present at a number of localities, but more individuals occur in the
Brooksville area than elsewhere. Among the Pelecypoda, Glycymeris
is present, some forms being rather large; Ostrea is rare and the species

Idem, p. 145.
Mansfield, W. C., and Gunter, Herman, Washington Acad. Sci. Jour., vol. 23,
p. 109, 1933.
t Coohe, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, op. cit., p. 73.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


are indeterminable; Phacoides is quite common, especially a rather
large form of the type of P. hillsboroensis; among the Veneridae,
Chione, similar to C. bainbridgensis Dall, a Flint River species, is
present at nearly all localities; large Teredo-like tubes are common.
Among the echinoderms, Rhyncholanipas gouldii (Bouv6) is present
at nearly all localities and appears to b1 confined to this zone; and a
large regular form has been collected in the Brooksville area and
along Blackwater Creek. Among the foraminifers, the cone-shaped
form, "Coskinolina cookci Moberg," described from a limestone now
referred to the Suwannee limestone, is present at a number of
localities.
A few species that appear to be characteristic of the Suwanrmee
limestone are: Orthaulax pugnax hernandoensis Mansfield, n. subsp.;
Ampullina flintensis Mansfield, n. sp.; Chlamnys flintensis Mansfield,
n. sp.; Chlaiims brooksvillensis Mansfield, n. sp.; Chione aff. C. bain-
\bridgensis Dall; Teredo? incrassata (Gabb) ; and Rhyncholampas
ouldii (Bouve). .- ----...
Sslpecies occurring in the Tampa limestone that have not
been found with certainty in the Suwannee limestone are: Many
land and fresh-water species; Lyria musicina (Heilprin) ; L. heilprini
Dall; Latirus, a number of species; Potamides hillsboroensis Heilprin;
P. camnpanulatus Heilprin; Turritella tammpae Heilprin; Ampullina am-
phora Heilprin; Globularia streptostoma (Heilprin) ; Glycymeris lainyi
Dall; Arca hyponiela Dall; Chla.imys crocus (Cooke); Crassatella
deformis (Heilprin) ; Venericardia serricosta (Heilprin) ; Cyrena pom-
pholy. Dall;- C. floridana (Dall); Antfigona glyptoconcha Dall; A.
shepardi Dall; Chione rhodia Dall; Anomnalocardia penita Conrad.

COMPARISON OF THE FAUNA OF THE SUWANNEE LIMESTONE WITH
OTHER FAUNAS
Flint River formation.-Dall," after a study of the fauna above
and below Bainbridge, Georgia, recognized two faunal groups charac-
terizing two zones, an upper zone represented chiefly south of Bain-
bridge and a lower zone found around and north of the town. The
so-called upper zone, according to Dall, contains a number of species
of Cerithiidae and is to be correlated with the Orthaulax pugnax zone
at Tampa; the lower zone is to be correlated with a horizon between
the Orthaula.r pugna.r zone and the Eocene Ocala limestone.
6s Dall, Tr. H., A contribution to the invertebrate fauna of the Oligocene beds
of the Flint River, Georgia: U. S. Nat. Mus. Proc., vol. 51, no. 2162, pp.
487-488, 1916.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Cooke" at first placed the chert beds of the Flint River in the
Glendon formation of the Vicksburg group, but more recently has"
applied the name Flint River formation to the beds, typically exposed
along the Flint River between Red Bluff, 7 miles above Bainbridge,
and Hales Landing, about 7 miles below the town. Cooke correlated
his new formation provisionally with the upper part of the Byram
marl of the Vicksburg group. The writer has not studied the faunas
of the Flint River formation sufficiently to determine definitely
whether this formation embraces two faunal horizons, as Dall be-
lieved, or only one faunal horizon, as Cooke thought. However, the
bed exposed at Blue Spring, 4 miles below Bainbridge; at Hales Land-
ing; and downstream, that contains many Cerithiidae and corals may
be stratigraphically higher than the bed at Red Bluff, 7 miles above
Bainbridge.
Most of the species of the Suwannee limestone that. are the same
as, or closely allied to, those of the Flint River formation occur in the
latter formation at exposures along the river between Blue Spring and
Lamberts Island, 10 to 12 miles below Bainbridge; but a number of
species occurring at Red Bluff have not been recognized in the Su-
wannee limestone.
The -following list shows species of the Suwannee limestone that
are the same as, or closely allied -to, species of the Flint River for-
mation:

SUWANNEE LIMESTONE SPECIES FLINT RIVER SPECIES
Cerithium hernandoensis Mansfield ........Cerithium halense Dall (Blue Spring
and Hales Landing)
Cerithium hernandoensis blackwater-
ensis Mansfield .......................... .......Cerithium' vaughani Dall (Hales Land-
ing)
Orthaulax pugnax hernandoensis
Mansfield ............................................ Orthaulax pugnax Heilprin (Blue Spring
and Hales Landing)
Turritella cf. T. halensis Dall ..................Turritella halensis Dall (Hales Landing
and Lambert Island)
Ampullina flintensis Mansfield ........ Ampullina solidula Dall (Red Bluff,
Hales Landing and Lambert Island)
Chlamys flintensis Mansfield .............. Chlamys alpha Dall (Cherry Chute and
Hales Landing)
Venericardia serricosta brooksvill-
ensis Mansfield ........-----------..................-- Cardita shepardi" Dall? (Lamberts Is-
land)
Phacoides cf. P. hillsboroensis Heil-
prin .................................. ...................... Phacoides cf. P. hillsboroensis H eilprin
(Blue Springs and Hales Landing)
9 Cooke, C. W., The correlation of the Vicksburg group: U. S. Geol. Survey
Prof. Paper 133, pp. 5-9, 1923.
SCooke, C. W., Notes on the Vicksburg group: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geol-
ogists, vol. 19, no. 8, pp. 1170-1171, 1935.


4-G. Survey





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


SUWANNEE LIMESTONE SPECIES FLINT RIVER SPECIES
Chione cf. C. bainbridgensis Dall ...----..---Chione bainbridgensis Dall (Bainbridge
to Hales Landing)
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bourv) ............Rhycholampas .gouldii (Bouv6) (Lam-
berts Island)

Well near Thomasville.-An interesting lot of mollusks was taken
from a well on the Jim McKinnon estate on the Boston road, 434
miles east of Thomasville, Thomas County, Georgia, at a depth of
about 55 feet below the surface. The species from this well indicate
a relationship to both the fauna of the Suwannee limestone and that
of the Flint River formation, especially that part of the Flint River
formation exposed from 4 miles to 12 miles below Bainbridge, Ga.
The species are: Lyria miisicina dalli Mansfield?, Cerithium cf. C.
suwannensis Mansfield, Orthaular pugna.ri Heilprin var.?, Turritella
cf. T. halensis Dall, Cassis sp. like the form at Blue Spring in the Flint
River formation, Chlamys cf. C. flintensis Mansfield, Chlamys wan-
nensis Mansfield, Phacoides cf. P. hillsboroensis Heilprin, Cardium
cf. C. hernandoense Mansfield, Chione bainbridgensis Dall, Teredo?
incrassata (Gabb).
A comparison of the fauna of the Suwannee limestone with that
of the Flint River formation (upper part of the Vicksburg), and
other faunas similar to that of the Flint River formation, indicates
that the fauna of the Suwannee limestone as a whole lived during the
latter part of the time represented by the Flint River formation and
continued on up to the end of the Vicksburg epoch.

LOCAL DETAXLS
Hillsborough County.-Fossils apparently from both the Tampa
and Suwannee limestones have been collected along Blackwater Creek
at the crossing of the Seaboard Air Line Railway, 2Y2 miles south
of the Pasco County Line. The fossils collected from the bed of the
stream came from the Suwannee limestone, but others collected from
the spoil bank may have come from either limestone. Those species
which occur in the Tampa limestone elsewhere may have come from
the upper bed, whereas those species that occur also in the Suwannee
limestone of the Brooksville area may have come from the lower bed.
About one third or more of the species that have been collected at
this place may have come from the Tampa limestone. A regular ech-
inoid and the echinoid Rhyncholamipas gouldii (Bouve) are known
to have come from the Suwannee limestone.






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


The matrix of the lower bed appears to be less oxidized than that
from the upper bed.
The species from Blackwater Creek are recorded below. Those
preceded by an asterisk were collected only by Miss H. I. Tucker at
this place (her locality no. 17). The letter "T" following a species
suggests that the species came frcm the Tampa limestone, and the
letter "S" that it came from the Suwannee limestone.

*Conus cooked Dall?, S.
*Cryoturris? hillsboroughensis Mansfield, S.
*Oliva post Dall?, ?T.
*Olivella brooksvillensis Mansfield, S.
*Marginella gregaria Dall, T.
*Lyria musicina (Heilprin) ?, ?T.
*Lyria musicina dalli Mansfield. S.
*Xancus polygonatus suwannensis Mansfield?, ?S.
*"Phos" ursula Dall?, ?T.
*Purpura propeposti Mansfield, S.
*Corralliophila magna Dall, T.
Orthaulax pugnax hernandoensis Mansfield, S.
*Cerithium aff. C. georgianum Lyell and Sowerby, ?T.
*Ceritlium pascoensis Mansfield, S.
Cerithium hernandoensis blackwatercnsis Mansfield, S.
Turritella howenae Mansfield, S.
*Turritella hillsboroensis Mansfield, ?T.
*Turritella blackwaterensis Mansfield, ?T.
*Ampullina flintensis Mansfield, S.
*Sinum aff. imperforatumn Dall, S.
Glycymeris suwannensis Mansfield, S.
Glycymeris hillsboroughensis Mansfield.
Glycymeris tuckerae Mansfield, S.
Chlamys brooksvillensis Mansfield, S.
Chlamys liveoakensis Mansfield?
*Modiolus blandus Dall, T.
MTodiolus grammatus Dall?
Venericardia serricosta brooksvillensis Mansfield, S.
*Chama tampaensis Dall. ?T (larger than Tampa specimens).
Phacoides wacissanus Dall, S (larger than Tampa specimens).
*Phacoides hillsboroensis Heilprin, T.
Cardium phlyctaena Dall, ?T.
*Cardium brooksvillens& Mansfield, S.
Pitaria aff. P. imitablis Conrad, S.
*Antigona tarquina Dall, ?T.
Chione aff. C. bainbridgensis Dall, S.
*Pitaria heilprini Mansfield, ?T.
Teredo? incrassata (Gabb), S.
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6), S.

Pasco County.-The following species from the Suwannee lime-
stone were collected by G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield at station
12762, prospect pits on property of Florida Trap Rock Co., about
2/4 miles south of Zephyrhills:






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Cerithium pascoensis Mansfield.
Turritella bowenae Mansfield.
Ampullina flintensis Mansfield.
Glycymeris suwannensis Mansfield.
Lima halensis Dall.
Modiolus silicatus Dall.
Phacoides hillsboroensis Heilprin?
Cardium aff. gadsdenense Mansfield.
Chione aff. C. bainbridgensis Dall.
Teredo? incrassata (Gabb).
Rhyncolampas gouldii (BouvA).

The following species occur respectively one and two miles north
of Hudson (stations 7356 and 12761):

Lyria musicina dalli Mansfield.
Orthaulax pugnax hernandoensis Mansfield.
Cerithium brooksvillensis Mansfield.
Turritella bowenae Mansfield.
Cypraea sp
Thracia vicksburgiana brooksvillensis Mansfield.
Phacoides? sp.
Cardium aff. C. gadsdenense Mansfield.
Cardium phlyctaena Dall.
Semele silicata Dall?
Panope brooksvillensis Mansfield?
Teredo? incrassata Gabb.

Hernando County.-The species listed below have been collected
from the Suwannee limestone at one or more of the following local-
ities: Station 11113 (C. W. Cooke and Stuart Mossom), station
12322 (H. Gunter and \W. C. Mansfield), station 12755 (G. M. Ponton
and W. C. Mansfield), Florida Rock Products Company quarry about
one mile southwest of Brooksville; station 7361, Peck sink, 32 miles
west of Brooksville (C. W. Cooke); station 12318, abandoned pit on
Florida State Road No. 15, 5 miles west of Brooksville (H. Gunter
and W. C. Mansfield); station 12317 (from all parts of quarry),
station 12757 (upper part of quarry), station 12756 (floor of quarry),
Florida Portland Cement quarry, 10.2 miles northwest of Brooksville
(H. Gunter, G. M. Ponton, W. C. Mansfield); station 12758, Camp
Concrete Rock quarry, 5.9 miles northeast of Brooksville (G. M. Pon-
ton and W. C. Mansfield) ; station 10513, 7 miles north of Brooksville
(0. B. Hopkins); station 7362, Varnes quarry,. 24 miles southeast of
Brooksville (C. W.. Cooke); station 12319, quarry 2 miles south of
Brooksville (H. Gunter and W. C. Mansfield); station 12320, 2 miles
east of Bayport (H. Gunter and W. C. Mansfield) ; station 7363, 12
miles west of Croom (C. W. Cooke).






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Scaphander sp.
Knefastia? brooksvillensis Mansfield.
Conus aff. C. cookei Dall.
Olivella brooksvillensis Mansfield.
Lyria musicina dalli Mansfield.
Vasum egonatum Dall?.
Cassis sp.
Orthaulax pugnax hernandoensis Mansfield.
Terebellum hernandoensis Mansfield.
Cerithiun pascoensis Mansfield.
Cerithium brooksvillensis Mansfield.
Potamides cornutus Heilprin?.
Cerithium hernandoensis Mansfield.
Cerithium aff. C. vaginatum Dall.
Turritella bowenae Mansfield.
Xenophora conchyliphora Born?.
Ampullina flintensis Mansfield?.
"Amauropsis" aff. A. burnsii meridionalis Pilsbry.
Sinum aff. imperforatum Dall.
Calliostoma silicatum Mansfield?.
Glycymeris cf. G. tuckerae Mansfield.
Barbatia marylandica Conrad ?.
Ostrea aff. 0. antiguensis Brown.
Chlamys brooksvillensis Mansfield.
Modiolus blandus Dall.
Modiolus grammatus Dall?.
Thracia vicksburgiana hernandoensis Mansfield.
Venericardia serricostata brooksvillensis Mansfield.
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.
Phacoides hillsboroensis Heilprin?.
Phacoides hernandoensis Mansfield.
Divaricella sp.
Cardium aff. C. gadsdenense Mansfield.
Cardium brooksvillense Mansfield.
Cardium hernandoense Mansfield.
Pitar aff. P. imitablis Conrad.
Chione aff. C. bainbridgensis Dall.
Venus? sp.
Panope brooksvillensis Mansfield.
Teredo? incrassata (Gabb).
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6).

