Stratigraphic and paleontologic studies of wells in Florida--no. 3 ( FGS: Bulletin 26 )

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Material Information

Title:
Stratigraphic and paleontologic studies of wells in Florida--no. 3 ( FGS: Bulletin 26 ) City of Quincy water well, St. Mary's Oil Corporation, Hilliard Turpentine Company no. 1 well
Series Title:
Geological bulletin (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Physical Description:
168 p. : incl. front., illus. (incl. map) 29 pl., tables. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Cole, William Storrs, 1902-
Gunter, Herman, 1885-
Publisher:
Published for Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee
Tallahassee
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1944

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Geology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Paleontology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Foraminifera, Fossil   ( lcsh )
Petroleum -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Geology, Stratigraphic   ( lcsh )
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Bibliographical foot-notes.
General Note:
"Addendum: Discovery of oil in Florida by Herman Gunter": p. 162-163.
Statement of Responsibility:
by W. Storrs Cole.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:

The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
notis - AKM4743
alephbibnum - 002036983
oclc - 01699922
lccn - gs 44000016
System ID:
UF00000240:00001

Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Front Matter
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Main
        Page 11
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    Index
        Page 164
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        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
Full Text


FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN


TWENTY-S


.kr


A9



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L:j6: :i XI





STATE OF
DEPARTMENT OF
Florida Geolo1
S. E. RICE, Supervist
HERMAN GUNTER, Direc


FLORIDA
CONSERVATION
dical Survey
or of Conservation
tor, Geological Survey


(3 (


- r --


arp


GEOLOGICAL


BULLETIN


NO.


STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC
OF WELLS IN FLORIDA -No.3


City


STUDIES


of Quincy water well


St. Mary's Oil Corporation, Hiliard
Turpentine Company No. 1 well







By
W. STORRS COLE, Ph.D.
Ohio State University


Ct


'N' .





Published February


1944


THE E. O. PAINTER PRINTING COMPANY


DELAND. FLORIDA




LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Honorable


Supervisor of


E. Rice,
Conservation


Florida State Board of Conservation

Sir:


have


honor


transmit


a report


entitled


STRATIGRAPHIC


AND


PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES


OF WELLS IN FLORIDA-No.


Storrs Cole of Ohio


State


University,


Columbus


, Ohio,


to be


published as Geological Bulletin No.
This paper deals primarily with


the cuttings and cores from a


well


drilled


River Oil


northeast


Florida


Corporation's


as a test


Hilliard


Turpentine


1, namely
Company


Mary's


well


near


Hilliard


, Nassau


County.


also


includes


studies


of samples


from


well drilled for water for the City of Quincy,


Gadsden County.


Studies


and reports similar to


this one have


been a


policy of the


Florida


Geo-


logical


Survey for some


time


they


have


proven


only


academic


practical


importance.


It is from


such studies


that inti-


mate knowledge of the character,


thickness


and age of


the underlying


formations is obtained and


this is particularly valuable now in


view


the increased interest in Florida as an oil producing State.


est has been


This inter-


tremendously stimulated by the discovery of oil in a deep


test at Sunniland
southern Florida.


, Collier County,


Cypress


Swamp


area


This well was drilled by the Humble Oil and Refining


Company and has a


total


depth


of 11,626


feet,


the oil


coming from


porous limestone stratum found at 11,113 feet.


Please


permit


me to


express


my appreciation


of the


uniform


couragement you have always given


us in


the prosecution of the work


the Geological Survey.


Respectfully submitted,


Herman


Gunter,


Geological


Tallahassee
December 1


Director


Survey


Florida
. 1943





CONTENTS


Introduction


Acki
City











St.


ow ledgm ents ......................
of Qu ncy w after w ell (W -4) ............................................................
Strait igra phy ........................................................................................
M iocene ....................... ...........................................................
H aw thorn form action .......................... .... ......................
Tampa limestone ................................................................
0ligocene .......................................................................................
Suw annee lim stone ..................... ......................... ..........
M arianna lim stone ............................................................
Eocene ..........................................................................................
Ocala lim stone .................... ...................... ..........................
Paleontological record .................................................. ....... .........
Mary's River Oil Corporation, Hilliard Turpentine Company


No. 1 Well (W-336)
Previous Studies on


the Hilliard Turpentine Company well ....


Stratig raphy ..............a.................
Recent and Pleistocene ...
Satilla formation .....


liiocene ...................
Caloosahatchee
Miocene ....................
Hawthorn form
Oligocene ..................
Upper Eocene ........
Ocala limestone


Middle


.... 5 5..*.* a .... a.. a....a .aa a a.a. a.a* a saa 5 a aa. .. q. .
* 5*C-* *CC*C C* Cao a C C* CC 5C C S .a aa 5 5 5 ~ lol l ~m o -


m arl ........................................... ...............

nation ..........................................................


- a. see Ca.aa.C.a.es.C... s.* s. Cae.aaaaa.. ae.. a. a. aaae*a.a.a...**


Eocene


Lisbon formation ................................................................
Salt M mountain lim estone ....................................................
A ckerm an form action ...... ................ ................. ..................
Low er Eocen ................................................ ..............................a
Cedar K eys form action ........................... ..................................
U paper Cretaceous ...... .............................................................
Selm a chalk ................... .......................................................
Eutaw form action ................................................................
Tuscaloosa form action ...... .....................a.a........... ..........
Triassic ? .....................................................................................
Paleontological record ........................................................................
D descriptions of species ................-.........-aa................................................
V alvulinidae ................... ............... ........... .................. ..........................
Pseudorbitolina cubensis Cushman and Bermudez ..............


Dictyoconus
Nonionidae ........


americanus


(Cushman)


I* a *. a ..5.I*I. a .. ... .....5 -a aaIa a-I a 0 a *- a- a a a a a .( a e a a .a


Nonion brown Cole, n. sp. ........................................ ........
C am erinidae ....a. .. ............................. .. ...... ... ...........................
Miscellanea dickersoni (D. K. Palmer) ................................
Oamerina guayabalensis Barker ................................---....
Operculinoides antiguensis Vaghan and Cole ......................
tius (Cole and Ponton) .......................---........
floridensis (Heilprin) ....................................
nvArnan7ll n l ra n an


Page
11


v


w


F'


m





Descriptions of species- (continued)
A lveolinellidae ...........................................................................


Borelis


Rotaliidae ....
Gyroidina


gunteri


Page
52


Cole


floridanus


Cole


nassauetsis Cole, n.


Siphonina nassauentsis Cole,


Amphisteginidae
Amphistagina


lopeztrigoi


Palmer


Orbitoides palmer


Gravell


Pseudorbitoides israelskii


Pseudorbitoldes


"' sp.


Vaughanina cubensis


Lepidocyclina


Vaughan


Cole


D. K. Palmer


antillea


ariana


Cushman


Cole


Ponton


cedarkeysensis


peruviana
pustulosa


douvillei


mantelli
mortoni
ocalana


parvula


Cole


..... ......S..
..............


Cushman


I. Douvill6)
Lisson ........


(Morton) .
(Cushman)
Cushman ...


, variety
Cushmair


cooket


Cushman


yurnagunensis
variety ...........


Cushman


(Eulepidina)


(Discocyclina)
(Asterocyclina)


morganopsts


favosa
undosa


blanpiedi


Cushman
Cushman


georgiana


Vaughan


Vaughan


monticellensis


Ponton-


(Cushman)


Cole


nassauensis Cole,


n. sp.


cedarkeysensis


Cole,


(Athecocyclina)


citrenais
flintensis
hannai C
cooked (V


(Vaughan)..
(Cushman)
:ole, n. sp...
Taughan) ....


Appendix


. .. ...... -................................. ... * . . ....... . ....................... 89


Interpretation of the Igneous Rock in


the Hilliard


Turpentine


Company well


Appendix


Osborn Fuller


....................... ................................ ..................................... 95


Supplemental information


driller's


.... ... ................. ..... ..... 95


ILLUSTRATIONS


(Polylepidina)
(Pliolepidina)


(Lepidocyclina)


Discocyclinidae .
Discocyclina


Pseudophragmina


(Proporocyclina)


Orbitoididae ................... ...............................


A A


L_ 1




TABLES


Table


Measurements of Camerina guayabalensis and Camerina


Page


mississippienats
Measurements


oides


sabtnensis


..... ............. .......... ...... .. .. ... ............................. 41


Operculinoides


jenny


Operculin-


......... ... ... C..... ..... ................ c....... ....... .. ... 46


Measurements of


Operculinoides vicksburgensis


Meaurements of vertical sections of Lepidocyclina peru-


vianca


............... .............*..................... ........................-a................. 64


Measurements


peruviana


horizontal


sections


of Lepidocyclina


..... -............................................................................... 65


Measurements


hannai


vertical


sections


Pseudophragmina


.................................... ... ........................ ......................... 86


Measurements


of horizontal


sections


Pseudophrag-


mnna


hannai


Addendum


Discovery of Oil in Florida,


by Herman


Gunter















































































1










































*






*


























1






t









































*



















*







STRATIGRAPHIC


AND


PALEONTOLOGIC


STUDIES


WELLS


FLORIDA


- No.


City of Quincy water well


Mary's River


Corporation,


IIllllnrd


Turpentine


Company


well


STORRS


COLE


OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY


INTRODUCTION


This


and
was


bulletin


paleontologic


initiated


studio


1936.


fourth
s of
So far,


in a series


vells
. six


Florida.


wells


stratigraphic


The


significant


project
t areas


have been analyzed and the results published.


Two additional


wells have


been studied for this


bulletin.


The


locations


wells studied for this bulle-


. \"'"----.--


tin
The


are
St.


shown i
Mary's


Corporation,


In figure
River


Hilliard


T


Oil
ur-


pentine Company well is lo-
cated in northeastern Flor-


a locality where de-


tailed


subsurface


informa-


tion was lacking.


fltUe i


of 4ells


IL.t il.


* Ca,t ef


* Io tf 'd Rftr 011 Cetfiporeion


i/,iltit ?v


'Ft.-b CD. f/ 9911 I t/.'.1J8


<1
V.


The


City


Quincy


water well is located in the


middle
Florida


portion


of northern


in a situation


derived


in which


concerning


Figure 1


additional


Miocene


information


, Oligocene,


and


could
upper


Eocene.


types and


the


Florida


other


Geological


specimens


Survey


from


wells


Museum


filed


Tallahassee,


Florida.


-I A - -* -


* 4


Q ,cy l 9f .ll 9. '..4f


.. .


_


--=


H* H 1 F 'p





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


The


preliminary work


on the


Hilliard


Turpentine


Com-


pany well was done in Columbus,


Ohio, but the project was


completed at the Florida Geological Survey where the writer


spent the summer of 1943.


It is a pleasure to acknowledge


the


assistance


easier
Gunter


than


has


which
would


has


have


given freely


made


been


work


otherwise.


this
Mr.


bulletin
Herman


of his time and has offered many


valuable


suggestions.


The


staff


Florida


Geological


Survey was most cooperative.


Mr. James R.


Galbraith Jr.


described the samples from the City of Quincy well, Mr. Dean
W. Wilson drafted the well logs, and Mrs. A. J. Rogers aided


with the manuscript.


Dr. Joseph A. Cushman examined and


commented on


certain


of the smaller


Foraminifera and Dr.


Wayland


Vaughan


furnished


photographs


and


advice


concerning certain large Foraminifera.


Dr. J. Osborn Fuller


did extensive work


on the


igneous rock


encountered in


the


Hilliard Turpentine Company well.


Dr. John


Wells iden-


tified the shark's teeth, and to him must be accorded special


appreciation
micrographs


labors


illustrating


taking


external


excellent


photo-


appearance


larger Foraminifera.


The writer made the thin sections and


took the major number of photomicrographs of these.


CITY


OF QUINCY WATER


WELL


(W-4)*


In the spring of 1928 the City of Quincy, Gadsden County,
Florida, drilled a well to a depth of 1370 feet on the water-


work's property located on


the Bainbridge road.


This well


was drilled by the Gray Artesian Well Company of Pensacola
and samples were furnished to the Florida Geological Survey.


These


samples


represent


general


foot


intervals.


The


elevation of the well is 149.7 feet above sea level.






STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


- -- -.




- -
*a e * .
* ~ d**
* 0* 0*t


* 0 *.'h.


* 0 0 I
-II -I


'o samples
royish -while,


soopy


C- olcoreous


Soapy
Argillaceous; shell
Groom -colored
Argt ceos, she/all
Fine to course, faoro


men's


frogments
mindero


Brownish, colcoreous


* 9 S **
I 9 i 0 **


* a *. *



'T^l* a s 9*T
S^^r








-- J_





^c


Greenish. gray
Ton
Graylsh- white

Cho/ky, dense

Green .rith shell
Chalky, dense

r Dolomific
- Greenish
, Groy
Cream-colored
Ton, crystolline


Wn
,rown
wn,
Cream-


cryvfolline
colored


Brown, porous, crystalline


Gray
Light
Groy
Brown


brown, crysto//lline


, crystalline


Ton, crystalline


MARIANNA


Cream,


porous


Cream,


porous, soft


a * *
* 0 0* *
( ' '


