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A fossil teleost fish of the snapper family (Lutianidae) from the lower Oligocene of Florida
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 Material Information
Title: A fossil teleost fish of the snapper family (Lutianidae) from the lower Oligocene of Florida
Series Title: Bulletin - Florida Geological Survey ; 5
Physical Description: 69 p. : incl. illus., 11 pl., tables. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gregory, William K. ( William King ), 1876-1970
Cole, W. Storrs ( William Storrs ), 1902-
Ponton, Gerald Mungo, 1888-
Donor: unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1930
Copyright Date: 1930
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Fishes, Fossil   ( lcsh )
Paleontology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Paleontology -- Oligocene   ( lcsh )
Foraminifera, Fossil   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
General Note: At head of title: Florida state Geological survey. Herman Gunter, state geologist ...
General Note: Plates 1 and 2 accompanied by guard sheets with outline drawings; plates 5 to 10 have letterpress on versos descriptive of plates opposite.
Statement of Responsibility: by William K. Gregory. The Foraminifera of the Marianna limestone of Florida, by W. Storrs Cole and Gerald M. Ponton.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA1609
ltuf - AKM4774
alephbibnum - 002037013
oclc - 03610642
lccn - gs 31000017
System ID: UF00000436:00001

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Full Text



FLORIDA STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
HERMAN GUNTER, State Geologist. P




BULLETIN NO. 5.





A FOSSIL TELEOST FISH OF THE SNAPPER FAMILY
(LUTIANIDAE) FROM THE LOWER
OLIGOCENE OF FLORIDA.
By WILLIAM K. GREGORY.





THE FORAMIINIFERA OF THE IMAPJANNA
LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA '
By W. STORRS COLE AND GER4LD M. PONTON.






TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA,
December, 1930.











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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


To His Excellency, Hon. Doyle E. Carlton,
Governor of Florida.
SIR:
I have the honor to submit herewith for publication the fifth
scientific bulletin of this department, consisting of two paleontological
papers based on Florida material. The first is a description of a new
fossil fish from the Marianna limestone (the first ever found in that
formation), by Dr. William K. Gregory of the American Museum of
Natural History, New York, who is a recognized authority on fossil
vertebrates. The second is a catalogue of foraminifera from the same
formation, by Dr. W. Storrs Cole of Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.,
and Gerald M. Ponton, assistant state geologist. These minute fossils
have recently been found to be very useful to oil geologists and others
in the precise identification of geological horizons, and the present
paper more than doubles the number of species known from our
Marianna limestone, and describes several new ones.

Respectfully,
HERMAN GUNTER,
State Geologist.
Tallahassee, Florida,
October 9, 1930.




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TABLE OF CONTENTS

A fossil teleost fish of the snapper family (Lutianidae) from the Lower
Oligocene of Florida. By William K. Gregory.
(Plates 1 to 4, Figures 1 and 2) ................................... 7
The foraminifera of the Marianna limestone of Florida. By W. Storrs Cole
and Gerald M. Ponton. (Plates 5 to 11).
Introduction ................................................... 19
Descriptions of species:
Textulariidae ............................................... 27
Verneuilinidae ............................................. 28
M iliolidae ................................................. 29
Lagenidae ................................................... 29
Polymorphinidae ........................................... 36
Nonionidae ................................................ 37
Camerinidae ....................................... ......... 37
Bulim inidae .................................. ............ 38
R otaliidae ..................................... ............ 40
Cassidulinidae ................................. ............. 44
Globigerinidae ............................................. 44
Globorotaliidae ............................................ 45
Anomalinidae ................. ............ ............ 45
Planorbulinidae .................... ....................... 50
Orbitoididae ....................................... ....... 51
P latest ............................................... .. .... .. .. 53
Index ..................... ............................ 69













[5]




7<






A FOSSIL TELEOST FISH OF THE SNAPPER FAMILY
(LUTIANIDAE) FROM THE LOWER

OLIGOCENE OF FLORIDA.



By WILLIAM K. GREGORY,
American Museum of Natural History, New York.



Mr. Herman Gunter, State Geologist of Florida, has very kindly
sent to me for identification and description three blocks of a creamy,
fine-grained limestone containing the greater part of the skeleton and
a good part of the scalation of a fossil fish. This proves to belong to
the family of the Snappers (Lutianidae), which, so far as I can dis-
cover, has not hitherto been recorded from the early Tertiary of the
Atlantic coast.*
The specimen was found by State road forces imbedded in lime-
stone at a depth of 13 feet, in a road cut immediately east of the Chipola
River, near Marianna, Jackson County, Florida. It was collected by
Mr. B. H. Dickson in January, 1926. Mr. Gunter assures me that there
can be no mistake as to the identification of the formation as the
Marianna limestone, which is referred to the lower Oligocene.
I have compared the specimen with the skeletons of recent and
fossil teleosts of the families Serranidae, Lutianidae and Haemulidae
to which it is evidently allied; by far the closest resemblances are with
the skeleton of Lutianus, from which it differs so far as known chiefly
in having two or three more vertebrae. Repeated counts and estimates
convince me that there are at least twenty-six and possibly twenty-
seven vertebrae. As twenty-four vertebrae is given by Jordan and
Evermann as a generic character of Neomaenis (Lutianus) one might
be justified in referring the fossil to a distinct genus. But the detailed
agreements of the parts of the dentition, skull and backbone that are

*Its resemblance to the red snapper (Lutianus aya), an important food fish of
the Gulf of Mexico, is so strong that Mr. Dickson, the discoverer, when he brought
it in, insisted that it was a red snapper and nothing else. Even the scales still have a
decided pinkish color, not unlike the living species, although its age is probably to
be reckoned in millions of years.-H. G.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


preserved in the fossil with those of Lutianus are so close that I refer
it tentatively to the genus Lutianus, recognizing the possibility that
the ancestors of the genus Lutianus may have lost two or three verte-
brae between lower Oligocene and recent times.
The plates show the fossil as preserved. On the basis of these
pieces a tentative restoration has been drawn by Mrs. Louise Nash,
under the writer's supervision. In this restoration the conjectural
parts shown in dotted outlines are based on data obtained from recent
species of Lutianus. The head lacks the preorbital and opercular
series, but the imprint of the inner sides of these plates are well pre-
served, together with many other features of the skull and dentition.
Unfortunately the fossil is too imperfectly preserved to afford many
of the data used by systematists in the differentiation of the various
genera and species of the recent Lutianidae. On the other hand, the
details of many of the skeletal parts are clearly shown and permit
direct comparison with those of recent fishes. Accordingly the fol-
lowing formal description may be given:

Lutianus avus n.sp.

Holotype-V-4372 (Old No. 8581). Florida State Geological Survey.
Geologic horizon and locality-(See p. 7).
Specific characters.-Estimated total length about 490 millimeters. Head 3.2
in standard length (to beginning of caudal fin.) Depth 3. Snout (in head) 2.5.
Eye 4. Maxillary 2.5. Vertebrae 26 or 27. Dorsal spines XIII (?), dorsal
rays 14 (?). Upper canines 3; vomerine teeth in a diamond shape patch immediately
in front of which is a crescent shaped elevation. Soft part of dorsal scaly near base.
Pharyngeal teeth conical recurved. Scales large, ctenoid, 47 along lateral line.
Apparently three anal spines, the first very short.

This species combines the diamond-shape patch of vomerine teeth
characteristic of the living species of Lutianus jordani with the raised
crescentic area of villiform teeth found in L. aratus. The general
proportions of head and body are not markedly different from those
of L. jordani, as recorded by Meek and Hildebrand.1 The absolute
size of body approaches that of L. aya.2 It differs from Neomaenis
hagari Jordan and Gilbert" (from the Miocene of California) espe-
cially in its smaller head.

tField Mus. Nat. Hist. Chicago, Publication No. 226. The Marine Fishes of
Panama. Part II, p. 495.
2B. W. Evermann and M. C. Marsh. The Fishes of Porto Rico. U. S. Fish
Comm. Bull. for 1900, pl. 20.
3Fossil Fishes of Southern California. Leland Stanford Junior Univ. Publ.
1919, p. 48, pl. XV, figs. 1, 4.





A FOSSIL TELEOST FISH OF THE SNAPPER FAMILY


This specimen establishes the fact that the family of snappers
was already domiciled on our coast in lower Oligocene times. They
are unrecorded from earlier formations in this country and may well
be descendants of some of the numerous Upper Eocene and Lower
Oligocene percomorphs of Europe.


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FIG. 1. Lutianus avus, type. Roof of mouth, showing vomerine, palatine and pre-
maxillary teeth. A. Roof of mouth X %. B. Alveoli of villiform teeth X '*".
C. Small teeth on premaxilla X 5. D. Caniniform tooth X ':%.


Inner and outer views, posterior edge on the


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FLORIDA GEOLi)CICAL SURVEY


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FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


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THE FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA

LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA

By

W. STORRS COLE,
Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.,
and
GERALD M. PONTON,
Florida State Geological Survey, Tallahassee, Florida.




The Marianna limestone was named by Matson1 in 1909 from
exposures at Marianna, Jackson County, but in light of knowledge
obtained later it was found that his definition when applied to the
localities he reported included in addition to the Marianna limestone
all of the Ocala limestone and most of the Glendon formation of
western Florida. Cooke2 in 1915 separated the formations and made
it possible to re-define the Marianna limestone.
The Marianna limestone is now defined3 as the white limestone or
"chimney rock" that overlies the Ocala limestone at Marianna and
carries Lepidocyclina mantelli and Pecten poulsoni. The Marianna
limestone is the lowest division of the Oligocene, Vicksburg Group,4
in Florida, and rests conformably on the Ocala limestone, the upper-
most division of the Eocene.
The Marianna limestone is mostly a soft, white, homogeneous,
somewhat porous rock. The purer parts contain about 93% to 95%
calcium carbonate. The lower beds are less pure and are speckled
with grains of glauconite. Most exposures show several ledges of
hard, compact limestone. The rock weathers to a dirty gray. The

1Matson, G. C., and Clapp, F. G., A Preliminary Report on the Geology of
Florida; Florida Geol. Survey Second Ann. Rept., pp. 51-52, 1909.
'Cooke, C. W.: The Age of the Ocala Limestone; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof.
Paper 95, p. 109. 1915.
3Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, S., Geology of Florida, Florida Geol. Survey
Twentieth Ann. Rept., p. 63, 1929.
4Cooke, C. W., The Correlation of the Vicksburg Group; U. S. Geol. Survey
Prof. Paper 133, p. 2, 1923.