One specimen of the genus Rhyncholampas, apparently the same
as an unpublished species from the lowest bed of the Vicksburg (Oli-
gocene) at Ellaville, was collected from a pit some 30 feet below the
main floor of the quarry at Brooksville (station 12755a). This may
indicate the presence of a lower horizon in the Vicksburg than that
exposed in the main walls of the quarry.
The following species occur at station 13853, 14.5 miles southwest
of Brooksville, Hernando County:

Cerithium sp.
Turritella bowenae Mansfield.
Cardium aff. C. gadsdenense Mansfield.
Cardium? sp.
Phacoides sp.
Semele silicata Dall?.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Fig. 1. Contact of the Suwannee limestone and the Hawthorn formation in the
left bank of the Suwannee River at White Springs, Florida; about half a mile
above old bridge on the White Springs-Lake City road. The head of the ham-
mer is on the contact. Photograph by Herman Guntcr, April 22, 1932.


Fig. 2. Upper surface of the Suwannee limestone in the bed of Suwannee River,
three-fourths mile above the old bridge on the White-Springs-Lake City road at
White Springs, Florida. River at a very low stage. Photograph taken by Her-
man Gunter, April 22, 1932.


BULLETIN FIFTEEN, PLATE C





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


Suwannee limestone, same horizon as bed 2 miles north of Hudson.
Alacliua County.-The echinoid Rhyncholamlpas gouldii (Bouv6)
has been collected in Alachua County from the following localities:
station 378b, 2 miles south of Gainesville (L. C. Johnson); station
6811, Cummer Lumber Company Phosphate Plant No. 10, one mile
north of Newberry (not in place) (C. W. Cooke) ; station 6786, Main
Street, High Springs (T. W. Vaughan and C. W. Cooke).
Columbia County.-The following species have been collected from
a small island in the Suwannee River three-fourths of a mile above
White Springs; station 6178 (L. W. Stephenson), station 6774 (T. W.
Vaughan and C. W. Cooke), station 12745 (H. Gunter, G. M. Pon-
ton and W\. C. Mansfield) :

Scaphander sp.
Orthaulax pugnax hernandoensis Mansfield.
Ampullina flintensis Mansfield.
Calliostoma silicatum Mansfield.
Dentalium ladinum Dall.
Glycymeris suwannensis Mansfield.
Modiolus grammatus Dall.
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.
Phacoides hillsboroensis Heilprin?.
Cardium brooksvillense Mansfield.
Chione aff. C. bainbridgensis Dall.
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouvr).

The species listed below have been collected in the Suwannee lime-
stone from the Rhyncholanmpas-bearing bed which overlies the Ocala
limestone in an old phosphate quarry one-fourth mile southeast of
Fort White; station 6818 (C. W. Cooke, 1913), station 12749 (G. M.
Ponton and \V. C. Mansfield, 1932):

Modiolus grammatus Dall.
Chione aff. C. bainbridgensis Dall.
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6).

The species listed below have been collected from the Suwannee
limestone at Bass, 7 miles south of Lake City; station 4960, 100 yards
west of station (G. C. Matson, 1908) ; station 6827, 100 yards south
of Bass (C. W. Cooke, 1913); station 12307, about one-fourth mile
south of Bass, near and on east side of railroad (G. M. Ponton and
W. C. Mansfield) :

Scaphander sp.
Modiolus silicatus Dall.
Modiolus grammatus Dall?
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6).




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY BULLETIN FIFTEEN, PLATE D


Fig. 1. Suwannee limestone exposed in old Lyle
Oak, Florida. Photograph by W. C. Mansfield.


quarry, 1V2 miles north of Live


No-ehwthkorn fm.


.,sSidtj I IU :5I

I SUWANNee ,' .T, N...

Fig. 2. A rock specimen taken from the same place as pl. C, fig. 1, showing the
contact of the Suwannee limestone (light colored) and the Hawthorn formation
(dark colored). Specimen collected April 21, 1932, by members of the Florida
Geological survey and W. C. Mansfield. Photograph by U. S. Geological Survey.






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6) has been collected in Columbia
County at station 12035, near an old stream channel near Florida
State Road No. 5a, about 1Y miles west of Santa Fe River (G. M.
Ponton and W. C. Mansfield).
Suwannee County.-The following species have been collected
from the old Lyle quarry, 1 miles north of Live Oak; stations 6826,
11109 (C. W. Cooke); station 12308 (G. M. Ponton and W. C.
Mansfield) :

Scaphander sp.
Euclathurella? liveoakensis Mansfield.
Olivella liveoakensis Mansfield.
Lyria mississippiensis Conrad?
Lyria musicina dalli Mansfield.
Xancus polygonatus suwannensis Mansfield.
Alectrion sp. a.
Purpura propeposti Mansfield.
Terebellum hernandoensis Mansfield?.
Cerithium pascoensis Mansfield?
Cerithiu:n suwannensis Mansfield.
Cerithium liveoakensis Mansfield.
Modulus liveoakensis Mansfield.
Turritella cf. T. halensis Dall.
Xenophora conchyliphora Born?:
Sinum aff. S. imperatum Dall.
Ampullina flintensis Mansfield.
Glycymeris suwannensis Mansfield.
Glycymeris tuckerac Mansfield?.
Barbatia marylandica Conrad?.
Chlamys flintensis Mansfield.
Chlamys aff. C. vaun wythei Hertlein.
Chlamys liveoakensis Mansfield.
Chlamys liveoakensis wannensis Mansfield.
Modiolus grammatus Dall.
Cardita liveoakensis Mansfield.
Venericardia serricostata brooksvillensis Mansfield?
Phacoides wacissanus Dall.
Phacoides hillsboroensis Heilprin?.
Cardium precursor Dall.
Chione aff. C. bainbridgensis Dall.
Tellina silicata Dall?.
Teredo? incrassata (Gabb).
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6).

The following species have been collected from the Suwannee lime-
stone at Suwannee Sulphur Spring; station 7339, upper bed (C. W.
Cooke) ; station 11110 (C. WV. Cooke) ; station 12303 (G. iM. Ponton
and W. C. Mansfield):

"Drillia" aff. D. pleutonica Casey.
Euclathurella? liveoakensis Mansfield?.
Chlamys flintensis Mansfield.
Modiolus grammatus Dall?.
Cardita liveoakensis Mansfield?.
Cardium suwannense Mansfield.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Cardium precursor Dall.
Chione aff. C. bainbridgensis Dall.
Tellina silicata Mansfield?.
Teredo? incrassata (Gabb).
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6).

Rhyncholanipas gouldii (Bouve) has been collected in Suwannee
County at the following localities not previously mentioned in this
paper: station 12309, east bank of Suwannee River, opposite Ella-
ville, 15-20 feet above river level; station 12741-2, left bank of Suwan-
nee River 2Y miles (airline) above Ellaville (H. Gunter et al.) ; deep
wells at Padlock, 7 miles south of Live Oak.
Hamilton Colunty.-Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6) has been col-
lected in Hamilton County from the following localities: station 12738,
Suwannee River, right bank, about 4 miles (airline) above Ellaville
(H. Gunter et al.); station 12739, Suwannee River, right bank just
below Noble Ferry bridge, Jasper-Live Oak road, 6 miles (direct line)
above Ellaville (H. Gunter et al.).
Taylor County.-The following species have been collected from
the Suwannee limestone at station 12737, along highway no. 19, 9.7
miles west of Perry (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield):
Chlamys flintensis Mansfield.
Teredo? incrassata (Gabb).
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouve).

Jefferson County.-The following species were collected from the
Suwannee limestone at station 12298, rock quarry, 12 miles east-
southeast of Flint Rock (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield):
"Amauropsis" aff. A. burnsii meridionalis Pilsbry.
Glycymeris tuckerae Mansfield?
Ostrea sp. aff. 0. antiguensis Brown.
Chlamys flintensis Mansfield.
Phacoides hillsboroensis Heilprin?
Tellina silicata Mansfield?
Teredo? incrassata (Gabb).
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouvd)

The following species have been collected at station 4990 (F. G.
Clapp, 1908); station 12299 (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield,
1931), Walker Spring, one-fourth mile south of the railroad and about
half a mile southeast of Walker Spring Railroad depot. Fossils from
surface material blasted out in the construction of the highway:
Cerithium liveoakensis Mansfield.
Chlamys flintensis Mansfield.
Phacoides waccisanus Dall.
Teredo? incrassata (Gabb).
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6).






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


The following species were collected from the Suwannee limestone
at stations 12301 and 12302 along highway 8 and 10 miles, respectively,
east of Wacissa (G. M. Ponton and WV. C. Mansfield):

Cerithiumn hernandoensis Mansfield?.
Cardium aff. C. gadsdenense Mansfield.
Chione aff. C. bainbridgensis Dall.
Tellina silicata Mansfield?.
Rhyncholampas gouldii (Bouv6).

These two localities are the most westerly points at which the
fauna of the Suwannee limestone has been found.

LIST OP STATIONS
The positions of U. S. Geological Survey stations on the Suwannee
limestone are indicated on the map, figure 2, by numbered squares
corresponding to numbers in parentheses at the left of the station
numbers in the following list. The numbered circles indicate localities
in the Tampa limestone (see p~4.f.P). -

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
(28). 11116 (C. W. Cooke, 1927); 12766 (G. M.. Ponton and W. C. Mans-
field, 1932); Tucker 17 (H. I. Tucker), Blackwater Creek at Seaboard Air Line
crossing. Tampa limestone and Suwannee limestone.

PASCO COUNTY
(29). 12762, prospect pits on property of Florida Trap Rock Company,
about 2Y miles south of Zephyrhills (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932).
(30). 7356, one mile north of Hudson (C. W. Cooke).
(31). 12761, two miles north of Hudson (W. C. Mansfield and G. M.
Ponton, 1932); (W. C. Mansfield and F. S. MacNeil, 1936).

HERNANDO COUNTY
(32). 11113 (C. W. Cooke and Stuart Mossom, 1926); 12322 (1H. Gunter
and W. C. Mansfield, 1931); 12755 (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932,
lowest part of quarry), Florida Rock Products Company quarry, about one mile
southwest of Brooksville.
(33). 7361, Peck sink, 3V2 miles west of Broo 29-30, T. 22 S., R. 18 E., middle of N. % sec. (C. W. Cooke, 1915).
(34). 12318, at abandoned pit of Florida State Road no. 15, 5 miles west
of Brooksville (H. Gunter and W. C. Mansfield, 1931).
(35). 12317 (from all parts of the quarry; 12756 (floor of quarry); 12757
(mainly from upper part of quarry), Florida Portland Cement quarry, 10.2
miles northwest of Brooksville (H. Gtnter, G. M. Ponton, 1931-2).
(36). 12758, Camp Concrete Rock quarry, 5.9 miles northeast of Brooks-
ville (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932).
(37). 10513, small quarry, 7 miles north of Brooksville on Inverness-Citrus
County Road (O. B. Hopkins, 1917).
(38). 7362, Varne's quarry, 2Y4 miles southeast of Brooksville (C. W.
Cooke, 1915).






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


(39). 12319, abandoned quarry, about 2 miles south of Brooksville (H.
Gunter and W. C. Mansfield, 1931).
(40). 12320, 2 miles east of Bayport (H. Gunter and W. C. Mansfield,
1931).
(41). 7363, 1V miles west of Croom (C. W. Cooke, 1915).
(42). 13853, quarry along highway no. 19, 14.5 miles southwest of Brooks-
ville and 2 miles west of Weekiwachee Springs (W. C. Mansfield and F. S.
MacNeil).
ALACHUA COUNTY
-(43). 378b, 2 miles south of Gainesville (L. C. Johnson).
-(44). 6811, Cummer Lumber Company Phosphate Plant no. 10, one mile
north of Newberry. Loose blocks Cassidilus-L!earing rock (C. AW. Cooke, 1913).
-(45). 6786, Main Street, High Springs (T. \V. Vaughan and C. W. Cooke,
1913).
COLUMBIA COUNTY
(46). 6178 (L. W. Stephenson, 1908); 6774 (T. W. Vaughan and C. W.
Cooke, 1913); 12745 (H. Gunter, G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932),
small island in Suwannee River three-fourths mile above White Springs.
(47). 6818 (C. W. Cooke, 1913); 12749 (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mans-
field, 1932), old phosphate quarry one-fourth mile southeast of Fort White.
(48). 4960 (G. C. Matson, 1908); 6827 (C. W. Cooke, 1913); 12307 (G.
M. Ponton and WV. C. Mansfield, 1931), near Bass.
(49). 12035, near an old stream channel near Florida State Road no. 5a,
about 11/ miles west of Santa Fe River (G. M. Ponton and WV. C. Mansfield,
1931).
SUWVANNEE COUNTY
(50). 6826, 11109 (C. W. Cooke, 1913, 1926); 12308 (G. M. Ponton and
\W. C. lansfield, 1931-2), old Lyle quarry, 1% miles north of Live Oak.
(51). 12309, east bank of Suwannee River, opposite Ellaville, 15-20 feet
above river level (H. Gunter, G. M. Ponton, W. C. Mansfield, 1931-2).
(52). 12711-2, left bank of Suwannee River, 21/2 miles (air line) above
Ellaville or about one mile above Clarks fishing camp (H. Gunter, G. M. Ponton
and W. C. Mansfield, 1932).
(53). 7339 (C. W. Cooke, 1915, upper bed); 11110 (C. W. Cooke, 1926);
12303 (G M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931), Suwannee Sulphur Spring.

HAMILTON COUNTY
(54). 12738, right bank of Suwannee River about 4 miles (air line) above
Ellaville (H. Gunter, G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932).
(55). 12739, right bank of Suwannee River just below Noble Ferry bridge,
about 6 miles (air line) above Ellaville (H. Gunter and W. C. Mansfield).

TAYLOR COUNTY
(56). 12737, along highway no. 19, 9.7 miles northwest of Perry (G. M.
Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1932).

JEFFERSON COUNTY
(57). 12298, rock quarry 11% miles east-southeast of Flint Rock (G. M.
Ponton and W. C. Mansfield, 1931).
(58). 4990 (F. G. Clapp, 1908); 12299 (G. M. Ponton and W. C. Mans-
field, 1931), Walker Spring, one-fourth mile south of the railroad and about






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


half mile southeast of Walker Springs railroad depot. Fossils from surface
rock blasted out in the construction of the highway.
(59). 12301; (60), 12302, along highway 10 and 8 miles, respectively, east
of Wacissa (G. M. Ponton and W. C.. Mansfield, 1931).