LEGEND


Sandstone


~~~0~
~~*4


-----4
-----


Arenoceous


Flint


Limestone


Frt!r~!rI
13S21211


Arenaceous


limestone


Selenite


Ar Greenish- groy,
I rn7viAsh.whlt/


sof/ org /ilacous
- -


Aes n nr flrOn


fragments


see
****
see


I




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX
a


MIOCENE


HAWTHORN


was


composed


FORMATION.-The


fuller's


earth.


first


The


sample


(10-20


geological


map


feet)


2 of


Florida


shows


that


City


Quincy


located


the


outcrop of the Hawthorn formation.


of the samples from


The lithologic character


this well indicates that the Hawthorn


formation extends to a depth of 210 feet.
The Hawthorn in this area is composed chiefly of sandy


clay much


which


has


appearance


fuller's


earth.


There are also some thin marl beds and beds of sandstone.


TAMPA


LIMESTONE.-At


210


feet


the


samples


contain


grayish white, dense fossiliferous limestone.


the sample


at 220 feet Sorites sp. and Peneroplis proteus d'Orbigny were
found, and at 230 feet good specimens of Archaias floridanus


(Conrad)


were recovered.


Although


the


upper portion


of the


Tampa limestone


this area is a pure limestone,
slightly arenaceous limestone.


the lower portion is largely a
There are one or two beds of


a greenish clay interbedded with the limestone.


The Tampa


has a thickness of 175 feet in this well.

OLIGOCENE
SUWANNEE LIMESTONE.-At 390 feet specimens of Rotalia
were found which seems to be the same as the one described


3 from Mexico as Rotalia mexicana Nuttall, variety


mecatepecensis Nuttall.
the top of the Oligocene.


The first large Foraminifera


The appearance of this form marks


were found at 410 feet.


this sample there were two species of Lepidocyclina,


L. (Lepidocyclina) yurnagunensis Cushman,


namely,


variety morgan-


opsis


Vaughan, and L. (Eulepidina)


favosa Cushman.


This


sample also contained specimens of Operculinoides which are


referred to O.


vicksburgensis Vaughan and Cole.


For comparison with the specimens recovered at 410 feet,


n a a t'% ni_^ a- JAa 1f l ai 1 1 : -1 7a a^ L.


nr-, -T-


by Nuttall




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


uppermost Oligocene in this well is very near the zone shown
in Falling Water Sink.
The samples below 410 feet are relatively unfossiliferous


until the sample at 505 feet was examined.


This sample con-


trained abundant specimens of Heterostegina texana Gravell


and Hanna.


This species has been reported from two other


wells in Florida.


the Port St.


Joe test well


(W-288)


H. texana was found at a depth of 859-870 feet4 and in the


Cory No.
1110 feet.


1


(W-445) this species occurred at a depth of 1100-


5 In the Port St. Joe Test well 3 (W-288) H. texana


appeared 190 feet below the top of the Oligocene, in the Cory


No.


(W-445)


occurred


200


feet


below the


top


the


Oligocene, but in the City of Quincy well


(W-4)


this same


interval was 125 feet.
The samples below 505 feet were sparingly fossiliferous or


unfossiliferous


until


the sample


at 615


feet


was examined.


Such fossils as did occur in this interval have been discussed.
MARIANNA LIMESTONE.--At 615 feet new species appear in
abundance, among which were identified Lepidocyclina (Lep-


idocyclina) mantelli (Morton)


and Operculinoides dius


(Cole


and Ponton)


These species are diagnostic of the Marianna


limestone on


outcrop.


But,


associated


with


these


two


species are others which have not been recorded previously
from the Marianna limestone.


this


Cushman,


sample


specimens


assigned


Cushman,


(L.)
and


parvula
Operculi-


noides antiguensis


Vaughan and Cole were found in associa-


tion with the two typical Marianna species.
L. (L.) parvula has been reported from the Port St. Joe


test well 3 (W-288)


at a depth of 1017-1035 feet.


The writer


has found this same species at a depth of 440-450 feet in the


test well drilled by the Calhoun Gas and Oil Company


(W-7)


about one-half mile northwest of Ciarksville, Calhoun County,


Florida.


neither


these


wells


was


(L.)


parvula


(Eulepidina)


undosac


___




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


from


above


but the


writer


has reason


believe


that


this


not the case.


more wells are studied


, the explanation may


found.
Howe


'who


recently made a


thorough


and


detailed


study


fauna


Glendon


formation


reports


that


(Lepidocyclina)


strata


the


mantelli


Glendon


(Morton)


type


was


found


locality


But


basal
other


Lepidocyclina


were found


in association


with


mantelli.


Cer-


tain Lepidocyclina may have longer ranges than was formerly


thought,


or the formational boundaries may have been chosen


incorrectly.


EOCENE


OCALA


rocks


LIMESTONE.-The


encountered


from


680


term
feet


Ocala


the


applied


bottom


this


the
well


although


the fauna is not that of the


typical


Ocala elsewhere


in Florida


because


no large


Foraminifera


were


found in


this


portion


well.


Small


Foraminifera


were


found


practically


attempt


lower


was


made


samples
identify


from


this


well.


the small


Foramini-


fera


which


were


found


but


a sufficient


number


were


picked


from key samples


and


identified


so that


the


identification


the rocks penetrated could be assured.


Various


species


Uvigerina


upper


Eocene


type


were


found
curred


virtually


last


every


sample


sample


(1370


and


numbers


feet)


easily


these


recognized


and
man


enszs


typical


and


Jackson


species


Hemicristellaria


(Cushman


and


fragaria


Applin)


jacksonensis


(Giimbel)


characterize


, variety


this


Cush-
texas-


section


gether


with


Eponides


jacksonensis


(Cushman


and


Applin)


and Siphonina jacksonensis Cushman and Applin.


The


fauna


nearly


small


same.


Foraminifera


However


throughout


should


this section
noted that


Bulimina


jacksonensis Cushman


was not observed


above


900


feet.


The Chilostomella cylindroides Reuss appeared at about


as Bulimina





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


thick


section


question


Ocala.


the samples,


Although


it is


possible


there
that 1


little


reason


Foraminifera


certain


of the lower samples represent cavings.


It should


noted


that


the


lower


sample


new


forms


appeared.


Therefore


fauna contained


in these


samples


is not


digenous


and


a new


formation


appeared,


is non-fossilifer-


ous.


PALEONTOLOGIC


RECORD


(W-4)


Sorites


Pencroplis
230 feet


Archaias


feet


proteus d'Orbigny


floridanus


Conrad)


Amphistegina sp.


Rotalia


feet


mexicana


Nuttall


Operculinoides vicksburgensis
Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyclina


U)


Nuttall


Vaughan and Cole


favos


yurnagunensis


Cushrnan,


morganops


variety


is Vaughan


a Cushman


Heterostegina texacla Gravell and


Hanna


Operculinoidcs


Lepidocyclina


antiguensis


dius


Vaughan


(Cole and Ponton)


(Lepidocyclina)


mantelli
parvula


Cole


(Morton)
Cushman


(Eulepidina)


undosa Cushman


Anomalina


Bolivina
Cibicides


bilateralis


Cushman


jacksonensis Cushman


americanus


mnssissippie
Eponides jacksonensi
Nonionella hantkeni


(Cushman)


and Applin


is (Cushman)
(Cushman an


, variety


antiquus


(Cushman
Applin)


Applin)


(Cushman and Applin)


Siphoning jacksonensis Cushman and Applin
feet


Robulus
feet


limbosus


(Reuss)


Anomalina bilateralis Cushman
Bulimina ovata d'Orbigny


Cibicides


lobatulus


(Walker and Jacob)


mississippiensis (
pseudoungerianus
Eponides ocalana Cushman


Cushman)
(Cushman)


, variety mecatcpecensis


(Eulepidina)





_





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


900 feet


jacksonensis
am ericanus


Dentalina cocoaensis


cocoaensis C
jacksonensis


Hemicristellaria fragar

Nodosaria jacksonensis
Robulus alato-limbatus
Siphoning jacksonensis
Uvigerina cocoaensis C


Cushman
(Cushman)


(Cushman)


, variety


:ushman
(Cushman


ic


antiques


Applin)


t (GUimbel), variety t
(
Cushman and Applin


(GUmbel)
Cushman
2ushman


gardnerae Cushman


(Cushman
Applin)


texasensis
Cushman and Applin)


Applin


1000 feet


Anomalina
Bulimina


bilateralis
acksonensis


Cushman
Cushman


Eponides cocoaensis Cushman


Nodosaria


jacksonensis


Cushman


Planulina cocoaensis Cushman


1050


Robulus


gutticostat us


(GUlmbel),


Applin


variety


cocoaensis


(Cushman)


Cancris


brongniartii


(d'Orbigny)


Chilostomella cylindroides


Reuss


1150 feet
Anomalina bilateralis Cushman
Bulimina pyrula d'Orbigny
Cassidulina globosa Hantken


Cibicides lobatulus


Eponides


Gyroidina
Nonionella


(Walker and Jacob)


cocoaensis Cushman


umbonata


(Reuss)


(Reuss)


jacksonensis Cushman


Planulina cocoaensis Cushman


jacksonensis Cushman


Siphoning


Uvigerina cookei


Cushman


Valvulina advena Cushman
1370 feet
Eponides cocoaensis Cushman
Gyroidina giraradana (Reuss)
Planulina cocoaensis Cushman


Siphoning
Uvigerina


and Applin


Applin


Cushman
Cushman


MARY'S


RIVER


OIL


CORPORATION


HILLIARD


TURPENTINE


COMPANY NO.


(W-336)


The St.
Comnanv i


Mary's


Sno. 1


River Oil


(W-RRfil *


Corporation, Hilliard Turpentine


i In loated about 4 miles northwest


Bulimina
Cibicides


Eponides


giraradana


jacksonensis Cushman and


cocoaensis
gardnerae


k




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


over a


period of several


had reached


had


reached


a depth


depth


years. t5
4762 feet.


4817


August 25,


January


feet


which


1939


the well


1940 the


point


well
was


abandoned.


The log and


samples from this well were received


by the Florida Geological Survey through


the courtesy


of Mr


Eugene Brown,


President of


Mary's


River Oil


Cor-


portion.


Many of the samples were taken at 5 foot intervals.


The


well


was drilled


with standard


tools


and


except for one


or two


interval


the samples were


very satisfactory.


PREVIOUS


STUDIES


ON


THE


HILLIARD


TURPENTINE


COMPANY


WELL


The first published record on


this well


was a


short article


by Campbell,"


formations


which


were


gave


encountered


depths


and


which


discussed


certain


occurrence


and
feet.
that


age


a black


Mrs.


the drill


shale


which


drill


penetrated


4635


Applin who made the determinations reported


encountered Miocene at a depth


30 feet,


the


Ocala limestone


500 feet


Upper


Cretaceous


2985


, and


top


Tuscaloosa


formation


4547


feet.


At 4635 feet a black shale was


the


hole


article


4762


Campbell


Mississippian
nooga shale.


feet


was


suggested


age


still
that


because


penetrated and


the


unit.


this


black


bottom


this


shale


similarity to


brief


might


Chatta-


tailed


another
account


brief


article


section


Campbell


which


the


presented


well


a more


penetrated


and


listed a few Foraminifera


The


table


on page


which Mrs.
summarizes


Applin had identified.


depths,


formations


encountered,


and


fossils.


Schuchert 1o


devote


several


pages


a discussion


this


well


, particularly


with


reference


the


age


material


which
shale.


Campbell


The


tentatively


reader


correlated


is referred


with


the


Schuchert's


Chattanooga


excellent


dis-





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


DEPTH
IN
FEET
40


FORMATIONS


Choctawhatchee


(upper


Miocene)


Elphidiumn


Rotalia


soniana;
primitiva


FOSSILS


gunteri,


var.


beccarii,


Bolivina
Nonion


var.


pulchell


incert-
parkin-
x. var.


depressu-


400-500


2215


2985


3280


3748


4547


4640


Tampa


Ocala


Middle Eocene

Wilcox-Midway


Upper Cretaceous


Selma


Eutaw


Tuscaloosa


Chattanooga
(Lower Mississippian)


Dictyoconus gunteri zone

Borolis zone

Lepidorbitoides sp.
Camerina cf. C. dickersoni
Inoceramus prisms
|


Amphissites sp.*


* Identified


R. S. Bassler.


was


made


part


upon


the


identification


Bassler


an ostracod


referred


Bassler


the


genus


Amphissites


(ran
men


ge=
was


Devonian


lost


Permian)


Unfortunately


this


speci-


or misplaced.


Stephenson submitted


material


in his


possession


Bassler


after


original


specimen


had


been


lost.


this


second lot of material from 4640 to 4660 feet


Bassler thought


that he


recognized


a second


specimen


referrable


Amphis-


sites


although


state


preservation


was


not


very


good.


Stephenson


in writing


Schuchert


concerning


this


states that he would never have recognized it as an
but that he does not think that he is in a position t<


specimen
ostracod,
) question


umn;




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


an ostracod


in its


general


outline.


This conclusion


was


sup-


ported


by finding several small round


to elongate concretion-


ary


masses


the


sample


sent


writer


Florida


Geological


Survey.


. Raymond


Moore


during


short


visit


with


writer


kindly


well.


examined
He agreed


some
with


the


samples


writer that


section


material


as could be observed was unfossiliferous.


study the writer examined hundreds


the detailed


shale fragments from


this section of the well but was not able to detect any fossils.


The


most


recent


mention


this


well


was


Munyan.11


The
that


only


section


"several


discus


investigators"


is the


chose


Tuscaloosa.


states


Tuscaloosa


at the depth of


top


the


4260 feet


Tuscaloosa


, although Mrs.


was


Applin indicated that


4437'


2 feet


177


feet


below that chosen


by the


"several


investigators."


Munyan'"


indicated


diagrammatic


cross-section


which
phase


illustrates


the


theoretical


Tuscaloosa


marine phase should ocupy a large


relationship


)n-marlne
portion o


phases


marine


that


if the total thick-


ness of the


Tuscaloosa


in this


well.


fact


from


cross-


section one would infer that only a small


basal


portion of the


Tuscaloosa


was


non-marine


this


well.


STRATIGRAPHY


The


formations


encountered


Hilliard


Turpentine


Company


well


(W-336)


with


their


lithologic


characteristics


are shown on figure 3,


page 31.


RECENT


AND


PLEISTOCENE


From


sands.
is fine


The


surface


sand


, subangular


feet


the one sample


and stained


well


penetrated


that covers


a dark


brown


this


surface
interval


color.


11 Mr iv Ian


Arthurr


Subsurface


gitartS raph y


and


Lithologv


- LAA* V a. a -- -- L2, U


n(





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


SATILLA


FORMATION.-Two


samples


were


taken


from


the


10 foot interval


between 30 and


40 feet.


These samples con-


sist
and


light


brown


represent the


, very


fine


grained,


Satilla formation


micaceous


of Pleistocene


sandstone


age.


The


entire


section from


Satilla


the surface


formation


but


seems


feet


might


desirable


included
separate


section


uncemented


sands


from


underlying


more


consolidated


material.


PLIOCENE


CALOOSAHATCHEE


MARL.-At


feet


there


was


found


gray-green,


arenaceous


clay


with


some


shell


fragments


and


Foraminifera.


From


this sample


10 species


Foraminifera


were


identified.


The


most


diagnostic


species


Elphidium


gunteri Cole "1 which


the


writer described and recorded from


several
hatchee


localities


marl


Although


desired


strata


would
which


in the


"Nashua


Florida.
Evidence


seem


from


well


not


the


equivalent


as conclusive
foraminiferal


penetrated


the Caloosa-


as might


evidence


feet


that


should


referred t
formation


Caloosahatchee


has


been


applied


marl


Veatch


The
and


name


Charlton


Stephenson15


sparingly


Marys


fossiliferous


River


north


impure


the


limestone


Hilliard


and


clay


Turpentine


along
Com-


pany


well


well


(W-336)


It


would


entered the same strata


applied,


but


foraminiferal


appear


that


feet


to which the name Charlton


fauna


suggestive


the
was
the


"Na
"Na


shua.
shua'


Inasmuch


as the


"deposits"


placed at present in


which


were


named


the Caloosahatchee marl.10


seems


logical


that


"Charlton


formation


should


classified


also


as Caloosahatchee


and


the


name


"Charlton"


abandoned.


The


samples


between


and


feet


consisted largely


brownish


which


gray,


contained


fine


grained,


loosely


broken shell fraemen


cemented


VI-.


Between


sandstone
85 and 90


_


I





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


feet there occurred rather numerous Foraminifera and Ostra-


coda


, but the Foraminifera observed at this depth represented


the varieties of Rotalia beccarii only.


The C
thickness


"Charlton


over
this


Saloosahatchee


feet.


formation"


feet


well


but


indicate


the


marl
Cooke


probably
lithologic


that


the


in
and


does


;his


well


Mossom 17


not


has


apparent


state


have


characteristics


strata


between


that


a thickness


and


fauna


and


feet


should be included as a unit.

MIOCENE


HAWTHORN


FORMATION.-At 90 feet the


well


penetrated


light greenish gray


fuller's
of the


earth.


This


Hawthorn


greasy
litholoi


formation


clay which has the appearance of


change


had


been


indicated
reached.


that
The


samples


from
feet)


this


100 to 505


feet


consist mainly


interval


were


(no sample


sand


and


limestone


furnished from 105


sandstone.


as is shown


few


on the


205


samples
graphic


log.
Until the sample at 500-505 feet was examined no Foram-


inifera


were


found.


Campbell 18


states


that


"from


400


500 feet


the


without fossils


cuttings


showed


a granular


but tentatively referred


cream-colored


Tampa.


lime
The


samples furnished the writer did not show this limestone,


nor


was


there


any


evidence


that


Tampa


limestone


occurred


this


well.


Even if the samples in


this section


(400 to 500 feet)


were


incorrectly taken,


the


presence


a cream-colored


limestone


would not establish


the existence of Tampa limestone


this


well.


Cooke


component


and
the


Mossom l,
Hawthorn


state


"The


formation


most
white


persistent.
or cream-


colored,
phorite."


sandy


limestone


containing


The section from 90 to


brown


grains


nearly 500 feet i


phos-


assigned


the


Hawthorn formation.


gic




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


Operculinoides


species.


which


detailed


Concentration


study


this


has


sample


proven
which


is a


new


consisted


largely of sand yielded a considerable fauna of small Fora-


minifera.


These specimens were studied in great detail and


then were sent to Cushman so that the writer's


identifications


could


checked


against


the


collections


the


Cushman


Laboratory.
Dr. Cushman not only examined the specimens but in most
cases was able to check them against the types or paratypes.


After this examination


Cushman


wrote


think the ma-


trial is Oligocene."


This opinion exactly coincided with that


of the writer.
The specimens most certainly did not come from a lime-


stone.


The


type


preservation


preserved in a clay material.


indicated


that


they


were


This might be used as evidence


that the entire section from 400 to 500 feet could not have


been limestone,


although


admittedly the


greater


portion


it could have been.
As Foraminifera of definite Oligocene age were found only
in this one sample, the Oligocene section in this well must be


thin.