[19]





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


greatest thickness known in Florida is at Marianna, where a section
shows about 30 feet. The known outcrops in Florida are confined to
a strip in Jackson County a few miles wide from north to south and
extending from the neighborhood of Blue Springs, 5 miles northeast
of Marianna, west for a distance of about 15 miles to Cottondale.
While the foraminiferal fauna from the Marianna and its equiva-
lents is well known in Alabama and Mississippi, that of Florida has
been neglected. It is of importance to record the species occurring in
Florida, for here is the type locality of this limestone.
Cushman5 has published an excellent series of monographs on the
Oligocene with check lists from numerous localities. It is unfortunate,
however, that only two localities were reported from the Marianna
limestone of Florida. From these two localities near Marianna he
reports a total of 15 species. The present authors, in a detailed study,
have been able to find and record 56 species and varieties, of which
6 are apparently new. That our knowledge of a locality, even after a
comprehensive study, may well be incomplete is suggested in the results
obtained by Howe6 in his studies on the Red Bluff Clay type locality,
Red Bluff on Chickasawhay River, near Hiwanee, Mississippi. There-
fore, it is the present authors' purpose to record such information as
has come to light in their investigations of this fauna, in the hope of
increasing our scope of knowledge of the Foraminifera of Florida and
of the Oligocene in general.
Even such a short paper as this would be incomplete without stat-
ing the authors' indebtedness to Mr. Herman Gunter, State Geologist,
for his many helpful suggestions and the freedom he has allowed the
authors in their investigations. The drawings were made by Mrs.
Elizabeth Burckmyer, of Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.
The following nine localities7 all in Jackson County, Florida, were
examined:

I. Quarry of R. D. Daffin, Marianna. Quarry about 100 feet south
of road leading from Marianna to old wagon bridge over
Chipola River just east of Marianna, and about 100 yards west
of the bridge. The old wagon bridge is now abandoned and

'Cushman, J. A., The Foraminifera of the Byram Calcareous Marl, U. S. Geol.
Survey Prof. Paper 129, pp. 79-143, pl. 14, 35, 1922; also Prof. Paper 133, The Fora-
minifera of the Vicksburg Group, pp. 11-71, pl. 1-8, 1923.
6Howe, H. V., Journ. Pal., vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 173-177, 1928.
7Further details of Marianna limestone localities are given by Mossom-A Pre-
liminary Report on the Limestones and Marls of Florida, Florida Geol. Survey,
Sixteenth Ann. Rept., 1925, and by Cooke and Mossom, Geology of Florida, Florida
Geol. Survey Twentieth Ann. Rept., 1929.




FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 21

is replaced by a new bridge on Florida State Road No. 1, about
200 feet up-stream.
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-305. This is likely U. S. G. S. locality
No. 6767 described below. Sample collected by S. Mossom,
July 10, 1924.
II. Quarry of Philip Sexton, 1% miles northeast of Marianna.
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-459. Sample collected by S. Mossom,
July 14, 1924.
III. Blue Springs, Jackson County, Florida, 61/2 miles northeast of
Marianna.
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-467. Sample collected by S. Mossom,
July 11, 1924.
IV. Quarry of C. Welch, one-half mile east of Cottondale on L. & N.
R.R.
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-473. Sample collected by S. Mossom,
Nov. 18, 1924.
V. Quarry of M. A. Spate, 11/2 miles north of Cottondale.
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-478. Sample collected by S. Mossom,
July 14, 1924.
VI. Quarry of B. B. Jordan, Jr., about 3/ mile northeast of Cot-
tondale.
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-585. Sample collected by H. Gunter,
March 25, 1920.
VII. Roof and wall of cave exposed in road-cut on Florida State
Road No. 1, about 150 yards east of bridge over Chipola River
just east of Marianna. (Fossil fish locality, see p. 7).
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-770. Sample collected by W. S. Cole
and G. M. Ponton, July 6, 1929. This locality is about 100 yards
northeast of U. S. G. S. locality No. 7241 described below.
VIII. Small "Chimney Rock" quarry on east side of Marianna-Green-
wood Road, 11/ miles northeast of junction of this road with
State Road No. 1, which junction is about 100 yards east of
new highway bridge over Chipola River, just east of Marianna.
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-760. Sample collected by W. S. Cole
and G. M. Ponton, July 6, 1929.
IX. Road-cut on State Road No. 1, about 100 feet west of bridge over
Chipola River, just east of Marianna.
F. S. G. S. sample No. M-843. Collected by H. Gunter and
G. M. Ponton, November 9, 1928.





TABLE 1.-LOCAL DISTRIBUTION OF SPECIES FROM THE VARIOUS STATIONS OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA.
(A, abundant; C, common; R, rare; V, very rare; X, reported without indication of abundance.)

Fla State U.S.G.S. U.S.G.S.
Species Geol. Surv. Locality Locality
SpeciesNo. 7241 No. 6767 I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX
Cat. No. (Cushman) (Cushman)

Textularia conica................................. S-2027 .... ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. V .
mississippiensisl ........................ S-2007 .... .. .. .. R .. R
porrecta............................... S-2015 .... .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. V
Clavulina byramensis ............................ S-2017 .... .... C .. C C C
byramensis var. extans. .................. S-2009 .... .... C .. .. .. C C C
M assilina decorata............................. .. S-2001 .... .... .. V
Robulus cultratus ................................ S-2018 .... .... A A A A A A A A
Lenticulina crassa var. mariannensis* ............... S-2028 ... .... . .. .. .. V
convergens......................... S-2029 .... R R
rotulata.................. ........... S-2030 .... X C C C C C C C C
vicksburgensis ....................... S-2010 .... XA A A A A A A A A
vicksburgensis var. aperta ................ S-2031 .... .. V .. V .. V ..
Marginulina pediformist .......................... S-2033 .... .. V .. V .
Dentalina communis ................... ......... S-2035 .... X .. C C C C C ..
Nodosaria longiscata .............................. S-2005 .... .... .. .. R R R
cf. jacksonensist......................... S-2036 .... .... .. V .
obliqua ................................ S-2037 .... .... C C C C C C C C C
vertebralis .................. .......... S-2014 .... .... C C C C C C .. C C ,
latejugata ................. ............ S-2019 .... .. .. .. V
Saracenaria italicat ................ .............. S-2034 .... C C C C C
Frondicularia zeta *............................... S-2032 .... .... .. .. V V ..
Guttulina problema ............................... S-2038 .... .... R .. .. .. .. R R
Globulina gibba.................................. S-2012 .... .... C C C .. C .. C
Nonion umbilicatulumt .................. ........ S-2006 .... .... R R .. .. R R
Operculinella dia*.................................. S-2039 .... .... A A A A A A A A A
Bulimina sculptilist .............................. S-2023 .... ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. V .
Bolivina ariana*................................ S-2041 ........ C C .. .. C C C C
caelata .................................. S-2013 .... .. .. C C C C
Reussia spinulosa var. glabrata ..................... S-2022 .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. V
Uvigerina byramensis............................. S-2002 .... V .. .. V .. .. V V
mariannensis* .......................... S-2040 .... .. V
pigmea ............................... S-2021 .... X C C C .. C C C C C
D iscorbis sp. .................................... S-2042 .... .... .. .. V .. .. .. .. V
Gyroidina vicksburgensis. ........................ ....... X .. .




TABLE 1.-LOCAL DISTRIBUTION OF SPECIES FROM THE VARIOUS STATIONS OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA.-Continued.
(A, abundant; C, common; R, rare; V, very rare; X, reported without indication of abundance.)

Fla. State U. S. G. S. U. S. G. S.
Species Geol. Surv. Locality Locality III VII VIII IX
oa. N. No. 7241 No. 6767 I II III IV V VI VII Ill IX
at. No. (Cushman) (Cushman)

Eponides byramensis ............................. S-2008 .... X A A AA A A A A
mariannensis ............................ S-2011 .... X .. .. .. V .. R V
advena ................................. S-2044 .... ... R .. .. .. .. .. R R
Rotalia sp ............................. ............... .. .. .. .. R
Siphonina advena ............................... S-2003 X X C .. .. C C C C C
Cancris sagrat....................... ........... S-2024 .... .... . .. .. R .. .. R
Cassidulina globosat. ............................. S-2045 .... .... .. .. .. .. .. V
Globigerina bulloides ............................. S-2046 X .... C .. .. .. C C .. C
dutertrei .............................. S-2047 .... X R
inflatat .............................. S-2048 .... .. .. C C C C
trilobat .................... .......... S-2049 .... .... C C .. C C C C C C
Globorotalia menardii............................. S-2043 .... .... .. .. .. .. V
Anomalina beta*................................. 2050 .... .... .. V V
bilateralis.............................. S-2004 .... A A A A A A A
mississippiensis ......................... S-2000 .... X C C C C C C C C C
vicksburgensis.......................... S-2051 .... .... V .. .. V .. .. .. V V
Planulina byramensis ............................. S-2016 .... X C .. .. C .. .. C C C
mexicanat............... ............... S-2052 .... .. V .. .. .. V
Cibicides americanus ............................. S-2026 .... C .. C C C C
lobatulus ................ ........... S-2025 X X C C C C C C C
pseudoungerianus ........................ S-2053 X X A A A A A A A A A
Planorbulinella larvata ........................... S-2020 .... A A A A A A A A A A A
Lepidocyclina mantelli............................ S-2054 .... X A A A A A A A A A
mantelli var. papillata................. S-2055 .... ... .. .. .. .. .. C C _
*Species and varieties described by us as new.
tSpecies and varieties not previously reported from the Oligocene of the Southern States.
$Species and varieties new to typical Marianna Limestone, but reported by Cushman in other members of the Vicksburg Group. (See Table No. 2.)





24 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE

Cushman's Florida localities were as follows:
U. S. G. S. locality No. 6767s Quarry south of road at top of first
hill west of bridge over Chipola River east of Marianna. C. W. Cooke,
collector. This is likely same locality as (I), as described above.
U. S. G. S. locality No. 7241.S Quarries on south side of hill south
of road and a quarter mile east of bridge over Chipola River, east of
Marianna, Florida. C. W. Cooke and W. C. Mansfield, collectors.
This locality is about 100 yards southeast of locality (VII) described
above.
A summary table of the species from the individual localities is
given in Table 1. For completeness, Cushman's localities from Flor-
ida have been included.
In Table 2 will be found species and varieties new to typical
Marianna limestone, but reported by Cushman in other members of
the Vicksburg Group:


TABLE 2.-SPECIES AND VARIETIES NEW TO TYPICAL MARIANNA LIMESTONE, BUT REPORTED
BY CUSHMAN IN OTHER MEMBERS OF THE VICKSBURG GROUP.

Mint Spring,
a Calcareous
lyrant Glendon Marl, Red Bluff
Calrelus Limestone member of Clay
Marianna
Limestone

Textularia mississippiensis................ X X X X
Lenticulina vicksburgensis var. aperta...... X.... X
Saracenaria italica ............... ..... .. .. .
Nonion umbilicatulum ................... X .. X ..
Bulimina sculptilis ........................ .. .... X
Discorbis sp............................. X .. X X
Cancris sagrus ......................... X
Globigerina triloba ......... . . . X.
Anomalina vicksburgensis ................. ... ... X....

Cushman" has listed from all localities in the typical Marianna
limestone, 64 species and varieties, and Vaughant" has reported
Lepidocyclina mantelli var. papillata. The following list gives those
which have been found by Cushman at other stations of the typical
Marianna than the Florida ones, and which were not recorded by the
present authors from Florida.

'U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, page 14, 1923.
"U. S. Geol. Survey, Prof. Paper 133, 1923.
IU. S. Nat., Mus., Proc. vol. 71, art. 8, p. 3, pl. 3, fig. 2-a, 2-b; pl. 4, fig. 1 and 2,
1927.





FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 23

Textularia tumidulum
agglutinans
subhauerii var.
mississippiensis var. alabamensis
Bolivina cookei
frondea
Verneuilina rectimargo
Gaudryina quadrangularis
advena
Clavulina byramensis var. turgida
Bulimina sp. ?
Cassidulina crassa
Lagena sulcata
Nodosaria catenulata
Cristellaria submalligera
Polymorphina byramensis
amygdaloides
equalis
Pullenia quinqueloba
Spirillina vivipara
Discorbis orbicularis
Truncatulina wuellerstorfi (=our Planulina mexicana) ?
Rotalia dentata var. parva
Gypsina rubra
Spiroloculina byramensis
Quinqueloculina bicostata
glabrata

From Cushman's original paper" it would appear that the Florida
material was not very satisfactory. His samples were, undoubtedly,
old ones which had been allowed tp dry completely, and this dried
material is very refractory nd hard t, work. By using much care in
preparation, the. junior author was able to obtain, a considerable
number of sp.c;es, from each locality. Very few specir.es had to be
discarded because of poor state of preservation, although specimens
from some localities were. bextcr than others. Station VNI. VIII was
worked in more detail than the others in order to obtain the most
complete list possible.
As Cushman12 has pointed out, the Vicksburg group is evidently
paleontologically more or less of a faunal unit. The only Foraminifera

11U. S. Geol. Survey, Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 13.
12Loc. cit., p. 11.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


which definitely appear to be confined entirely to the Marianna are
Lepidocyclina mantelli and its variety papillata, Eponides mariannen-
sis and Operculinella dia. Vaughan13 states that "Lepidocyclina
mantelli is certainly known from no other horizon." Using the small
Foraminifera, the typical Marianna may be recognized by faunal
grouping rather than by ranges of individual species.
Cushman14 and Schenck1' have pointed out that the factors of
depth and temperature are of utmost importance in the grouping of
individuals. That there was some slight physical difference in the
deposition of the typical Marianna from the other members of the
Vicksburg group is apparent from a study of its fauna. While many
of its small Foraminifera are forms that range throughout the entire
group, certain forms seem, from our present knowledge, to be restricted
to it solely. Of these, Lepidocyclina mantelli and its variety papillata
are the most important, Eponides mariannensis to date has been re-
ported only from the Marianna, and Operculinella dia, while a new
species, is so large that if it occurred in any other member, it should
have been reported. Whether these last two mentioned forms indicate
only a temporary migration or a short evolutionary change, only more
detailed study can tell. For the present, the grouping of these forms,
specifically mentioned above, with the others as indicated on our lists,
will have to be taken as indicative of typical Marianna limestone.

13Vaughan, T. W., Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Proc., vol. LXXIX, p. 300, 1927.
'4Cushman, J. A., Contr. Cushman Lab. Foram. Res., vol. 2, pt. 3, pp. 71-74, 1926.
15Schenck, H., Journ. Pal., vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 158-166, 1928.










I . a a




FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 27

DESCRIPTIONS OF SPECIES

Order FORAMINIFERA
Family TEXTULARIIDAE
Subfamily Textulariinae
Genus TEXTULARIA Defrance, 1824
TEXTULARIA CONICA d'Orbigny
Plate 8, figure 8
Textularia conica d'Orbigny in De la Sagra, Hist. Fis. Pol. Nat. Cuba, Forams.,
1839, p. 143, pl. 1, figs. 19, 20.
Textularia conica Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, pp. 16 and 17,
pl. 1, figs. 5, 6.
Test short, conical, laterally compressed; chambers narrow, but
long; sutures not very distinct; surface of the test slightly roughened
by sand grains projecting through the cement; final chambers very
flat, giving a flattened, abbreviated apertural face; mouth a narrow
slit at the base of the last chamber.
Length 0.46 millimeter.
Our specimens agree very well with the figures given by Cushman
and also with the original of d'Orbigny's. The only difference from
the original that can be pointed out is that d'Orbigny's figure shows
slightly more acute ends.
Locality: This species was found only at Station VIII, and is very
rare.
TEXTULARIA MISSISSIPPIENSIS Cushman
Plate 10, figure 3
Textularia mississippiensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, pp.
90, 123, pl. 14, fig. 4.
Textularia mississippiensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 17.
Original description:
"Test elongate, fairly broad, thickest in the middle, thence thinning
toward the periphery, in end view biconvex, central portion curved;
chambers rather low and broad, especially in the early stages, becom-
ing somewhat higher in the adult; sutures covered by a coarsely
arenaceous layer, meeting in the center and at the periphery, leaving
the central portion of each chamber uncovered; periphery irregular,
not definitely or regularly spinose, chamber walls smooth and finely
perforate.
Length 0.40-0.75 millimeter."
Cushman found this species almost entirely limited to stations in
Mississippi, and made a new variety, viz., Textularia mississippiensis
var.' alabamensis, which seemed to replace the typical form almost
entirely in Alabama and was characteristic of the Marianna limestone.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


Our specimens appear to be closer to the typical rather than to
the variety alabamensis, as they lack the keel, are not sufficiently
elongated, and the sutures appear to be covered with a distinct are-
naceous layer.
Locality: Found in small numbers at Stations V and VIII.
TEXTULARIA PORRECTA H. B. Brady
Plate 10, figure 12
Textularia agglutinans d'Orbigny var. porrecta H. B. Brady, Challenger Rept.. Zool-
ogy, vol. 9, 1884, p. 364, pl. 43, fig. 4.
Textularia porrecta Egger, K. bayer. Akad. Wiss. Miinchen, Abh., vol. 18, 1893,
p. 269, pl. 6, figs. 17, 18.
Textularia porrecta Cushman, U. S. Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 16. pl. 1, fig. 8.
Test elongate, subcylindrical, slightly compressed, but with the
periphery broadly rounded; sutures depressed when showing, but
often concealed by the rough arenaceous character of the test; cham-
bers rather numerous; about as high as long; aperture rather small,
round, at the inner margin of the last formed chamber.
Length 0.81 millimeter.
The Marianna specimens agree very closely with Cushman's figure
and description, except that the sutures are often not quite so pro-
nounced. This may be due to condition of preservation. Brady's
figure represents a more elongate type than is represented by either
Cushman's figure or our specimens. With more specimens for study
this might prove to be a different species from porrecta.
Locality: Very rare, in one sample only, from Station VIII.

Family VERNEUILINIDAE
Genus CLAVILINA d'Orbigny, 1826
CLAVULINA BYRAMENSIS Cushman
Plate 11, figure 2
Clavulina byramensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 92,
pl. 16, fig. 1.
Clavulina byramensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 22,
pl. 2, fig. 3.
Original description:
"Test elongate, subcylindrical, the early chambers triserial, forming
but a small portion of the test, later ones uniserial, both portions
rounded; sutures slightly depressed, often not very distinct otherwise;
aperture terminal, central, rounded; wall coarsely arenaceous but
smoothly finished. Maximum length 1 millimeter."
Locality: This is one of the relatively common and easily recog-
nized forms in the Marianna, and was found at Stations I, VI, VIII
and IX.




FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 29

CLAVULINA BYRAMENSIS var. EXTANS Cushman
Plate 9, figure 9
Clavulina byramensis var. extans Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133,
1923, p. 22, pl. 2, fig. 6.
Original description:
"Variety differing from the typical form in the more elongate form
and distinct chambers.
Length of adult specimens 0.31G millimeter."
This variety occurs in smaller numbers than the typical. It may
only represent a form of byramensis rather than a separate variety.
As we have not made sections, we are still retaining the varietal name.
Locality: Common at Stations II, VI, VII and VIII.

Family MILIOLIDAE
Genus MASSILINA Schlumberger, 1893
MASSILINA DECORATE Cushman
Plate 10, figure 5
Massilina decorate Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 143, pl.
34, fig. 7.
Masillina decorate Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, pp. 55 and 56.
Original description:
"Test much flattened, elliptical or oval, slightly longer than wide,
basal and apertural ends projecting, the apertural end narrowing to
a small cylindrical neck, nearly in the longitudinal axis of the test:
sutures rather indistinct; surface dull white; periphery rounded, the
sides ornamented by very fine pits, giving a finely granular appear-
ance to the test.
Maximum length 1 millimeter."
Our specimens agree exactly with the description given by
Cushman.
Locality: Found only at Station VIII, and extremely rare there.

Family LAGENIDAE
Subfamily Nodosariinae
Genus ROBULUS Montfort, 1808
ROBULUS CULTRATUS Montfort
Plate 11, figure 9
Robuluts cultratus Montfort, Conchyliologie systematique, vol. 1, 1808, p. 214, 54e
genre.
Cristellaria cultrata Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 130, pl.
31, fig. 8; U. S. G. S. Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 29.
Test large, closely coiled, with 7-9 chambers in the last evolution;
sutures distinct, recurved, flush with the surface; surface of test smooth,

'"This is a typographical error. The figure Cushman gives was drawn from a
specimen 3.0 millimeters long. (Verified by Cushman, letter Aug. 4, 1930.)




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


unornamented; test generally bordered with a distinct, fairly heavy
keel; aperture peripheral, radiate, distinct, with a secondary aperture
directly below, but often concealed.
Diameter 1.8 millimeters.
The Marianna specimens agree exactly with the one figured by
Cushman. Numerous forms have been placed under the specific name
of cultratus, many of which undoubtedly do not belong there. Our
specimens, however, agree very well with the type as given by Montfort.
Locality: This form occurs quite abundantly at all stations exam-
ined except No. IX.

Genus LENTICULINA Lamarck, 1804
LENTICULINA CRASSA d'Orbigny var. MARIANNENSIS, n. var.
Plate 6, figure 8
The variety differs from the typical in weaker development of the
keel and in the shape of the apertural face which in the variety is
nearly straight across.
Height 0.87 millimeters; width 1.04 millimeters.
Cotypes: Florida State Geological Survey, No. S-2028.
Locality: Specimens of this variety are very rare, and were found
only at Station VIII.
LENTICULINA CONVERGENS (Bornemann)
Plate 11, figure 3
Cristellaria convergens Bornemann, Zeitschr. deutsch. geol. Gesell.; vol. 7, 1855, p.
327, pi. 13, figs. 16 and 17.
Cristellaria convergens Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 28,
pL 4, fig. 2.
Lenticulina convergens Cole and Gillespie, Bull. Am. Pal., vol. 15, No. 57 b, 1930,
p. 7, pi. 3, fig. 1.
Test small, tightly coiled, biconvex, chambers, roughly triangular
in shape, the final one produced; sutures on most specimens fairly
distinct; aperture distinct, radiate.
Diameter: 0.40 millimeter.
Our specimens compare very well with Cushman's figure and also
with specimens from the Meson formation (Middle Oligocene) of
Mexico. As has been pointed out by the senior author in the Mexican
paper, all the American forms are referable to Bornemann's figure
16 rather than 17 which should probably be considered a variety.
The American forms further have more pronounced sutures than
given in the original description.
Locality: Rare, and found at Stations I and II only.




FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 31

LENTICULINA ROTULATA (Lamarck)
Plate 10, figure 10
Lenticulites rotulata Lamarck, Annales Mus., vol. 5, 1804, p. 188, No. 3; vol. 8, 1806,
pl. 62, fig. 11.
Cristellaria rotulata Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1921, p. 130, pl.
32, fig. 1; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 29.
Test large, closely coiled; chambers numerous, peripheral margin
acute rather than keeled, but in some specimens developing a very
slight keel; sutures distinct, straight; aperture peripheral, radiate.
Diameter: 1.30 millimeters.
It is sometimes hard to distinguish L. rotulata from Robulus cul-
tratus in the Marianna material. L. rotulata is generally smaller, with-
out the indication of a distinct keel and straight sutures which are
sometimes slightly raised.
Locality: This species was quite common at all stations examined,
and Cushman found it at U. S. G. S. Station No. 6767.

LENTICULINA VICKSBURGENSIS (Cushman)
Plate 10, figure 7
Cristellaria vicksburgensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 130,
pl. 31, figs. 6 and 7.
Cristellaria vicksburgensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 29.
Original description:
"Test composed of few chambers, seven to eight in the visible coil;
surface generally smooth, except on the sutures, which are marked
by rather broad, curved, raised ridges, those near the earlier part of
the coil broken into rounded knobs, especially near the umbilical
area, the later ones more continuous; periphery angled, the early
portion carinate; apertural face smooth and somewhat concave, with
acute projecting angles; aperture radiate at the angle of the chamber.
Length 0.65-1.0 millimeter."
Locality: This is one of the most abundant and easily recognized
species in the Marianna. It conforms absolutely to type and occurs
in considerable numbers in all samples we examined, and Cushman
found it at U. S. G. S. Station No. 6767.