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE SUWANNEE LIMESTONE
The map, figure 2, shows the southernmost exposure of the Suwan-
nee limestone to be in the northeastern part of Hillsborough County
along Blackwater Creek (no. 28). It appears at the surface in the
southeastern part (no. 29) and again in the northwestern part (nos.
30, 31) of Pasco County. In nearly all of Hernando County, the
Suwannee limestone either crops out at the surface or is overlain by
later deposits (nos. 32-42).
Remnants of this limestone, usually resting on the Ocala limestone
of Eocene age occur in Alachua County (nos. 43, 44 and 45) ; and in
Columbia County (nos. 47, 48, 49). In Suwannee County, it has been
quarried near Live Oak (no. 50), and is exposed along the Suwannee
River from Ellaville (no. 51) to White Springs (no. 46).
West of the Suwannee River the Suwannee limestone crops out
at 9.7 miles northwest of Perry, Taylor County (no. 56); at Flint
Rock (no. 57); at Walker Spring (no. 58); and along the highway
8 and 10 miles east of Wacissa (nos. 59, 60), Jefferson County.

DISTRIBUTION OF SPECIES IN THE SUWANNEE LIMESTONE
The following list includes the species (Gastropoda, Pelecypoda,
Scaphapoda, and Echinoidea) in the Suwannee limestone. (See table
of distribution, inserted on back cover page.) The list of species from
Blackwater Creek, Hernando County, is given on page 51.

RESUME OF THE SUWANNEE LIMESTONE
The Suwannee limestone is typically exposed along the Suwannee
River, Florida, from Eliaville, where it unconformably overlies a white
limestone containing Vicksburg (Oligocene) fossils, to a short dis-
tance above White Springs, where it is unconformably overlain by
the Miocene Hawthorn formation. Another large area of the Suwan-
nee limestone centering near Brooksville, Hernando County, lies be-
tween the Eocene Ocala limestone (on the north) and the Miocene
Tampa limestone (on the south). West of the Suwannee River, this
limestone crops out a few miles west of the Aucilla River, Jefferson
County.
The fauna of the Suwannee limestone, as a whole, lived during
the latter part of the time represented by the Flint River formation
(Oligocene).






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Cooke'0 correlates the Flint River formation (S. C., Ga., and Ala.)
with the Chickasawhay marl member of the Byram marl (Ala. and
Miss.); the Antigua formation (Leeward Islands); and the Meson
formation (Mexico). The Flint River formation is correlated with
the European Rupelian.
The fauna of the Tampa limestone was derived from that of the
Suwannee limestone. Some species appear to be confined to the
Suwannee limestone. As noted before, the echinoid Rhyncholampas
gouldii (Bouv6) has not been found in deposits now referred to the
Tampa limestone. It is not known with certainty whether some species
dredged from the Blackwater River in Hillsborough County came
from the Tampa limestone or from the Suwannee limestone.
The fauna indicates warm water conditions rather than cool.
The contact between the Suwannee limestone and the succeeding
Tampa limestone has not been observed, but the transgression of the
Hawthorn formation beyond the shore line of the Tampa, as ob-
served at White Springs, Suwannee River, causing the Hawthorn to
rest directly on the Suwannee limestone, indicates a hiatus between
the Suwannee and the Hawthorn.


6 Cooke, C. W., Notes on the Vicksburg group: Bull. Amer. Assoc. Petroleum
Geologists, vol. 19, no. 8, pp. 1171, 1172, Aug., 1935.






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


DESCRIPTIONS OF SPECIES OF THE TAMPA AND
SUWANNEE LIMESTONE

Phylum MOLLUSCA
Class GASTROPODA
Subclass ANISOPLEURA
Superorder EUTHYNEUBA
Nonmarine species
In recording the land and fresh-water species, the writer has fol-
lowed Dall's classification as given in the U. S. National Museum
Bulletin 90. In some instances Dall referred species provisionally to
certain genera. Some of these species may belong to other genera
and some closely related forms perhaps should be united under one
specific name. The main purpose, however, is to record in other
deposits the forms identical with or similar to those occurring in the
Tampa "silex beds." The marine forms follow the non-marine.

Order PULMONATA
Family HELICIDAE
Tribe BELOGONA
Genus CEPOLIS Montfort, 1810
Key to species of the genus Cepolis
Shell rotund, full and rounded with a rather low spire....--..................---C. latebrosa
Shell depressed, body whorl slightly angled at the periphery................C. instrumosa
Shell elevated and moderately narrow; whorls full and rounded .....-----C. dircpta

Subgenus PLAGIOPTYCHA Pfeiff.r, 1856
CEFO IS (PLAGOIOTYCHA) IATEBROSA (Dall)
1890. Helix (Jeanncretia) latebrosa Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol.
1, p. 8, pl. 1, figs. 8, 8a.
1915. Cepolis (Plagioptycha) latebrosa Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 22,
pl. 2, figs. 13, 17, 19.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111944.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The shell of this species is rotund, with a rather low spire and
weakly convex whorls; margin of lower lip within supporting a large
callus.
The holotype is the only specimen at hand.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


CEPOLIS (PLAGIOPTYCHA) INSTRUMOSA (Dall)
1890. Helix (Jeanneretia) instrumo'sa Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3,
pt. 1, p. 9, pl. 1, figs. 7, 8b.
1915. Cepolis (Plagioptycha) instrumosa Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 23,
pl. 2, figs. 6, 15.
Cotypes: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111945.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The shell of this species is depressed and the body whorl is angled
at the periphery.
The species has not been recognized outside of its type locality.

CEPOLIS (PLAGIOPTYCHA) DIREPTA (Dall)
1890. Helix (Jeanneretia) direpta Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3,
pt. 1, p. 10, pl. 1, figs. 7a, 7b.
1900. Helix (Plagioptycha) direpta Dall, idem., pt. 5, pl. 39, figs. 4, 5.
1915. Cepolis (Plagioptycha) direpta Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 23,
pl. 2, figs 12, 14.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111955.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The shell of this species is elevated, rather narrow; the whorls are
full and rounded.
Other occurrence: Sixmile Creek, near Orient Station, Hills-
borough County (Tucker).

Tribe EPIPHALLOGONA
Genus PLEUODONTE Fischer de Waldheim, 1808
Key to the species of the genus Pleurodo'nte:
Shell large, low-spired, whorls carinated, umbilicus concealed in the adult
..... ......................................... .............................................................P haruspica
Shell rather small, low-spired, whorls rounded, umbilicus not covered, P. crusta
Shell similar to P. crusta, but smaller -. ........................................P. cunctator
Shell similar to P. crusta, but larger, more covered umbilicus and with a
more flattened base (Dall) ................................................................... ....P. diespiter
Shell of medium size, low-spired, umbilicus nearly concealed....... P. kendrickensis

PIEUBODONTE HARUSPICA (Dall)
1890. Helix (Jcannertia) haruspica Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol 3,
pt. 1, p. 11, pl. 1, figs. 7c, 7d.
1915. Pleurodonte haruspica Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 23, pl. 1, figs.
12, 13, 14 (paratype); pl. 2, fig. 11 holotypee).
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. 111957; figured paratype: U. S. Nat.
Mus. No. 165005.
Type locality: "silex bed," at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Horizon; Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Other occurrence: Sixmile Creek, near Orient Station, Hills-
borough County (Tucker), one silicified specimen.
The shell of this species is large and low spired, with carinated
whorls. The young shell is preforate, but adult specimens have the
umbilicus hermetically sealed.

PFLEURODONTE CUSTA (Dall)
1890. Hclix (Jcanneretia) crusta Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3,
pt. 1, p. 9, pl. 1, figs. 6e, 6f holotypee) ; figs. 4, 4a, 4b (paratype).
1915. Pleurodonte crusta Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 24, pl. 2, figs 8, 16
holotypee).
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111946; paratype 111947.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The shell of this species is small, low spired with rounded whorls.
The umbilicus is uncovered. This species appears to be confined to
the area of its type locality.

PLEURODONTE CUNCTATOR (Dall)
1890. Helix (Jcanneretia) crusta var. cunctator Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci.
Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 10.
1915. Pleurodonte cunctator Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 24, pl. 4, figs. 8, 9.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111950.
Type locality: "silex bed," at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species is similar to P. crusta, but Dall states that it is smaller,
with a more bevelled base in the area of the umbilicus; however, it is
very closely allied to P. crusta.
Other occurrences: Sixmile Creek, near Orient Station, Hills-
borough County (Tucker); station 12292, Cherokee sink, Wakulla
County (internal molds, specific determination not confirmed); sta-
tion 12726, 2.2 miles above Willis bridge on the Chipola River (inter-
nal molds, determination not confirmed); station 7353, between An-
thony and Martin, Martin County (external mold, identification not
confirmed); station 12300, 1 4 miles N. E. of Lloyd, Jefferson
County (Internal mold, determination not confirmed).

PLEURODONTE DIESPITER (Dall)
1890. Helix (Jeanneretia) diespiter Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3,
p. 10, pl. 1, figs. 1, la. (Figure based on several partly defective speci-
mens.)
1915. Pleurodonte diespiter Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 24, pl. 2, figs.
18, 20.


5-G. Survey





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Cotype: U. *. Nat. Mus. No. 111951.
Type locality: "silex bed" at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Dall states that this species resembles P. crusta in form but is
larger with a more covered umbilicus, more horizontally flattened
base and a larger and more oval aperture.
This species appears to be confined to the area of its type locality.

PLEUBODONTE KENDRICKENSIS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 1, Figures 8, 11, 14
Shell solid, with a very low spire consisting of 42 whorls. Suture
shallow, close-fitting but not appressed. Early whorls very weakly
convex. Body whorl narrowly rounded at the periphery. Aperture
wider than high; lower margin nearly at right angles with the axis
of the shell. Peristome of aperture thickened and reflected. Parietal
wall covered with a rather heavy wash of callus. Umbilicus nearly
concealed, only a small chink lies behind the peristome. The shell is
smooth except for faint growth lines.
Holotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 495996) measures: Height,
10.8 mm.; greatest diameter, 21.0 mm.
* Type locality: Station 12314, Cummer Lumber Company quarry
at Kendrick, 4.8 miles north-of Ocala, Marion County, Florida; from
a bed about 3 feet thick -that overlies the Ocala. (Eocene) limestone.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Pleurodonte kendrickensis, n. sp., has a lower.spire than the species
referred to this genus from the "silex bed" at Tampa Bay.

Genus HUMBOLDTIANA von Ihering, 1892
HUMBOLDTIANA? TUCKERAE Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 1, Figures 9, 12
Shell of moderate size, globose, wider than high, rather thin and
consisting of about 4V2 whorls in all. Apical turn corroded but ap-
parently lowly domed and-rapidly enlarging. Following whorls evenly
convex. Suture shallow, weakly appressed. Last whorl composing
most of the shell, similarly rounded above and below. Sculptured with
rather coarse retractive growth lamellae. Aperture oblique and a little
wider below than above; margin weakly reflected. Parietal wall prob-
ably originally covered with a thin callus. Umbilicus small, partly con-
cealed at the upper part by the dilation of the peristome. Columella
weakly concave medially.






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Holotype measures: Height, 14 mm.; greatest- diameter; 20 ninm.
Type locality: Sixmile Creek, near Orient Station, Hillsborough
County, Florida. Collected by Miss Helen I. Tucker.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Only two specimens were received with the material from Miss
Tucker, the holotype being a little better preserved but a little smaller
than the other specimen.
U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 4959340.
I am not certain that the specimens belong to the genus Hnm-
boldtiana. In general outline they appear closely related to H. tc.rana
Pilsbry from Texas. The surface of the shell is somewhat corroded
and no color bands or granulose ornamentation can be seen, if orig-
inally present.
Tribe POLYGYRA
Genus POLYGYRA Say, 1818
POZYGYEA ADAMlXS (Dall)
1890. Helix (Polygyra) adamnis Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Trans.,.vol. 3,
pt. 1, p. 12, pi. 1, figs. 5, 5a.
1915. Polygyra adamnis Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 24, pl. 2, figs. 7, 9.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111959.
Type locality: "silex bed," at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species has not been recognized outside of its type locality.

Family BULIMULIDAE
Genus BULIMULUS Leach, 1814
Key to the species of genus Bulimulnus
Shell moderately long and with-a relatively long body whorl ..........B. floridanus
Shell small, rather stout, whorls slightly convex-...............................B. heilprinianus
Shell rather large and stout ....:............................. ...-..-. ..... .. ...B. americanus
Shell similar to B. americanus but a little more slender, --.... .....................
.............................................. B. americanus var. partulinus
Shell more slender than B. americamis and with stronger growth lines........
......--.--.- ..-- ..-- .. ..-..-..-..--.... ..- B americanus var. laxus
Shell of moderate size and moderately slender ........ -..-............... .......B. tamtpae
Shell similar to B. heilprinianus but more slender ...................- .................B. ballistae
Shell small, very slender ................................................. .. .... ....B. stearnsii
Shell small, rather stout, similar to B. heilprinianus ...................................B. tortilla
Shell small and rather slender ....................................................................-B. remi olina
Shell very large -----------... ......................-........-....- B. americanus wakullae

Subgenus HYPERAULAX Pilsbry, 1897
BU.IMUL.US (HYPERAULAX) PLORIDAIUS Conrad
1846. Bulitmus floridanus Conrad, Amer. Jour. Sci., ser. 2, vol. 2, p. 399, fig. 1:
1865. Bulimus floridanus Conrad, Amer. Jour. Conch., vol. 1, p. 144, pl. 11,
fig. 11.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


1881. Bulimulus longaevus Ancey, Le Naturaliste, 1881, p. 414.
1890. Bulimulus (?Anctus) floridanus Conrad. Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci.,
Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 5, pl. 1, fig. 11.
1915. Bulimulus (Hyperaulax) floridanus Conrad. Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull.
90, p. 25, pl. 2, fig. 2.
Type not found in the collection of the Academy of Natural Sci-
ences, Philadelphia.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene
According to Dall," B. floridanus differs from B. americanus and
B. heilpriniamus in being more elongated and less abruptly tapered at
the ends.
BULIMULUS (HYPERAUL.AX) HEILPRINIANUS DDaU
1890. Buliniulrs (?Anctus) heilprinianus Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Trans.,
vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 6, pl. 1, figs. 6b, 10.
1915. Bulimulus (Hyperaulax) heilprinianus Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90,
p. 25, pl. 2, figs. 1, 10.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111962.
Type locality: "silex bed, Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species is small, fusiform. with a rather pointed conical spire.
The suture is distinct but not deep.