From the evidence at hand it is not possible to state


the exact point at which the well penetrated the Oligocene.


The


presence


Eponides


manrannensts


would


suggest


that the Oligocene in this well should be correlated with the


Marianna


limestone,


but


again


definite


commitments


should not be made.
UPPER EOCENE
OCALA LIMESTONE.- At 505-508 feet the sample contained
a considerable amount of limestone which has the appearance


of Ocala.


One specimen of Discocyclina (Asterocyclina) was


recovered from this sample.


The sample at 513-515 feet con-


trained a few specimens referred


to Operculinoides


ocalanus


(Cushman)


At 515-517


feet


a specimen


Lepidocyclina


referred to L. (L.) tschoppi Thiadens was found.


However,


large


Foraminifera


other


than


those


mentioned


..--. -- - Y U -- W


notw


not


were





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Hawthorn


There
stone.


formation


is no question


However


and
but


thought


that


this


represent


section


is actually


cavings.


lime-


, it was thought best to record on the graphic


material


which


samples


contained


with


suitable


notes


as to


interpretation


material.


The
860 feet


base of


the Ocala


The Ocala has


this


well


a thickness of


found


355


a depth


feet.


MIDDLE


EOCENE


LISBON


cream


FORMATION.-At


860


colored limestones


feet


middle


typical


Eocene


brown


appear


and
The


sample


860-870


feet


contained


few


poorly


preserved


specimens of


The


first


Coskinolina
Dictyoconus


floridana Cole.


americanus


(Cushman)


were


corded at the depth of 967-980 feet.


From thi


depth to


1350


feet


abundant


large


Foraminifera


were


found.


Many


these


have


been


described


from


other


well


but


some


were


recorded for the first time from the middle Eocene of Florida.


The


interval


from


the


the


middle


Eocene


first
695
No.


pany


appearance


feet


(W-445)


No.


Sholtz


and 107


1 (W-336)


No.


americanus


(W-166),


feet in


710


the Hilliard


The middle Eocene in


(Cushman)


feet


Cory


Turpentine Corn
the Sholtz No.


(W-166)


and the Cedar


Keys No.


2 (W-355)


had a


thickness


about 1820 feet.


Hilliard


Turpentine Company


No.


1 (W-336)


the thicknes


of the middle Eocene is


1355 feet.


Within


middle


Eocene


the


well


under


discussion


several


faunal


zones


were


encountered.


The


occurrence


Coskinolina
(Cushman)


floridana


in the


Cole


uppermost


and


Dictyoconus


portion


amertcanus


same


has


been found in the past in other wells which have been studied


detail.


1245


epidina)


feet


antillea


a few


specimen


Cushman


Lepidocyclina


(formerly


(Poly-


gardn


erae


Dictyoconus


w




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


Calhoun


Gas


and


Company


(W-7)


about


one-half


mile


northwest


Gravell


cyclina


Clarksville


and


Hanna


(Polylepidina)


Calhoun


22 have


zone


County


called


from


Florida.


attention


eastern


Texas


The zone from 1245 feet to 1350 feet in which L.


a Lepido-
c Florida.
.) antillea


Cushman
(W-336)


(Polylepidina)


occurs


Hilliard


eastern


zone


Turpentine


continuation


of Hanna and


Company


No.


Lepidocyclina


Gravell.


At 1065 feet specimens were recovered which


were


identi-


field


Gravell
species
Ponton.


Southern


first
and


as Lepidocyclina


Hanna.


Detailed


same


(Pliolepidina)


States


study


has


(Pliolepidina)


anana


Corporation's


was


well


claibornensis


shown
ariana


described


(W-19)


that
Cole
from


drilled


this
and
the


about


one and


and


one-half


Hanna


Ponton


miles


" report


=L.


north


that


of Monticello,
(Pliolepidina)


claibornensis


Gravell


Florida.
ariana


and


Gravell


Cole


Hanna)


and
was


found about 55 feet above


their


Lepidocyclina (Polylepidina)


zone


in wells


Turpentine


George County,


Company


No.


Mississippi.


(W-336)


the


the


interval


Hilliard
between


these zones is 180 feet.


It might be stated here that L.


(Plio-


lepidina) ariana Cole and Ponton was found at a depth of 995


feet in
As


the Calhoun
the Lepidoci


and


clina


Gas Company's


zone


well


(W-7)


is a well


estab-


lished zone in


the Cook Mountain formation of Texas and the


sbon formation


of Mississippi and Alabama,


logical to


extend thi


unit as a subsurface formation into


Florida.


The


name
below
clina


the


Lisbon


Ocala


used


this


limestone


(Polylepidina)


Dictyoconus


bulletin


and


antillea


cookei


the


zone.


(Moberg)


include


base


would


and


the


section


Lepidocy-


thus


Dictyoconus


include
ameri-


canus


Florida


(Cushman)
Geological


zones


defined


Bulletin


Survey.


At the


present time


is not


possible


give


the


correla-


tion


the


section


between


the


top


the


Salt


Mountain


(Lepidocyclina)


(Polylepidina)


*





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


idocyclina (Polylepidina) antillea zone.


435 feel
lowest
Wilcox


(between 1350 and. 1785 feet)


portion
which


.he Claiborne
unassigned.


group


There is, thus, some
which represent the


and


uppermost


Pseudophragmina


advena


(Cushman) is known to occur below the Lepidocyclina (Poly-


lepidina)


antillea


zone


Alabama.


may


that


Pseudophragmina hannai zone of this well is the approximate
equivalent of the Pseudophragmina advena zone.


SALT MOUNTAIN LIMESTONE.--At 1785 feet a dense,


white


limestone


with


scattered


grains


glauconite


was


encoun-


tered.


The


upper


portion


this


limestone


had


abundant


specimens
(Vaughan)


Pseudophragmina


(Athecocyclina)


cookei


The lithologic characteristics and the fauna is


indicative of the Salt Mountain limestone.
As far as could be determined the base of the Salt Moun-


tain limestone occurred at 1910 feet.


The thickness of the


Salt Mountain limestone in this well is 125 feet.


The Gran-


berry


well


(W-285)


had


thickness


194


feet


Salt


Mountain limestone.


It is entirely possible that the base of


the Salt Mountain limestone is lower in the Hilliard Turpen-


tine Company well (W-336)


. If the zone of lignitic fragments


in the limestone is disregarded, the base of the Salt Mountain
limestone could be placed at 2025 which would give a thick-


ness of 240 feet.


More wells will have to be studied in this


area before the actual thickness can be determined.
Except for the upper portion which contained the Disco-
cyclinidae the remainder of the Salt Mountain limestone in
this area does not contain recognizable fossils.
ACKERMAN FORMATION.-Below the base of the Salt Moun-
tain limestone in this well there is a section of unfossiliferous


limestone.


From its position below the Salt Mountain lime-


stone and above the lower Eocene which is considered to be the
stratigraphic equivalent of the Midway, this limestone section


et ntatively


referred


A eklrrmnn


- - - - W a- a a a a a aaa L


formation




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


was reached at a depth of 2215 feet.


These limestones are


cream to tan colored, hard limestones which contain Borelis
gunteri Cole and Borelis floridanus Cole in their upper por-


tion.


Small


Foraminifera


associated


with


Borelis,


but are


badly preserved.


The lower portion


of these


lime-


stones are unfossiliferous or sparingly fossiliferous.
The term Cedar Keys formation is designed to cover the
rocks encountered in wells in peninsular and northern Florida
from the first appearance of the Borelis fauna to the top of


the


Upper


Cretaceous.


The


Cedar


Keys


formation


questionably


stratigraphic


equivalent


Midway


formation of the Gulf Coast area.


This unit is not known


to outcrop, and the Florida Geological Survey has hesitated


name


these


rocks


until


their stratigraphic


position


was


known fairly accurately.


Inasmuch
fauna and ab


as these rocks lie below a definite Salt Mountain


love


rocks of proven Upper Cretaceous age,


would appear that their stratigraphic position was established


with a fair degree of accuracy.


The Cedar Keys formation


is a
been


widely


studied


distributed subsurface


some


detail


unit


four


Florida.


wells


the


has


writer,


namely, the Cory No.
the Cedar Keys No.


1 (W-445)


(W-355)


the Sholtz No. 1


(W-166)


and the Hilliard Turpentine


Company No. 1


(W-336).


The Cedar Keys formation has a thickness of 570 feet in


the


Hilliard


Turpentine


Company


No.


(W-336)


and


thickness of 566 feet in the Cedar Keys No. 2 (W-355)


thickness of this unit cannot


be determined


exactly in


The
the


Cory


No.


(W-445)


because


paleontological


evidence


was not sufficient to determine the exact point at which this


well


entered


the


Upper Cretaceous.


However,


available


formation indicates that the Cedar


Keys formation is con-


siderably thicker in that portion of the State of Florida.

TTPPFER CIRI.Tr AP .TT





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


section


obtained


illustrated


(figs.


, pl.


21).
The


fauna


Cretaceous


obtained


and is similar to


2985-3000


feet


definitely


that reported from


many


Upper
locali-


ties
feet


Cuba.


and


2985


no recogni


feet


exact


able


fossils


age


occur


this


between


interval


2785


must


questioned,


Cretaceous


genus


related


but the


type


writer


although


believes that


probably


This


Pseudorbitoides.


small


orbitoid


represents


opinion


new


is based


the


character


embryonic


apparatus


which


was


indis-


tinctly seen in the preparation of


one horizontal


section.


SELMA


CHALK.-The first small


Foraminifera


type


recorded from the Selma chalk


on the outcrop appear at 3110


feet.


about


this


depth


limestone


becomes


chalky


nature


and numerous Ino


ceramus


prisms


found.


Although


referred


entire


Selma


section


chalk


from


2985


bulletin


3440
may


feet


that


upper


portion


which


contains


orbitoids


represents


new formation


which


does not appear on


the outcrop.


The


base of the Selma chalk was placed


where


the chalky


limestones


changed


dark


, green


h-gray


, calcareous


shale.


EUTAW FORMATION.-The top of the Eutaw was chosen at


3440 feet


, at which


point the samples changed from a chalky


limestone


signed


a dark


Eutaw


, greenish


this


gray


well


shale.


consists


The


largely


section


a shale,


a cons


iderable portion of which has a greenish


color.


As far


as could


be determined


only


one


sample


contained


Foraminifera.


At 4220-4222 feet there were found specimens


which


were


identified


Globigerina


cretacea


d'Orbigny


Globotruncana
identical forms


well
the


No. 1
portion


arca
were


(W-285)
of the v


(Cushman)


reported


26 taken


yell assigned


and


from


Giimbelina


a core


a depth


in the


3291-3294


These


Granberry


feet


the Eutaw.


Iw





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


Keys No.


(W-355)


the thickness of the


Eutaw was 573


feet.
Several samples within the section assigned to the Eutaw


were lignitic.


Mrs. Applin has placed the top of the Eutaw


at 3748 feet, apparently basing her opinion on the occurrence


of lignite in the sample at this depth.


However, lignite was


found above this depth and the most marked lithologic change
occurred at 3440 feet at which point the writer believes the
well entered the Eutaw.


TUSCALOOSA FORMATION.-The top of the Tuscaloosa


was


encountered at a depth


4260 feet.


Campbell states that


Mrs.


Applin


determined the


top


Tuscaloosa at


4547


feet or 287


feet lower than the point chosen by the writer.


The bottom of the Tuscaloosa was determined to be 4640 feet.
The thickness of the Tuscaloosa is 380 feet.
The lithologic characteristics of the Tuscaloosa are shown


on the graphic log


(fig. 3)


Red, yellow and mottled shales


appear only in the lower 45 feet.


The


samples


were


unfossiliferous


through


this


section


except
shark's


sample


teeth.


figures 1,


The


plate 3.


best


4369-4389


preserved


Dr. John


feet


tooth
Wells


which


contained


illustrated


examined


these


teeth and wrote the following note concerning them:
"The specimens of shark's teeth from a depth of 4369-4385


feet are Odontaspis elegans


(Agassiz)


1843,


(plate 3, figures


They


small


but


typical


this


species


which


occurs in the Coastal Plain region in beds from


taceous through the Miocene.


Upper Cre-


It has been reported from the


Upper


Cretaceous,


Matawan,


and


Monmouth formations


New


Jersey, and I have specimens from the Taylor marl of


Travis county,


Texas."


TRIASSIC ?
At 4640 feet there was found a dark gray, hard shale in
which the writer could not find any fossils although virtually









" NO pfllftl
L q(#t a..-', n'ec'tes 5

- re~r.C'ttS
8rO.IIA.#'Gy
No .c'yp't








cera, ffleetr








Gr'. 0'r d ef etrtefltfl



fIt* AFced





wA., C rete



S-ff S
We V, &&ege 'se~feg


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'rppreigs *:9 'lte cry tff
/

-- g raf f re .t .
Defl* Spret.ffl' f

- orf., Stfe crys 7 "r
- ,.o'.~
- ... cU


Cf.ea-Ct.f'GL. fl# tes


- R@c* ..PAj~tP e,,P le*s
ft9^ vfwv '^r rr lp i^'l

- / /
*
- Cnr....tt*eE
9


~ ff^W, Y tff^.e CW
- A.te. pe .9
- C'ns.. ePf)


e/
l
/
-" Cfo.S tj'5titi


C-setever't-,


SC' c.I eOt rrlte



















$? M, Cff't Ffc




AM ##**f feetv
- erSe* q evre s *











'ugs a d.
- Srewa* cryl'e* '







" Cre-rf.f-r- *






- Sr.r, ,'l '










C'M* ce o :*,' e* -. Cf t
' f J
plpr~ krj












' C'II ftLI -^ ''

-Irb Jl^r fIf
C rr f ^^f^* '-


C0.Aretl 9,sjr
^ Dee'. 'e*1t

- Tfn. ESnE. atC


- 7.a, *e t. r-flV't.'



/ ff^t^fm^f~ff


-- -


- -


- .-
- -



--*-
- -




- -.


- 7e. r f9f-' e/*. #y9e'rf






Sfree ffforeah pags











- Ccrei,







1 il7, COfey *vf




SC.Oe',i*.c *a "f*


t e rrrt''





talrl tl



Gevy. --ry 'tc


- Cc,


w4rr-


LEGEN


m

.. .
. *il


0 SO


UL4lll lil L .
ceTtCAL SC


- CenaesA*(tr,, Atet


dl~,
spy





'p ar.
-~ ser
: E* I'l r War"






** I*'P
f. Bee ,,.



.7 O. n. cefltres*e *F
fr~

- Dr, irrnr


Figure 3.


Log of St. Mary's


River Oil


Corporation,


Hilliard


Turpentine Company


No. 1


(W-33(


1500 -


I




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


The igneous rock was examined by Dr. J.


Osborn Fuller


at the request of the writer, and his report on this rock is
given in full in Appendix A.
There has been considerable speculation as to the age' of


the rocks from 4640 to 4795 feet.
been summarized under the topic
Hilliard Turpentine Company well


The various opinions have


"Previous Studies on


the


(W-336)" and need not be


repeated here.
It is the opinion of the writer that the section from 4640
to 4795 feet represents a non-marine phase and that the age


of these rocks is Triassic.


The writer believes that they are


equivalent to the Newark series.
Fuller has established that the age of the diabase which


intrudes this shale is Newark.


This fact alone does not prove


the age of the shale,


but it is suggestive.


Knopf


has re-


ported on his examination of a piece of this shale to Schu-
chert that lithologically it is distinct and different from the


Chattanooga shale.


Knopf


found


that the shale


from


this


well was composed of kaolin which was deeply stained with


carbonaceous matter,


a fact


which


would suggest that the


shale was non-marine in origin.
Inasmuch as this dark gray shale is overlain by the Tusca-
loosa, it is logical to assume that this area was land during


Jurassic


and


Lower


Cretaceous


time.


Therefore,


only


posits which


were favorably situated could escape removal.


Such is the case of Triassic deposits elsewhere in the eastern
United States which accumulated in basins produced by fault-


ing and because of the conditions so


produced were able to


survive the long period of
of the Cretaceous seas.
As stated previously in


erosion


this


before the encroachment


bulletin no organisms were


found


this


shale,


and


examination


the


specimen


Stephenson's possession did not convince the writer that this


specimen represented an


ostracod.


It may be that Bassler






STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


PALEONTOLOGICAL RECORD


40-45 feet
Angulogerina occidentalis (C
Bolivina striatula Cushman
Buliminella elegantissima (d
Cassidulina crassa d'Orbigny


Cibicides lobatulus
Elphidium gunteri (
Entosolenia lucida


(W-336)


'ushman)


'Orbigny


(Walker and Jacob)
Cole
(Williamson)


Globigerina triloba Reuss


depressulumn


(Linn6)


alker


Jacob),


var. parkinsoniana


var.


(d'Orbigny)


85-90 feet


Rotalia


beccarii


(Linn6)


var.


ornata


Cushman


parkinsoniana


(d'Orbigny)


500-505


feet


Asterigerina cf.
Angulogerina b


tepida Cushman


choctawensis


yramensis


vicksbur
Anomnalina bilateralis


Cushman


(Cushman)
ris Cushman


and McGlamery


Cushman


fastigia Cushman


Cassidulina laevigata d'Orbigny


lobatulus
mississipp


(Walker and Jacob)
iensis (Cushman)


pseudoungerianus
Discorbis sp.


Entosolenia laevigata


byramensis


mariannensis


gibba d'Orbigny,


Guttulina irregularis
Gyroidina sp.


Lingulina mesonensis C
Nonion brown Cole. n.


(Cushman)


(Reuss)
(Cushman)


(Cushman)


var.


'Orbigny)

,ole


globosa


Miinster)


. sp.


var.


(Fornasini)


Spirillina limbata H. :
Textularia subhauerii


tumidulumt


505-508


feet


Discocyclina
Gypsina gloi


t. Brady,
Cushman


var. bipunctata


Cushman


ushman


(Asterocyclina)
ula (Reuss)


nassauensis Cole, n


513-515


feet


Operculinoides


ocalanus


(Cushman)


-517 feet


T7 oo'aidnron'. Mnn7


/ T.OJaaflfl4Ifl7A~Wfl


)*o nli^ntnin mliiorlnn


Nonion


Rotalia beccarii


matagordanum
Kornfeld


Bolivina


Gibicides


Eponides


Globulina


Operculinoides nassauensis Cole, n
Sigmomorphina semitecta (Reuss
Siphonina advena Cushman
Siphonina nassauensis Cole, n. sp.


terquemiana


(<


b





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


-585


feet


Pseudophragmnina
640-645 feet


(Proporocyclina)


Heterostegina ocalana Cushman
720-730 feet


Discocyclina
860-870 feet


Coskinolina


(Asterocyclina)


floridana


georgiana


(Cushman)


(Cushman)


Cole


940-950 feet
Discorbis inornatus Cole


967-980


Dictyoconus amnericanus
1005-1025 feet


Fabularia sp.


(Cushman)


F. vaughani Cole and Ponton


Gyroidina nassauensis Cole, n. sp.
Lepidocyclina (Pliolepidina) cedarkeysensis Cole
Pseudorbitolina cubensis Cushman and Bermudez


-1070


feet


Lepidocyclina


1095-1100


Lepidocyclina


(Pliolepidina)


(Pliolepidina)


ariana Co


peruvzana
pustulosa


and Ponton


Cushman


Douvill6)


2r. douvillei Lisson


1140-1145


feet


guayabalensis Barker


Operculinoides jennyi Barker


1198-1200


Disco


cyclita


(Asterocyclina)


monti


cellensis Cole and Ponton


1245-1250 fe


Lepidocyclina


(Polylepidina)


antillea


Cushman


1285-1295


feet


Amphistegina
1300-1305 feet


Eponides


lopeztrigoi


gunteri


Palmer


Cole


1480-1490 feet


Asterigerina texana
Operculinoides grave
1680-1690 feet


Pseudophragmina


(Stadnichenko)
lli Cole, n. sp.


(Proporocyclina)


hannai


e, n. sp.


1785-1790 feet


Pseudophragnmina


(Proporo


cyclina)


(A thecocyclina)


cedarkeysensis


(Vaughan)


n. sp.


1808-1812


Discocyclina (Discocyclina)
2245-2260 feet
Borelis floridanus Cole
gunteri Cole
2790-3000 feet


Pseudorbitoides


blanpiedi Vaughan


2985-3000 feet


flintensis


Camerina


cookei




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES


3288-3295 feet
Anomalina sp.
Arenobulimina americana