LENTICULINA VICKSBURGENSIS var. APERTA (Cushman)
Cristellaria vicksburgensis var. aperta Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper No.
133, 1923, pp. 29, 30, pl. 4, fig. 4.
Original description:
"Variety differing from the typical form in the character of the sutures,
which are broadly limbate, of clear shell material, and either not other-
wise ornamented or with a single knob at the inner end; test otherwise
smooth, often with a thin keel."





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


Cushman figured a specimen about 0.54 mm. in length and 0.42
mm. in width.
Locality: Very rare, at Stations I, V and VIII.

Genus MARGINULINA d'Orbigny, 1826
MARGINULINA PEDIFORMIS Bornemann
Plate 7, figure 3 (very young specimen)
Plate 7, figure 4 (adult specimen)
Marginulina pediformis Bornemann, Zeitschr. deutsch. geol. Gesell., vol. 7, 1855,
p. 326, pl. 13, fig. 13.
Test cylindrical, elongate, slender, axis curved, composed of 5-6
chambers which gradually increase in size; sutures depressed, distinct;
aperture eccentric on the margin, radiate, slightly produced.
Length 1.07 millimeters.
This form from the Marianna agrees very well with Bornemann's
original figure in size, arrangement of chambers and general appear-
ance. We are figuring a specimen which is evidently a young one of
this species, as well as an adult specimen.
While greatly resembling M. glabra d'Orbigny, this species is less
tumid and has more regularly shaped chambers.
Locality: This species is very rare, and was found only at Stations
V and VIII.

Genus DENTALINA d'Orbigny, 1826
DENTALINA COMMUNIS d'Orbigny
Plate 8, figure 1
Nodosaria (Dentalina) communis d'Orbigny, Ann. Sc. Nat. vol. 7, 1826, p. 254, No. 35.
Nodosaria communis H. B. Brady, Challenger Rept., Zoology, vol. 9, 1884, p. 504,
pl. 62, figs. 19-22.
Nodosaria communis Cushman, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 71, 1913, pt. 3, p. 54, pl. 28,
figs. 1, 2; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 129, pl. 30, fig. 4; U. S.
Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 27.
Dentalina communis Cushman, Florida State Geol. Survey Bull. 4, 1930, p. 27, pl.
5, fig. 1.
Test rather stout, axis curved, chambers rather numerous, increas-
ing in size as added; amount of suture depression variable, in some
specimens sutures nearly flush with the surface, in others quite strongly
depressed especially toward the apertural end; initial end of test rather
pointed; aperture produced, radiate, eccentric.
Length 2.6 millimeters.
This is one of the common forms, although generally broken.
Specimens occurred at Stations II, III, V, VII and VIII. Cushman
found it at U. S. G. S. Station 6767.




FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 33

Genus NODOSARIA Lamarck, 1812
NODOSARIA LONGISCATA d'Orbigny
Plate 6, figure 4
Nodosaria longiscata d'Orbigny, Foram. Foss. du Bassin Tert. Vienne, 1846, p. 32,
pl. 1, figs. 10-12.
Nodosaria ewaldi Reuss, Zeitschr. deutsch. geol. Gesell., vol. 3, 1851, p. 58, pl. 3, fig. 2.
Nodosaria filiformis Cushman (not d'Orbigny), U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129,
1921, p. 129, pl. 30, figs. 1-3.
Nodosaria ewaldi Cushman, Jour. of Pal., vol. 1, 1927, No. 1, p. 153, pl. 24, figs. 1, 2.
Nodosaria longiscata Nuttall, Quart. Jour. Geol. Soc., vol. 89, 1928, pt. 1, p. 81, pl. 4,
fig. 13.
Various names have been applied to this form, but from a study of
our specimens and the various illustrations representing these forms,
we have concluded that there is not enough variation to warrant sep-
arate names. Reuss in his description of ewaldi claims that it may be
distinguished by the more produced aperture; but it seems to us that
the amount that the aperture is produced is an individual character-
istic rather than a specific one.
The Marianna forms, together with those figured by Cushman, have
too elongated, cylindrical chambers to permit their being correlated
with N. filiformis, which typically has shorter and more inflated
chambers.
Locality: Only a few specimens were found, at Stations V, VII
and VIII.
NODOSARIA ef. JACKSONENSIS Cushman and Applin.
Plate 6, figure 1
Nodosaria jacksonensis Cushman and Applin, Bull. Am. Assoc. Petrol. Geol., vol.
10, 1925, no. 2, p. 170, pl. 7, figs. 14-16.
Test slender, elongate, axis slightly curved; sutures distinct, de-
pressed especially between the last formed chambers; chambers grad-
ually increasing in size, subglobular to globular; aperture not observed.
Length 1.74 millimeters.
Our specimens are very similar to the ones described by Cushman
and Applin from the Texas Eocene, except they appear to be slimmer.
But for the present, we are referring them to Cushman and Applin's
species.
Locality: Very rare, and found only at Station VI.

NODOSARIA OBLIQUA (Linne)
Plate 8, figures 9, 10
Nautilus obliquus Linne, Systema naturae, 12th ed., 1767, p. 1163; 13th (Gmelin's)
ed., 1788, p. 3372, No. 14.
Nodosaria (Dentalina) obliqua (Linnd) Parker and Jones, Annals and Mag. Nat.
Hist., 3d ser., vol. 3, 1859, p. 482.
Nodosaria obliqua Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 129, pl. 30,
figs. 6, 7; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 27.





34 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE

Test elongate, large, chambers numerous, becoming more distinct
as the apertural end is reached; surface ornamented with numerous,
distinct costae which run the entire length of the test with occasional
additional ones running between those already formed; aperture
slightly produced, radiate.
Length 10 millimeters (?) when complete.
Most of our specimens are broken so that the separate pieces show
only 5 or 6 chambers. We have enough pieces, however, to reconstruct
the entire test. It is identical with the form figured by Cushman.
Locality: Common in all samples examined.

NODOSARIA VERTEBRALIS (Batseh)
Plate 10, figure 2
Nautilus (Orthoceras) vertebralis Batsch, Conchylien des Seesandes, 1791, p. 3, No. 6,
pl. 2, figs. 6 a, b.
Nodosaria vertebralis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 27, pl. 4,
fig. 1. '4
Test elongate, slender, but slightly tapering, chambers short, in-
flated, subglobular; sutures depressed; surface ornamented by a few,
relatively heavy costae which run the entire length of the test; initial
end often with a short, fairly heavy spine.
Length 1.5-4.0 millimeters.
Locality: Common at all stations except No. VII.

NODOSARIA LATEJUGATA Gumbel
Plate 6, figure 3
Nodosaria latejugata Giimbel, Abhandl. K. bay. Akad. Wiss. Miinchen, vol. 10, 1868,
p. 619, pl. 1, fig. 32.
Nodosaria sp. Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1921, p. 130, pl. 30, fig. 5.
Nodosaria latejugata Cushman and Hanna, Proc. Calif. Acad. Sci. 4th ser., vol. 16,
1927, No. 8, pp. 212.213, pl. 13, figs. 15-17.
Test relatively large, but composed of very few chambers, 4-5;
chambers large, subglobular, the initial chamber the largest gradually
decreasing in size toward the aperture; sutures depressed, pronounced;
costae run the entire length of the test, comparatively few in number
with wide spaces in between; aperture produced, slightly radiate.
Length 1.45 millimeters.
Cushman figured in his Mint Spring paper, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof.
Paper 129, a form as Nodosaria sp. Later he referred it to N. verte-
bralis17. We have specimens from the Marianna which compare very
well with Cushman's Mint Spring specimen. Also some of our speci-
mens compare very favorably with N. latejugata as figured by Giimbel

17Cushman. J. A.. U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, p. 28, 1923.





FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 35

and later by Cushman and Hanna from the Eocene of California. We
are placing our forms under Giimbel's species because of its relatively
few inflated chambers and the appearance of its costae. It seems
distinct from forms we are referring to N. vertebralis.
Locality: Found only at Station VIII, where it was very rare.

Genus SARACENARIA Defrance, 1824
SARACENARIA ITALICA Defrance
Plate 6, figure 5
Saracenaria italica Defrance, Dict. Sci. Nat., vol. 32, 1824, p. 177; vol. 47, 1827, p. 344.
Cristellaria italica H. B. Brady, Rept. Voy Challenger, Zool. vol. 9, 1884, p. 544, pl.
68, figs. 17, 18, 20.23.
Cristellaria italica Cushman, U. S. Nat Mus. Bull. 100, 1921, p. 252, pl. 51, fig. 2.
CristeUaria italica Cushman, U. S. GeoL Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 30, pL 4,
fig. 3.
Test rather large, stout, triangular in cross section, composed of a
tightly coiled initial part followed by an uncoiled portion; uncoiled
portion variable in length according to the age of the individual;
chambers of uncoiled portion narrow; sutures fairly pronounced,
sloping; aperture produced, radiate.
Length 1 millimeter.
This species is quite common at most of the stations examined by
us. It does not follow the type as closely as one might like, but as
there appears to be so many variations, we have placed it under this
species for the present. Many of our specimens agree very closely with
the figure given by Cushman in his Philippine report, U. S. Nat. Mus.
Bull. 100.
Locality: Stations I, II, III, V, VII and VIII.

Genus FRONDICULARIA Defrance, 1824
FRONDICULARIA ZETA, n. sp.
Plate 5, figures 4 and 5
Test compressed, subelliptical in side view, widest about 3/4 the way
from the initial end, initial end more pointed than the apertural;
initial end in the megaspheric form with a subspherical proloculum
which appears as a raised knob on the outside of the shell, followed
by 6 or 7 of the typical inverted V-shaped frondicularian chambers;
sutures showing as depressed lines which are more pronounced in
the center of the test and toward the apertural end; periphery bluntly
rounded; surface entirely without ornamentation; aperture slightly
produced, sometimes slightly radiate, often giving the appearance of
two slightly produced lips.
Length 1.88 millimeter; width 1.22 millimeter.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


Cotypes: Florida State Geological Survey, No. S-2032.
This is a very interesting form, although only a few individuals
were found. No tendency to coil was observed in the sections made of
megaspheric individuals.
The microspheric form was not observed.
Locality: Stations IV and V.

Family POLYMORPHINIDAE
Subfamily Polymorphininae
Genus GUTTULINA d'Orbigny, 1826
GUTTULINA PROBLEMA d'Orbigny
Plate 10, figure 11
Polymorphina (Guttulina) problema d'Orbigny, Annales Sci. Nat., vol. 7, 1826, p.
266, No. 14, ModBles, No. 61.
Guttulina problema d'Orbigny, Foraminiferes fossiles du bassin tertiaire de Vienne,
1846, p. 224, pi. 12, figs. 26.28.
Polymorphina (Guttulina) problema H. B. Brady, Challenger Rept., Zoology, vol.
9, 1884, p. 568, pl. 72, fig. 20; pl. 73, fig. 1.
Polymorphina (Guttulina) problema Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129,
1922, p. 94, pl. 18, fig. 1; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 33, pl. 5,
fig. 6.
Test elongate, spindle shaped; chambers few, inflated, sutures
distinct; apical end more or less rounded, apertural end more tapered;
surface smooth; aperture radiate, slightly produced.
Length 0.83 millimeter.
Locality: This species was found at Stations II, VII and VIII, but
is rare.
GLOBULINA GIBBA d'Orbigny
Plate 10, figure 6
Polymorphina (Globulina) gibba d'Orbigny, Ann. Sci. Nat., vol. 7, 1826, p. 226, No.
20, Modeles, No. 63.
Polymorphina gibba Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 93, pl. 17,
fig. 3; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 31.
Globulina gibba Cushman, Florida State Geol. Survey Bull. 4, 1930, p. 34, pi. 5,
fig. 21.
Test almost circular in front view, in end view broadly oval; cham-
bers few, inflated, approximately triserially arranged; sutures fairly
distinct; wall smooth; aperture radiate and slightly produced.
Length up to 0.7 millimeter.
Locality: Common at Stations I, II, III, V, and VIII.





FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 37

Family NONIONIDAE
Genus NONION Montfort, 1808
NONION UMBILICATULUM (Montagu)
Plate 9, figure 1
Nautilus umbilicatulus Montagu Testacea Britannica, 1803, p. 191; Suppl., 1808,
p. 78, pl. 18, fig. 1.
Nonionina umbilicatula Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 139,
pL 23, figs. 3, 4; U. S. GeoL Survey, Prof. Paper 133, p. 49.
Test biconvex, nearly circular in outline, symmetrical; deeply
umbilicate; 8-10 chambers, comprising the last formed whorl; sutures
slightly depressed, limbate; surface of test smooth, finely punctate;
peripheral margin broadly rounded; aperture a narrow, curved slit
at the base of the final chamber.
Diameter 0.50 millimeter.
Locality: Rare, at Stations I, V, VIII, and IX.

Family CAMERINIDAE
Subfamily Camerininae
Genus OPERCULINELLA Yabe, 1918
OPERCULINELLA DIA, n. sp.
Plate 6, figure 7, and
Plate 7, figures 11, 12, and 13
Test small, greatly compressed, volutions 31/2 to 4, the last one
having about 22-24 chambers. Periphery in some specimens slightly
thickened, central area of the test thickened, this thickening occupying
half the area of the test, a marked area of depression often exists
between these two thickened areas, especially in more adult specimens.
Surface entirely unornamented, some specimens occasionally showing
the septae as fine light lines, especially if the specimen is wet, extend-
ing from the periphery to the center of the test. In section the sutures
for their first half are gently curved, in their last half strongly
recurved.
Width 1.74 millimeter to 2.1 millimeter (from outer edge of
aperture through the center.)
Length 2.03 millimeter to 2.6 millimeter (at right angles to above.)
Cotypes: Florida Geological Survey Cat. No. S-2039.
This species is evidently related to Operculinella sabinensis Cole,
from the St. Maurice formation (Eocene). The arrangement and
shape of the sutures is similar, except in 0. dia they are more strongly
recurved. 0. sabinensis is larger, has more chambers in its final volu-
tion and is also thicker than the form described above.
Locality: 0. dia with Lepidocyclina mantelli should make a splen-
did marker for the Marianna, as it occurs abundantly in every sample
examined.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


Family BULIMINIDAE
Subfamily Bulimininae
Genus BULIMINA d'Orbigny, 1826
BULIMINA SCULPTILIS Cushman
Plate 9, figure 11
Bulimina sculptilis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 23, pl. 3,
fig. 3.
Original description:
"Test elongate, tapering, subacute at the initial end, broadly rounded
at the apertural end, or somewhat contracted; chambers numerous,
distinct; sutures slightly depressed; surface ornamented by longitu-
dinal costae, raised considerably above the general surface of the test,
comparatively few and continuous from the apex nearly to the aper-
ture; aperture elongate, comma-shaped.
Maximum length 1 millimeter."
Our specimens from the Marianna are identical with specimens in
the senior author's collection from the Red Bluff Clay, Mississippi,
and also from the Alazan formation of Mexico. It is apparently one
of the characteristic species of the Lower Oligocene.
Locality: Found only at Station VIII, and very rare there.

Subfamily Virgulininae
Genus BOLIVINA d'Orbigny, 1839
BOLIVINA ARIANA, n. sp.
Plate 5, figure 7
Bolivina nitida Cushman (not H. B. Brady), U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129,
1921, p. 91, pl. 15, fig. 4.
Test elongate, thin, tapering, broadest just below the apertural end;
segments relatively few in number, regularly textularian in arrange-
ment, each chamber bordered by an area of clear shell material which
forms a relatively wide keel around the entire test; chambers broadest
in the center of the test, regularly tapering toward the periphery,
slightly recurved; aperture, regular, elongate.
Length 0.61 millimeter; width 0.36 millimeter.
Cotypes: Florida Geological Survey Cat. No. S-2041.
This species, while near B. nitida of Brady,'s differs in not having
such a large, irregular aperture, and in not having such strongly
recurved chambers. The border of clear shell material around each
chamber is also more pronounced in ariana than in nitida giving con-
sequently a broader keel.
Locality: Common at Stations I, II, V, VI, VII and VIII.

18Bolivina nitida H. B. Brady, Challenger Rept., Zoology, vol. 9, 1884, p. 420,
pl. 52, figs. 30 a, b.





FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 39

BOLIVINA CAELATA Cushman
Plate 9, figure 6
Bolivina caelata Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 19, pl. 2, fig. 2.
Original description:
"Test elongate, compressed, rhomboid, nearly twice as long as wide;
chambers comparatively few, thickest toward the middle; sutures
indistinct, except near the apertural end, curved; periphery acute,
sometimes slightly carinate; surface ornamented by a reticulate pat-
tern, but very irregular, consisting of irregularly longitudinal costae,
crossed or connected by other curved costae, not in any general direc-
tion; aperture narrow, elongate.
Maximum length 0.5 millimeter."
Locality: This is a distinct and easily recognized species, and was
common at Stations V, VI, VII and VIII.

Subfamily Reussiinae
Genus REUSSIA Schwager, 1877
REUSSIA SPINULOSA Reuss var. GLABRATA Cushman
Verneuilina spinulosa Reuss var. glabrata Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper
129, 1922, p. 92; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 21.
Original description:
"Test pyramidal, three-sided, widest above the middle, generally trian-
gular in transverse section, the sides somewhat concave; angles of the
test bluntly angled or even rounded, without spines; surface smooth;
aperture small, at the inner side of the last formed chamber.
Maximum length 0.75 millimeter."
Locality: Very rare, and found only at Station VIII.

Subfamily Uvigerininae
Genus UVIGERINA d'Orbigny, 1826
UVIGERINA BYRAMENSIS Cushman
Plate 9, figure 7
Uvigerina byramensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, pp. 95,
133, pl. 18, fig. 5; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, pp. 34-35, pl. 4, figs.
10, 11.
Original description:
"Test minute, elongate, somewhat fusiform, initial end pointed;
chambers numerous, distinct; sutures depressed; surface ornamented
by longitudinal costae, rather thin and sharp; the last-formed chamber
more distinct than the rest, the inner side concave, the other two sides
slightly convex, giving a generally triangular section, the surface of the
last-formed chamber smooth; the apertural end produced into a short
cylindrical neck with a slight lip, the aperture circular.
Length 0.25-0.40 millimeter."
Locality: Very rare, but represented at Stations I, IV, VII and VIII.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE


UVIGERINA MARIANNENSIS, n. sp.
Plate 6, figure 6
Test minute, fusiform; chambers and sutures indistinct; test cov-
ered by numerous, rather prominent, raised costae which run the
entire length of the test; aperture on a very short neck with a phialine
lip.
Length 0.67 millimeter.
Holotype: Florida State Geological Survey Cat. No. S-2040.
This species is distinct from the other two Uvigerina associated
with it because of its form and costae which extend unbroken the entire
length of the test. In general appearance, U. mariannensis somewhat
resembles U. eocaena Giimbel, but our form has more regular costae
and a slightly different shape.
Locality: This form is very rare, and occurred only at Station
No. II.
UVIGERINA PIGMEA d'Orbigny
Plate 9, figure 10
Uvigerina pigmea d'Orbigny, Ann. Sci. Nat., vol. 7, 1826, p. 269, pl. 12, figs. 8, 9,
ModBles, No. 67.
Uvigerina pygmaea d'Orbigny, Foraminiferes fossiles du bassin tertiaire de Vienne,
1846, p. 190, pL 11, figs. 25, 26.
Uvigerina pigmea Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 134, pl. 32,
fig. 2; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 34.
Uvigerina pigmea Cushman, Florida State Geol. Survey Bull. 4, 1930, p. 49, pl. 9,
figs. 3, 6.
Test subcylindrical, largest in the center, tapering to bluntly
rounded ends; chambers numerous, inflated, triserially arranged;
sutures slightly depressed; chambers ornamented with longitudinal
costae which are not continuous; final chamber generally smooth;
aperture at the end of a short cylindrical neck with a phialine lip.
Length 0.73 millimeter.
As Cushman has already pointed out the specimens from the Vicks-
burg group greatly resemble pigmea as described and figured by
d'Orbigny in the Vienna basin monograph. The form described in
the Annales Sci. Nat. is evidently a different form, as the final cham-
ber is produced and spinose.
Locality: This form was fairly common at all stations except No.
IV, and Cushman found it at U. S. G. S. Station No. 6767.

Family ROTALIIDAE
Subfamily Discorbisinae
Genus DISCORBIS Lamarek, 1804
DISCORBIS sp.
Plate 7, figures 1, 2
Test small, plano-convex, ventral side rather flat or slightly concave,
dorsal side strongly convex, 6 chambers in the last evolution; sutures




FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 41

depressed, limbate with clear shell material; margin of test acute; wall
very finely punctate; aperture a narrow, curved slit at the base of the
final chamber on the ventral side.
Diameter 0.43 millimeter.
In the Marianna material, one specimen was found which is very
similar to a form figured by Cushman'9 as D. auracana. As he gives
only a ventral view, it may be that his form is different than the Mari-
anna specimen which we are considering the same as his.
Rosalina auracana of d'Orbigny is now referred to the genus Val-
vulineria.20 Neither Cushman's figure nor our specimen from the
Marianna shows the prominent flat valvular tooth on the ventral side
which is characteristic of this genus.
It is probably that this form represents a new species and belongs
in the genus Discorbis. We are figuring our specimen for future
reference.
Locality: Stations III and VIII, where it is very rare.

Genus GYROIDINA d'Orbigny, 1826
GYROIDINA VICKSBURGENSIS (Cushman)
Rotalia vicksburgensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 139,
pl. 35, figs. 3, 4.
Rotalia vicksburgensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 46.
Cushman found this species in material from U. S. G. S. Station
7241, but it was not found by the authors.

Subfamily Rotaliinae
Genus EPONIDES Montfort, 1808
EPONIDES BYRAMENSIS (Cushman)
Plate 8, figures 5, 6
Pulvinulina byramensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, pp. 99,
138, pl. 22, figs. 4, 5; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 44.
Original description:
"Test small, biconvex, rotaliform, consisting of about three coils, seven
to eight chambers in the last-formed one; on the dorsal side sutures
oblique and at a considerable angle with the periphery, somewhat
limbate; on the ventral side the chambers extend in to the center,
which is usually not umbilicate; sutures nearly straight; surface pol-
ished, punctations appearing as light tubules against the translucent
wall; aperture near the inner end of the chamber on the ventral side,
with a definite valvular lip, the aperture hidden below but when
examined found to be composed, in the adult, of several adjacent
small rounded openings.

19Cushman, J. A., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, pl. 32, fig. 6.
20Cushman, J. A., Bull. Scripps Institute Oceanography, Tech. Ser. vol. 1, 1927,
p. 160.