BU.IMULUS (HYPEBAULAX) AMEzICANUS (Heilprin)
1887. Partula americana Heilprin, Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Trans., vol. 1, p.
115, pl. 16, fig. 60.
1890. Bulimulus (.Anctus) americanus (Heilprin). Dall, Wagner Free Inst.
Sci., Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 7, pl. 1, figs. 9, 9a (with varieties partulinus
and laxus).
1915. Bulimulus (Hyperaulax) americanus (Heilprin). Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus.
Bull. 90, p. 26, pl. 2, fig. 5 formaa typical) ; pl. 3, fig. 3 formaa typical ;
pl. 4, fig. 12 (var. partulinus), pl. 4, fig. 14 (var. laxus)..
Holotype: Forma typical deposited in the collection of Wagner
Free Inst. Science, Philadelphia; var. partulinus (U. S. N. M. No.
111970) and var. la.rus (U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111971) deposited in the
U. S. National Museum.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The species is rather large and stout. It is the most abundant
species in the "silex bed."
Other occurrence: Sixmile Creek, near Orient Station, Hills-
borough County (Tucker). An imperfect specimen, collected at sta-

a Daln, W. H., Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 6, 1890.






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


tion 12294, 2.5 miles south of Crawfordville, Wakulla County, ap-
pears to belong or is closely allied to B. americanus.
B. americanus var. partulinus is very similar to B. americanus but
B. americanus var. la.vus is more slender than the typical form.

BULIMULUS (HYPERAULAX) TAMPAE Dall
1915. Bulimulus (Hyperaulax.) tampac Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 20,
pl. 1, fig. 3.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165012.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The shell of this species is of moderate size and subfusiform in
outline.
BULIMULUS (HYPERAULAX) BALLIISTAE Dall
1915. Bulinmulus (Hyperaula.) ballistac Dali, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 26,
pl. 1, fig. 5.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165013.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Shell similar to B. heilprinianus but more slender.

BULIMUL.US (HYPERAULAX) STEABNSII Dall
1890. Buliliulus (?Anctus) stcarnsii Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Trans., vol.
3, pt. 1, p. 7, pl. 1, fig. 12.
1915. Bulimulus (Hyperaulax) stearnsii Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 27,
pl. 2, fig. 4.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111964.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Shell rather small and very slender.

BU.IMULUS (HYPERAULAX) TORTILLUS Dall
1915. Bulinimlus (Hyperaulax) tortilla Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 27,
pl. 1, fig. 2.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165015.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Shell small, rather stout, similar to B. heilprinianus.

BULIMULUS (HYPERAULAX) REMOLIINUS Dall
1915. Bulimulus (Hyperaulax) remolina Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 27,
pl. 1, fig. 18.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165014.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


- Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species is somewhat similar to B. tampae but smaller and more
slender. .
BUIMiU8LUS AMERBCANUS WAKUlI TAE Mansfield, n. subsp.
Plate 1, Figures 10, 13
A number of specimens, one an external mold and a number of in-
ternal molds, were collected at station 12293, about 200 yards south
of Wakulla railroad station, Wakulla County, Florida, and about 16
miles south of Tallahassee. These specimens appear to be closely re-
lated to Bulimulus americanus Heilprin and until better specimens
may be procured are placed as a subspecies of Heilprin's species.
The mold of the new subspecies is twice the size of the largest
specimen of Heilprin's species. The molds reveal a rather stout shell
with moderately inflated whorls. Only retractive growth lines orna-
ment the shell.
An impression of an external mold measures: Height, 30 mm.;
greatest diameter, about 17 mm.
Holotype: U. S. Nat Mus. No. 495932.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.

Family CERIONIDAE
Genus CERION Bolten, 1798
Section EOSTROPHIA Dall, 1890
CEBION (Eostrophia) ANODONTA (Dall)
1890. Strophia (Eostrophia) anodonta Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans.,
vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 13, pl. 1, figs. 8c, 8d.
1915. Cerion (Eostrophia) anodonta (Dall), U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 28,
pl. 1, fig. 15.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111972.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Other occurrence: Sixmile Creek, near Orient Station, Hillsbor-
ough County, Florida (Tucker) (? Mansfield and MacNeil) : station
12294, 2.5 miles south of Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida;
station 12292, Cherokee sink, Wakulla County, iFlorida (external
mold, identification questioned); station 12293, Wakulla Stationf, Wa-
kulla County (external mold, identification questioned).

CERION (Eostrophia) ANODONTA VAB. PLOBIDANUM Dall
1915. Cerion (Eastrophia) anodonta var. floridanumm Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus.
Bull. 90, p. 28, pl. 3, fig. 4.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111975.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa: limestone, lower Miocene.
This .variety is shorter and stouter- than the typical form.

Genus MICROCERION Dall, 1915
MIOCOCERION PLORIDANUM Dall
1915. Microcerion floridanum Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 29, pl. 1, figs.
16, 17.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165018.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species is very rare; it has. not been found outside of its type
locality.
Family PUPILLIDAE
Genus PUPOIDES Pfeiffer, 1854
PUPOIDES PILSBBYI Dall
1915. Pupoides pilsbryi Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 29, pl. 1, fig. 6..
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165017.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Dall states that the pillar and aperture of this species are without
teeth or callosities. The figured specimen (Dall, pl. 1, fig. 6) has
teeth and it is not the same as the specimen in the U. S. Nat. Mus.
marked "Type." The figured specimen may not be the specimen de-
scribed by Dall.
Family UROCOPTIDAE
Genus UROCiPTIS Beck, 1837
UROCOPTIS PLORIDANA (Dall)
1890. Cylindrella floridana Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1,
p. 13, pl. 1, fig. 6a.
1915. Urocoptis floridana Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 30, pl. 1, fig. 4;
pl. 2, fig. 3 holotypee).
Holotype: U. S, Nat. Mus. No. 111976. Figured paratype: U. S.
Nat. Mus. No. 165019.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower .Miocene.
This species appears to be confined totlihe area of its type locality.


71






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Family PLANORBIDAE
Genus PLANORBIS Miiller, 1774
PI.ANOBBXS TAMPAENSIS Dall
1915. Planorbis tampaensis Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 30, pl. 1, fig. 1.
Holotype: U. S.. Nat. Mus. No. 165020.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The holotype, a poor specimen, is the only specimen in the collec-
tion at the U. S. National Museum.

Section TORQUIS Dall, 1905
PLANOBlIS (TOaQUIS) Wr.InCOXII Dall
1890. Planorbis willcoxii Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1,
p. 4, pi. 1, figs. 6c, 6d.
1915. Planorbis (Torquis) wvillcoxii Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 31,
pl. 3, figs. 5, 6.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 111938.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The holotype is the only specimen in the U. S. National Museum.

PLANORBIS (TOgQUIS) EMIBUS Dall
1915. Planorbis (Torquis) elisus Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 31, pl. 1,
figs. 8, 9.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165021.
Type locality: "silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The holotype and only specimen, is smaller than P. willcoxii and
the relationship to it is difficult to determine.

Family OLEACINIDAE
Genus SPIRAXIS C. B. Adams, 1850
SPIRAXIS? TAMPAE Dall
Plate 1, Figure 1.
1915. Spiraxis? lampae Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 31.
Holotype: U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 214738.
Type locality: "silex bed," Tampa, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The holotype is the only specimen in the U. S. National Museum.






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


Marine species
Order OPISTHOBRANCHIATA
Suborder TECTIBRANCHIATA
Family ACTEONIDAE
Genus ACTEON Montfort, 1810
ACTEON TAMPAE Dall
1915. Acteon lamnae Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 32, pl. 4, fig. 10.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell short, inflated, with a short, rather acute spire and about five whorls;
nucleus rounded, smooth; suture distinct; general surface smooth except for
the spiral sculpture, which consists of two close-set equidistant deep grooves
in front of the suture which make the interspace and the sutural margin look
like rounded threads; near the periphery and in front of it are two or three
distant shallower striae; on the base and extending to the anterior end are seven
or eight equidistant, moderately impressed striae; aperture moderately wide, the
margins thick and solid, the pillar with one strong plait; there is no umbilical per-
foration but a narrow depressed smooth space behind the pillar.
"Height 7, diameter 4.5 mm.
"Tampa silex beds, at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. U. S. Nat. Mus.
No. 166094."

Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Acteon shilohensis Whitfield, a .species from the Kirkwood for-
mation, middle Miocene, of New Jersey, has a higher and more tur-
reted spire than A. tampae Dall and also differs in other features.
Acteon lampae is represented by a single individual which consti-
tutes the holotype. I have not seen it outside of its type locality.

Family ACTEONIDAE
Genus ACTEOCINA Gray, 1847
ACTEOCINA WETHERILLI I. Lea?
I find only one specimen collected at La Penotiere's sulphur spring,
about 6 miles northeast of Tampa, Fla., and labelled "Tornatina" weth-
erilli Lea" under No. 97469 in the U. S. National Museum collection.
Another poorly preserved shell which may belong to this species was
collected by me at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Fla. The holotype of
Acteocina wetherilli (Lea)" came from the Tertiary at Deal, N. J.
I have not seen this specimen and am not sure that the specimens
from the "silex beds" and the Tampa limestone of Dall referred to the
species by Dall are correctly identified.
The specimen mentioned above (U. S. N. M. No. 97469) has about
0 Lea, Isaac, Contributions to Geology, p. 213, pl. 6, fig. 224, 1833.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


4 whorls in all, the last whorl comprising most of the shell. The
spire is acute but not much elevated. A spiral incised line is situated
below the suture forming a subsutural cord between it and the suture.
The body whorl is weakly compressed medially and the columella bears
a single fold. The illustration of the figured holotype of A. weth-
erilli (Lea) appears to be a relatively shorter shell than the Tampa
form referred to this.species by Dall.

ACTEOCINA SQUARROSA Dall
1915. Acleocina squarrosa Dall, U. S. Nat( Mus. Bull. 90, p. 33, pl. 6, fig. 8.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell of moderate size, subcylindrical, slightly wider anteriorly, of about
4 whorls, separated by a very deeply excavated channeled suture; the outer
margin of the suture is formed by a sharp-edged thin carina, the inner margin
is duplicated by a layer of enamel so that in the adult, in the whorls preceding
the last, the carina seems double-edged; nucleus small, swollen, sunken so that
the nuclear whorl is not visible above the squarely truncated posterior end of the
shell; axial sculpture of faint vertical incremental lines, somewhat irregular in
strength and receding arcuately to and near the carina; spiral sculpture on the
anterior half of the whorl at first faint, but becoming accentuated anteriorly,
and extending to the labial callus, composed of fine, nearly equally spaced grooves
or striae, apparently not ptinctuate; aperture as long as the shell, narrow behind,
Where the commissure is deeply incised, wide in front; outer lip straight, sharp,
simple; body without enamel; pillar short, almost horizontally twisted, bearing
a single strong plait on a heavy callus behind which is a rather deep narrow
bounding furrow; anterior sinus wide and deep. Length of shell, 11.5, depth
of sutural channel 1, maximum diameter of shell 5.5 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165025."

Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The species has not been found outside of the type locality.

Genus RETUSA Brown, 1827
RETUSA? VAGINATA Dall
1890. Utriculus vaginatus Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 16.
1892. Utriculus vaginatus Dall, idem., pt. 2, p. 219, pl. 20, fig. 2.
1915. Retusa vaginata Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 34.

Dall described this species in 1890 and 1915 as follows:
"Shell small, elongate ovate in profile, with a subtruncate spire above the
last whorl; surface smooth or marked with incremental lines; whorls three or
four; spire depressed, barely visible. above the last whort; suture.narrow, deeply
excavated, the rim in front of it sharp; last whorl descending toward the
aperture; shell slightly wider in front than behind; aperture very narrow be-
hind, more than three times as y)ide in front; outer i-ip simple, sharp, rounding






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


imperceptibly into the simple unplicate pillar, behind which there is no um-
bilicus; Ion. 4.0; lat. 2.0 mm.
"This species recalls R. mayoi Dall of the recent fauna, in miniature, but
has a deeper suture with the margin in front of the suture sharp edged as, in
Olivella."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species, as pointed out by Dall, has a deeper suture than
Retusa mayoi Dall. It also has a deeper suture than Retusa obtusa
(Montagu) usually regarded as the genotype. However, the char-
acter of the unplicate pillar of the Tampa form is quite similar to that
of R. obtusa and in this respect appears to be nearer the genus Retulsa
than to other genera of the Tectibranchiata. The species belonging to
the genus Retusa are usually found in rather cool water.

Family SCAPHANDRIDAE
Genus SCAPHANDER Montfort, 1810
SCAPHANDER BALLISTUS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 1, Figures 5, 6
1890. Scaphander prinus Aldrich (part). Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans.,
vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 17.
1915. Scaphander primus Aldrich (part). Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 34.
Shell large, ovate, expanding anteriorly, with a depressed spire.
Body whorl weakly transversely depressed at about upper third of
shell which is distinctly indicated by a narrow furrow on the internal
mold of specimens which have lost the shells. Sculpture of regularly
spaced concentric striae over the whole shell. Aperture inverted ear-
shaped, extending posteriorly as far as the body whorl; outer lip thin.
Dimensions: Holotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 165026), length, 9.8
mm.; greatest diameter, 5.6 mm. Larger paratype (U. S. Nat. Mus.
No. 495935), length, 23.2 mm.; greatest diameter, 12.7 mm. Smaller
paratype, length, 12 mm.; greatest diameter, 7.8 mm.
Type locality: Holotype, "silex beds," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay,
Florida; Iaratype, station 12285, quarry, half mile south of River
Junction, Gadsden County, at an elevation of about 150 feet above
sea level.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Scaphander primus Aldrich from the Oligocene at Red Bluff,
Miss., is smaller, more inflated in the posterior region and marked
with stronger primary striae than the new species. The primary
striae also on S. primus are usually interpolated with secondary striae
whereas on the new species there appear to be no secondary striae.






FLORID\ GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Occurrence: "silex beds" at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida;
La Penotiere's Sulphur Spring, 6 miles northeast of Tampa, Hills-
borough County (large specimens in a limestone matrix); station
12292, Cherokee sink, Wakulla County (three internal molds) ; stations
3411 and 12285, quarry half mile south of River Junction, Gadsden
County; station 4836, Old Chattahoochee Landing, Gadsden County,
echinoderm bed (internal molds and identification not certain).