Bolivina incrassata Reuss


Bolivinoides decorate
Bulimincdla carseyae ]
Gyroidina alabamensis
370-3380 feet


Anomalina sholtzens


S


OF WELLS


Cushman


(Jones)
summerr
Sandidge

Cole


4220-4222


feet


Globigerina cretacea d'Orbigny


(Cushman)


4369-4385


feet


Shark's


teeth-Odontaspis


elegans


(Agassiz


DESCRIPTION


OF


SPECIES


FAMILY VALVULINIDAE


Subfamily


EGGERELLINAE


Genus


PSEUDORBITOLINA


Douvill6


, 1910


PSEUDOBBITOLINA


CUBENSIS


Cusmlnan and Bermudez


Plate


, Figure


Plate 8


, Figures


Plate 13


, Figures 1


1936.


1941.


Pseudorbitolina cubensis Cushman and Bermudez,


man Lab. Foram.


Res.,


vol. 12


Pseudorbitolina cubensis Cush


Geol.


Survey Bull.


, pp.


Pseudorbitolina cubensis


Geol.


Survey


Bull.


, pp.


, p. 59, pi. 10, figs. 2
man and Bermudez.


, figs.


Contrib.


Cush-


7-30


Cole


Florida


5-11.


Cushman and Bermudez.


Florida


, fig.


One


horizontal


and


three


vertical


sections


specimens


referred to this species are figured for future reference.


The


writer


has made recently thin


sections of


similar forms from


Bartholomew and Cuba.


The Cuban material wa


sent by


Pedro


Bermudez.


Cole


and


Bermudez


intend


study


these forms intensively in the near future.


The following notes were made on


the Florida specimens


Test dome-shaped,


those of nearly
umbilical area


conical
on the


varying from


shape,
ventral


often
side.


broad
with a
Some


flattened forms


L deeply


excavated
specimens


found


United


Brotherhood


Carpenters


and


Joiners


Ur ar i a* 1 on~ 1 1


Globotruncana arca
Gilmbelina sp.


I


L


1


1 _


*m j *I





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


In others the umbilical area is open as if the plate had been


broken.


The following are the dimensions of the specimens


which were sectioned


Specimen
number


Height


Diameter


at base


mm.


1.2
1.26


2.16
2.3


mm.


Height of
umbilicus
0.94 mm.


Diameter of umbilicus
at base


1.6 mm.


0.66
1.1


Surface


uneroded


specimens


unornamented,


but


the


larger individuals show concentric growth lines or sutures by


slight crenulations of the surface of the test.


Vertical sec-


tions show that


test


is composed


a single


layer


chamberlets arranged on top of each other with the long axis
of the chambers parallel to each other and to the base of the


test.


The arrangement and structure of these chambers is


similar to those of the marginal trough of Dictyoconus.


The


floor


each


chamberlet


is nearly straight


or very


gently


curved from the periphery of the test until it nears the um-


biblical area


where


it recurves abruptly toward


the apex


the test.


The recurved portion is thickened so that the ends


have a knob-like appearance.
chamber does not touch the


In many cases the floor of one
floor of the chamber above so


that an opening is left into the umbilicus.


On the peripheral


side of the chamberlet there is one short lamella which pro-


jects


into


the chamber.


The


height


of the


chamberlets


variable from 40 to 140 x.


Horizontal


sections


suggest


the


outer


chamberlets


Dictyoconus, but the central area is open as the test is com-


posed
walls


only


project


outer


radially


chambers.


inward


from


The
the


main


chamberlet


periphery


the


central


umbilical area.


Irito each chamberlet from the peri-


phery of the test there projects one or three vertical plates.
When three occur the outer ones are shorter than the central
plate.


First appearance:


At depth of 1005-1025 feet in W-336.


-- - ft




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


1942.


*Dictyoconus americanus


Bull.


1-5; pl.


, pp. 21-24
16, figs. 14


, pl.
, 15.


(Cushman).


, figs.


, 13;


Cole,


Florida Gcol.


figs.


(references and synonomy)


survey
, figs.


Typical


specimens


this


species


were


encountered


first


at 967-980 feet in


W-336.


At 1255-1260 feet other specimens


species


were


found.


These


specimens


similar


those


recovered


967-980


feet.


The number of short lamellae that project inward between


peripheral


platforms


in certain


these


specimens


, fig.


have


is 4 rather than 3


chamberlets


with


, although the same


3 lamellae


next


specimen may


chamberlets


with


Specimens


assigned


species


in previous


studies


had typically 3 lamellae.


Vaughan


in discussing the struc-


ture of D.


amerwcanus


(referred to a


codon)


has observed


that


a single


specimen


may


have


one


two


three


or four


short lamellae as shown


by the following


the right-hand side of plate 43,


each space i


figure


small, only one, two, or three;


quotation


the number in


but on the left-hand


of the


same


figure


they


are more


numerous,


four


being


common


therefore


more crowded.


First appearance


At a


depth


967-980


feet


W-336.


Occurrence


Middle


Eocene


Lisbon


formation.


Family


NONIONIDAE


Genus NONION Montfort, 180
ONION BROWN Cole, n. sp.


Plate


, Figure


Test


planispiral,


close-coiled


, circular


side


view


, pen-


phery rounded


chambers distinct


9 to


10 in


last formed


coil


, increasing


regularly


size


as added


sutures


distinct


limbate,
slightly
length,


earlier


ones


depressed,


flush


straight


then slightly and


with


surface


approximately


evenly recurved


later
half


ones
their


umbilicus distinct


open,


or with


a small knob of


clear shell material surrounded


by a narrow depressed area between it and the proximal ends




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


with
walls


the


a thickened


smooth


aperture


margin


, finely


a narrow


clear


perforate


, elongate


shell


apertural


material


face


opening


chamber


flattened


the


base


with


the


apertural


face.


Diameter 0.40 mm.


thicknes


0.16


mm.


Type


locality


Mary's


River


Corporation,


Hilliard


Turpentine


Company


well


No.


(W-336)


at a


depth


500-


505


feet.


Cotypes


(Florida


Geol.


Survey


Cat.


No.


-3004)


Occurrence


Oligocene.


This


species


sely


related


Nonion


chapapotense


Cole


which


was


described


from


Chapapote


formation


(upper
potense


Eocene)


in havin


chambers


not


of Mexico.


fewer


increase


. brown differs from N


chambers


as rapidly


in the


in size


last


coil


chapa-


and


as added.


the
The


proximal ends of the chambers are more pointed in N


brown


than


chapapot


ense.


Thi


species


is named


honor


Eugene


Brown


who


furnished the


samples and log of this well


Family CAMERINIDAE
Subfamily CAMERININAE


Genus


MISCELLANEA


Pfender


, 1934


MISCELLANEA DICKERSONI


K. Palmer)


Plate


, Figures


8-11


1934.


Cam erina


Mem.,


vol. 8


dickersoni


Palmer,


Soc.


, figs.


Cubana


Hist.


Nat.


1934.


1937


Camnerina


Can erina


cubensis


veC irmunti


figs.


D. K


.Palmer,


Thiadens,
; text figs.


idem


Jour.


, figs.


vol. 11


No. 2


1937.


Cam erina


tensch.


dickersoni


Amsterdam


Palmer.


Verh.,


Voorwijk,
191. 192. 1


Akad.


We-


11-16


1939.


pi. 3, figs.
Camerina


Museum,


1942.


Jour. Pal


vol. 86


Palmer.


No. 3052,


cal enula


vol. 16


Cole


(not


Barker,


pl. 20, fig. 3
Cushman a


No. 5,


92, figs.


Proc.


Nat.


21, fig. 1
Jarvis).
6-10.


2.
Cole,


B T'


dickersoni


Miscellanea


J J ^ *





__


~




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Cole suggested that the dickersoni group of


species might


combined


with


Operculina


catenula


Cushman


and


Jarvis.


However
holotype
personal


Waylan


Operculina


communication


Vaughan has recently


catenula


dated


Cushman
October


and


examined


Jarvis.


1943


has


stated


that


Miscellanea


this


specimen


seems


but that Camerina


belong


genus
differ-


ent and


should not be placed in


synonymy


of that


species.


also


examined


same


time


Mexican


specimen


assigned


Barker to


catenula and


is of


opinion


that


they


represent


a species


distinct


from


catenula.


The


illustrations show the


internal


features


which


small


-shaped groove of the spiral suture is a


very


distinct-


feature.


presence of two


periphery


Externally


rows of


test


a distinctive
osely packed


fringed


characteristic


plates which


appearance.


give


Between


rows of
encircle


plates


there


a shallow


-shaped


depression


which


test.


First appearance


At a depth


of 2975-2985 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence
Occurrence


Upper


sewhere


Cretaceous.


This


species


is widely


distributed


beds of Upper Cretaceous


age


in the Caribbean


area


as it


has


been reported from Mexico


Genus


Plate


CAMERINA


CAMERINA
, Figure 4


and Cuba.


Brugibre,


GUAYABALENSIS Barker


Plate 5


, Figure


Plate


Figures 2,


Plate 17


, Figures 4,


1939.


Camerina


guayabalensis


Barker,


Proc.


U. S.


Nat.


Museum,


1940.


86, No. 3052, p. 325, pi. 13, fig. 4; pi. 18
Camerina mississippiensis Gravell and


No. 5,


, figs.


7-11.


, fig. 4; pl. 22, fig. 3.
Hanna, Jour. Pal.,


0ol. 14,


The


only


distinction


that


can


observed


between


specimens


described


as C


. guayabalen


Barker


from


Guayabal formation of Mexico and those described by Gravell


? dickersoni Palmer is


--- -- a 1 1 n a


N rr


*


I




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


slight suggestion of a flange or keel."


Inasmuch as the other


features


should


re identical
combined.


would


seem


that


these


two


species


Numerous


small


specimens


Camerina


were


found


Hilliard


above


Turpentine


Lepidocyclina


Company


well


(Polylepidina)


No.


(W-336)


antillea


zone


just


which


pos


sess


most of


features


guayabaZensis.


However


specimens


possess only


whorls.


recovered


whorl


If the structure


were


apparently


whereas


, arrangement,


incomplete


has


and number of


as they


41/


cham-


bers


first


mtsssstpt ensts


3


volutions


compared


either


with


the


guayabalensis


Florida


specimens,


found


that


they


entirely


similar.


Therefore


these


specimens


referred


this


species


not


only


because


their


similarity,


but


also


because


they


occur


same


stratigraphic relationship


to mississippiensis.


The


internal


features


these


specimens


compared


Table


First appearance


At a depth


of 1140-1145


feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Middle Eocene


Lisbon


formation.


Genus OPERCULINOIDES Hanzawa


, 1935


OPERCU.INOIDES ANTIGUENSIS


Vaughan


Cole


Plate 6


, Figures 13,


1936.
1937.
1937.
1939.


1941.


Operculinoides c
Museum, vol. 83
Camerina sp. B.


fig. 3;
Operc


mntiguensis


Vaughan


, No. 2996, pp. 492, 41
Thiadens, Jour. Pal.,


3, pl
vol.


Cole,


Proc.


. 38, figs.
11, No. 2


text-figs. 3 B, D.
ulinoides howei Gravell and Hanna, Jour. Pal.,


6, pp. 523, 524
Operculinoides
U. S. Nat. Mi


, pl. 61,


figs.


antiguensis


iseum,


16, fig. 3; pl.


Operculinoides
Cole, Geol. Soc.


vol. 86,
17, fig.


antiguensis
Amer. So.


Vaughan


3052


Vaughan


Paper


and
figs.
and


No. 30,


Cole.


Cole.


7-10.


Nat.


p. 95, pl.


vol. 11


Barker,
4, pl. 1


Vaughan


Proc.
figs.
and


Gravell


and


thinner than


Hanna
antigu


state
ensis.


that


Vaughan


howei


and


is smaller


Cole


the


and
type


1 * I. A a *S -^ fl -


guayabalensis


3





TABLE 1


Measurements


of Camerina


guayabalensis and Camerina mississippiensis


SPECIMEN


Length ..................


W idth ...................


Thickness ..........


Number of
whorls .............


Number of cham-
bers in the final'
whorl -..............


Internal diameter
of the initial


- chamber


W-336 at


1.9 mm.


1.6 mm.


2


2.0 mm.


1.9 mm.


50 n


a depth


2.5 mm.


1.3 mm.


of 1210-1215'


2.3 mm.


1.0 mm.


2.0 mm.


0.86 mm.


.... . . . . .- .-- -


Camerina
guayabalensis
Barker
(after Barker)


average =
2.8 mm.


0.85-0.95 mm.


24-27


m.5
mis
Grav
.after G]


Dia.


Up


I~


42-5


60 p






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY--BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


mm.
mensi
called


would


appear


specimens


that


there


assigned


no difference
antiguensis


the


and


those


howei.


The


Quincy


gucnsts.


external


well


appearance


(W-4)


single


vertical


specimens


same


and


one


as that


horizontal


from


the


typical
section


City
anti-
were


made.


The measurements of these two sections are given


Length ...................................................
Width ......................................................

Thickness .................... ...........................

N um ber of coils ..................................
Number of chambers in the final
evolution ..............................................


Internal
chamber


diameter


of the


initial


mm.


mm.


150 $


mm.


2.08


mm.


. .3 . . .


26

180 u


Although


the thickness is


slightly more


than


typical


anti-


guensis,


would


seem


that


these


specimens


should


ferred


that species.


specimens studied


It should


, but not sectioned


noted
there


that
were


the


some


whose


thickness was


over


mm.


description


howei


Gravell


and


Hanna


note


that the wall


coalesces on


to form a cone of


solid


both sides over the initial


shell material.


This


feature


chamber
is found


the specimens


under discussion


and


the


type figures


antiguensis have the same feature.


First appearance


At a depth


of 615 feet in


Occurrence


Marianna limestone.


The


occurrence


antiguensis


which


has


been


consid-


ered a middle Oligocene species in association with O.


dius and


mantelli


was


considerable


surprise.


(See


notes


under L.


parvula.





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


City


Quincy


well


given


following


table:


Length ...................... .

W idth ..............................

Thickness ......................

Number of coils ........
Number of chambers
in the final evolution


Internal


diameter


initial


chamber.


2.4 mm.

2.1 mm


4%

24


1.6 mm.


1.4 mm.


1.9 mm.


0.44 mm.


.2 mm.


0.36 mm.


1.4 mm.

.. -. a. . .. a. a.


0.32 mm.


30 u


This species is very


closely related to O.


forresti Vaughan


and


Cole.:':'


The


of the sutures.


most striking


The sutures of


difference


is in


curvature
periphery


strongly


and


sharply


recurved.


The


sutures


dius


are also strongly recurved near the


periphery


but


the degree


of backward


curvature


is not as strong as


in the type


figure


ences


forresti.
between


However


these


two


it is to
species


be admitted


that the differ-


slight.


First


appearance


At a


depth


615


feet


Occurrence


Marianna limestone.


OPERCULINOIDES


PLORIDENSISB


(Hellprin)


Plate 1


, Figures 11,


Plate 5


, Figures 7-9,


1885.


1921.
1941.


Nummulites


delphia, pp.
Operculina
Prof. Paper


floridensis


321-322, t
floridentis


Hellprin,


;ext fig.
(Heilprin)


128-E, p. 130,


Operculinoides floridennss


Bull.


30, 31,


pl. 20, fig.
(Heilprin).


9, fig. 8; p


Proc.


Nat.


Cushman


Acad.


Geol.


12.
Cole, Florida Geol.


10, figs.


Phila-


Survey
Survey


This species is characterized by raised sutures,


pressed,


and a com-


fragile test with about 30 chambers in the last volu-


tion.


The


specimens


from


Hilliard


Turpentine


Company


well No.


1 have 2 /'A


volutions with about 27


chambers


--- -


forresti near the


o. ... ... .. .D .~ . .







FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


from


United


Brotherhood


Carpenters


and


Joiners


America


Power


House well No.


-448).


First appearance


Occurrence


Ocala


At a depth
limestone.


of 560-565 feet in


W-336.


OPEROCULINOIDES GRAVEL-I COle, n. ap.


Plate


, Figure 3


Plate 5


, Figure


Plate


Figure


Test


small


, fragile,


compressed


thin


and


involute.


Sur-


face
show


without


traces


ornamentation


sutures


, smooth


near


weathered


periphery


The


specimens


average


thickness is about 0.5 mm.


The


septa


thin


, straight,


and


radial


about


three-


fourths


their


length,


then


rather


strongly


recurved.


Measurements


four


median


sections


are


given


the


following


table:


Length .... ............................

W idth .......... .... ...................

Number of whorls ......
Number of chambers
in the final whorl ....
Internal diameter of
the initial chamber..


Internal
second


diameters
chamber


1.44 mm.


1.2 mm.


1.24 mm.


1.0 mm.


1%

12


120 p


70x140 p


1.3 mm.


1.08 mm.

2

17

100


70x1


1.56 mm.


1.4 mm.


100 p


70x140 p


Type


locality


Mary's


Turpentine Company well No.


River Oil


1 (W-336)


Corporation,


at a depth


Hilliard
of 1650-


1665 feet.


Cotypes


(Florida


Geol.


Survey Cat.


No.


S.-3003 A)


Occurrence


Middle


Eocene.


F-I ---I p ''-p 'I -*


J *


mr


. I


^ m





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


There


dividuals
represent


illustrated


recovered


gravelli


on plate


, figures


1480-1490 feet
although there


which are
are some


, larger
believed


differences.


These


individuals


were


badly


recrystallized


so that


adequate


preparation


scription


Test thin


were
these


difficult


make.


The


following


a de-


individuals:


, compressed,


fragile without surface ornamenta-


tion.


Length .. ..................................... ...... ..............................
Width
Thickness ......................................................................


Number of
Number of


2.5 mm.
2.4 mm.
0.49 mm.


whorls


chambers in


last whorl


Internal
Internal


diameter


of initial


chamber


diameters of second chamber


* .............. .-.. .. aa..
a a o . a .~ . a **a a a *


80 g
60x100 g


Although


these


specimens


larger


size


than


those


selected for the types of this species,
other features are very similar.


it will be noted that the


First appearance


At a depth


of 1480-1490 feet in


W-336.


OPEROULINOIDEB


JENNYI Barker


Plate


, Figures


Plate


Figures


, 11


Plate


, Figures


1939.


Operculinoides


3052,
19, fig.


jenny Barker,


pp. 315,
7; pl. 2


316, pl.
, fig. 9.


Proc.


, fig.


Nat.
I, fig.


Museum


; pl.


, vol.
7, fig.


Specimens


were


found


Hilliard


Turpentine


Com-


pany well No.


1 (W-336)


which are identical in every respect


with


0. jennyi.
formation


illustrations


This


and


species


(Claiborne


descriptions


was


Eocene)


described


given
from


Barker


Guayabal


of Mexico.


jennyi


closely


related


sabinensis


(Cole.)


median sections of


jennyi and


sabinensis are compared,


discovered


differences


that


. however


they


. ... ...


virtually
transverse


identical.


sections


There


that


- -


I


..


L








TABLE 2


Measurements


Operculinoides


jenny:


Operculinoides


sabinensis


Specimen


Diameter


Thickness


Number of whorls


Number of chambers
in final whorl


Internal
first c


diameter
chamberr


W-336
1210-
1215'


3.1 mm.


1.0 mm.


90 p


I I .--


W-336
1210-
1215'


2.5 mm.


317



17


W-336
1255-
1260'


3.3 mm.


3%2


100 l


W-336
1255-
1260'


.14 mm.


1.0 mm.


80 p


I


Operculinoides
jennyi Barker


(after


Barker)


3.0-4.0 mm.


0.8-1.0 mm.


2.5-3.5


18-28


Operculinoides sabinensis


2.54 mm.


0.6 mm.


160


nmm.


0.64 mm


2.6 mm.


3%


100 p


* Cole,


W. Storrs, Op. cit.


(Bull. 16)


p. 38, pi. 5, figs. 1-7.


1T


3'


80