42 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE

Maximum diameter 1.5 millimeters."
This is one of the most abundant forms. It is easily recognized
and absolutely true to the type as far as we have observed.
Locality: All samples examined, and Cushman found it at U. S.
G. S. Station No. 6767.
EPONIDES MARIANNENSIS (Cushman)
Plate 5, figures 8 and 9
Pulvinulina mariannensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 44,
pl. 7, figs. 1-3.
Original description:
"Test unequally biconvex, the dorsal side nearly flat; chambers with
a keel and slightly limbate sutures, obliquely curved, ventral side some-
what convex, sutures deeply depressed, with a deep umbilical central
opening; aperture elongate at the base at the inner margin of the
last-formed chamber; surface smooth. Maximum diameter 1.5 milli-
meters."
This species has been reported to date only from the Marianna
limestone. It is distinct and readily recognized. It should prove to
be one of the markers for this horizon.
Locality: Very rare, at Stations III, V and IX; rare, at Station VIII,
and Cushman found it at U. S. G. S. Station 6767.
EPONIDES ADVENA (Cushman)
Plate 11, figures 10 and 11
Rotalia advena Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 46, pl. 7,
figures 4-6.
Original description:
"Test rotaliform, composed of about three coils, nearly as high as
broad, the last coil consisting of five or six chambers, umbonal region
elevated, periphery broadly rounded, ventral side somewhat more
convex than the dorsal; sutures slightly if at all depressed, only those
of the last-formed coil distinct: aperture an elongate slit, several times
as long as wide, the ends curved, on the ventral side at the inner margin
of the last-formed chamber; wall finely punctate, smooth, somewhat
shiny.
Diameter 0.80 millimeter or less."
Locality: This form was found at Stations I, VII and VIII, where
it was rare.
Genus ROTALIA Lamarck, 1804
ROTALIA Sp.
Plate 11, figure 6
We are figuring a species of Rotalia for future reference. There is
only one specimen and that is not too well preserved. Ventrally it
looks very much like R. byramensis except that the spines are missing.





FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 43

It may represent that species, but more and better specimens are
needed for a specific determination.
Locality: Rare, at Station III.

Subfamily Siphonininae
Genus SIPHONINA Reuss, 1849
SIPHONINA ADVENA Cushman
Plate 11, figures 7 and 8
Siphonina advena Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, pp. 98, 137,
pl. 22, fig. 12; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 42.
Original description:
"Test unequally biconvex, dorsal side usually less convex than the
ventral; periphery subacute; chambers making up the last-formed
coil; sutures distinct, on the dorsal side flush with the surface, on the
ventral side, slightly depressed, on the dorsal side somewhat broadened
and limbate, ventrally narrow; surface smooth but punctate; aperture
with a short neck, compressed, with a phialine lip and elliptical aper-
ture; color even in the fossil specimens somewhat brownish; wall thin
and translucent.
Maximum diameter 0.50 millimeter."
Locality: Relatively a common form at Stations I, IV, V, VI, VII
and VIII, and Cushman found it at U. S. G. S. Stations 7241 and 6767.

Subfamily Baggininae
Genus CANCRIS Montfort, 1808
CANCRIS SAGRA (d'Orbigny)
Plate 5, figure 6, and
plate 11, figure 1
Rotalina sagra dcOrbigny in De la Sagra. Hist. Fis. Pol. Nat. Cuba, Forams., 1839,
p. 77, pl. 5, figs. 13-15.
Pulvinulina sagra Cushman, U. S. Geol. Surv., Bull. 676, 1918, p. 65, pl. 22, fig. 3;
pl. 23, fig. 1.
Pulvinulina sagra Cushman, U. S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 45, pl. 6,
figs. 9, 10.
Cancris sagra Cushman, Florida State Geol. Surv. Bull. 4, 1930, p. 56, pl. 11, figs. 4 a-c.
Test small, almost equally biconvex, slightly longer than wide,
ventral side slightly more convex than the dorsal; 5-7 chambers in the
last-formed coil, which increase rapidly as added, the final chamber
occupying nearly half the test; sutures not depressed on the dorsal
side, on the ventral side quite depressed; margin of the test decidedly
angulate, often bordered with a slight keel; aperture a narrow slit
opening into the umbilicus generally covered by a plate (which is,
however, lost in most fossil specimens.)
Length 0.78 millimeter.
The forms which occur in the Marianna are apparently identical
with the forms figured by Cushman from the Glendon limestone. A




44 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE

comparison of Cushman's figures and our specimens with d'Orbigny's
original figure of Rotalina sagra, indicate that there are some differ-
ences in form between the recent and Vicksburg specimens. Whether
these differences are sufficient to make the fossil forms a different
species can only be determined by a direct comparison of specimens.
The form figured by Cushman under the name Pulvinulina sagra from
the Miocene seems closer to d'Orbigny's figure than the Oligocene
species. The Vicksburg form does not seem to be so elongated and
the final chamber is of a different shape. This appearance of the final
chamber, however, may be due to the lip over the umbilical area being
broken away in the fossil specimens.
Locality: This form was found only at Stations V and VIII, and
was rare there.

Family CASSIDULINIDAE
Subfamily Cassidulininae
Genus CASSIDULINA d'Orbigny, 1826
CASSIDULINA GLOBOSA Hantken
Plate 7, figure 7
Cassidulina globosa Hantken, A. magy. kir. foldt. int. evkon, vol. 4, 1875, (1876),
p. 54, pl. 16, fig. 2.
Test small, globular; chambers few, inflated; sutures very slightly
depressed, slightly limbate; wall smooth, very finely perforate; aper-
ture comma-shaped in a slight depression.
Diameter 0.41 millimeter.
In size and shape, our specimens seem identical with the form
described by Hantken from the Clavulina szaboi beds. It is very rare,
and may easily be overlooked because of its small size.
Locality: Station No. VIII.

Family GLOBIGERINIDAE
Subfamily Globigerininae
Genus GLOBIGERINA d'Orbigny, 1826
Plate 8, figure 7, and
plate 9, figures 4 and 8
The classification of the various species in this genus is in a very
chaotic state.
Numerous specimens were found at several localities which are
referable to definite types at least, and these are listed below with the
specific name questioned.
Globigerina bulloides d'Orbigny (?). Common at Stations I, V,
VI, VIII, and Cushman found it at U. S. G. S. Station No. 7241.
Globigerina dutertrei d'Orbigny (?). Rare at Station I, and Cush-
man found it at U. S. G. S. Station No. 6767.




FORMATION OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 45

Globigerina inflata d'Orbigny (?). Common at Stations V, VI,
VII and VIII.
Globigerina triloba Reuss (?). Common at all Stations except
No. III.

Family GLOBOROTALIIDAE
Genus GLOBOROTALIA Cushman, 1927
GLOBOROTALA MENARDII (d'Orbifny)
Plate 11, figures 4 and 5
Rotalia menardii d'Orbigny, Ann. Sci. Nat., vol. 7, 1826, p. 273; Modeles No. 10.
Pulvinulina menardii Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 45.
Globorotalia menardii Cushman, Bull. Scripps Inst. Oceanography, Tech. Ser., vol. 1,
1927, p. 175; Cushman and Wickenden, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 75, Art. 9,
1929, p. 13, pl. 6, figs. 2 a-c.
Test relatively large, unequally biconvex, ventral side slightly more
convex than the dorsal; 6-8 chambers in the last formed coil; sutures
almost flush with the surface, curved; surface unornamented, finely
punctate; margin of the test angulate; not keeled; aperture a small
slit situated at the margin of the last formed chamber.
Diameter: 1.16 millimeters.
Only one specimen which can be considered under this species was
found in the Marianna material. Cushman has reported it previously
from the Marianna limestone at one locality only, viz., 5 miles south
of Jackson, Alabama. Our specimen is very similar to figures of
recent material, except that it does not have as pronounced a keel as is
generally figured on recent specimens. This is undoubtedly due to
the state of preservation.
Locality: Station VIII.

Family ANOMALINIDAE
Subfamily Anomalininae
Genus ANOMALINA d'Orbigny, 1826
ANOMALINA BETA, n. sp.
Plate 5, figures 1, 2, 3
Anomalina grosserugosa var. (?) Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1921,
p. 98, pl. 21, figs. 3.5.
Plano-convex, six chambers composing the last coil, margin
strongly lobate; ventral side very convex with chambers strongly in-
flated, sutures depressed and showing as light lines, recurved; a knob
of shell material often occupying the umbilical region; dorsal side flat
or slightly concave, sutures strongly depressed, recurved; margin of
shell bluntly rounded; aperture a curved opening at the inner margin
at the periphery.
Diameter 0.70 millimeter.
This species is recorded by Cushman from the Byram marl as




46 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE

Anomalina grosserugosa var. (?) and also by Howe21 from the type
locality of the Red Bluff Clay, Mississippi. As Cushman has already
pointed out in his paper, this species is very different from Giimbel's
A. grosserugosa, but near a form figured by Brady in the Challenger
report. A. beta differs from Brady's (which should probably be given
another name) in its more lobate outline, and more piano-convex form.
The sutures in A. beta are also more strongly recurved.
Locality: This species is very rare, and was found only at Stations
V and VI.
ANOMALINA BILATERALIS Cushman
Plate 10, figures 8 and 9
Anomalina bilateralis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, pp. 97,
137, pl. 21, fig. 12; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, pp. 42, 43.
"Test of about four coils, bilateral or nearly so, composed of numerous
chambers, ten or more in the last-formed whorl, umbilical region on
both sides with a knob of clear shell material, more pronounced on
the dorsal side; chambers smooth, but coarsely punctate, more coarsely
so on the ventral side; sutures broad and somewhat limbate with clear
shell material; aperture a narrow curved opening at the base of the
final chamber.
Maximum diameter, 1 millimeter."
Locality: Abundant at all stations examined.

ANOMALINA MISSISSIPPIENSIS Cushman
Plate 9, figures 2 and 3
Anomalina mississippiensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper, 129, 1922,
pp. 98-137, pl. 21, figs. 6-8; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 43.
Original description:
"Test small, piano-convex, of about two and one-half coils, periphery
slightly lobulate, bluntly rounded, dorsal side very much flattened,
even slightly concave, ventral side very convex; chambers compara-
tively few, six to eight in the last-formed coil; sutures curved, on the
dorsal side broad and limbate, even with the surface of clear shell
material, on the ventral side narrower and depressed; the last-formed
two or three chambers on the inner margin on the dorsal side slightly
above the general surface; wall thin and translucent, especially on
the dorsal side, smooth, on the ventral finely punctate and not so clear;
aperture a curved opening at the inner margin at the periphery.
Length 0.25-0.35 millimeter, breadth 0.20-0.30 millimeter."
Locality: Common at all stations, and Cushman found it at U. S.
G. S. Station No. 6767.

21Howe, H. V., Jour. of Pal., vol. 2, 1928, No. 3, pp. 173.176.




FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 47

ANOMALINA VICKSBURGENSIS Cushman
Plate 9, figure 5
Anomalina vicksburgensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p.
137, pl. 35, figs. 5, 6; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 43.
Original description:
"Test equally biconvex, dorsal side more flattened than the ventral;
chambers numerous, 10 to 12 in the last-formed coil; sutures slightly
limbate; periphery rounded, not lobulate; wall between the sutures
finely granular or punctate, ventral side with a clear mass of shell
material at the umbilicus.
Diameter 0.35 millimeter."
The specimens examined by us have a fairly flat dorsal side; more
strongly so than one would be led to believe from the original descrip-
tion. The other characters are the same as given in the original de-
scription.
Locality: Very rare at Stations I, IV, VIII and IX.
Genus PLANULINA d'Orbigny, 1826
PLANULINA MEXICANA Cushman
Plate 6, figure 2
Planulina mexicana Cushman, Contrib. Cush. Lab. Foram. Res., vol. 3, 1927, pt. 2,
pp. 113-114, pl. 23, figs. 5 a, b.
Test complanate, compressed, composed of about 31/2 whorls with
12 chambers in the final evolution; all the chambers visible and distinct
from both sides of the test; sutures distinct, limbate, gently recurved;
chamber walls distinctly perforate; periphery of test broadly rounded,
not lobate; aperture small, at the base of the very narrow apertural
face.
Diameter 0.79 millimeter.
This is apparently the same species as described by Cushman from
the Alazan formation (Lowermost Oligocene) of Mexico. The cham-
bers in the specimens we have from the Marianna when compared
with specimens from Mexico in the collection of the senior author,
show a slightly different shape, but hardly enough to give the Florida
specimens varietal rank.
This may represent the "Truncatulina" wuellerstorfi reported by
Cushman from the Marianna and Glendon limestones.
Locality: Very rare, and found only at Stations IV and VIII.
PLANULINA BYRAMENSIS (Cushman)
Plate 10, figure 1
Truncatulina byramensis Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, pp. 96,
136, pl. 20, figs. 4-6; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 41.
Original description:
"Test plano-convex, dorsal side slightly convex, ventral side flattened,
peripheral margin subcarinate; about eight chambers in the last-





48 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE

formed whorl, chambers on the ventral side failing to reach the center
of the test, leaving a definite umbilical area which is filled with clear
shell material; on the dorsal side each chamber at its inner border
has the angles somewhat produced and a broad, rounded re-entrant
near the middle; on the ventral side the inner half of the chamber is
rather intricately lobed, the chambers themselves of lighter color;
the sutures darker, of clear shell material; surface finely granular;
aperture an elongate opening at the base of the last-formed chamber
near its inner ventral border.
Diameter 0.35-0.75 millimeter."
Locality: Common at Stations I, IV, VII, VIII and IX, and Cush-
man found it at U. S. G. S. Station 6767.
Subfamily Cibicidinae
Genus CIBICIDES Montfort, 1808
CIBICIDES AMERICANUS (Cushman)
Plate 7, figures 5, 6
Truncatulina americana Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 676, 1918, p. 63, pl. 20,
figs. 2, 3, pl. 21, fig. 1.
Truncatulina americana Cushman, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 103, 1918, p. 68, pl. 23,
figs. 2 a-c.
Truncatulina americana Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, p. 97,
pl. 20, figs. 7-8.
Discorbis sp. ? U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 39, pl. 6, figs. 5, 6.
Anomalina mantaensis Galloway and Morrey, Bull. Am. Pal., vol. 15, No. 55, 1929,
pp. 28-29, pl. 4, fig. 5.
Cibicides americanus Cole and Gillespie, Bull. Am. Pal., vol. 15, No. 57 b, 1930,
p. 14, pl. 4, fig. 4.
Cibicides americana Cushman, Florida State Geol. Survey Bull. No. 4, 1930, p. 61,
pl. 12, fig. 5 a-c.
Test plano-convex, the ventral side strongly convex, the dorsal side
generally slightly concave, 9-12 chambers in the final evolution; cham-
bers gradually increasing in size as added, narrow, recurved; sutures
wide, pronounced, limbate; margin angulate, often with a slight indi-
cation of a keel; chambers fail to meet in the center on the dorsal side,
leaving a marked umbilicus; on the ventral side, tightly coiled with a
very small plug of clear shell material; chamber walls entirely unor-
namented, rather coarsely perforate; aperture ventral, but extending
over into the dorsal umbilicus where it is generally covered with a
small valvular flap.
Diameter 0.30 millimeter.
The placing of this form generically is unsatisfactory, as has been
pointed out before by the senior author.22 Anna Martinotti23 has
22For a generic discussion, the reader is referred to Cole and Gillespie, Bull.
Amer. Pal., vol. 15, no. 57 b, 1930, p. 14.
23Martinotti, A., Atti. Soc. Ital., Milano, vol. LXII, Fas. III, IV, 1924, pp. 350,
351, pl. 7, figs. 62-64.





FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 49

referred forms examined by her in Italy to Truncatulina scarenaensis
of Hantken, placing Cushman's T. americana in synonomy. Later
Galloway and Morrey24 described a form from Ecuador as Anomalina
mantaensis placing Cushman's T. americana from the Oligocene in
synonomy, and further pointing out that the Miocene form described
in Bull. 676 of the U. S. Geol. Survey should be considered the true
americana.
While the form figured by Martinotti has the general appearance
of C. americanus, T. scarenaensis Hantken is an entirely different spe-
cies, as may be readily seen from the illustration and description.
The difference between the forms found in the American Oligocene
and Miocene does not seem sufficient to the present authors to warrant
the erection of a new species. We have examined forms from the
Miocene (Choctawhatchee Marl) and the Oligocene (Byram Marl and
Meson formation). These we have compared carefully with the Mari-
anna specimens. The Oligocene forms are alike and agree very closely
to the specimens from the Miocene. The only differences noted were
that the Miocene forms seem to have a few less chambers in the final
whorl and the sutures are not so broadly limbate. These minor differ-
ences do not in our mind constitute a sufficient cause for the erection
of a new species.
Locality: Quite rare, at Stations I, IV, V, VII, VIII and IX.

CIBICIDES LOBATULUS (Walker and Jacob)
Plate 8, figures 2, 3
Nautilus lobatula Walker and Jacob, Adams's Essays on the Microscope, Kanmacher's
ed., 1798, p. 642, pl. 14, fig. 36.
Truncatulina lobatula d'Orbigny, in Barker, Webb, and Berthelot, Histoire naturelle
des iles Canaries, vol. 2, 1839, pt. 2, Foraminiferes, p. 134, pl. 2, figs. 22-24;
Foraminiferes fossiles du bassin tertiaire de Vienne, 1846, p. 168, pl. 9, figs. 18-23.
Truncatulina lobatula Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Bull., 676, 1918, p. 16, pl. 1, fig.
10; p. 60, pl. 17, figs. 1-3; Carnegie Inst. Washington Pub. 291, 1919, p. 41; U. S.
Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922, pp. 96, 135, pl. 20, figs. 1.3; U. S. Geol.
Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 40.
Test piano-convex, flattened on the dorsal side, strongly convex
ventrally, peripheral margin acute, without any indication of a keel;
7-9 chambers in the last-formed whorl; sutures depressed on the ventral
side, nearly flush with the surface dorsally, limbate; wall smooth,
punctate; aperture extending over on the dorsal side between the last-
formed chamber.
Diameter: 0.5-1.00 millimeter.

24Galloway and Morrey, Bull. Am. Pal., vol. 15, no. 55, 1929, pp. 28-29, pl. 4,
fig. 5.





50 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FIVE

The Marianna specimens are apparently the same as specimens
from the Byram marl and also from the Meson formation of Mexico.
As Cushman has pointed out, they are not as typical of the original as
one might wish, but it is best to refer these specimens to this species
for the present.
Locality: This is a common species and was found at all stations
except Nos. III and IV, and Cushman reports it from U. S. G. S. Sta-
tions Nos. 7241 and 6767.
CIBICIDES PSEUDOUNGERIANUS (Cushman)
Plate 10, figure 4
Truncatulina ungeriana H. B. Brady, Challenger Report, Zoology, vol. 9, 1884, pl. 94,
figs. 9 a-c, (not Rotalina ungeriana d'Orbigny.)
Truncatulina ungeriana Cushman, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 103, 1918, p. 69, pl. 24, fig. 1.
Truncatulina pseudoungeriana Cushman, U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 129, 1922,
pp. 97, 136, pl. 20, fig. 9; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 40.
Original description:
"Test almost equally biconvex, periphery subacute; chambers nine to
eleven in the last-formed whorl, those of the earlier whorls not showing
on either the ventral or the dorsal side, being hidden on the dorsal
side by the roughness of the surface and on the ventral side by the
involute character; periphery lobulate; sutures distinct above the last
whorl and very distinct below, as they are somewhat tumid on the
ventral side; umbilical region filled nearly flush with the chambers by
clear shell material, last few chambers on the dorsal side slightly above
the surface on the inner margin; surface dorsally with coarse punctae,
below smooth and more finely punctate; aperture at the periphery.
Diameter: 1 millimeter or less."
Locality: Fairly abundant at all stations examined, and Cushman
found it at U. S. G. S. Stations 7241 and 6767.


Family PLANORBULINIDAE
Genus PLANORBULINELLA Cushman, 1927
PLANORBULINELLA LARVATA (Parker and Jones)
Plate 8, figure 4
Planorbulina vulgaris d'Orbigny var. larvata Parker and Jones, Annals and Mag.
Nat. Hist., 3d ser., vol. 5, 1860, p. 294.
Planorbulina larvata Parker and Jones, Philos. Trans., vol. 155, 1865, p. 379, pl. 19,
figs. 3 a, b.
Planorbulina larvata H. B. Brady, Challenger Rept., Zoology, vol. 9, 1884, p. 658,
pl. 92, figs. 5, 6.
Planorbulina larvata Heron-Allen and Earland, Zool. Soc. London Trans., vol 20,
1915, p. 706.
Planorbulina larvata Cushman, U. S. Nat. Mus. Bull. 71, 1915, pt. 5, p. 27, pl. 8,
fig. 2; fig. 30 (in text) ; U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 133, 1923, p. 39, pl. 6,
figs. 7, 8.





FORAMINIFERA OF THE MARIANNA LIMESTONE OF FLORIDA 51

Test large, typically attached, discoidal, one side being flatter and
smoother than the other indicating the attachment; chambers of the
central portion indistinct, hidden by a secondary growth of granules
or tubercles; peripheral chambers, distinct with markedly depressed
sutures, arranged in a more or less regular pattern of annular rings;
apertures numerous, peripheral.
Diameter: 0.50-2.00 millimeters.
This is an abundant and easily recognized species. The chambers
are generally indistinct except in the outer ring. These show the alter-
nating character extremely well.
This species, together with Lepidocyclina mantelli and Operculi-
nella dia indicate the comparatively shallow, warm-water deposition
of the Marianna limestone.
Locality: Found in all samples examined.

Family Orbitoididae
Subfamily Orbitoidinae
Genus LEPIDOCYCLINA Giimbel, 1868
LEPIDOCYCLINA MANTELLI (Morton)
Plate 7, figures 8, 9 and 10
Nummulites mantelli Morton, Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 23, 1833, p. 291, pl. 5, fig. 9.
Orbitoides (Lepidocyclina) mantelli Giimbel, Abhandl. kon. bay. Akad. Wiss.
Miinchen, vol. 10, 1870, p. 718.
Lepidocyclina mantelli Cushman, U. S. Geol. Sur. Prof. Paper 125, 1926, p. 57,
pls. 12-14.
Lepidocylina mantelli Vaughan, Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc., vol. 74, 1927, pp. 299-
300, pl. 23, figs. 1 a, 1 b, 2.
We are figuring a horizontal and a vertical section of what we con-
sider to be this form for reference. For full details on the species, the
reader is referred to the works above, especially Vaughan's.
Locality: Abundant and characteristic in all samples examined, and
Cushman reports it from U. S. G. S. Station 6767.

LEPIDOCYCLINA (LEPIDOCYCLINA) MANTELLI var. PAPILLATA Vaughan
Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyclina) mantelli var. papillata Vaughan, U. S. Nat. Mus.
Proc., vol. 71, 1927, Art. 8, p. 4, pl. 3, figs. 2a, 2b: pl. 4, figs. 1-2.
Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyclina) mantelli var. papillata Vaughan, Acad. Nat. Sci.
Phila., Proc. vol. 79, 1927, p. 300.
Occurring with the typical L. mantelli at two of our stations are
forms referable to Vaughan's variety in having a finely papillate outer
surface, and small but well-developed pillars.
Locality: Found at Stations Nos. VII and VIII, and fairly common
there.











b_



































i`





















..





