SCAPHANDER up.
Specimens belonging to the genus Scaphander, too poorly preserved
for specific determination, occur at three localities in Florida. Al-
though these specimens may represent more than one species they
appear to differ from S. ballistus, n. sp., in having the posterior ex-
tremity more contracted.
Horizon: Suwannee limestone, Oligocene.
Occurrence: station 11109, 1 2 miles north of Live Oak, Suwan-
nee County (silicified specimens).; station 6872, Bass, Columbia
County; station 6774, rock island, three-fourths mile above White
Springs, Columbia County (posterior end of a silicified specimen);
station 12753a, lower part of quarry at Brooksville, Hernando County.

Family BULLIDAE
Genus BULLA Linn6, 1758
BULL.A PETROSA Conrad
1846. Bulla petrosa Conrad, Amer. Jour. Sci., vol. 2, ser. 2, p. 399, with figure..
1890. Bulla petrosa Conrad. Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1,
p. 18.
1915. Bullaria petrosa (Conrad). Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 35.
Conrad described in 1846 this species as follows:
"Oval, destitute of striae?, summit oblique. Ballast Point, Tampa Bay,
Rare."

Dall' states:
"Rare in the Tampa silex beds, where it was first found by Conrad and
later by Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 97488. This belongs to the typical section
of the genus with perforate apex and resembles Bullaria solida but is of smaller
size.
"This species has also been collected from the Oligocene limestone of Jack-
sonboro, Georgia."

Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The specimen under U. S. National Museum number 97488, re-
ferred to "Bullaria" petrosa (Conrad) by Dall, is a poor specimen.


" Dall, W. H., U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 35, 1915.






MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


It has a perforate apex and has spiral striations on the anterior third
of the body whorl.
The specimens from Jacksonboro, Georgia, that Dall identified as
"Blullaria" petrosa (Conrad), are internal molds, and I am not sure
that they are identical with Conrad's species.

Genus HAMINEA Leach, 1847
HAMINEA? SULCOBASIS Dall
1915. Bullaria (Haminea?) sulcobasis Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 35, pl. 6.
fig. 6.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, subovate, anterior third spirally striated, posterior two-thirds
smooth or faintly marked by incremental lines; whorls involved, thin, the apex
depressed, showing only the external whorl; outer lip as long as the shell, thin,
simple; anterior third with fine spiral striae, at first close, later coarser and
with wider interspaces; around the minutely perforate umbilicus there is a
narrow space free from striae; aperture behind extending beyond the apex,
and rather narrow, in front wider; body with a thin wash of callus; pillar lip
short, smooth with a slight free reflection over the umbilical region. Height
8.2, maximum diameter 5.4 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. One specimen
from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165027.
"This species may belong to the genus Haminea, the specimen is hardly
perfect enough to be positive as to its proper location."

Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
No more specimens have been obtained from Ballast Point to aid
in placing the species in the proper genus.


Superorder STREPTONEURA
Order CTENOBRANCHIATA
.Suborder ORTHODONITA
Superfamily TOXOGLOSSA
Family TEREBRIDAE
Genus TEREBRA Bruguiere, 1789
Subgenus STRIOTEREBRA Sacco, 1891
TEREBRA (STRIOTEBEBRA) BALLISTA Mansfield, n. sp,
Plate 1, Figure 3
1915. Terebra (Oxymeris) tantula Conrad (part). Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull.
90, p. 36.
Shell small, moderately slender, sculpture stronger axially than
spirally. Ten remaining whorls on holotype, about 12 or 13 in all;
nuclear whorls missing on holotype; postnuclear whorls nearly straight






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


and gradually enlarging. Suture shallowly depressed and closely ap-
pressed. Axial sculpture of rather strong, arcuate ribs (18 on the
penultimate whorl) which are retractive above and protractive below
and separated by interspaces a little wider than the ribs. These-ribs are
transversely weakly incised, at the upper third of the whorl. Spirally
sculptured over the whole shell with very narrow bands separated
usually by narrower incised lines, which are situated mainly between
the ribs. Aperture not entirely preserved. Columella apparently
uniplicate, the sulcus being at the lower part of the pillar,
Holotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 165028) measures: Height, 17.5
mm.; greatest diameter,4.5 mm;
Type locality: "silex beds" at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
E. J. Post, collector. Not known outside of the type locality..
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Terebra ballista n. sp. differs from T. tantula Conrad, an Oligocene
species, in having a larger shell with a greater apical angle, and a much
shallower incised spiral eliminating the subsutural band.
Terebra are very rare in the Tampa limestone, there being only
two specimens which I have referred to .the new species, T. bal-
lista, in the U. S. National Museum collection. The specimen figured
by Dall," and referred to T. dislocata Say came from the. Shoal River
formation, 5 miles east of DeFuniak Springs, Florida.

Family .CONIDAE
Genus CONUS Linnaeus, 1758
Key to the species of Conus
1. Shell slender, elongate and turreted.
Anal fasciole concave.
Spire whorls sharply keeled at the shoulder and undulated on the
earlier whorls, ornamented within the anal fasciole with 2 feeble
spiral threads and on the vertical area below the carina by protractive
to nearly vertical axial folds ............... .. ...........- ........ ..... Conus illiolus
2. Shell broadly conical.
Nucleus erect, rising from a nearly flat surrounding area.
Anal fasciole weakly concave to nearly flat.
Spire whorls gently inclined to nearly flat, sculptured on the anal
fasciole with about 3 spiral threads.
Lower half of body whorl sculptured with rather coarse, sharp
spiral lines ............. ........... .............-..................... .................. C. planiceps
3. Shell similar to C. planiceps but differing from it in having a higher
spire, and in the absence of strong spiral ornamentation in the area
of the anal fasciole ..................................................... ........... Co s designatus
4. Shell similar to C. planiceps but differing from it in having a less
broadly conical shell and a higher spire ...............-...C. planiceps wakulleitus
63 Dall, W. H., U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, pl. 5, fig. 2, 1915.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


CONUS ILLIOLUS Dall :
1915. Conus illiolus Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 37, pl. 6, figs. 3, 5.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell solid, slender, elongate, turreted, of about 9V2 whorls; nucleus small,
bulbous, of about' one whorl, smooth and oblique; suture distinct; the shoulder
of the whorl sharply keeled, the space between it and the suture slightly ex-
cavated, with two feeble spiral threads equidistant from each other, the suture
and the keel; excavated space transversely sculptured with numerous concavely
flexuous, equal, close-set, slightly elevated incremental lines; suture meeting the
whorl behind at nearly a right angle some distance below the keel; axial sculp-
ture, beside that above mentioned, comprising a series of very small, short, sub-
equal, and nearly equidistant folds on the whorl just below the keel, with sub-
equal interspaces, which do not nodulate the keel and are stronger on the earlier
whorls and nearly obsolete on the last whorl; these are crossed by two or three
feeble spiral threads with narrower intervals, below which the spiral sculpture
is obsolete and the surface practically smooth for two-thirds the length of the
whorl; anterior third has rather coarse spiral threading of which the first 10
are paired, the anterior 10 being coarser and equidistant, aperture narrow, outer
lip (defective); pillar straight, the anterior edge a little prominent and twisted.
Length 41.5, breadth at keel 17 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. Type specimen
from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus, No. 165030."

iHorizon: Tampa limestone, lower 'Miocene.
This species is well characterized and has been well described by
Dall. The holotype is the only specimen in the U. S. National Museum
collection from the "silex beds" at Tampa Bay.
Occurrence: Sixmile Creek, near Orient Station, Hillsborough
County (Tucker); station 7080, 'quarry half mile south of River
Junction, Gadsden County, at an elevation of about 150 feet above sea
level (imperfect specimen, identification not fully confirmed).

CONUS PLANICEPS Heilprin
1887. Conus planiceps Heilprin, Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Trans., vol. 1, p. 110,
figs. 48, 48a.
1890. Conus planiceps Heilprin. Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Trans., vol. 3,
pt. 1, p. 25, pl. 11, figs. 5, 5a.
1892. Conrs planiceps Heilprin. Dall, idem, pt. 2, p. 219.
1915. Conus planceps Heilprin. Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 37, pl. 6,
figs. 1, 2.
Heilprin described this species in 1887 as follows:
"Shell broadly conical, rapidly tapering toward the base; spire reduced to
a minimum, represented in most specimens by an exceedingly gentle rise, crowned
by a papilla (apex); whorls about seven, all of them fully exposed on the
crown, the shoulders concentrically lined; revolving lines nearly obsolete over
the greater extent of the body-whorl, prominent on the basal portion; notch?
"Length 1.4 inches; width of crown, .8 inch."





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The cotypes are deposited in the Wagner Free Institute of Science,
Philadelphia. The spire or crown in most specimens gradually de-
scends from the nucleus but in a few specimens it is nearly flat. The
nucleus is erect and consists of about 3 moderately inflated whorls.
The sculpture on each spire whorl consists of about 3 raised, rather
strong, spiral threads crossed by fine acuate axials. The specimen
figured by Dall" has a stronger and sharper shoulder behind the suture
than most of the other specimens referred to this species but in other
features is identical.
Conts demiurgus Dall from the Chipola formation of the Alum
Bluff group of Florida has a slimmer and larger shell with a larger
nucleus than C. planiceps Heilprin. In outline C. sulculus Dall from
the Chipola resembles the "silex bed" form, but the former species
has a different type of sculpture on lower part of the body whorl and
a higher spire.
Conus aemulator Brown and Pilsbry from the Cerado formation
of the Dominican Republic, a close relative to C. sulculus Dall, is
somewhat similar to the "silex bed" species but differs from the latter
in having a stouter shell, more conical early whorls and a more inflated
shell below the shoulder of the body whorl.
Occurrence: Type locality (common), Sixmile Creek, near Orient
Station, Hillsborough County (Tucker); station 2470, one mile west
of Bartow, Polk County; Baileys Mill Creek sink, Jefferson County;
"Wacissa," Jefferson County; station 12285, quarry half mile south
of River Junction, Gadsden County, at an elevation around 150 feet
above sea level.
CONUS DESIGNATUS Dall
1915. Conus designates Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 37, pl. 6, fig. 4.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell of moderate size with low, broadly conical spire of about 8 whorls;
nucleus prominent, subglobular, inflated, smooth; subsequent whorls flattened
on the spire, narrow, bordered at the shoulder by a slightly rounded keel, and
separated by a distinct but not deep suture; the whorls on the spire are not
spirally sculptured, but show faint traces of incremental, concavely accurate
lines; last whorl in front of the shoulder smooth, acutely conic, the only sculp-
ture being in the anterior third, which has about a dozen fine spiral threads with
wider interspaces becoming more crowded and feebly minutely nodulous an-
teriorly; on the smooth posterior part of the whorl in certain lights can be seen
spiral lines distant and fine, but which appear rather to be in the substance of
the shell and do not sculpture the surface; aperture narrow elongate, the canal


" Dall, W. H., U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, pl. 6, figs. 1, 2, 1915.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


short and wide; the outer lip sharp, simple and very slightly convexly arcuate.
Length of shell 23.8, of aperture 21.5, maximum diameter 12 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165031."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The holotype and three other specimens of the type lot are siliceous
Spseudomorphs. All the specimens are small. The last whorl of the
holotype is weakly concave in the area of the anal fasciole and is
bordered in front of this concavity and at the shoulder by a weak,
rounded spiral cord. One specimen shows faint spirals in the anal
fasciole.
This species differs from C. planiceps Heilprin mainly in having a
higher spire without distinct spiral ornamentation in the area of the
anal fasciole.
Occurrence: Type locality, rare; station 7358, Anclote River at
Tarpon Springs, Pinellas County. (Some of these specimens show
spiral sculpture in the anal fasciole, but in other features appear to be
the same as the silex beds fossils.)

CONUS Pi.ANICEPS. WAKUI.ELNSIS Manffeld, n. subsp.
Plate 1, Figures 2, 4, 7
Shell of medium size, rather broadly conic, low spired, con-
sisting of about 6 postnuclear whorls, nucleus not preserved. Spire
very broadly and evenly conic, rising about 7 millimeters above- the
shoulder of the body whorl. Suture distinct and weakly depressed.
Whorls not depressed in the area of the anal fasciole, sculptured with
2 or 3 rather strong concentric threads. Body whorl sculptured only
on lower half by rather coarse raised concentric lines, the upper ones
being paired.
The holotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 495936) measures: Length,
about 40 mm.; greatest diameter, about 22 mm. The holotype con-
sists of an external impression of the original shell.
Type locality: Station 12292, Cherokee Sink, Wakulla County,
Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The new subspecies is closely related to both C. planiceps Heilprin
and C. designates Dall. It has a higher spire than C. planiceps and
larger and more strongly sculptured in the area of the anal fasciole
than C. designates. The sculpture on the base is similar to both of
the above species.


6-G. Survey






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


Occurrence: Common at the type locality; station 12293, Wakulla
Railroad Station, Wakulla County; station 13840, 14 miles northeast
of Lloyd, Jefferson County.

CON US SP. APP. C. COOXEI Dall
Specimens collected at station 12758, 5.9 miles northeast of Brooks-
ville, Hernando County, though poorly preserved, appear to be re-
lated to Conus cookei Dall, a species described from the Flint River
formation at station 7079, east bank of Flint River at Mascot Point,
about 4 miles below Bainbridge, Ga.
The largest specimen measures about 45 millimeters in length.
The spire, shown by a fragment of an external mold, is moderately
high, turreted and sculptured with 4 or 5 spiral lines. Body whorl
sculptured throughout with raised ( ?) spiral lines.
Horizon: Suwannee limestone, Oligocene.

Family TURRIDAE
Genus POLYSTIRA Woodring, 1928
POLYSTIEA Gt P. ALBIDA (Perry)
1915. Turris albida Perry (in part?), Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 38.
(Not pl. 5, fig. 13; pl. 14, fig. 7, specimens from the Chipola formation).
Four poorly preserved specimens (U .S. Nat. Mus. nos. 112083
and 112084), labeled "Pleurotoma albida" Perry and from the
"silex bed," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Fla., have lost their early
whorls. In the absence of these parts no comparison can be made with
corresponding parts on recent or fossil specimens belonging to this
group, and until better preserved specimens are procured I believe
their identity with the recent species should be left in doubt.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.