80 u





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


over the


poles.


Table


2 indicates


similarity


in measure-


ments


between


two


species.


Detailed


study


a large


suite


specimens


may


prove


that O.


jennyi and 0.


sabinensis are one and the same species.


is entirely


probable


that slight differences


in environment


could cause a thicker and heavier test tb develop.


Until such


a study
presses


made
belief


writer


that


retains


two


two


species are


names


but


identical.


First appearance


At a depth of 1140-1145 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Middle


Eocene


Lisbon


formation.


OPEZCUIlNOIDES


NASSAUENSIS


Cole,


n. Up.


Plate 1


, Figure 6


Figure 8


Test
located


Plate 5


Plate 8


small


, Figures 2,


, Figures


involute


embryonic


9-11


thickest


apparatus,


10-1


Plate


through t
thickened


Plate 7


, Figures


eccentrically


portion


test surrounded


which


by an


is composed


ornamentation
shell material.


expanding flange of


a portion


consists


flexuous


uniform


last


septal


The sutures are nearly flush


whorl.


markings


with


thickness
Surface


clear


the surface


the


test


except


in slightly


weathered


specimens


in which


case they may form


prominent ridges at least over a


portion


test.


There


is commonly


an area


clear


shell


ma-


trial


either


as a solid area


, or composed


numerous small


masses at the apex of the thickened


which


the sutures radiate.


portion


of the test


This clear area is flush


also


from
with


surface


were


slightly


diameters


test.


chipped


cannot


Most


on the


given.


outer


The


specimens


edges


largest


so that


specimen


examined
complete
measured


had


a length


smallest


2.2+


specimen


mm.


measured


and


had


a breadth


a length


1.7+
1.5+


mm.;
mm.


and


a breadth


mm.


The


thicknes


test


through


the embryonic apparatus


is 0.5 to 0.8 mm.


The


number


chambers


final


whorl


varies


from


.4 +






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


The initial


chamber is spherical with an internal


diameter


The


second


chamber


partially


embraces


the


initial chamber and has diameters of


40 by


100 to


130 u.


Type locality


Mary's


River Oil


Corporation,


Hilliard


Turpentine


Company


well


No.


(W-336)


depth


500-505


feet.


Cotypes


(Florida


Geol.


Survey Cat.


No.


S-3005)


Occurrence


Oligocene.


The


median


those


sections


erculinoides


this


vaughani


species


resemble


(Cushman)


somewhat
Barker 80


has reported O.


vaughani from the Guayabal formation


(Clai-


borne


vaughani


Eocene)


which


Mexico.
confined


These


the


specimens


upper


Eocene


not


, but


repre-


sent 0.


cushmani


(Cole).


vanghani


much


larger


and


thinner


in proportion


size


than


vaunghani


nassauens s.


The


is quite different from


surface
that of


ornamentation
0. nassauensis.


OPERCULINOIDESB 00AIANUS (Cushman)


Plate


1, Figures 5,
Figures 1, 4-


Plate 2


Plate


, Figure


Plate


, Figures 18,


1921.


Operculina
128-E, p. 1


ocalana


Cushman
, figs. 4,


Geol.


Survey


Prof.


Paper


1941.


Operculinoides ocalanus
Bull. 19, pp. 31, 32, pl.


(Cushman)
0, figs. 4-7


Cole


Florida Geol.


(references


Survey


synonymy)


This


species is characterized by a strongly costate surface,


the rapid increase in height of the chambers in


the final volu-


tion


and


the


relatively


few


number


chambers


in the


final


evolution.


Vaughan and


Cole


have given a detailed


descrip-


tion


this


species


which


reader


referred.


The


internal features of the specimens in this well are summarized


the following table:





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Length


Width

Thickness


Number of whorls
Number of chambers in final
whorl


Internal
chamber


diameter of


initial


2.08 mm.


1.64 mm.


1.8 mm.

1.44 mm.


. . . .a a I ...... . ... .... .. .S


.1 mm.


2.46 mm.


I. .. .. .... .1............... ) *


0.76 mm.


30 ~ I............. ........ O....*............


First appearance


At a depth of 513-515 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Ocala


limestone.


OPEROULI-NOIDEB


VICOKBURGENSIB


Vaughan


Cole


Plate 3


, Figures 7


Plate 6


, Figures 1-5,


,12,


Plate


, Figure


1936.
1939.

1939.


Opercultnoides
Nat. Museum.


vicksburgensis


vol. 83


No. 2996


Operculinoides vicksburgenosts
U. S. Nat. Museum, vol. 86, No.


fig. 2; pi. 19, figs. 8, 9.
Opercultnoides muiri Barker,
20, fig. 1; pi. 22, fig. 1.


Vaughan


, pp.


raughan a


3052


Cole


491, pi. i
Lnd Cole.


, p. 318, pl.


313, pi


Proc.


36, all figs.
Barker,


, fig
. 14


Proc.


6; pl.


, fig.


410 feet in


medium


size


the City


specimens


of Quincy well
Operculinoides


(W-4)
which


there occur


resemble


vicksburgensis


median


section


but


have


the


thickness


through


the center assigned to O.


muiri.


Barker indicated in


description


muiri


that


this


species


related


vicksburgensis.


The chief difference in the two species is the


thickness
thickness


through
through


the


center.
center


Vaughan


and


Cole


vicksburgensis


give


as 0.3


mm


and Barker


states


that


muiri


has


a thickness


to 0.9 mm.


murs


and.


. vicksburgensis


found


in association


the.Alazan formation


of Mexico and in


the Byram marl


Mississippi.


It is doubtful if the thicker specimens should be


0.8 mm.


idem,







FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


(W-4).
Quincy


Measurements


well


(W-4)


and


three
four


specimens
specimens


from
from


the


City


bottom


of Falling


Water Sink


given in


Table 3.


At a


depth


435


feet in


the City


Quincy well


specimens were found which have a smaller number of


cham-


bers


the final


evolution.


Measurements of


three specimens


from this depth are given.


fall


within


the range of


It is probable that these specimens
vicklsburgensis.


Length


Width


Thickness


Number of coils
Number of chambers in the final
evolution


Internal


chamber


diameter


initial


1.88 mm.


0.96 mm.


1.72 mm.


1.56 mm.


1.7 mm.


1.7 mm.


17


60 p


First appearance


At a depth of


410 feet in


Occurrence


Suwannee limestone.


Genus


HETEROSTEGINA


d'Orbigny,


1826


HETEnROTEGINA


Plate


, Figure


OOA.iANA


Plate


Ouahman
, Figure


1921.


Hcterostegina ocalana Cushman,


128-E


, pp. 130,


, figs.


15-18.


Geol.


Survey


Prof.


Paper


1941.


Heterostegina ocalana Cushman.


33, pl.


, figs.


Cole


Florida Geol.


Survey Bull.


Most


specimens


found


were


virtually


devoid


surface ornamentation and resemble the variety


glabra.


Cole


found complete gradation from specimens with raised sutures


chambers


and


chamberlets


those


with


surface


test


smooth


or nearly


so in


the


study


specimens


n .


Na


n. - - U A a- .1 *B a- 1 a .AA aU *aNl iaA I n aA n a .


a


I


T


X


Z.., Y- LI~ I 1.,;L--l





TABLE


Measurements


of Operculinoides


viclcsburgensis


Locality


Length


Width


Thickness


Number of coils


Number of chambers in the final
evolution


Internal


diameter


initial


chamber


410 feet


2.3 mm.


0.86 mm.


2.4 mm.


2.2 mm.


4-


80 p


(W-4)


Floor of Falling


2.7 mm.


1.8 mm.


2.6 mm.


0.7 mm.


80 a


1.9 mm.


0.8 mm.


Wa


2.2 m


2.14 n


80 /







FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


HETEROSTEGI"NA


TEXANA


Gravell


Hanna


Plate 6


Figures


1937


Ilctcrostc!ina texana Gravell and Hanna,


Jour.


vol. 11


1938.

19411.


, pp.


525, 526, pl.


Hctcrostmgina
Survey Bull. 1
IlHterostc:yina


Survey


The


, figs. 1-0.


Gravell


16, pp. 4
d('Xafl(L


Bull.


specimens


from


and I
5, figs.


Gravell an
pl. 10, figs.


City


Ianna.
18-21


Hanna.


Quincy


Cole,


Florida


>1. 6, figs. 1, 2,
Cole. Florida


, figs.
well


Geol.
3-8.
Geool.


(W-4)


identical


with


those from


Port St.


Joe


test


well


-288)


and


from


the Cory well


-445).


First appearance


At a depth


500-505


feet in


Occurrence


Suwannee limestone.


Family ALVEOLINELL
Genus BORELIS Montfort


BORELISI


Plate


JIDAE


1808


GUNTEBI Cole


, Figures


1921.


Alcolinac


Cushman


Florida


Geol.


Survey,


13th


Ann.


port,


1941.


1942.


p. 641


Borcls
figs. 1-4
Borclis


guntcrt
; pl. 18


3, figs.
Cole,


, figs. 5,


guntcrt Cole.


Florida


Cole,


L Geol.
8.


Florida


Survey


Geol.


Bull.


Survey


Bull.


The


well


Bushnell a
preserved
Peninsular
(W-445)
Petroleum


type


specimen


(W-3)


depth


excellently.


and


this


Dundee


2270


This


Refining


depth


species


were


Petroleum


feet.


species


These


was


recovered
Company
specimens


found


Company's


3360-3370


Corporation's Sholtz No.


feet


from
near
were


also


. Cory


, in


(W-166)


No.


Suwannee


at a


depth


2090


-2100


feet


and


Florida


Discovery


Company's


Cedar
these


Keys No.


wells


2 (W-355)


state


at a depth


2051-2073


preservation


feet.


specimens


was


poor


Thi


species


was


encountered


at a


depth


2245-2260


r *


.1~ L .


- -


*- *


r*


t n a


'a. -l -- er Il-Yl *1i -a 5~ 5 la .ai .J-. n- at


. W


^WII *


m


)II UU AU


4




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


are globular


Thus


, the original


definition must


be expanded


include


specimens


this


type.


The


two


specimens


from


the Cory well,


Survey
variety


figures 7


Bulletin l
floridana.


plate


, should be


18 of the


Florida Geological


referred to gunteri


rather than


The


have
160 ,.
with
from


most


large,
initial


striking
globular
chambers


internal


initial


with


characteristic


.chamber.


internal


The


this


type


diameter


Specimens from the Cory well have an initial


an internal


Hilliard


diameter


Turpentine


160


220


Company


The


No.


species


specimens


150


chamber


specimens


have


initial


chambers with internal


diameters of 120 to


180


First appearance


At a depth of


2245-2260 feet


abundant


2280-2290


feet


W-336.


Occurrence


Lower


Eocene


, Cedar


Keys


formation.


BORELIl
Plate


PLORIDANUfS


Cole


, Figures


1941.


Borclis
Bull. 11


guntori Cole,
, p. 35, pi. 18


variety
, flgs. 3,


floridana Cole,
4 (not figs. 7,


Florida


Gecol.


Survey


There


Borelis


small


gunteri


subglobular


specimens


wells examined


associated


to date


which


with
were


considered


number


well


has


shown


a variety o
excellently


that


these


gunteri.
preserved
specimens


Detailed


specimens
represent


examination


from


this


distinct


species.


The


illustrations


show


internal


features


so well


that


additional notes


are not required.


First appearance


At a depth


of 2245-2260 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Lower


Eocene


Cedar


Keys


formation.


Family ROTALIIDAE
Subfamily DISCORBINAE


Genus GYROIDINA


d'Orbigny


I'IvTrnnnTTw A WK A Ua A i W 7T0*la


1826


I1~IA






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


pressed;
inflated,
inflated:


chambers


except


wall


increase


the


covered


regularly


last


by small


size


chambers


as added,


not


which


pustules on the ventral side


except for the final


chamber which may


or may not


be so


covered, on the dorsal side the wall is more or less smooth;


umbilicus


well


developed;


aperture


low


distinct


opening


near


umbilical


end


ventral


border


last


formed chamber.
Diameter 2.1 n
Type locality:


im.


thickness 0.3 mm.


St. Mary's River Oil Corporation, Hilliard


Turpentine Company well No. 1


(W-336)


at a depth of 1005-


1025 feet.


Cotypes:


(Florida Geol.


Survey Cat. No. S-3002)


8 speci-


means.
Occurrence: Middle Eocene, Lisbon formation.


This


species


differs


from


soldanii d'Orbigny,


variety


octocamcrata


Cushman


and


Hanna


ornamentation


which is developed.


G. nassauensis has the chamber walls on


ventral


side


covered


with


rather


strongly


developed


pustules which are a distinctive characteristic.

Subfamily SIPHONININAE
Genus SIPHONINA Reuss, 1850
SIPHONINA NASSA.UENSIS Cole, hn. sp.
Plate 3, Figure 6
Test biconvex, the ventral side slightly more convex than


the dorsal side,


periphery subacute with


a slight keel


com-


posed of alternating, radial, narrow bands of clear and opaque


shell material; about 5 chambers in the final evolution,


those


on the


ventral side showing more distinctly than


those


the dorsal side as the chambers on the dorsal side are covered


a thickened


area


clear shell


material


except for


final two or three chambers; ventrally,


the sutures are dis-


L: ~ l tC1 ; I: nrF n. 4-1. A arHn,.na i-Ir C1 11. AL ar n ..a ad nnn 1 1:




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS

Diameter 0.60 mm.


Type


locality


Mary's


River


Corporation,


Hilliard


Turpentine Company well


No.


(W-336)


a depth


500-


505 feet.


Cotypes


(Florida


Geol.


Survey Cat.


No.


3006)


Occurrence


Oligocene.


The aperture of this species is similar to that of


jacksonensis


Cushman


and


Applin


that


lacks


Siphonina
a distinct


neck


but


the


narrow


, elongate


final


chamber


similar to that of S


jacksonensis.


Family


AMPHISTEGINIDAE


Genus


AMPHISTEGINA


d'Orbigny,


1826


AMPHISTEGINA .LOPEZTRIGOI D.


K. Palmer


Plate 1


, Figure 17


Plate 8


, Figure 16


Plate 9


, Figures 10-13


1934.


1936.


1942.


Amphistegina


Mem


vol. 8


Amphistegina


Jour


34, fig. 1


, p. 255,


vol. 10,
1.t 38, fig.


, figs.


, pl.


Amphistegina lopestrigoi D.
vey Bull. 20, pp. 33, 34, pl.


Palmer,
6, 8.
Palmer.


figs.


K. Palmer.


15,


figs.


Cubana


Hist.


Nat.


Barker and Grimsdal


, figs.


Florida Geol.
3, fig. 11.


Sur-


Typical


The center


specimens


of the


test,


assigned
dorsally


this


and


species


ventrally


were


found.


is ornamented


a group


pustules.


These


pustules


have


a surface


ameter


100 to


160


specimen


with


a diameter


mm.
The


has


initial


3


coils


chamber


with


has


chambers


an internal


final


diameter


evolution.


about


The thickness of the test is


First appearance


from


At a depth


0.8 to


1 mm.


of 1285-1295 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence:
Appearance


Middle Eocene


elsewhere


Thi


Lisbon formation.


species


been


reported


from
the


Cuba


Mexico


Suwannee


and Florida.


Petroleum


In Florida


Corporation


it was found


Sholtz


No.


depth
pany'i


1340


Cedar


feet


and


Keys No.


Florida


2 at a depth


Discovery


1301-1308


Com-


feet.


T7nmoatt flDflTmflTfTT1ATr Cnlnkni.4-


"loon


lopeztrigoi


lopeztrigoi D.






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


A single specimen was found from which a vertical section


was


made.


Many


features


exhibited


similar


those of


palmeri


which


species


this


specimen


is doubt-


fully referred.


First appearance


At a depth


of 2985-3000 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence
Occurrence


Upper


elsewhere


Cretaceous.


Thiadens :1


reports


palmeri


from


Cuba


in association


with


Camerina


vermunti


Thiadens.


vermunti


dickersoni


was


rare


is considered


Palmer)


but


dickersoni


a synonym


Thiadens reports that O


abundant.


This


Miscellanea


palmeri
relation-


same


ship occurs in


the well under consideration.


Genus PSEUDORBITOIDES


Douvilld


1922


PSEUDORBITOIDES ISRAELBXII Vaughan and


Plate 21


Cole


, Figures 1


1932.


Pseudorbitoides


israelskii


Vaughan


Cole


, Proc.


Nat.


Acad.


1943.


Sci., vol. 18, p. 6:
Pseudorbitoides


Cole


Jour. Pal


14, pi. 2, all figs.
israelskit, Vaughan
vol. 17, No. 1, p. 98,


Cole.
, figs.


Vaughan


Several


specimens


were


recovered


which


assigned


this


species


although


the


preparations


were


not


entirely


satisfactory.


fair


vertical


section


was


obtained,


but


horizontal
similar to
equatorial


section


were


that of the


layer


does


poor


The


external


type specimens of P


clearly


show


sculpture


. israelskii,


double


was


but the


chambers


near the periphery of the test which is an outstanding feature.


First appearance


At a depth of 2985-3000 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence
Occurrence


Upper Cretaceous.


elsewhere


This


species


has


been


reported


from
Cuba.


Louisiana


Texas


Southern


Peten


(Guatemala)


and


PSEUDORBITOIDEB


? sp.


Plate 2


, Figures 4,


9, 10; Plate 21


, Figure




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


that satisfactory thin sections could not


made although


number


tion


ternal


specimens


obtained


were


illustrated


appearance


these


sectioned.
as figure
specimens


The


best


, plate
shown


vertical


sec-


The


figures


, plate


Although


dorbitoides


these


doubt


specimens


exists


as to


appear
which


similar


nus


these


Pseu-


specimens


should


referred.


They


noted


and


figured


future


reference.


First appearance


At a depth of


2790-2800 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Upper Cretaceous


Genus


VAUGHANINA D.


Palme


r, 1934


VAUGHANINA


CUBENSIS D.


K. Palmer


Plate 3


, Figure 11


Plate


, Figures 6,


1934.


Vaugnhlanina cubensis D.


p. 240,


1943.


Vaughanina


pl. 12,


cubensi


vol. 17, No. 1, pp.


K. Palmer,


fig. 5; pi. 13,
r D. K. Pain


98-100,


Soc.


figs.
ler.
17, fi


Cubana Hist.
, 4; text figs.


Vaughan


Nat.


Cole,


Mem.,


Jour.


18, figs. 1-10.


The


specimens


satisfactory


recovered


preparations


were
could


badly


recrystallized


obtained.


that


However


sufficient feature


were preserved so that there is no question


of the identification of this species.


First appearance


At a depth


of 2985-3000 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence
Occurrence


Upper Cretaceou


elsewhere


This


species


has


been


reported


from Cuba and Mexico.


Genus LEPIDOCYCLINA
Subgenus POLYLEPIDINA


GUimbel, 1870
Vaughan, 1924


LEPIDOCYCLINA


(POLYLEPIDINA)


ANTILLEA


Cushman


Plate


, Figures


Plate


, Figures


Plate


Figures 1-8; F
Figures


'late 11


, Figures 1-9


Plate


Plate 12


, Figure 4


1919.


Lepidocyclina antlilea Cushman,


Carnegie Inst.


Wash.


Publ.


w







FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


19241


1921


1928.


1929.


Lcpidocyclina
808, 809, pl. 3
Lvpidocyclina
810, p1. 31, fit
Lcpidocyclina
vol. 1, pp. 28(
Lepidocyclina


(Polylopi
, figs. 1-3.


Ilna)


(Polylcpidtna)
gs. 1-5.
(Pliolcpidina)


, 1l.


chiapasonsis


adkitns


knllossconsis


, figs.


(Polylopidtna)


(/ardfl crac


Vaughan,


Vaughan,


idnt


Vaughan,


Cole


Bull.


idom


, pp.


, pp. w8O
lour. Pal


Amnr. Pal


, pp.


1929.


1929.

1929.


1936.


Nat.


Acad.


60-6


Lcpidoc'yclina
idcm, pp. 280,
Lcpidocyclina


pp. 289, 201, fig. 4.
Poliylcpidina (cliapasonsis


1, figs.


L-6; p1. 2, figs. 1, 2
antllUva Cushman.


292-294


ughan,


P1roc.


, figs.


chiapascnsis

adkinsi Vaui


Vaughan.


, figs.


1936.


fig. 1; pl. 3?
Polylcpidlina


Grim


sdale,


33, fig. 8


1936.


Vauglhan.


Vaughan,


Vauglian,


idcum


]3arker and Grimsdale, Jour


, fig.


, 1pp. 24 0, 241
, figs. 7, 8.
chliaptastnsis


ideltm


35, fig. 6


Lcpidochclina barTkeri Tan,


Vaughan,
. 31, figs.


var.


pl. 37, fig. 2.


Natuurk.


Tijdsc


planet


Barker


, figs.


irift Ned.


IndilI,


1936.
1938.


Lepidocyucliuta


cpidocyclitna (Polylcpidtia)


Bull.


1938.


Am r.


Assoc.


Petrol.