.
















;








i








;












r













































-;-' :























PLATES 5-11



















PLATE 5.


1. Anomalina beta n. sp.; dorsal view; holotype; X 40. Page 45. Specimen
figured from Station V.
2. Anomalina beta n. sp.; apertural view; holotype; X 40. Page 45. Specimen
figured from Station V.
3. Anomalina beta n. sp.; ventral view; holotype; > 40. Page 45. Specimen
figured from Station V.
4. Frondicularia zeta n. sp.; holotype; X 25. Page 35. Specimen figured from
Station IV.
5. Frondicularia zeta n. sp.; apertural view; holotype; X 25. Page 35. Specimen
figured from Station IV.
6. Cancris sagra (d'Orbigny) ; ventral view; X 48. Page 43. Specimen figured
from Station V.
7. Bolivina ariana n. sp.; holotype; X 48. Page 38. Specimen figured from Sta.
tion VIII.
8. Eponides mariannensis (Cushman); dorsal view; X 40. Page 42. Specimen
figured from Station VIII.
9. Eponides mariannensis (Cushman); side view; X 40. Page 42. Specimen
figured from Station VIII.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SUl\ 1FY


BULLETIN FIVE. PLATE 5


I I





















PLATE 6.

1. Nodosaria cf. N. jacksonensis Cushman and Applin; X 48. Page 33. Specimen
figured from Station VI.
2. Planulina mexicana Cushman; side view; X 48. Page 47. Specimen figured
from Station VIII.
3. Nodosaria latejugata Giimbel; X 48. Page 34. Specimen figured from Station
VIII.
4. Nodosaria longiscata d'Orbigny; X 48. Page 33. Specimen figured from Sta-
tion VIII.
5. Saracenaria italica Defrance; X 48. Page 35. Specimen figured from Station
VIII.
6. Uvigerina mariannensis n. sp.; holotype; X 48. Page 40. Specimen figured
from Station II.
7. Operculinella dia n. sp.; side view; holotype; X 25. Page 37. Specimen fig-
ured from Station VIII.
8. Lenticulina crassa (d'Orbigny) var. mariannensis n. var.; side view; holotype;
X 48. Page 30. Specimen figured from Station VIII.


[56]




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


4 ,4n ,
.f


BULLETIN FIVE. PLATE 6


, I


-"


I
r, ? 1

: ~; \
8
'.,
" ~1 :.j







PLATE 7.


1. Discorbis sp.; ventral view; X 40. Page 40. Specimen figured from Station VIII.
2. Discorbis sp.; dorsal view; x 40. Page 40. Specimen figured from Station VIII.
3. Marginulina pediformis Bornemann; side view of a very young specimen; X 40.
Page 32. Specimen figured from Station V.
4. Marginulina pediformis Bornemann; side view of an adult; x 25. Page 32.
Specimen figured from Station VIII.
5. Cibicides americanus (Cushman); dorsal view; x 48. Page 48. Specimen
figured from Station VIII.
6. Cibicides americanus (Cushman); ventral view; x 48. Page 48. Specimen
figured from Station VIII.
7. Cassidulina globosa Hantken; apertural view; X 40. Page 44. Specimen
figured from Station VIII.
8. Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyclina) mantelli (Morton) ; vertical section; x 16. Page
51. Specimen figured from Station VII.
9. Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyclina) mantelli (Morton); horizontal section; X 16.
Page 51. Specimen figured from Station VII.
10. Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyclina) mantelli (Morton) ; microspheric form; vertical
section; X 16. Page 51. Specimen figured from Station VII.
11, 12, 13. Operculinella dia n. sp.; sections showing internal arrangement of cham-
bers; X 16. Page 37. Specimen figured from Stations VII and VIII.


[ 58 J





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN FIVE. PLATE 7

















PLATE 8.

1. Dentalina communis d'Orbigny; X 25. Page 32. Specimens figured from
Station VIII.
2. Cibicides lobatulus (Walker and Jacob) ; ventral view; X 25. Page 49. Speci.
mens figured from Station VIII.
3. Cibicides lobatulus (Walker and Jacob) ; dorsal view; x 25. Page 49. Speci-
mens figured from Station VIII.
4. Planorbulinella larvata (Parker and Jones); X 25. Page 50. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
5. Eponides byramensis (Cushman); ventral view; X 25. Page 31. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
6. Eponides byramensis (Cushman); dorsal view; x 25. Page 41. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
7, Globigerina bulloides d'Orbigny; dorsal view; X 80. Page 44. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
8. Textularia conica d'Orbigny; side view; x 80. Page 27. Specimens figured
from Station VIII.
9. Nodosaria obliqua (Linn) ; initial end; X 25. Page 33. Specimens figured
from Station VIII.
10. Nodosaria obliqua (Linn) ; central, more inflated chambers; X 25. Page 33.
Specimens figured from Station VIII.


[60]





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN FIVE. PLATE 8





PLATE 9.

1. Nonion umbilicatulum (Montagu); side view; X 80. Page 37. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
2. Anomalina mississippiensis Cushman; ventral view; X 80. Page 46. Speci-
mens figured from Station VIII.
3. Anomalina mississippiensis Cushman; dorsal view; x 80. Page 46. Speci-
mens figured from Station VIII.
4. Globigerina triloba Reuss; ventral view; X 80. Page 44. Specimens figured
from Station VIII.
5. Anomalina vicksburgensis Cushman; dorsal view; X 80. Page 47. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
6. Bolivina caelata Cushman; side view; X 80. Page 39. Specimens figured
from Station VIII.
7. Uvigerina byramensis Cushman; x 80. Page 39. Specimens figured from
Station VIII.
8. Globigerina inflata d'Orbigny; ventral view; X 80. Page 44. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
9. Clavulina byramensis var. extans Cushman; X 25. Page 29. Specimens fig-
ured from Station VIII.
10. Uvigerina pigmea d'Orbigny; X 80. Page 40. Specimens figured from Sta.
tion VIII.
11. Bulimina sculptilis Cushman; x 80. Page 38. Specimens figured from
Station VIII.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


' 7
7


BULLETIN FIVE. PLATE 9








PLATE 10.

1. Planulina byramensis (Cushman); dorsal view; x 48. Page 47. Specimens
figured from Station IV.
2. Nodosaria vertebralis (Batsch); X 48. Page 34. Specimens figured from
Station VIII.
3. Textularia mississippiensis Cushman; side view; x 48. Page 27. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
4. Cibicides pseudoungerianus (Cushman); ventral view; x 48. Page 50. Speci-
mens figured from Station IV.
5. Massilina decorate Cushman; x 48. Page 29. Specimens figured from Sta-
tion VIII.
6. Globulina gibba d'Orbigny; X 48. Page 36. Specimens figured from Station II.
7. Lenticulina vicksburgensis (Cushman); x 48. Page 31. Specimens figured
from Station VIII.
8. Anomalina bilateralis Cushman; ventral view; X 48. Page 46. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
9. Anomalina bilateralis Cushman; dorsal view; x 48. Page 46. Specimens
figured from Station VIII.
10. Lenticulina rotulata (Lamarck); side view; x 48. Page 31. Specimens fig-
ured from Station III.
11. Guttulina problema d'Orbigny; X 48. Page 36. Specimens figured from Sta-
tion VIII.
12. Textularia porrecta H. B. Brady; x 48. Page 28. Specimens figured from
Station VIII.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN FIVE. PLATE 10




PLATE 11.


1. Cancris sagra (d'Orbigny); dorsal view; X48. Page 43. Specimen figured
from Station V.
2. Clavulina byramensis Cushman; x 40. Page 28. Specimen figured from
Station VIII.
3. Lenticulina convergens (Bornemann) ; side view; X 48. Page 30. Specimen
figured from Station I.
4. Globorotalia menardii (d'Orbigny); dorsal view; X25. Page 45. Specimen
figured from Station VIII.
5. Globorotalia menardii (d'Orbigny) ; ventral view; X 25. Page 45. Specimen
figured from Station VIII.
6. Rotalia sp.; ventral view; X 25. Page 42. Specimen figured from Stiaion III.
7. Siphonina advena Cushman; dorsal view; x 80. Page 43. Specimen figured
from Station VIII.
8. Siphonina advena Cushman; ventral view of another specimen; X 80. Page
43. Specimen figured from Station VIII.
9. Robulus cultratus (Montfort) ; side view; x 25. Page 29. Specimen figured
from Station III.
10. Eponides advena (Cushman) ; dorsal view; X 48. Page 42. Specimen figured
from Station VIII.
11. Eponides advena (Cushman); ventral view; x 48. Page 42. Specimen figured
from Station VIII.





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN FIVE. PLATE 11








INDEX TO SPECIES

(NOTE: First page number indicates description, and second number plate.)
PAGES
Anomalina beta ..................................................... 45, 54
bilateralis ...................................................... 46, 64
mississippiensis ............................................. . 46, 64
vicksburgensis ........................................ ......... 47, 62
Bolivinia ariana ..................................................... 38, 54
caelata .............. ........................................ 39, 62
Bulimina sculptilis ................................................... 38, 62
Cancris sagra ................................................. 43, 54
Cassidulina globosa ............................................... 44, 58
Cibicides americanus ................................................. 48, 58
lobatulus ........................................ ............ 49, 60
pseudoungerianus ............................................. 50, 64
Clavulina byramensis ................................................. 28, 66
var. extans ............................................. 29, 62
Dentalina communis .................................................. 32, 60
Discorbis sp. ....................................................... 40, 58
Eponides advena ..................................................... 42, 66
byramensis ..................................................... 41, 60
mariannensis ............................................. 42, 54
Frondicularia zeta .................................................... 35, 54
Globigerina bulloides ................... ............................. 45, 60
dutertrei ...................................................... 45
inflata ................................................ ....... 45, 62
triloba ....................................................... 45, 62
Globorotalia menardii .............................................. 45, 66
Globulina gibba ........................................ ........... 36, 64
Guttulina problema ....................................... ........ 36, 64
Gyroidina vicksburgensis ........................... ............... 41
Lenticulina convergens ................................................ 30, 66
crassa var. m ariannensis ......................................... 30, 56
rotulata .......................... ............................ 31, 64
vicksburgensis ........................................ ........ 31, 64
var. aperta ........................................... . 31
Lepidocyclina mantelli .............................................. 51, 58
var. papillata ............................ ..... ..... 51
Marginulina pediformis ............................................... 32, 58
Massilina decorate .................................... ............... 29, 61
Nodosaria cf. N. jacksonensis .......................................... 33, 56
latejugata ................................................... 34, 56
longiscata ..................................................... 33, 56
obliqua ................................................... ...... 33, 60
vertebralis ..................................... ..... .......... 34, 64
Nonion um bilicatulum ............................................. 37, 62
Operculinella dia ................................................. 37, 56
Planorbulinella larvata ............................................. 50, 60
Planulina byramensis ........................................ .. 48, 64
m exicana ................................................... 47, 56
Reussia spinulosa var. glabrata ..................................... 39
Robulus cultratus ...................................... ............ 29, 66
Rotalia sp. ........................................................ 43, 66
Textularia conica ............................ .......................... 7, 60
mississippiensis ................................................. 27, 64
porrecta .................................................... 28, 64
Saracenaria italica ................................................... 35, 56
Siphonina advena ..................................................... 43, 66
Uvigerina byramensis ................... ............................. 39, 62
mariannensis .............................................. 40, 56
pigm ea ...................... .................................. 40, 62

[69]