POLYSTIRA TAMPENSIS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 2, Figures 1, 8
1915. Turris vibex Dall (in part), U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 39 (not Turris
vibe.r, Bull. Mus. Comp. Zoology, vol. 18, no. 19, p. 73, 1889).
Shell small, slender, with a high spire and long canal. Nucleus
decollate. Whorls nearly straight in outline. Suture shallow and
closely adhering to a spiral thread. Spiral sculpture on the early
whorls consisting of two rather sharp spirals, the anterior being the
stronger and forms the low periphery of the whorl; on the penulti-
mate whorl, two secondary spirals are interposed between the periph-
eral spiral and forward suture and two tertiary spirals lie between





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


the primary spirals. Interspiral spaces axially crossed by fine threads
which are retractive above and protractive below. Canal long and
sculptured with primary and secondary revolving threads. Outer lip
defective.
Cotypes (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 166095) measure: Larger cotype,
height, 15.4 mm; greatest diameter, 7.5 mm. Smaller cotype, height,
11.1 mm; greatest diameter, 6.0 mm.
Type locality: "silex beds," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Fla.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Polystira tampensis is more slender than the recent species, P.
albida (Perry). It has a spiral structure different from that of P.
vibe.r (Dall), the living species to which Dall referred it.
Polystira cochlearis (Conrad), an Oligocene species, has a less
slender shell and stronger spiral sculpture than the new species here
described.
Genus KNEFASTIA Dall, 1919
KNEFASTIA? BROOKSVIIiENSIS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 2, Figures 5, 9
Shell of moderate size, rather stout, with a high spire and prob-
ably a rather long canal (end broken away). Suture wide. Sculp-
ture on the spire whorls mainly consisting of three rather strong
spirals of about the same strength, two of which are situated below
the anal fasciole and one above. Last whorl has eight rather strong,
widely spaced spiral threads between the suture and the base of the
whorl. Outer lip and end of the canal defective.
Larger cotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. 495937) measures: Height, 23
mm.; greatest diameter, 8.5 mm.
Type locality: Station 11113, Brooksville, Hernando County, Fla.
Horizon: Suwannee limestone, Oligocene.
Occurrence: Type locality, 2 specimens; station 7363, 1 2 miles
west of Croom, Hernando County (external mold, may be a varietal
form of Knefastia? brooksvillensis).

Genus FUSITURRICULA Woodring, 1928
FUSITUBRICUIA CONDOMINIA (Dall)
1915. Drillia condominia Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 39, pl. 12, fig. 25.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell of moderate size, rather thin, with an elongatcd, turreted spire of
about eight whorls, separated by a closely appressed but distinct suture; nucleus
defective, subsequent whorls strongly shouldered and sculptured; axial sculpture
of (on the penultimate whorl 10) rounded ribs beginning at"the shoulder, on the






S"LORIDA GEOLOGICAL' SURVEY--BULLETIN FIFTEEN


spire reaching the suture in front, and on the last whorl obsolete on the base, with
subsequent interspaces which become wider on the last part of the last whorl;
these ribs are slightly protractive; lines of growth not conspicuous; spiral sculp-
ture of (on the spire 3 to 5) revolving threads, the posterior two paired, the
others more distant, on the last whorl about 15, becoming obsolete on the canal
and slightly swollen where they override the ribs; on the base these threads are
slightly undulated by their intersection with the lines of growth, and many of
the interspaces have one (or even two) much finer intercalary threads; anal fas-
ciole behind the shoulder but not quite at the suture, wide, smooth, or marked
with concave growth-lines corresponding to the anal sulcus somewhat excavated,
and having a single thick obscurely defined thread between it and the suture;
aperture rather wide; anal sulcus wide, shallow; outer lip thin, internally smooth,
arcuately protractive, receding toward the canal, slightly crenulated by the spiral
sculpture; pillar straight, smooth; canal nearly straight, ample. Length of shell
exclusive of the nucleus 25, of aperture 14, maximum diameter 10 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. Type specimen
from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 165032."

Horizon: Tampa. limestone, lower Miocene.
It is rather unfortunate that the nucleus on the holotype is defec-
tive. This species is closely related to Fusiturricula paraservata
Gardner (Ms.) from the Chipola formation but it has more ribs than
the latter species.
Other occurrence: station 12292, Cherokee Sink, Wakulla County.

FUSITURRICULA -CONDOMINIA SEVERINA (Dall)
1915. Drillia severina Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 40, pl. 5, fig. 4.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell with a smooth' rather swollen nucleus and about eight sculptured
whorls; suture appressed, the margin in front of it in the early whorls elevated
and sharp, later cordlike and swollen; anal fasciole in front of it nearly smooth
except for incremental lines and a few very faint spirals; the fasciole is distinctly
excavated; axial sculpture of about (on the last whorl) 10 slightly oblique
rounded prominent ribs beginning at the shoulder of the whorl and becoming ob-
solete on the base; these are crossed by (between the sutures) four, and on the
last whorl by about a dozen prominent spiral cords with finer -threads between
them and on the canal; the intervals between the cords are subequal as are those
between the ribs; the anal.sulcus is wide and rather shallow, the lip in front of
it thin, sharp, and roundly produced; the pillar and body have a slight wash of
callus' the canal is shorter than the aperture, rather deep and wide, slightly re-
curved.
"Height of shell 23, of last whorl 15, maximum diameter of shell.9 mm.
"Tampa silex beds, not rare. U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 166096.
"This species is near T. servata Conrad, also found in the same horizon, but
is more robust and lias ten instead of only six axial ribs. It grows larger than
the dimensions above given, but the description has been drawn from a more per-
fect if smaller specimen."





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower- Miocene.
I consider "Drillia" severina Dall a subspecies of F. condominia
Dall, differing from the latter in having a more slender shell and finer
spiral sculpture.

FUSITURRICULA CONDOMINIA BILICATA Mansfield, n. subsp.
Plate 2, Figure 11
Some specimens mixed with others identified as "Drillia" condo-
minia Dall and "Drillia" severina Dall are somewhat unlike the holo-
types of these forms and are regarded as a subspecies of Fusiturricula
condominia.
Following is a description of this new subspecies:
Shell moderately stout, turreted, with the body whorl a little longer
than the spire and consisting of 1Y2 nuclear and 6 postnuclear whorls.
Nucleus rather large, smooth, and naticoid. Suture of postnuclear
whorls deep, undulating and closely adhering. Axial sculpture of
strong, rounded, protractive ribs (10 on the penultimate whorl) which
extend on the spire whorls from the upper shoulder forward to the
suture and on the body whorl to the base. Anal fasciole wide, delin-
eated behind by a double row of spirals and in front by the abruptly
rising ribs, and sculptured with very fine spiral threads. Spire whorls
over the ribs and interspaces sculptured with about 5 spiral threads
interlineated with finer spirals similar in strength to those on the anal
fasciole. Upper part of pillar marked with widely spaced spiral
threads intercalated with 2 to 4 finer threads. Columella provided
with a thin wash of callus behind which at the anterior end of the
pillar is a small chink. Anal sinus rather deep and wide. Outer lip
arched medially. Anterior siphonal canal short and deflected.
Holotype: U. S. National Museum No. 496122 (separated from
165032).
Dimensions of the holotype: Height, 25 mm.; greatest diameter,
10.5 mm.
Type locality: "silex beds," Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Fla.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Fusiturricula condominia silicata differs from Fusiturricula con-
dominia severina Dall in having a less slender shell, larger nucleus,
a double row of spirals below the suture and ornamented with more
spirals in the anal fasciole and from Fusiturricula condominia Dall
in having a less slender shell, with a double row of spirals below
suture, fewer spirals over the whole shell and a shallower anal fasciole.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


.TUSITU~RIOCULA? APP. .SEBVATA (Conrad)
Dall" identified specimens from the "silex beds" at Ballast Point
as Turris (Surcula) servata (Conrad), an Oligocene species from the
Byram marl of Mississippi. Only one fragment of a shell, with the
early whorls missing (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 112085), has sculpture
somewhat similar to that of the Oligocene species, but as the
nucleus is missing the identification must remain in doubt. Nuclei of
all other specimens from the Tampa are unlike F. servata (Conrad).
The specimen figured by Dall"6 came from the Chipola formation and
is referred to a new species, Fusiturricula paraservata, by Gardner."'
The specimen with U. S. National Museum, no. 115267"1 is an Oligo-
cene species.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.

rUSITURZICUZ.A zLAPENOTIERE (Dall)
1900. Pleurotoma lapenotierei Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 5,
p. 1199, pl. 43, fig. 14.
1915. Drillia lapenoticrei Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 40, pl. 8, fig. 4.
Only one specimen, the holotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 130351)
has so far been obtained at the type locality. The specimen is
imperfect, the anterior end of the canal has been broken off. It be-
longs to the same genus as "Drillia" condominia Dall. The nucleus
is rather large, smooth and naticoid. The ribs (8 on the penultimate
whorl), which extend from the deep anal fasciole to the forward
suture, are strong. The anal fasciole is sculptured with fine spiral
threads, and the ribs and interspaces with spiral lines are intercalated
with fine spiral threads.
Type locality: "silex beds" at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
A fragment consisting of the spire, collected at station 12300, 1%
miles northeast of Lloyd, Jefferson County, Florida, appears to be-
long to Fusiturricula lapenotierci (Dall).

Genus CRASSISPIRA Swainson, 1840
CBASSISPIRA SELL (Dall)
1915. Drillia sella Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 41, pl. 12, fig. 10.
1915. Drillia bclotheca Dall, idem, p. 42, pl. 4, fig. 7.
Dall described "Drillia" sella as follows:
"Shell small, slender, acute, solid, with nine whorls separated by a closely
appressed suture; nucleus smooth, plump, of about one whorl; subsequent whorls
61 Dall, W. H., U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 39, 1915.
6s Idem, pi. 5, fig. 16.
69 J. A. Gardner, Manuscript awaiting publication.
To Dall, idem, p. 39.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


stronglyy and sharply sculptured; axial sculpture of (on the penultimate whorl
nine) prominent rounded ribs, beginning in front of the anal fasciole, continuing
over the whorl, on the spire to the suture, on the last whorl over the periphery,
gradually becoming obsolete on the base; the interspaces are about equal in width
to the ribs, and the incremental lines are not prominent; spiral sculpture behind
the anal fasciole of a prominent keel close to the suture; the fasciole being a
strong smooth-surfaced constriction, in front of which the ends of the ribs form
a sort of shoulder to the whorl; there are also (on the spire three, on the last
whorl nine) prominent spiral threads with wider interspaces which override the
ribs and are continuous between them; the suture is laid on the fourth thread in
iront of the fasciole; anal sulcus shallow, rather wide; aperture narrow, outer
lip prominent in the middle, sharp-edged, not varicose; inner lip raised, continuous
over the body to sutural commissure, smooth; pillar smooth, canal wide and deep.
Height 11.4, maximum diameter 3.7 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. Type-specimen
from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165035."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.

C ASSISPIBA EUPOBA (Dall)
1915. Drillia cupora Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 42, pl. 5, fig. 3.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, slender, elongate, of more than 6 flattish whorls (specimen
decollate) ; suture distinct, separated from the fasciole in front by an elevated
spiral ridge, carinated and beveled from the carina to the suture which is slightly
undulated by the ribs; anal fasciole excavated and spirally faintly striated, es-
pecially on the anterior slope; axial sculpture of (on the last whorl) about 20
sharp low straight narrow ribs, with much wider interspaces, and extending from
the shoulder to the canal; spiral sculpture between the sutures of 4 fine elevated
threads, including 1 at the shoulder and a fifth on which the suture is laid, with
wider flat interspaces; on the last whorl there are 14 or 15 equal and equally spaced
similar threads; aperture narrow; anal sulcus wide, shallow; outer lip defective;
canal long and straight, rather narrow; pillar and body with a rather thick smooth
layer of callus. Height of five whorls 16, diameter at decollation 2, maximum
diameter behind aperture 5.75 mm.
"Tampa silex beds, at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida, one specimen. U.
S. Nat. Mus. No. 166099.
"This species belongs to the group of D. ostreatum Stearns and resembles D.
abundans Conrad, but is more slender and has sharper ribs."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The holotype, as stated by Dall, is decollate and the character of
the nucleus is unknown.

CEASSISPIRA SM IIA (Dall)
1915. Drillia: smilia Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 43, pl. 12, fig. 21.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, slender, solid, with 7 or more whorls, the apex of the specimen
defective as well as the outer lip; suture distinct, appressed, preceded by a very






FLORIDA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


strong cord which separates it from the anal fasciole; axial sculpture of (on the
penultimate whorl 15) strong rounded whorls which extend from the anal fasciole
to the canal with wider interspaces which are axially striated by rather conspicuous
incremental lines; spiral sculpture, comprising the sutural cord; a deep constric-
tion, spirally striated, which forms the anal fasciole; and, in front of the fasciole
about a dozen strong, subequal, distant, and nearly equally spaced rounded threads
which are distributed over the whole whorl in front of the constriction; these
threads are but slightly swollen where they override the ribs, between the sutures
only two to four threads are visible; aperture sublunate; anal sulcus shallow;
:outer- lip defective, probably produced with a swollen varix behind it; body and
pillar, callous; canal moderately wide, straight, short. Length of decollatee) shell
12:5,-of- last whorl 7, maximum diameter 4 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type-specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165037."

Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.

CRASSISPIRA EUPATOBIA (Dall)
1915. Drillia eupatoria Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 44, pl. 12, fig. 16.
1915. Drillia tama Dall, idem, p. 45, pl. 12, fig. 23.

Dall described "Drillia" eupatoria as follows:
"Shell small, slender, acute, sharply sculptured, of about 7 whorls; suture
distinct, not deep; anal fasciole marked by a constriction slightly in front of the
suture, thus cutting off the posterior ends of the ribs and marginating the suture;
ixial sculpture of (on the penultimate whorl about 20) rather sharp narrow ribs,
slightly retroactively flexed where they cross the furrowv of the anal fasciole, with
wider interspaces, extending from suture to suture on the spire, and over the
whorl to the canal on the last whorl; spiral sculpture of very fine equal parallel
threads with about equal interspaces on the spire and shoulder, and (about 7) more
widely spaced on the base, and four or five more close set on the canal; these
threads override the ribs but do not nodulate them; aperture sublunate; outer
lip (in the specimen). thin, sharp, simple, pillar smooth, short; canal short and
wide. Height of shell 7, of last whorl 5, maxmium diameter 2.8 mm.
"Tampa silex beds, at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. One specimen from
the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No.. 165040.
"This species has much the sculpture of No. 165039, U. S. Nat. Mus., but is
a much smaller and relatively more sharply sculptured shell. It is possible that
the adult may have a varicose outer lip, and that the type-specimen is immature,
in which case the species would be referable to the group to which Drillia ostrearum
Stearns belongs. The first or nuclear whorl is smooth and somewhat inflated.
The second shows the ribbing but riot the spiral threads."


Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


Genus SYNTOMODRILLIA Woodring, 1928
SYNTOMODRXrlIA SPICA (Dall)
1915. Drillia spica Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 42, pl. 12, fig. 8.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, slender, thin, acute, elongate, with about 8 whorls; nucleus of
2 smooth whorls rounded above; subsequent whorls sculptured, suture closely
appressed but without a sutural cord; axial sculpture of (on the penultimate whorl
12) narrow, rounded flexuous ribs, equal and with subequal interspaces, extending
from the suture to the canal, concavely arcuate and compressed in front of the
suture, thus indicating the anal fasciole, then arcuately protractive and in front
receding to the canal; the ribs and interspaces smooth and in front receding to
the canal; the ribs and interspaces smooth or faintly marked by incremental lines;
spiral sculpture only of half a dozen oblique threads on the back of the siphonal
fasciole; aperture moderately wide; anal sulcus wide and shallow, a narrow strip
of callus between it and the suture; outer lip arcuately produced in the middle,
sharp edged with a varical rib behind it between which and the last regular rib
the whorl is smooth ; inner lip and pillar with a moderately thick callus, smooth,
and with a slightly raised outer edge; canal short, wide, slightly recurved. Length
13, maximum diameter 5 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type-specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165033."

Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species differs from Syntomodrillia newmnani (Dall) and S.
iecla (Dall) in having a stouter shell, a less depressed sutural area, and
a stronger subsutural band.

SYNTOMODBRILLIA TECLA (Dall)
1915.- Drillia lecla Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus Bull. 90, p. 43, pl. 12, fig. 18.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, slender, thin, acute, elongate, with about seven whorls; nucleus
of one whorl and a half, smooth, slightly bulbous; subsequent whorls sculptured,
with a closely appressed suture, the sutural edge swollen into a prominent cord;
axial sculpture of (on the penultimate whorl 10) narrow, rounded slightly flexuous
ribs, with wider smooth interspaces, extending from the anal fasciole to the base
of the whorl; surface smooth, probably polished in life; spiral sculpture com-
prising only a smooth constriction in front of the sutural cord, and on the base
and canal about eight somewhat alternated threads mostly with wider interspaces
diminishing anteriorly; aperture wide, anal sulcus as deep as wide; outer lip
thin, with sharp edge and the usual varical rib behind it; body and pillar smooth,
not callous; canal short, wide and deep. Length 10, maximum diameter 4 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type-specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165036."


Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


This species is closely allied to Syntomodrillia newmani (Dall)
but differs from the latter species in having fewer axials on the early
whorls.
SYNTOMODRILLZa A NEWMANz (Dal)
1890. Drillia newmnani Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 29,
pl. 4, figs. 5, 5a.
1915. Drillia (Cymatosyrina) newimani Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 46,
pl. 3, fig. 9; pl. 7, fig. 3.
Dall described this species in 1890 as follows:
"Shell small, seven-whorled, with a small, smooth nucleus of two whorls, the
remainder is transversely sculptured (on the last whorl eleven) very uniform,
rounded, moderately elevated, slightly sigmoid ribs or waves, which are most
prominent on or just behind the periphery of the whorls, which do not cross the
anal fasciole and on the base become gradually obsolete; the spiral sculpture is
hardly visible except on the last whorl, and consists of fine rounded threads, most
evident on the base and canal, and fading as they recede from the base; anal fas-
ciole smooth, rather wide, unsculptured except by incremental lines; suture ap-
pressed over the ribs of the preceding whorl, and thus rendered slightly wavy;
last rib varicoid; canal short and wide; outer lip not internally lirate; inner lip
concave, simple, with a moderate callus. Max. Ion. of shell 12.5; max. lat.
4.8 mm.
"Ballast Point silex beds, Tampa Bay, Florida; Newman."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.

SYNTOMODRIL.IA GLYPHOSTOMA (Dall)
1915. Drillia, (Cymnatosyrin.x) glyphostonma Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 45,
pl. 5, fig. 12.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, acute, with about 9 whorls, including the small rounded nucleus;
surface polished, suture distinct, axial sculpture of about 14 narrow, flexuous
rather sharp ribs with subequal interspaces, the ribs cross the anal fasciole and
are abruptly arcuate there, reaching the suture which they slightly undulate, and
in the other direction extending to the canal; the canal and base all sculptured
with faint spiral threads which seem to be missing on the rest of the shell;
aperture wide behind with a conspicuous rounded anal sulcus with an outwardly
flaring edge; outer lip internally much thickened, incurved with a sharp edge,
but no denticulation; body and pillar with a smooth layer of callus, the canal
recurved, short, with a pronounced siphonal fasciole and a chink behind the pillar-
callus. Height of shell 15, of last whorl 8.5, of aperture 6, diameter above the
outer lip 4 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida; two specimens.
U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 166098.
"The absence of denticulations on the pillar lip removes this species from the
genus Glyphostoma Gabb, which it otherwise much resembles, and the character
of the outer lip precludes a reference to Clathurella."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


"DEIDLLIA" SILFA Dall
1915. Drillia (Cymatosyri.nx?) silfa Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull., p. 46, pl. 12,
fig. 22.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, solid, the whorls rapidly increasing in diameter, the surface
:.inooth except for axial sculpture; nucleus lost, subsequent (5) whorls strongly
sculptured with twelve narrow, prominent, arcuately protractive ribs, continuous
from the canal to thi suture and so on to the apex in a continuous series; lines
of growth not visible, canal short, smooth, slightly recurved; aperture rather wide,
body and pillar slightly erased by the animal in process of growth. Height 7 mm.
without the (lost) nucleus, maximum diameter 3.3 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"One specimen in the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165034.
"This specimen is obviously immature; the aperture if complete would prob-
ably have the characters of the section Cymatosyrin.r, but it is distinct from any
of the other species yet collected from this horizon."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
A small, probably immature shell with the nucleus missing.

"DERILIA" ILLIOTA Dal
1915. MIangilia illiola Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 46, pl. 12, fig. 15.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, solid, acute, with about 8 whorls separated by a distinct but ap-
pressed suture; nucleus small, inflated, bulbous, smooth; subsequent whorls strongly
sculptured; axial sculpture of (on the last whorl 13) narrow, rounded, nearly
straight ribs, separated by wider interspaces and extending from the sutural cord
to the vicinity of the canal with a constriction at the anal fasciole; the interspaces
behind the periphery are smooth, the surface polished, and the incremental lines
hardly visible; spiral sculpture of a rather strong low cord in front of the suture,
a constriction indicating the anal fasciole in front of the cord, and in front of
the periphery a dozen or more feeble subequal spiral threads growing stronger
toward the canal and with about equal interspaces; on the back of the canal there
are a number of finer close-set threads; aperture sublunate, anal sulcus shallow,
the outer lip thin, simple, not lirate internally; body and pillar smooth, not callous;
canal short, wide, straight. Length 8, maximum diameter 3 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type-specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165038."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The nucleus is broken away.

"DRILLIA" AFP. PLUTONICA Casey
Plate 2, Figure 3
An external mold of a fragment of a shell collected at station 12303,
Suwannee Sulphur Springs, Hamilton County, Florida, appears to be
related to "Drillia" plutonica Casey, a species from the Oligocene of






92 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN

Mississippi. The exact identification, however, of this fragment can
not be confirmed with the material in hand.
Horizon: Suwannee limestone, Oligocene.

Genus EUCLATHURELLA Woodring, 1928
EUCLATHURELLA? LIVEOAKENSIS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 2, Figures 2, 6
Shell rather small, turreted, slender, with a long spire and canal.
Later whorls more inflated than earlier. Suture deep and fasciole
narrow bounded behind by a subsutural cord. Axial sculpture of
rather narrow, closely spaced, weakly protractive ribs. Ribs and inter-
spaces crossed by moderately coarse threads forming a somewhat can-
cellate ornamentation. Canal long and straight. The species is de-
scribed from a cast of an external mold.
Cotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 495938) measures: Height, 18 mm.
(nucleus defective); greatest diameter, 8 mm.
Type locality: station 11109, 1Y2 miles north of Live Oak, Suwan-
nee County, Florida.
Horizon: Suwannee limestone, Oligocene.
Other occurrence: station 12303. Suwannee Sulphur Springs,
Suwannee County (external mold, identification questioned).

Genus CRYOTURRIS Woodring, 1928
CRYOTUBRIS? HILI.SBOROUGHENSIS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 2, Figures 7. 10
Shell small, turreted, axial sculpture stronger than spiral and con-
sists of 4 whorls; early whorls missing. Spire whorls carinated me-
dially by a moderately strong spiral thread forming the periphery of
the whorl, from which the strong ribs (10 on the penultimate whorl)
descend to the sutures. On the last whorl the ribs are weaker in the
broad anal fasciole but strongly developed from the carinated shoulder
to the base of the whorl. Spiral sculpture below the carina, on spire
whorls and shoulder of last whorl, consisting of uniformly spaced
raised threads. Margin of outer lip broken but apparently thin and
arched. Columella straight, without observed folds.
Holotype: (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 495939) measures: Height, 14.4
mm.; greatest diameter, 6.4 mm.
Type locality: Blackwater Creek at S. A. L. Ry. crossing, Hills-
borough County, Fla. H. I. Tucker, collector.
I am unable to determine definitely the genus of this species. In
outline it somewhat resembles specimens that have been referred to





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


The genus Lora Gistel, a genus inhabiting cold water. The lower col-
umella on the new species here described is different from that on
the genus Colus and the insinuation of the anal fasciole is deeper.

Family CANCELLARIIDAE
Genus CANCELLARIA Lamarck, 1799
Subgenus TRIGONOSTOMA Blainville, 1826
CANCELL.ARIA (TRIGONOSTOMA) SUBTHOMASIAE Dall
1890. Cancellaria (Trigonostoma) subthomasiae Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci.,
Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 44, pl. 11, fig. 3.
1915. Cancellaria (Trigonostoma) subthomasiae Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90,
p. 47, pl. 3, fig. 7; pl. 10, fig. 1.
Dall redescribed this species in 1915 as follows:
"Shell of moderate size, strongly sculptured, turreted, of about 7 whorls;
nucleus minute, smooth, of about one whorl; subsequent whorls axially sculptured
with (on the penultimate whorl 11, on the last whorl nine) strong, crenulated,
elevated ribs, angular, or even subspinose at the shoulder behind which the whorl
is subtabulate; these ribs are moderately retractive, feeble at the suture, most
elevated at the shoulder, and continue over the whorl to the siphonal fasciole,
somewhat recurved, and concave behind and axially striated in front; spiral sculp-
ture of numerous fine threads, with a tendency to alternate in strength, subequi-
distant, the interspaces equal to the threads or wider; the threads override and
somewhat crenulate the edges of the ribs; base with a strong siphonal fasciole
and small umbilical perforation; aperture subhriangular, with continuous margin,
notched in front obliquely by a distinct siphonal sulcus; outer' lip subvaricose,
with about a dozen internal lirae; pillar lip thinner, free from the body, sharp-
edged, with three well-marked plaits, the posterior most prominent. Length of
shell 20, of last whorl 14, of aperture 11, maximum diameter 12.2 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. U. S. Nat. Mus.
No. 165042. Dall, 1915.

Holotype:. U. S. National Museum no. 112090.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
I have not seen this species outside of its type locality.

CANCELLARIA (TRIGONOSTOMA) DEPRESSA Dall
1915. Cancellaria depressa Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 48, pl. 10, fig. 4.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell short, turbinate, solid, with about four well-rounded whorls; nucleus
defective; suture deep, not channeled, the whorl in front of it narrowly tabulate;
axial sculpture of (on the last whorl about 15) narrow, rounded, more or less
unequal, riblets, which extend from the suture, slightly swollen at the angle of
the shoulder, to the rounded margin of the umbilical funnel, with usually subse-
quent interspaces; the incremental lines are also rather coarse and prominent;
all the axial sculpture is slightly retractive; spiral sculpture of (at the beginning


93






94 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN

of the last whorl about 10) subequal and mostly subequally spaced, flattish
threads with wider interspaces, overriding the ribs, but not notably swollen at
the intersections; near the periphery a few of these are alternately smaller and
closer, there are also two or three finer threads between the shoulder and suture;
umbilicus large and deep, funicular, with spirally threaded walls; aperture sub-
triangular, the margin continuous; body with a rather thick smooth layer of
callus; outer lip with a small subsutural internal liration, and about 8 more lirac
between the shoulder and canal; margin sharp oblique with a moderately swollen
external varix; canal short, narrow, shallow; pillar-lip smooth with three plaits,
enlarging posteriorly. Height of shell 17.5, of last whorl 14.5, maximum diameter
12 mm.
"Tampa silex beds, at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. One specimen
from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165043."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species also belongs to the section Bivetopsis Jousseaume.
Only one poorly preserved specimen, the holotype, is in the U. S.
National Museum collection. I have not seen it outside of its type
locality.
Superfamily RHACHIGLOSSA
Family OLIVIDAE
Genus OLIVA Martyn, 1786
OOL.VA POST Dall
1915. Oliva post Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 49, pl. 12, fig. 24.
1926. Oliva posti Dall. Kellum, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 143, p. 41.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, solid, smooth, with 4 or more whorls; nucleus defective; suture
moderately channeled; shell rather slender; last whorl with a wash of callus near
the suture; aperture long and narrow, acute behind; outer lip slightly thickened,
internally smooth; inner lip plicate, in front as figured; canal deeply excavated.
Height, 21.5; height of last whorl, 18; maximum diameter, 8.5 mrm.
"Tampa silex beds, at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type-specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus., No. 165045."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Only one specimen (the holotype), with a defective nucleus, is
in the collection at the U. S. National Museum from the type locality.
Two poorly preserved specimens, collected at Blackwater Creek at
Seaboard Air Line Railway crossing by Miss Helen I. Tucker, may
belong to this species.
Outside occurrence: Silverdale, N. C., Trent marl, lower Miocene.