flgs. 1, 3, 4, 6, 7.
Lcpidocyclina (Polylcpidina)


idtm,


gardnera c
Geol., vol.


Cole.


, pp.


fardft:l'rac Cole.


Gravell and Hannat


1007


Cole


1008


, pl.


Florida


Survey


1938.


Bull.


Lcpidocyclinal


Geol.


1939.


Survey


Lcpidocyclina
Geol. Survey
Lcpidocyclina


Ned.


Inditi


1


, pp.1


46-48


(Polylcpidina)
Lull. 16, pp. 46-
(Polylcpidina)


Bull.


-4:


9, figs.
anticlla
8, pi. 1C


; pl.


Cushmnan.


10, figs.


Cole


orlda


, figs.


garden crac


89, pl.


(Polylcptdtna)
iv, pp. 58, 61,


Cole.


Howe


Loui


Iana


figs.


ya'rdwcrac


Cole.
, fig.


Die Ing.
, figs. 5,


1919


sp)eces


Cushman


Lcpidocyclina


described


which


from


Bartholomew


assigned


name


tillca


This


species was


illustrated


one vertical


section


a micros
sections


doubt


pheric individual.
prepared from


whether


this


species


1924


topotype


should


Vaughan
material.


had
and


assigned


equatorial
expressed


genus


Lcpidocyclina.


sections
Vaughan


were
was


should be noted that


made
able


from


microspheric


obtain


an equatorial


both


of the equatorial


individuals.


section


In 1929
of a me-


galospheric


individual


and


that


time


correctly


assigned


(Polylopidtna)
i., vol. 15, pp.
(Polylepidina)
291, fig. 3.
(Polylepidina)


/Jinslidalci Tan,


Lepidocyclita


rhan.




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


this new form.


The embryonic apparatus of


has not been published to date.


For a comparison,


antillea


therefore,


the most striking differences appear in the vertical sections."


Vaughan '
(Cushman)
idocyclina


in 1932 in a discussion of Dictyoconus americanus


wrote:


(Polylepidina)


"associated with D.


antillea


americanus is Lep-


Cushman.


Cole


has


ccntly


described


gardnerac,


from


species,
middle


Lepidocyclina


Eocene


east


(Polylopidina)


Texas.


This


species so closely resembles L.


antillca Cushman


that I am


not convinced that it is distinct from that species."


Cole *'"


in 1938 made


three


new thin sections from topo-


type specimens of antillea for comparison with specimens of


gardncrae from


the Granberry well


No.


(W-285)


From


this study Cole concluded:


closely related species,


gardnerae and L. anitllca are


yet there seem to be sufficient charac-


teristics
species."


separate


readily


these


forms


into


two


distinct


In the Hilliard Turpentine Company well No.


(W-336)


specimens were found at 1340-1350 feet which were identified


immediately as antillca.


(Compare figures


2 and 9, plate 11


of this bulletin with figures 1 and


Geol.


Survey


Bull.


were others which


Associated


plate 10 in the Florida


with


these


possess the characteristics of


(see figures 1 and 5, plate 11)


specimens
gardnerac


In addition one vertical


sec-


tion


(figure


3, lower right,


, plate 12


plate 30, Geol. Soc.


other vertical section


Amer. Bull.


(see figure 1, plate 11)


vol.


(see figure


An-


possesses many


of the characteristics of


adkinsi


(see figures 3 and


, plate


Geol.


Soc. Amer. Bull.


vol.


35).


The sample at 1300-1305 feet contained specimens which
were first identified at chiapasensis following the illustrations


given by Barker and Grimsda
of this bulletin with figure 7,


10, and figure 7


(compare figure 3,


plate 12


plate 35 in the Jour. Pal.,


plate 11, with figure 14, plate 32,


1


vol.


n the same
/TI C:nrnn i \


nfne rrlflrniltnrtien 4v'r^wI fl-i nl nn wi ti wt v^ ilr


is similar to chiapasensis


n v4- /l /\






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


(Pliolepidina)


subgenus


kinlossensis
Polylepidina,


Vaughan


and


must


at the same


transferred


time


they voiced


the suspicion


that


this


species


represented L.


(Polylepidina)


chiapasen
Grimsdale


Vaughan.


apparent


that


Barker


and


were correct.


Vaughan


bewildering


has


variation


emphasized


in species


in a number


orbitoidal


articles


Foraminifera.


not surprising that a number of names have been applied


antillea


range


constant.


because


vertical


in characteristic


The


sections


equatorial


Enough thin sections have


been


show


a considerable


sections a
published


more


to show


that


there


is complete


gradation


between


various species


which have


been


signed


names


listed in


synonymy


Moreover


ngle


No.


since


population


(W-336)


virtually


Hilliard


no useful


named


variants


Turpentine


stratigraphic


purpose


occur


Company


in a
well


is served


retaining these names.


First appearance


At a depth


of 1245-1250 feet


W-336.


Occurrence:
Occurrence el


Middle Eocene


sewhere


This


Lisbon formation.


is a widely distributed species


occurring


Bartholomew


(antillea),


Mexico


(adkinsi,


chiapasensis,


chiapa


senses


var


subplana),


Jamaica


(kin-


losscn


sis), and in Texas,


Louisiana


Mississ


ippi,


and Alabama


(gardnerae).


Gravell


and


Hanna


report


that


Lepidocyclina


(Poly-


epidina) zone has a thickn


of as much as 200 feet in some


well


100


cycling a


In the Hilliard No.


feet.
(Pliol


These s,
epidina)


ame


1 (W-336)
authors"


aranau


the zone has a thickness


report


that


ensis)


the Lepido-
zone occurs


about


feet


above


Lepidocyclina


(Polylepidina)


the Hilliard Turpentine Company well No.


(W-336)


zone.
this


same


interval is


180 feet.


claiborn





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Subgenus


LEPIDOOYOfINAl


PLIOLEPIDINA
(PLIOLEPIDINA)


H. Douvill6,


ABIANAA


1915


Ponton


Plate 1


, Figure


Plate


, Figure 3


Plate


, Figures


Plate


, Figures


11-13


Plate


, Figure


1934.


1940.


The


that


Lepidocyclina
Midland Nat.,
Lepidocyclina
Jour. Pal., vol.


preliminary
Specimens


(Leptdocyclilna)


pl. 57,
i thin


depth


Cole


142-143,


(Lepidocyclina)
14, pp. 414-416,


study
from


figs.


Ponton


Amer


figs.


Gravell


Hanna,


12-18.


sections


1065


demonstrated


-1070


feet


were


identical with the specimens from the Gulf Refining Company


of Louisiana's Pascagoula Lumber Company


No.


located in


Sec.
were


3 S.


described


,IR.
by


7 W.,
Gravell


George
and H


County


.anna


Mississippi,


as L.


which


(Lepidocyclina)


claibornensis.


same


type


However
embryonic


, the


and


equatorial
equatorial


sections


chambers


showed


that


char-


acterize L. ariana.


Gravell and Hanna in


their description


claibornensis
claibornensis


compare


can


with


a


distinguished


mrana,
from


but conclude
ariana because


that
clai-


bornensis


has


slightly


greater


diameter


and


twice


thick.


Gravell and Hanna also


point out that ariana has only


2 or 3 layers of lateral


chambers,


but claibornensis


has about


6 and


that


roofs


and


floors


lateral


chambers


claibornensis


considerably


thicker


than


artana.


The


writer


has


possession


some


specimens


ariana from the


and


section.
section


most
This


was


type lot.


inflated
section


prepared


These specimens were


specimen


was


illustrated


also


one


selected


by figure


very


re-examined
r a vertical


, plate


thin


, fra


specimens


(figure


, plate 14).


The


inflated


thickness


side


the


0.72


specimen


mm.


equatorial


has


There
layer


a diameter


4 lateral


and


on the


mm.


chambers


other


side.


and


on one


The


thin specimen has a


thickness of


0.5 mm. and there are three


I n -nni 1


a


Il n n vnnhnvr


em Qanh


oi,,n


* *u


+hl


rimntnrinl


12 vpr


Thfe




(taru's(





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


The


specimen


assigned


anana


and


those


described


(ilaiborncnsis


form


an integrated


series


from


thin


, flat


um-


bonate


forms


(ariana


type)


thickly


lenticular


specimens


(claiborncnsis


type)


Although


or the other may predominate in a


is possible
population


that


one


form


is apparent


that only one


specific name should be used for the group.


First appearance


At a depth of 1065-1070 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Middle


Eocene


, Li


sbon formation.


Appearance elsewhere


From


a depth


1740 feet in


outh


ern States


Corporation


s well


(W-19)


located about


one


and


5 E.)


2291


-2298


one-half


miles


Jefferson


feet


north


County


Gulf


of Monticello


Florida
Refining


and


(Sec.
from


Company's


2N


depth


Pascagoula


Lumber


Company


well


No.


located


George


County


Missi


ppi.


(Pliolcpidina)


ariana


similar


in many


internal


feature


(Pliolepidina)macdonaldt Cushman.


LEPIDOCYOLINA


(PLIOLEPIDINA)


OEIDARKEYSENSlBI


Oole


Plate


, Figures


1912.


Lcpidocyclina
Survey Bull.
figs. 6, 7; pl.


(Pliolcpidina)


, PP.
, figs.


43-45


ccdaIrkeyscn


, pl.


Cole


, figs.


. Florida


Gcol.


fig.


Only


this


four specimens


species.


There are


were


found


however


which


certain


seem


difference


represent
s between


ese specimens and


types.


The


lateral


chambers


in the


type


specimen


are more open


and


tend


more


regularly


tiers.


much


The


specimen


illustrated


same appearance as


the one


figure
from 1


, plate
Sholtz


7 has


No.


(W-166)
Survey


chambers


expands


shown on plate 12,


Bulletin


with


rapidly


thick


This
floors


toward


figure 4 of the Florida Geological


specimen


and


roofs.


periphery.


has


The


The


very


low


equatorial


specimen


lateral


layer
from


the Hilliard Turpentine Company well No.


same


1 (W-336)


features.


-Iu .re4 n t-\nn rin n nfl


A n 4n c\ rr r4 -1


nC 1 lnnFl Cnrof c


IXL QOa





STRATIGRAPHIIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


1922.
1932.


Lcpidocyclita antillca Cushman,
Lcpidocyclina antillca Cushman,
Lepidocyclina (Lcpidocyclina) 2
Barker, Geol. Mag., vol. 69, No.


pl. 42,


1937


figs.


Lcpidocycltn
in Sheppard,
fig. 117 (1-4


0L


)


(Lcpido


cyclina)


idcm, p.
1919).
ecruviana


, pp.


pfruvianala


137, pl.


Cushman.


535-537,


Cushman.


The Geology of South-western Ecuador


fig. 118


(2-8)


(1-6)


, fig.


Todd
, figs.


(not
and


Vaughan,
pp. 167-171,


fig. 120


Small specimen


were encountered in


this


well


just


below


the Lepidocyclina ariana zone which


should


be referred to


pcruviana Cushman.


It is not at all


surprising that L.


peru-


viana should
that Opercul
(Cushman)


Ecuador


assigned


Florida


occur


linoides


Florida


floridensi,


occur with
However
Vaughan


specimens


occur


inasmuch
s (Heilpri]


as Vaughan


and


Clay


bed


in the


Pebble


Eocene
definite


reports
ocalanus


Pebble


bed


definitely


, where


middle


Eocene


age.


Two vertical section


,figs.


and one horizontal


section of specimens


of L.


pcruviana from


Verdun


section


of Peru are shown for comparison


with the Florida specimens


assigned to this


species.


Berry '" described the Lepidocyclina


from


species.


Verdun


Vaughan "


section


and


concluded


created


that


not


large
more


number


than


two


species were


present in the material from


Verdun


section


and


that


peruviana


ranged


from


713


991


feet.


The


pecimens


used


here


comparison


were


from


one


sample
trial.


used


Vaughan


study


Peruvian


ma-


Measurements


spheric


individuals


(Table


4 and 5)


were


from Florida and Peru.


made from


The final


megalo-
column


of the tables


presents the measurements


of Ecuadorian speci-


mens made by
The figures


Vaughan in his


study


of L.


show that the equatorial


peruwnana.


chambers


as seen


horizontal


section


have


pronounced


tendency


form


radiating


rows.


This


can


observed


I. -fl~ I ~ --------------------- -


in the


Floridian


m


1.- -


perumana


Clay


upper


in a bed


A


A


'I n


-- --- ~ --. A A A U -


1


1i Ir * n^ ~


v






TABLE 4


Measurements


of Vertical


Sections


of Lepidocyclina


peruviana


W-336


Locality


1100-1105'


W-336

1100-1105'


W-336


1095-1100'


W-336


1160-1162'


Verdun
section,
Peru
757-758'


Verdun
section,
Peru
757-758'


Diameter


Thickness


Number of lateral chambers on each


side of the equatorial


layer


Embryonic chambers
internal length


internal


height


thickness surrounding wall


1.6 mm.


0.66 mm.


5


200 ft
130 %
20 c
I 2


1.34 mm.


0.68 mm.



6


180 lp
160 %
20 p


1.66 mm.


0.72 mm.


J 2.08 mm.


0.98 mm.
tj


1.4 mm.


0.66 mm.


- 6


240 p
160 p


200 p
130 t
20 p


160 4f+
120 f
20 p


1.98 mm.


0.82 mm.


140 /
100 p
20 p


Height of equatorial layer
(including floor and roof)
at center
at periphery


80 Ct
100 p


100 p
100 p


90 p
110 lO


80p
140 p


80 p
120 p


80so
120 p


* Lateral
internal


chambers:


length


internal height
thickness of floors and roofs


100 f
30 p
20 %


80-140 p
20 p
20 p


60-100 p
20 %.
18 p


120-180 p


20 p


100 p
37
20p


100 i
35 p
20 u


Surface diameter of


pillars


40-60 p


40 p


40-60 p


180 p


80-120 p


80-120 p


* At the


periphery


directly


over the embryonic chambers.


~__ _


i


!


|





Measurements


of Horizontal


TABLE 5
Sections


Lepidocyclina


perviana


Locality


Diameter


Embryonic


chambers:


*length across both chambers


diameters


diameters


width


Diameters


of initial


of second


chamber


chamber


of bounding wall


of equatorial


cham-


bers near periphery


radial


transverse


-


W-336


1100-1105'


1.52 mm.




270 p

140x180 t


100x160


15 i


60 g


W-336

1100-1105'


1.44 mm.


260 p

160x180 p


80x160 p


W-336

1095-1100'


1.6mm.


260 p


160x200 p


120x200 p


Verdun
section,
Peru
757-758'


1.7 mm.


160 t


80x100 p


70x100 p


15 g


20 u


60 p

45 fC


40 u


60 p


40


50 p


E

V


1.5


24


150x


83-i


* Internal measurements.


40




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


Peruvian


those


specimens


here


specimens


figure
from


Florid


more
, but


pronounced


than


Ecuadorian


specimens


illustrated


Vaughan


have


pillars


which


weakly


developed.


The


lateral


chambers


arranged


regular


tiers


and


are open.


This


specie


has been classified previously in the subgenus


Lepidocyclina,


but


detailed


study


the


internal


features


proves


that


belongs


subgenus


Pliolepidina


as re-


defined by


Vaughan and Cole.4'"


peruviana is closely related


to Lepidocyclina (Pliolepidina) pustulosa


Douvill6)


First appearance


At a


depth


of 1095-1100 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence
Occurrence


Middle Eocene


elsewhere


This


Lisbon formation.


species


widely


distributed


Peru


and Ecuador.


LEPIDOOYOLINA


(PLIOLEPIDINA)


PUSTUL.OSA


Douvill6)


Plate


, Figures 5-7


, 13-15


Plate 8


, Figures 1-5,


Plate 16


1917.


pustulosa


, Figures 1
H. Douvill6


Paris


Acad.


1941.


844, text figs.


Lcpidocyclina


and Cole


30, al


Geol.


figs.


(Pliolcpidina)


Soc.


Amer.


pustulosa
p. Paper


Douvill6)


Vaughan
66, pls. 25-


(references and synonymy).


Test


small


, robustly


lenticular


with


or without


a narrow


encircling


amined.


rim.


The


Megalospheric


following


individuals


measurements


only


show the


were


relationship


thicknes


diameter


five


typical


specimens:


Specimen number


Diameter


Thickness


1.92 mm.


mm.


mm.


0.98 mm.


mm.


0.96 mm,


Isolcpidina


1 I





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Surface


ornamentation


consists


an apical


crown


rather


strong papillae which decrease in size and importance toward
the periphery of the test.


The embryonic apparatus consists


two subequal


cham-


bers


with


two


periembryonic


chambers,


one


on each


side


juncture of the embryonic chambers.


The


periembryonic


chambers have curved outer walls.


The inner walls are those


main


embryonic


chambers.


These


chambers have diameters of about 60 by 40


periembryonic
The following


are the dimensions of the
.- .


Specimen
number


Internal


diameters of
initial
chamber


initial


I t .. ---n ------
Tn nrn 1


diameters of
second
chamber


embryonic chambers:


Total length
across both
chambers


Total


width


along partition


140x180 p


100x180 /'


290 p


160 p


240x290 p


140x200 p


460 j


220 p


140x190 p


160x220 p


5 180x210 p
I __ __ __ _ __ _ - #


100x180 p


130x180 p


100x150 p


240 p


380 p


360 $


200 p


180 u


160 $


Vertical


sections


show


length


and


height


em-


bryonic apparatus,


including the walls,


Length of embryonic Height of embryonic
Specimen number chambers chambers
1 2 160____________
1 240 p 160zi


I


I


I




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


The walls surrounding the embryonic apparatus are about


20 /i thick.


The partition separating the initial chamber from


the second chamber is straight or very slightly curved.


This


partition is about half the width of the wall surrounding the
chambers.
Equatorial chambers are arcuate with curved outer walls


and


pointed inner ends.


There


is considerable


variation


size and some variation in shape of the individual chambers.


Average chambers have


radial


and


tangential


diameters of


about 50 ri.


The equatorial layer has a height of about 80 .


at the center of the test and a height of about 120 /i at the


periphery.


These measurements include the floor and roof.


The thickness of the floors and roofs is about 25 /.
The lateral chambers are arranged in rather regular tiers,


although
thick has


there is some overlapping.


7 lateral


chambers to


A specimen


a tier on


0.94 mm.


each side of the


equatorial


layer;


another specimen


1.26


mm.


thick


has


lateral chambers on each side of the equatorial layer


specimen 1.1 mm.


and a


thick has 8 on one side of the equatorial


layer


and


regularly


number


other.
toward


The
the


lateral


chambers


periphery.


decrease


specimens


examined had one or more layers of lateral chambers cover-


equatorial


layer


periphery


The


chamber


cavities are open but between rather thick roofs and floors.


The lateral chambers are about 20


are about 30


not


constant


thick.


and


The


varies


length


with


/ high;
of the


the


roofs and floors


lateral


individual


chambers
specimens.


The lateral chambers range in length from 80 AL to more than
200 u.


Pillars are irregularly present.


The pillars are largest in


the center where they may have a surface diameter of 140 (L.
The pillars taper toward the center of the test.


First appearance:


At a depth of 1095-1100 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence:


Middle Eocene, Lisbon formation.


vertical


section


(Pliolepidina)


pustulosa


_ -- -


_


__


%





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Vaughan '"


has


given


a detailed


description


specimens


amaica


from J
scribed


presented


assigned


Venezuelan


numerous


this


specimen


and


figures


species.


Vaughan


Trinidad


Gravell ,,


and


has


Cole "'


specimens.


have
The


Florida specimens fall


within the range of measurements and


illustrations given by these authors.


(Pliolepidina)


Caribbean


dad


, Jamaica


pustulosa


region


Panama


as it


is a
has


, Venezuela


widely


been


and


distributed species


reported
Mexico


from


Trini-


these


Eocene.


localities


the deposits


Therefore


is not


have


been


surprising


referred


find


this


Supper
species


in Florida


but


it is most


unusual


discover it in sediments


which are of middle Eocene age.


Jamaica


semble


Vaughan


(Pliolepidina)


reports


pustulosa


that


occur


specimens


which


in association


with


Dictyoconus


amercanus


(Cushman)


amerwcanus was


ported first from the St.


omew, L
be upper


eeward
Eocene


Islands.
in age.


Bartholomew formation


Thi


More


formation
recently,


was


Vaugh


Barthol


considered
an and Cole


have suggested that the St.


rather than upper


Bartholomew formation is middle


Eocene in age.


The


specimens


on which


description


Florida


specimens


(Pliolepidina)


pustulosa


was


based


came


from a depth


of 1300-1305 feet.


1100-1105 and 1198-1200


feet


there


occurred


specimens


which


figured


on plate


figure
mens


There


should


referred


little
also


question


but


that


these


specd-


S, Vaughan,


Foraminifera from


No. 4


, pp.


60 Gravel
Smithsonian
1933.


Wayland,


the Tertiary
pl. 49, figs.


, Donald
Miscell.


Species of Large Arenaceous and Orbitoidal


Deposits of


1928.


Larger


11-13


W., Tertiary
Coll., vol. 89.


Jamaica,


Jour


Foraminifera


, pp.


,pl.


vol. 1


of Venezuela,


, figs.


r, Vaughan,
Cretaceous


West Indies


(all figs.)


Wayland and Cole,


Tertiary


Geol.


Soc.


Amer.


Large
Sp.


Storrs, Preliminary


Foraminifera


Paper


1941.


of Trinida


, pp.


, 66,


Report on
id. British


25-30


(Pliolepidina)


pustulosa


r





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


although most of them are not as inflated as the more typical


specimens assigned


this species.


LEPIDOOYOLINA


Plate


(PLIOLEPIDINA)


, Figures 5,


Plate


DOUVILLEIK
8, Figures


limnon


1921.


Archiv


1922.


vol. 1


Lcpidocyclina
Indust. y Con


r. douvilcit Lisson,


p. 52, pls.
r. doutvillei


struc., ser. 2,


3, 4, 5,
Lisson


Asoc.


Per.


(all figs.).
Escuela d


para


Prog.


Ingen. Bol.
s. (all figs.


Ciencia,

Minas,
, except


the lower one of the two vertical sections).


1937


L(pidocyclitla
Sheppard, Th


(Lcpidocyclin
Geology of


9-14


Several small


r. douvilltci


South-western


Lisson.
Ecuador,


117 (5).


specimen


Vaughan, in
pp. 165-167,


were found in association with L.


pcruvzana


villei


which


Lisson


apparently
redefined 1


should


referred


Vaughan.


Vaughan


dou-
has


indicated


, the pillars are irregularly and indefinitely developed


and
sion


lateral


into


tiers.


plate


chambers are


The


show


vertical


these


very


sections
features.


long without


illustrated as


The


definite divi


figures


embryonic


and


equatorial


chambers


First appearance


similar to


At a


depth


those


peruvtana.


of 1095-1100 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Middle Eocene


Lisbon formation.


Subgenus
LEPIDOCYOLIRNA


LEPIDOCYCLINA
(LEPIDOOYOLI.NA)


Glimbel


1870


MANTELLI.


(Morton)


Plate


, Figure


Plate


, Figures


13-15


1833.


Nummulittcs


m ant clli


Morton


, Amer


Jour


vol. 23


pl. 5, fig. 9.
Orbitoidcs


handle.


1904.


1920.


kon.


Lcpidocyclitna


Soc.
pl. 3,


geol.
figs.


Lepidocyclinia


(Lcpidocyc:lia )
ay. Akad. Wiss.


manttclli


France Mem


minant lli


m an tcll
MUnchon


Morton).


Morton)


(Morton)


Lemoine


, fig.


Cushman


Gtlmbol,


Douvill6,
, fig. 18;


Geol.


Survey


Prof.


1927.

1927.


Paper


Lcpidocyclin
Proc. U. S.
Lcpidocyclit


125, pp. 57-60, pls. 12.
Ia (Lcpidocyclina) n
Nat. Museum, vol. 71,
ia inantelli (Morton).


Philadelphia,


vol. 79


, pp.


iant., l
art. 8,


Morton)


Vaughan,
300, pi. 23,


)l. 3, fig. 1
Proc. Nat.
figs. la, b,


Vaughan,


Acad.
2.


Lcpidocyclina


1870.




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


pillars


irregularly
equatorial


papillata


distributed.


layer


Many


Vaughan


variants


papillae on the outer surface.


these


has


mantelli
Vaughan


created


which
"'i state


have


extend
variety
minute


"The variant


appears


intergrade


with


typical


specimens


species


and


, therefore


does


not


represent a


distinct


species


but


order


distinguish


typical form


from


of the species


specimens


it seems


desirable


representing
e to apply to


the
it a


varietal


designation."


In a


more recent study


variation in


species of


Lep-


idocyclina,


Vaughan t


emphasis


that


"The


tests


orbitoides are composed of many elements,


is subject to variation


every one of which


The writer believes that the develop-


ment


of the


weak


pillars


in certain


individuals of


mantclli


sufficiently


worthy


character


which


base


varietal


name.


However


should


noted


that


varietal


names


are entirely in


order when


variation


is as extreme


that


found


between


typical


yurnagunenszs


and


variety morganopsis.
First appearance:


At a depth


of 615 feet in


Occurrence


Marianna limestone.


LEPIDOOYOLINA


(LEPIDOOYOLINA)


MORTONI


Culllhman


Plate


, Figure 6


Plate


, Figures


1920.
1941.


Lepidocyclina nortoni
125, pp. 70, 71, pi. 27,
Lopidoc'yclina (Lcpidc
Geol. Survey Bull. 19,


Cushlllan,


figs. 1-4
cyclina )
n. 41. n


Geol.


urvey


Prof.


, figs.


mortoni0


, figs.


Cushman.


9-13


Cole,
1, figs.


Paper


Florida


; p1.


figs.


Specimens


species
Joiners
depth i
figures


from


which


the


America


300-320


, 13


are


similar


United


Power


feet


, plate


were


ones


Brotherhood


House


well


found


(Florida


Geol


No.
this


Survey


referred


Carpenters
2 (W-448)


well.


Bull.


this
and


Compare


with


figure


, plate


16 of


this


bulletin.


First appearance


At a depth


of 540-548 feet in


W-336.




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


LEPIDO0YOLINA


SURVEY--BULLETIN


(I.EPIDOOYOLINA)


OOAbLA]


TWENTY-SIX

WA Outhlnan


Plate 8


, Figures 21


Plate 12


, Figure 12


Plate 14,


Figure 8; i
Figures


Plate
6-12


, Figure 6


Plate


Plate


Figure


1919.


1941.


1942.


pidoc

Geol.
6-10,


Survey


ocallUanat


CushInan


2, pi. 28, figs. 3, 4
(Lcpidocyclina )
Bull. 19, pp. 41-43


Geol.


oc(latlat


, pl.


Survey


, figs. 1-3.
Cushnman.


Prof,


Cole


, flgs.


. Paper

Florida


(references and synonymy).


L'pidoeyclina
Geol. Survey


(Lcpidocyclina )
Bull. 20, pp. 45,


ocalatna


Cushnman.


Cole,


Floridn


, figs.


Numerous


specimens


which


typical


this


species


were found in the portion of the Hilliard Turpentine Company


well


(W-336)


assigned


to the


Ocala limestone.


First al)pearance


Occurrence


Ocala


At a depth
limestone.


540-548 feet.


LEPIDOCYOLINA


(L.EPIDOOYO'IINA)


OOAILANA


Ouillunan,


Plate 3


, Figure


variety
Plate


0OOKBI


O1a1hnman


, Figure


Plate


, Figure


1919.


c:ookci


Cushinni


, igs.


I l,)idocri(linat


CushIImun.
155-157.


Vai


5, 6.


( Lcpidocyclina ) ocu
ughan, Florida Geol.


Survey


lania


Cushnllln,


Survey


Prof.


variety


19th Ann.


Paper


cook


Report,


mall


inflated


specimens


Lcpidocyclina


associated


with


typical


specimens


ocalana.


These


specimens


doubtedly represent the


variety


cooked.


First appearance


At a


depth of 540-548 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Ocala limestone.


ILEPIDOOYOLINA


Plate 3


, Figure 4


(LEPIDOOYOLINA)


Plate 19


PARVULA


, Figures 1,


Onuhmanlu
Plate 20,


Figures


Plate 22


, Figures 1-11


1919.

1933.


Lcpidocyclina parvula Cushmnan,


58, pl.


, figs.


cpidocyclino


t (Lcpidocyclina)
ty ... /*<.. t 11 ....5


Carnegie Inst.


parvula


Wash.


Cushman.


Publ.


Vaughan,


runs ur u su ---- ed ds as 4 B-


figs.


clidocyclina


Lepidoctlclina


1 -.. &1..... 1....




STRATIGRAPIIIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Gravell


and


Hanna "


have


described


a species of


Lepido-


cyclina which


they named cole.


The


specimens


characteristics


from


615


colei.


feet


-4 have


According


Gravell


many


and


Hanna


colei


differs


from


parvula


Cushman


being thinner


less umbonate and less flanged,


and generally in having fewer


smaller


study


.and


less


actual


prominent
specimens


pillars.


Cole


colei


has


but


been


appears


Gravell and Hanna's description and illustrations that L.


is within
Cushman.


range of


forms


normally


signed


able
from
cold


parvula


parvula2


middle


has


been


Oligocene


reported


from


from
Gulf


numerous


and


localities


Caribbean


region.


It is
tion


amazing to


with L.


find specimens in


in a 1)ortion


this well


well


in associa-


assigned


Marianna limestone.


At first it was thought that these speci-


mcns might have caved from above,


reveal any specimens above 615


but careful


feet.


search failed


the sample at 615


feet two


specimens of L.


to a large specimen


of L.


parvula were found tightly cemented
mantclli which would seem to estab-


lish


the fact that these species were associated in life.


More


ments


wells


made


will


have


, but


would


studied
appear


before


that


final


committ-


parvula


has


longer range than heretofore expected.


Gravell


and Hanna have


the Byram marl


in association


reported


with


that 0.


dius occurs


vicksburgensis.


Pre-


viously,


dius


was


thought


confined


Marianna


limestone.


Many


the


small


Foraminifera


range


through


entire


Vicksburg


group.


may


that


certain


larger


Foraminifera


have


longer


ranges


than


was


thought


previously.


First appearance


At a depth of 615 feet in


Occurrence


Marianna


LEPIDOOYOLINAA


limestone.


(LEPXDOOYOLINA)


YURtNAGUNENSIS


variety MORGANOPSIB Vaughan


I1(,, vtr, U -


D1 n4


ti; rvimt s 9


mantelli


il | 1 0


Cushman,


* -


11111




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


1920.


Lepidocyclina morgant Cushman,


33, figs.


1933.


1933.


19341.


1941.


Lcpidocycltna
Washington


Lcpidocycl
Vaughan,


Lepido


, figs.


12-14


yurnag/uncnsis
Acad. Sct.. vol.


ina (Lcptdocycltna)
Smithsonian Miscell.


cyclina


Vaughan.


); pi. 23, figs. 1
(Lcptdocyclina )


Cole,


Lcpidocyclita


Cushman.


Geol.


Survey


(not Lemoino and R.


var.


morganlopsis
354.


yJtrnaguncdis,


Coll


vol. 80


yurflagtunttcsis,


Prof.


Douvill6


Vaughan,


Paper
)Jour.
Jour.


var. moryanlopsfs
No. 10, pp. 22, 23,


var.


Jour.


(Lepidocyclita)


Vaughan
. 390, fgs.


Cole


yuttrnagtuncnstl,


Geol.


Soc.


var


Amer.


mnorganopsis
3, figs. 1-3.


'. morganopsis
Sp. Paper No.


pecimens


which are entirely typical


figured


from


City of Quincy well
First appearance


Occurrence


-4).


At a depth of


Suwannee


410 feet in


limestone.


Subgenus EULEPIDINA H.


Douvill6, 1911


L.EPIDOCYOLINA.


(EUZLEPIDINA)


PAVOBA


Ou sahmlan


Plate


1919.


1933.


, Figure


Lcpidocyclina
p. 66, pi. 3, f1
Lcpidocyclina


Somllan


19341


Miscel


pl. 18, figs. 1-
4 (probably);
Lcpi(doc!lclina
vol. 8, No. 1,
Lcpidocyclina


Cole


Geol.


Soc.


Plate


favosa
Igs. 1,2;


, Figure


Cushman


, fig.


(Eulepidina)
. Coll.. vol. 89


; pi. 10, figs. 1
pl. 29, flg. 4 (
(Eulcpidina )
. 27, p1. 4, figs.


Plate


, Carnegie


favosa


Inst.


Cushman.
), pp. 37-41
20, figs. 1-3


references and


ravosa
2. 3.


(Eulcphidna) favosa
Amer. Sp. Paper No.


Cushman.


, Figures 3-9


Wash.


Publ.


Vaughan,


, pl.


synonymy)


Cushman.


Smith-


, figs.
, figs.


Jour


Pal.,


Vaughan
40, figs.


Entirely


typical


specimens


were


found


the


City


Quincy
bottom
Florida


well


sample


Illustrations


Falling


Water


specimens


Sink


, Washington


from


the


County


introduced for comparison.


First appearance


Occurrence


At a depth of


Suwannee


410 feet in


limestone.


ILEPIDOOYOLINA


(EULEPIDINA)


UNDOBA


Cushman


Plate 19


, Figure 9


Plate 22


, Figure 12


1919.


Lepidocyclina


- or


ft *t *u t1r I I


undosa


'a-


Cushman


, Carnegie


Inst.


Wash.


Publ.






STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELL


were
were


not


found


encountered


numerous


until


this


individuals.


depth


Thin


was


reached.


sections


were


Here
made


specimens from


635


feet.


First appearance


: At a depth of 615 feet in


W-4


question-


able fragments higher.


Occurrence


Suwannee


limestone


Marianna


lime-


stone.


Family


DISCOCYCLINIDAE


Genus DISCOCYCLINA


GUlmbel


Tan
1870


DISOOOYOLINA


(DISOOCYOINA)


BLANPIEDI


VAUGHAN


Plate 3


, Figure 3


Plate


Plate 6


Figure


, Figure 19


Plate


; Plate 26
, Figures


, Figure 8


1936.


1938.


Discocyclina


4-256


Discocyclina


Amer


Assoc.


, p1l.


blantpicdi
1, figs. 1-
blapnpiodt


Petrol.


Vaughan,


Vaughan.


Gcol


figs.


Jour.


Cravcll


, pp.


vol. 10


No. 4


Hanna


1010-1012


, pp.


Bull.


, pl.


pecimens


which


seem


typical


this


species


were


found


in association with P
P. (Proporocyclina)
First appearance:


. (Athecocyclina) cook


cedarkeysensis Cole,


At a depth


(Vaughan)


and


n. sp.


of 1785-1790 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Salt


Mountain


limestone.


SUBGENU
DISOOOYCLINA (


ASTEROCYCLINA


ASTEROOYOLINA)


Glimbel


GEORGIANA


1870


(OCuhman)


Plate


, Figure


1 917


1920.


Orthophragmina


Paper
2. 3.


108-G,


gctor*iana


p. 117,


Orthoph ragn ina


gjcorgiana


Survey Prof. Paper 1


5, p.


Cushman,
, figs. 2, 3,


Cushman.


45, pl.


Geol.
, fig.


Cushman,


Survey


. S.


Prof.
, figs.

Geol.


10, fig. 1.


1924.


1926.


1928.


1928.


Discocyclina
Geol. Soc. A
Astoriacites


Set.,


vol. 12


Astcrocyclitna
1, No. 4, p. 2
Discocyclina


(Astertacites )


xmer.


Bull


(eorgiana


yeor(jatna


vol. 35, p.
(Cushman)


No. 8, pp. 520, 521.
georgtana (Cushnman).


(As


(Cushman)


Vaughan,


Vaughan,


gcorliatna


Proc.


Vaughan,


Nat.


Acad.


Jour


(Cushman).


S,,mrrmnF 1 tfh A n M


Vaughan,


terocyclina )


Titla.fA^ Firt1


Tnnrtnf- n


1R'7





76 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX

Test of moderate size, with a small but distinct umbo from
which radiate 4 raised rays at nearly right angles to each


other.
thin.


The areas between the rays are nearly flat ana1 very
The margins of the test are broken so that the com-


plete outline could not be ascertained.


The rays widen and


thicken


apparently


The


central


they


extend
umbo


approach


slightly


has


the


periphery


beyond
crown c


the


margin


papillae


test


of the


and


and
test.


scattered


papillae


occur


along


rays.


The


interradiate


areas


devoid of papillae but are covered by a reticulate mesh.


The


umbo


has a


diameter of


about 0.4 mm.


The maximum


ameter of the test is 2.6 mm.


The rays have a width of 0.2


mm. near their junction


with


mm. at the margin of the test.


the umbo and a


The umbonal


width of 0.3
papillae have


a surface diameter of about 100 t.


First appearance:
Occurrence: Oca


At a depth of 720-730 feet in W-336.


la limestone.


DISCO CYCLINA


(ASTEROCYCLINA)


MONTICEILLENSIS Cole and Ponton


Plate 1


, Figure 8; Plate 2,


Figure 11


Plate 8, Figure 23;


Plate 13, Figure 5; Plate 23,


Figures 1-12


1934.


Discocyclina
Amer. Midlan


(Asterocyclina) it
d Nat., vol. 15, No.


ionticellensis


Cole


pp. 141, 142, pl.


1 Ponton,
figs. 6-11.


MEGALOSPHERIC FORM.-Test small, lenticular to robustly


lenticular,


radiate.


The


rays


become


pronounced


near the


periphery of the test but are barely visible over the inflated


central portion.


The specimens from this well have the pro-


jecting portion of the rays broken, but the base of the rays
is visible on the outer margin of the test. All of the specimens


have 4 pr
specimens


'onounced rays


have


with


apical


2 to


crown


4 secondary rays.


large,


The


well-developed


papillae
margin


which


decrease


test.


The


in size


and


central


prominence toward the


papillae


have


surface


meters of 80 to 125 ;t.


The papillae near the margin of the


test are nearly flush


with


the surface of the test and have





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Specimen
number


Shape of ini-
tial chamber


spherical
subspherical
subspherical


Diameters
initial
chamber
100 lp
120x90 p
130x100 p


Distance


tween ends of
curved second
chamber


160 /,
140 JL
160


Distance
across both
chambers


160 p
140
160 p


vertical sections


height of the embryonic chambers


is 90 to
a ring
normal


100


The


nearly


rectangular


embryonic


square


chambers


chambers


equatorial


beyond


surrounded


which


occur


chambers.


The equatorial


crease


size


chambers are


toward


rectangular


periphery


in shape


test.


The


and in-
Srayed


character of the test is


clearly


shown


by the arrangement of


equatorial


chambers
portion.


chambers.


much


The


test and in


about


larger


equatorial


a ray
. but


have
those


Along


than


chambers


a length


rays


those


near the
40 to 65


interradiate


i equatorial
interradiate


periphery


and a


portion


width
have


length of 20 to 30 p. and a


width of about 15/ .


The


thin


center


equatorial


but distinct.


of the


layer
It has


test


as seen


in vertical


virtually the


periphery.


same


The


sections


height from


height,


very
the


including


roof


and


floor walls


about


the center and


jL at


periphery.


The


lateral


chambers


arranged


regular


tiers


pecially in


the central


portion


of the test where


heavy pillars


occur


side


There are


the


10 to


equatorial


lateral


layer


chambers to a


center


the


tier on


test.


each
The


number


lateral


chambers


a tier


decreases


regularly


periphery


approached,


but


equatorial


layer


covered


one


or more


lateral


chambers


the


periphery.


The lateral


chambers at the


periphery and


over the center of


test


and


have a


roofs


cavities


length


thin,


open


La


iL and


about


and


distinct


a height <
thickness.


well


Floors


The


preserved


chamber
specimens


1




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


papillae are distinct over the central area of the test but less


pronounced toward the periphery.


is from 2.1 to 3.4 mm.


The diameter of the test


the thickness from 1.1 to 1.5 mm.


The


equatorial


sections


indicate


the


rayed


character


the


test.


The equatorial


chambers at the center are small


and square but become elongate as the periphery of the test


is approached.


The equatorial chambers in the rayed portion


of the test are more elongate than those in the areas between


the


rays.


average


equatorial


chamber


in a ray


has


length of about 80 u and a width of about 20 a, but an average


equatorial chamber in


the interradiate portion has a length


of 40 A and a width of 18 g.
In vertical sections the equatorial layer is distinct,


very


thin at the center of the test, but of marked height near the
periphery of the test. The change from the thin portion to
the expanded part is abrupt. The height of the thin portion,
including floor and roof, is about 20 /i. The expanded portion
has a height of about 45 p. Other vertical sections show the


equatorial layer without the expanded peripheral part.


sections


pass


across


interray


part


test.


Such
Those


sections with the expanded equatorial portion include a por-
tion of the rays.


The


lateral


chambers


arranged


in regular tiers


tween heavy pillars particularly in the central portion of the


test.


There are 25 to 30


lateral


chambers


to a


tier in


the


central portion of the test on each side of the equatorial layer.
The number of lateral chambers to a tier decreases regularly


toward


periphery,


but


periphery


the


equatorial


layer is covered by 4 or 5 lateral chambers.


Near the peri-


phery and over the center of the


test the lateral


chambers


have a length of 100 u.


The height of the chamber cavity is