Genus OLIVELLA Swainson, 1831
OLIVELLA LATA Dall
1890. Olivella leta Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 45,
pl. 4, fig. 8b.
1915. Olivella lata Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 49, pl. 15, fig. 4.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES 95

Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, broad, moderate stout, with a rather low spire and about live
whorls; surface smooth, suture narrow, deeply channelled and deeply notched
at the aperture; spire with little enamel and a rather large globular nucleus of one
whorl; outer lip arcuate, simple, sharp; inner lip with a moderate callus, hardly
pirate; pillar straight, slightly twisted, with a groove behind it; canal short, wide,
shallow; siphonal fasciole distinct, bordered behind by a faint sulcus, behind which
,gain is a still fainter indication of a depressed line. Max. Ion. of shell 9.25;
max lat. 5.25 mm.
"Ballast Point silex beds; Dall, Shepard.
"It is not unlikely that, when fully adult, this shell has the pillar lip lirate;
lu.t if it is immature it cannot be united with any of our Tertiary species."
Holotype: U. S. National Museum no. 112092.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
I have not seen this species outside of its type locality.

OLIVEL.I.A EUTORTA Dall
1915. Olivella eutorta Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 50, pl. 10, fig. 10.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, stout, solid, with 5V whorls separated by a deeply channeled
suture; first whorl rounded and subglobular; subsequent whorls smooth, mod-
erately convex; aperture wide in front, behind ending in a deep narrow sinus at
the end of the suture, between the body and the outer lip; anterior third of the
body body covered by a revolving band of enamel with a groove at the posterior
edge, otherwise smooth; the outer lip sharp, smooth within; body with a thin
wash of callus, pillar thick, callous, twisted, with its anterior edge forming a
strong rounded fold with a depression behind it, the inner surface of the pillar
finely spirally lirate; canal wide, shallow. Length, 12; length of aperture, 8.5;
maximum diameter of shell, 6 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type-specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165047."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Olivella eutorta Dall has a relatively more elongate shell and a less
arcuate outer lip than 0. lata Dall.
It is a common species at its type locality. One silicified specimen
was collected by Miss Helen I. Tucker from Sixmile Creek, near
Orient Station, Hillsborough County; and one poorly preserved speci-
men, which may be this species, was collected at station 12300, 14
miles northeast of Lloyd, Jefferson County.

OLIV.ElL COLZMETA Dall
1915. Olivella colleta Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 50, pl. 12, fig. 9.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell very small, smooth, slender, with about 5% whorls, separated by a
deeply channeled suture; nucleus minute subglobular, of about one whorl; sub-






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--BULLETIN FIFTEEN


sequent whorls subcylindrical, smooth; last whorl attenuated in front, with a faint
fasciolar band of enamel close to the anterior edge; aperture narrow behind,
wide in front; outer lip thin, sharp, simple; inner lip not callous; pillar with one
or two faint very anterior folds; canal wide and deep. Length of shell,4.5, of
aperture 2.5, maximum diameter 1.8 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"One specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165048."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The holotype may be an immature specimen. This species has
not been recognized outside of its type locality.

OLIVEI.LA BROOKSVILLENSIS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 4, Figures 1, 2, 4
Shell medium-sized, subovate, solid with a rather high conical spire.
Nucleus defective on holotype. Postnuclear spire-whorls smooth.
Suture rather deeply channeled and bordered below by the sharp
overhanging margin of the whorl. Body whorl moderately inflated
at the posterior third and gradually slopes forward from this inflation
to the anterior end. Margin of outer lip nearly straight between curved
extremities. Aperture long, rather narrow, gradually widening an-
teriorly. Anterior third of body whorl provided with an enamel,
the upper edge forming a low ledge. Another low ledge situated half-
way between the posterior ledge and the anterior end of the shell
encircles the base. Lower two-thirds of columella provided with a
callus; the inner part of this callus lirate, whereas the lower and ex-
ternal part consists of two heavy imbrications.
Larger cotype (U. S. Nat. Mus.'no. 495941) measures: Height,
18.5; greatest diameter, 8.8 mm.
Type locality: station 11113, quarry about half mile south of
Brooksville, Hernando County, Florida.
Other occurrence: Blackwater Creek at S. A. L. Ry. crossing.
Hillsborough County, Florida (Tucker); station 12758, quarry 5.9
miles northeast of Brooksville, Hernando County.
Horizon: Suwannee limestone, Oligocene.

OLIVE-LLA LIVEOAXENSIS Mansfield, n. sp.
Plate 3, Figure 7
Shell small, subovate, moderately stout, with a rather low spire and
with about 5 whorls. Suture weakly channeled. Body whorl very
weakly rounded medially and restricted behind columellar lip. Margin
of outer lip weakly arched. Aperture broader below than above. An-
terior canal short, wide and emarginate. Holotype (U. S. Nat.


96





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONE


,\us. no. 495940) measures: Height, 11.4 mm.; greatest diameter,
6.5 mm.
Type locality: station 11109, 1Y2 miles north of Live Oak, Su-
w-annee County, Florida.
Olivella liveoakensis is closely related to 0. lata Dall, differing
from the latter in having a larger shell, a narrower aperture and a less
tapering and fuller lower body whorl.
Horizon: Suwannee limestone, Oligocene.

Genus ANCILLA Lamarck, 1799
ANCILXjA SHEPARDI Dall
1890. Ancillaria shepardi Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1,
p. 46, pl. 4, fig. 4.
1915. Ancilla shepardi Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 51, pl. 7, fig. 1.
Dall described this species in 1890 as follows:
"Shell slender, acutely pointed, with its surface on the spire glazed with a
coating of enamel, but indicating about 5 whorls; aperture less than half the
length of the shell, callous at the posterior commissure and on the body; outer
lip arched, simple, thin, perhaps with a slight projection in the adult, near the
canal, between the two principal sulci of the whorl; canal wide and deep; pillar
concave and twisted, scored with numerous fine shallow, spiral grooves, and with
a pronounced sulcus behind it; the anterior end of the pillar is obliquely truncate,
shorter than the aperture and with its anterior edge excavated so as to make a
shallow gutter, behind which the edge of the whorl projects in a rounded point
before falling to the siphonal notch. In this manner, when looked at directly from
in front, the shell seems to have two canals, one small and shallow, curving with
the pillar, the other larger and deeper, cut out of the wall of the whorl. On the
base behind the pillar is the usual sulcus, followed by the siphonal fasciole bor-
dered behind by a sharp impressed line; then follows a band about as wide as
the siphonal fasciole, but of which the anterior half is convex and the posterior
half impressed; this is bordered by a band or fasciole between two sharply and
deeply incised lines; this fasciole is transversely striate with backwardly some-
what concave lines and corresponds to the tooth or projection of the outer lip, if
one existed, which is not certain. On the last whorl in front of the suture is
another impressed spiral line or groove, not very distinct on the fossils, but
which seems to have formed the anterior border of the enamel on the spire; the
callus on the inner lip does not thin out over the body, but is bounded by a straight
line extending from the collumellar sulcus to the spiral line just described; the
posterior commissure of the aperture is more or less filled with callus. Max. Ion.
of shell 34.75; of aperture 17.0; max. lat. of shell 14.5 mm.
"Silex beds of Ballast Point and the shores of Hillsboro Bay, Tampa Bay,
Florida. Shepard, Newman and Dall."

Holotype, U. S. National Museum no. 165049.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.


7-G. Survey


97





98 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN

Ancilla shepardi is more acutely pointed and a stouter shell and
has shallower sutural area than A. chipolana Dall from the Chipolh
formation of Florida. A. shepardi is rather abundant at its type lo-
cality. It also occurs at Sixmile Creek, near Orient Station, Hills-
borough County, Florida.

Family MARGINELLIDAE
Genus MARGINELLA Lamarck, 1799
Key to genus Marginella
Shell large or small, broad, low-spired, outer lip within without denticulations:
Shell large-....Marginella (Prunum) ballista Dall and subspecies tampae Dall
Shell small, aperture rather narrow ........................ (Prunum) intense Dall
Shell small, aperture wide --- ........ .................. (Prunum?) myrina Dall
Shell small or rather large, usually slender, spire moderately low, outer lip not
denticulated:
Shell rather large .--............................... (Porcellanella) gregaria Dall
Shell rather small and slender, M. (Porcellallalla) gregaria silicata Mansfield
Shell small, solid, biconic, spire rather high, M. (Porcellanella) posfi Dall
Shell rather thin, outer lip nearly straight (fid6 Dall) .........................
............................. ..................................... (P orcella lla) bellula D all
Shell small, relatively high spired (fide Dall) ....M. (Porcelallanea)inepta Dall
Shell stout, sub-biconic with a rather high spire, -.......................... ....
.......... ....... ....................................... M. (Porcellanella) infect Dall
Shell moderately slender, aperture broad below ---. ......................
.............................................................. (Porcellanella) faun la Dall
Shell with a high or moderately high spire, inner margin of outer lip denticulated:
Shell biconic, high-spired .....-.......-.......- ....M. (Serrata) imollitor Dall
Shell small, biconic, high-spired ..........................M. (Serrata) newmnani Dall
Shell moderately high spired, inner margin of outer lip feebly denticu-
lated ................. ...................... ......... (Serrata) elegantula Dall

Section PRUNUM Herrmannsen, 1852
MARGINEILLA (PRUNUM) BALLISTA Dall
1890. Marginella hallista Dall, Wagner Free Inst. Sci., Trans., vol. 3, pt. 1,
p. 47, pl. 4, fig. 6.
1915. Marginella ballista Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 54, pl. 16, fig. 12.
Dall described this. species in 1890 as follows:
"Shell large, strong, rounded, subpyriform; whorls about four; spire short,
nearly enclosed by the last whorl; sides convex, compressed about the middle
near the adult varix; outer lip thick, differentiated by a sulcus behind it, arcuate
in the direction of the whorl and also toward the body-lip, aperture rather wide,
especially in front; body-wall with a callus, which extends over the spire from
the posterior commissure; anteriorly with four rather oblique plaits; outer lip
smooth within. Max. Ion. of shell 18.0; lat. 11.7; Ion. of aperture 16.2 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point."

Holotype: U. S. National Museum no. 112096. Collected by W. H.
Dall.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.





MOLLUSKS OF TAMPA AND SUWANNEE LIMESTONES


This species is characterized by its rather large and relatively broad
shell with a low spire and a thickened outer lip destitute of internal
clenticulations.
Occurrence: Type locality, rather common; Sixmile Creek, near
Orient Station, Hillsborough County, Florida (Tucker).

MARGINELLA (PRUNUM) BALLISTA TAMPAE Dall
1890. Marginella (ballista var?) tampae Dall, Wagner Free Ins. Sci., Trans.,
vol. 3, pt. 1, p. 47.
1915. Marginella tantpae Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 54, pl. 11, fig. 6,
Dall at first thought that M. tampae might be a varietal form of
M1. ballista but later considered it distinct and raised it to specific rank.
The holotype (U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 112097) is the only well pre-
served specimen referred to Al. famipae. This specimen is slightly more
angulate at the shoulder and more compressed behind the shoulder
than AM. ballista but in other features appears nearly identical with it.
Type locality: "silex beds." Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
This species has not been recognized outside of its type locality.
Marginella (Prtunun) incrassata Nelson, from the middle Miocene,
Zorritos, Peru, as pointed out by Dall, is related to B. ballista fainpae.

MARGINELLA (PRUNUM) INTENSE Dall
1915. Marginella intense Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 56, pl. 10, fig. 8.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, short, solid, smooth, with a short spire, obscured by a coat of
enamel covering it entirely, and about 3 whorls; aperture narrow; outer lip pro-
duced behind over nearly half the penultimate whorl, heavily smoothly varicose,
the varix distinctly limited behind, marginating the lip and canal, internally
smooth, thicker in the middle; body with a slight wash of enamel; pillar with
four low, stout, equal and equally spaced plaits, the anterior on the edge of the
pillar at the narrow and shallow canal. Length 8, maximum diameter 5 mm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. no. 165055."
Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
Marginella intense Dall is a small and solid shell, with a low spire
and very heavy outer lip for the size of the shell. A feeble spiral
thread is below and adject to the suture. It appears to belong to the
same group as M. ballista Dall, though it has a much smaller shell.
M. intense appears to be closely related to M. (Prunum) elethira
dasa Gardner Ms. from the Chipola formation of Florida.


99






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIFTEEN


MARGINELLA (PRUNUM?) MYRINA Dall
1915. Marginella myrina Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 57, pl. 12, fig. 2.
Dall described this species as follows:
"Shell small, stout, short, smooth, of about 3 whorls, the spire, nucleus, and
suture obscured by a rather thick coat of enamel; outer lip varicose and exter-
nally marginate, receding toward the suture and broader toward the middle:
aperture rather wide, posterior sinus rounded; outer lip not internally lirate;
body with a thin wash of callus; pillar with four distinct plaits, the anterior
coincident with the edge of the pillar and with the adjacent plait somewhat
larger than the posterior pair, all about equidistant; canal shallow, short, wide.
Height 6, maximum diameter, 4 mnm.
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida.
"Type-specimen from the Post collection, U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165056."

Horizon: Tampa limestone, lower Miocene.
The holotype of Marginella (Prununm?) marina is a small, short,
and poorly preserved shell with a low spire and wide aperture. One
poorly preserved shell (not the holotype) from the type locality may
also belong to this species.

Section PORCELLANELLA Conrad, 1862
MARGINE LLA (PORCELLANELLA) GREGARIA Dall
Plate 3, Figure 5
1915. Marginella gregaria Dall, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 90, p. 55.
Dall described and commented upon this species as follows:
"This species, in my original studies from imperfect material supposed to
be a variety of M. iinmalula, seems now, from material received too late for
figuring, to be quite distinct. I therefore describe it comparatively until an
opportunity may arise when I can supply a figure.
"This shell is of a shape not unlike M. linatule, but longer and more ovoid.
Its relative diameter at the shoulder of the last whorl is much less and the outer
lip at the shoulder is therefore less prominent. The thickening of the outer lip
is less pronounced, and in all the specimens received it is perfectly smooth, while
in M. lintatula fully adult specimens have it finely denticulate on the inner edge.
The plaits are also much more delicate than in M. mlinatula. Comparative meas-
urements are as follows:
"'.. gregaria: Length 17.5. maximum diameter 9.3, length of aperture 15
mm.
"1f. linatula: Length 14.7, maximum diameter 9, length of aperture 13 rmm
"Tampa silex beds at Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida; Dall and Post.
U. S. Nat. Mus. No. 165051.
"M. gregaria somewhat resembles M. onchidella Dall, of the Pliocene, but
is smaller and less arcuate laterally, with the spire more apparent. The speci-
men of AM. limatula measured above is that figured on plate 11, figure 7, of this
paper."