about


and


the


floor


and


roofs


about


thick.


Directly above the equatorial layer the lateral chambers are
small and so depressed that the floors and roofs almost touch.


DIscussIoN.-Cole and Ponton


described megalospheric


forms of D. (Asterocyclina) monticellensis from the Southern





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


spheric forms
identical with


in the


the


Hilliard


Turpentine


type specimens except


Company


that


No.


protruding


portions


the


rays


broken


specimens


from


this


well.
Associated with these megalospheric specimens were large


microspheric


forms


which


have


general


features


megalospheric forms.


no other


Asterocyclinae were found


these


samples,


it is


logical to assume


that


these specimens


represent the two generations of this species.


In the Southern States Oil


Corporation


well D.


(Asterocy-


clina)


monticellensis wa


found


in association


with L.


(Plio-


pidina)


ariana Cole and Ponton at a depth


of 1740 feet.


Hilliard


Turpentine


Company


well


(Asterocyclina)


monticellensis i


found 133 feet below the hori


on of L.


(Plio-


lepidina)


ariana.


First appearance


At a depth


of 1198-1200 feet


W-336.


Occurrence


Middle


Eocene


Lisbon


formation.


DISCOCYCLINA


(ASTEROCYCLINA)


NASSAUENSIS Cole


, n. sp.


Plate 1


, Figure 16


Plate 2


Figure


, Figures 1,


Plate


, Figures


5, 6;
1-8.


Plate 12,


Test


small


, lenticular


radiate


with


four


five


arms


which


start


papillate
periphery


near


the


periphery


apical


The central


region,


portion


test


less


densely


of the test is


; surface
papillate


inflated


strongly
near the


, sloping


steeply


The


first


peripheral


and


then


portion


more


gently


of the test


toward


is thin


e periphery.
interradiate


parts


but swollen


where


rays


commence


so that


rim


an undulating appearance.


The papillae are round and of


varying


intensity.


Most


specimens


have


very


large,


raised


and pronounced


papillae in


the apical


crown


, but a few speci-


mens
area.


have


small


weak


specimens


, reduced


papillae


papillae are


over


the


much reduced


central


size


and importance in the peripheral


portion


of the


test.


specimens


examined


were


megalospheric.


Diameter


the




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


both chambers including the walls is 140 a and measurement


at right angles to the foregoing is 120 p.


The internal height


of the embryonic chambers is 100 p to 140 p..
The equatorial chambers are rectangular in shape and of


varying


length


those of the


rayed


portion


of the


test are


longer than those of the interray parts.


Average chambers


in the interradiate portion are nearly square with radial and


tangential


diameters of about 20 p.


The elongate chambers


of the rayed portion have radial diameters of about 40 and


transverse diameters of about 20 u.


The radial walls of ad-


jacent annuli alternate in alignment and are slightly thinner


the


rayed


portion


than


the


interradiate


parts.


The


equatorial layer is about 30 p. high near the center of the test


and about 40 u high at the periphery.
include the roof and floor walls. There


These measurements
Sis a sudden expansion


in the height of the equatorial layer where the vertical section


encounters a ray


(pl.


,fig. 3)


In this situation the equa-


trial layer is about 120 p high.
The lateral chambers are numerous with 12 to 20 cham-
bers on each side of the equatorial layer in the inflated portion


of the test.


The lateral chambers decrease gradually toward


the


periphery,


but


there are


least


two


layers of lateral


chambers covering the equatorial layer even at the base of


the rays.


The lateral chambers are arranged in regular tiers


in the central


portion


of the test.


However,


there is some


overlapping of the lateral chambers in the central region and
this overlapping becomes pronounced in the outer areas of the


test.


The cavity of the lateral chambers is slit-like between


thick roofs and floors.


Average lateral


chambers


near the


periphery of the test have a length of 60 to 80 /p; the internal


height of the lateral


chambers is about 6


and the


roofs


and floors have a thickness of about 10 p..


Heavy pillars are


irregularly present in


the


central


area,


and


smaller


pillars


are found in the outer portions of the test.


have a surface diameter of 80 u,


The small pillars


but the large central pillars


-.~I a C aa





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


A number of species of


from
chipol


sion.


the


upper


ensis is


The


Eocene


the


closest


surface


Asterocyclina have


Florida


ally


Asterocyclina


which


species


been described
Asterocyclina


under


chipolensis


discus-
pitted,


whereas


that


. nassauensws


is papillate.


chipolensis


has


more


rays,


the


lateral


chambers


arranged


very


regular tiers and are more open.


Genus


PSEUDOPHRAGMINA


H. Douvill6


, 1923


Subgenus


PROPOROCYCLINA


Vaughan


Cole,


1940


PSEUDOPRAGMINA (PROPOROTOYCI.NIA) OEDARKEYSENSIS Cole, n. sp.


Plate 2


, Figure 13


Figures


Plate 18


Plate


, Figure 9
', Figures


; Plate 26,
1-2


1942.


Pseudophragmina


Geol.
(not
seum,


Survey


Bull.


Discocyclina


(Proporocyclina )
20, pp. 46-48, pl.


zarago
3, pp.


senses


Vaughan,


Cole


Proc. U. S.
1-3, 1929).


Florida


, figs.
Nat.


1-5
Mu-


The specimens which were assigned to the Mexican species


described


Corporation's


Vaughan


Sholtz No.


came


from


(W-166)


Suwannee


at a


depth


Petroleum
1470 feet.


At the time this


identification was made


Vaughan agreed with


determination.


tinued


Recently


; detailed
Vaughan


During the


studies


and


Cole


past


year


American


have


had


some


Vaughan


has


con-


Discocyclinidae.
correspondence


with regard to the Florida specimens which


were


ass


signed to


zaragosensis


Vaughan 00 wrote Cole


as follows:


"I have


now restudied


every


species


the


family


Disco-


cyclinidae


which


been


described


from


America


and


appears that a good many


changes will


need to


be made.


zaragosensis


pretty


surely


should


put


into


subgenus


Athecocyclina.


The specimen


that you had from the Florida


well


belong


the


subgenus


Proporocyclina,


and


now


convinced


that


they


referrable


cushmani


lower


middle


Eocene


species


from


Mexico.


But


I have


7 V-


concluded


....


classification


zaragosenszs


* . .


. (P




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


tion


and figures of


cushmani.


Specimens were finally sent


Vaughan 61 who wrote as follows


"I have compared the specimens that you sent me


good specimens of Pseudophragmina cushmani.


me that they are not that species.


with


It seems to


I am inclined to agree with


you that they represent a new species which belongs in the


same group as P


. cushmani."


The following description is based on specimens from the


Suwannee Petroleum Corporation's Sholtz No. 1


a depth of 1470 feet.


(W-166)


These specimens were selected to


the types of the new species and three specimens are refigured


(pl.


,fig.1


Test


medium


26, figs. 3, 4).


size,


flat


lenticular


umbonate,


with


without a narrow encircling rim.


All the specimens recovered


were broken so that the exact diameter could not be deter-


mined.


The largest specimen measured had a diameter of 2.9


mm. so that the diameter of an entire specimen would exceed


3 mm.


The thickness through the center is from 0.56 to 0.9


mm.


The surface of the test is covered


by small


papillae


which are slightly stronger on some specimens than on others.
The central umbonate portion has a diameter from 1.3 to 2.1
mm.


The embryonic apparatus consists of two chambers,


larger of which virtually surrounds the smaller.


chamber is subspherical with an internal


120 L.


the


The initial


diameter of 60 to


The diameter across both chambers is 160 to 220 jt.


The equatorial chambers near the center of the test are
nearly square with radial and tangential diameters of 20 to


40 u.


Near the periphery of the test the equatorial chambers


are elongate with radial diameters of 40 to 60 x and tangential


diameters of 20 to 40 u.


The equatorial layer is very thin


and does not increase in height as the periphery is approached.
The height of the equatorial layer is 8 to 15 .
The lateral chambers are low with thick roofs and floors.
Toward the equatorial layer the chamber cavities are virtu-
ally obliterated, the chamber cavities auuearinE as slits: near





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


tiers


but


where


pillars


not


present


the


lateral


chambers


overlap


from


one


tier


another.


Lateral


chambers


have


length of


40 to 120 p and a height of 5 to 15 .


The thickness


of the


roofs


Pillars


and floors


irregularly


is variable from


present


with


10 to 40
a surface


diameter


40 to


100


The


one


next
and


equatorial


annulus


adjacent
irregular


sections


more


annuli.
others


show


that


alignment


or less


Some


straight.


chamber


with


chamber


The


walls


those


walls


annular


wavy


stolon


distally


Type


situated.
locality


Suwannee


Petroleum


Corporation


Sholtz


No.


(W-166)


at a


depth


of 1470 feet.


Holotype


(Florida


Geol.


Survey Cat.


No.


1939)


Hilliard


Turpentine


Company well


No.


(W-336)


specimens
blanpiedi


above


were


which


found


as cedarkeysensis


in association


same


from


with


the


Sholtz


cooke


specimens


No.


and


described


(W-166)


is not considered neces


sary to describe th


specimens as the


illustrations


characters


which


6, fig.
agree


,fig.


in every


respect


show
with


essential


those


type


specimens


cedarkeysensis.


First appearance


At a depth


of 1785-1795 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence


Salt Mountain limestone.


PSEUDOPHRAGMTINA


(PROPORO CYCLINA)


CITEENSIS


(Vaufhan)


Plate 1


, Figure 9


Plate 18


, Figure 10


Plate 25,


Figures 1-6


Plate 28


, Figure 6.


1928.


1941.


Discocyclina


Survey


19th Ann. Report,


Pseudophragmma


Florida Geol.


citrensis


160,


(Proporocyclina )


Survey Bull.


Vaughan,
pl. 2, figs.


citrensis


, pl. 17


Florida


(Vaughan)


figs.


Geol.


Cole,


Numerous small specimens were found which are assigned


this species.


These specimens


are normally inflated,


lenti-


cular


cross-section


shape


with


finely


papillate


surfaces.


-~~ - .i .


n n


(Discocyclina )


L .I





I





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX

Three specimens in the collection of the Florida Geological


Survey from U. S. G.


locality No. 7266, near Citra, Florida,


and identified by


Vaughan as citrensis have been


compared


with


the specimens


from


the


Hilliard


Turpentine Company


well No. 1


(W-336)


There is no essential difference in the


general shape or surface ornamentation.


Vaughan has indicated that citrensis is close to P.


flint-


enszs


(Cushman)


The


specimens


under


consideration


semble citrensis more than specimens which


considered to represent flintensis.


the writer has


. flintensis is normally a


much larger species which has a larger embryonic apparatus,
and the equatorial layer has considerably greater height and


distinctness.


In citrensis the equatorial layer shows only as


a line,


whereas in


clearly observed.


flintensis the individual chambers can be
The lateral chambers of flintensis are more


open and regular than those of citrensis.


In fact, it is difficult


to count the number of lateral chambers in citrensis because
of their irregularity.


First appearance


At a depth of 548-555 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence: Ocala limestone.

PSEUDOPHBAGMINA (PROPOROCYCIINA) PFINTENSIS (Cushman)
Plate 25, Figures 7-9


1917.
1941.


Orthophragmina


flintensis Cushman,


Paper 108-G, p. 115, pi. 40, figs. 1, 2.
Pseudophragmina (Proporocyclina)


S. Geol.


flintensis


Survey


Prof.


(Cushman).


Vaughan and Cole, Geol.
pl. 20, figs. 8, 9.


Numerous flat,


Soc.


Amer. Sp. Paper No. 30, pp. 61, 62,


finely papillate specimens are


referred to


this species although the specimens are small.


The horizontal


sections are identical with those of P
but the vertical sections are different.


First appearance:


. citrensis


At a depth of 575-585 feet in


(Vaughan)


W-336.


Occurrence:


Ocala limestone.


PSEUDOPHRAGMINA (PROPOROCYCLINA) HANNAI Cole, n. sp.


-. ~ ~ Sn -ar *.1 .4 nI *C .h. .4n*


__ ___ _


_





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


surrounded


a thicker


area


beyond


which


the test


becomes


thinner


(pl.


, fg.


One


or two


individuals


were


flat


lenticular
recovered


with
were


a narrow


marginal


megalospheric.


rim


The


the


average


individual


diameter


about 3.0 mm.


the thickness about 0.8 mm.


The
regular


equatorial


annuli


chambers


with


annular


rectangular


stolon


on the


, arranged


distal


side


the chambers.
in alignment.


The radial


The radial


walls in adjacent annuli


wall


are often irregular


tend to


and wavy.


The


lateral


chambers are


low


in most case


the chamber


cavity is a slit
floors and roofs


actual


thickness.


between


thick


are thick there


Toward


floors


and


roofs.


Although


is a considerable range


equatorial


layer


in the


chamber


cavities are more compressed than those nearer the periphery
of the test. Normally the lateral chambers are not in regular


tiers


but


overlap.


However


when


pillars


present,


lateral


The


chambers may


pillars


in regular tiers


irregularly


present.


between


they


are


! pillars.
present,


they are strong and taper regularly from the periphery to the
equatorial layer.


Tables 6 and


7 give the


measurements of


nine


specimens.


Type


Turpentine
1745'.


locality


Mary's


Company well


No.


River


Corporation


1 (W-336)


at a depth


Hilliard
of 1735-


Cotypes


(Florida


Geol.


Survey


Cat.


No.


S-3001)


First appearance


At a depth


of 1680-1690 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence
Specimens


Middle


this


Eocene.
species


were


found


considerable


abundance from 1690 to


1780 feet.


The specimens were


first


identified
However.


as P


detailed


. (Proporocyclina)


study


indicated


cedarkeysensis


that


there


are


Cole


differences


which
most


seem


striking


consistent


difference


the


specimens


is observed


examined.


vertical


The


sections.


hannai has more massive internal features of


coarser


aspect than doe


fl I


(P


-) cedarn.rke. mren..


.(P







TABLE 6


Measurements


of Vertical


Sections


of Pseudophragmina


hannai


Specimen


Diameter


Thickness


Number of lateral chambers on
each side of the equatorial
layer
Embryonic chambers
length
height
Height of equatorial layer
at center
at periphery

Length of lateral chambers


Height of lateral chambers


Thickness of roofs and floors


Surface


diameter


of pillars


W-336
1680-1690'


W-336


1735-174


3.1 mm.


0.82 mm.


8+


160p
80 ft

5ft
10 ft

60-120 ot


10-20 pf


20-35 f


50 S


60-80 p


I | '


I


W-336
1735-174


2.6 mm.


3.0 mm.


0.92 mm.


11


220 g
100 f

15 f
20 p

60-120 ft


10-20 pf


10-20 pf


60-100 pt


W-336
1735-1745'


3.3 mm.


0.84 mm.


220 g
120 g


0.8 mm.


6


240 f
100 f

10 p
20 O

80-100 pt


10-30 p


20-40 pt


10-20 pt


20-40 pt


60-80 ,p


W-336
1780-1785'


3.2 mm.


0.72 mm.





..... . ..S. *. S S ... ..... .

90 Cc

15 g
20 p

80-140 p


10-20 1'


20-40 p


80-100 p


80-120 g


m e aam a ma m m


1




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Measurements


of Horizontal


TABLE
Sections


Pseudophragmina


hannai


Specimen


Diameter


Internal diameter of initial
chamber

Distance between ends of
curved chamber

Distance across both
chambers

Equatorial chambers
at center
radial diameter


tangential


diameter


at periphery
radial diameter


tangential


diameter


W-336


1737-1745'


2.8 mm.


100 $


240 g


240


80 $


40 u


W-336
1780-1785'


3.0 mm.


120 p


240 p


240 p


40 $


40 p


80 $


40 #


W-336
1780-1785'


2.9 mm.


220(


240 ip


40 $


40 $


never


has


variable


external


shape


exhibited


hannai.


hannai


occurs


just


above


the


zone


which


cedarkeysensis


the


two


species


found.


not


occur


together


as could


although


observed
specimens


hannai


with P


were


found


cedarkeysensis.


recognized since


hannai


had a


Howev


typical


cavmgs
er, they


light


could


tan


color


samples
readily
as well


as its


distinctive


external


appearance,


but


cedarkeysensis


this


well had a


This


species


white color.
is named for


Marcus A.


Hanna


who


has


- -- a1 a


40 u


. (P


. (P


. (P


.(P


r 1 -- A


Y





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


1936.


1938.


Discocyclina cookei
42, figs. 1-6.


Discocyclina


Assoc.


Petrol.


Vaughan has


cooked
Geol.,
given


Vaughan,


Vaughan.
vol. 22, p


a detailed


Jour.


Gravell


p. 1010-101


Hanna,
1. 7, fig.


description


256-259,


Bull.


this


Amer.


species.


The


Florida


specimens


entirely


typical


so only


notes


these


specimens will


given.


Test small


thin


flat or selliform


diameter 2.9 to 3.6 mm.


thickness through the center about 0.56 mm.


The


following


table


shows


the


dimensions


the


embry-


onic chambers


in comparison


with


the


type specimens


Diameter


of smaller
chamber *


Distance


between ends
of curved
chamber


Distance


across


both


chambers at
right angles
to (b)


Florida specimen | 140 p | 240 j 220 p
After Vaughan | 135 t | 262-270 | 187-225 I


* Measurements


include


walls.


In a


vertical section the equatorial layer is very depressed,


appearing


only


a dark


line.


The


lateral


chambers


narrow


, elongate slits of


different lengths appearing


between


rather thick


arranged


chambers on


roofs
tiers.
each


and floors.


There


side


The


lateral


about


the equatorial


chambers


layers


layer


the


not


lateral
center.


the


periphery


the


test


there


about


layers


lateral


chambers on each side of the equatorial layer.


The


figure


radial
, plate


chamber


walls


rudimentary


as shown


First appearance


At a depth' ol


1785-1790 feet in


W-336.


Occurrence:
Appearance


Salt


Mountain limestone.


elsewhere


This


species


has


been


reported


from Salt Mountain


6 miles south of Jackson


, Clarke County,


Alabama


has


been


(type locality)


discovered


Gravell


a well


and Hanna "2
Washington


state that it


County,


Ala


bama


, and in one drilled in Polk County


Texas.


Cole 03 found


nnn:..s..^. j.! /^si IOf I O C<,a- 4.-


4-inn frln nknnnwnr 1Tfrolh





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Appendix


Interpretation


Igneous


Rock


Hilliard


Tur-


pentine


Company well


Osborn


Fuller


Ph D.


MEGASCOPIC


EXAMINATION


The


mum


greenish


posed


fragments


coarse


sample


consists


about


dimension


black


crystals
suggest


aphanitic


above


color


and


of several
an igneous


texture.


description


but


crushed


mm.


fragments


The


with


fragments


equidimensional.


mineral
3 rock


Most


several


with


basic


the


were


They


cleavage.


a maxi-


dark
com-
The
and


composition


fragments


platy


answer


in character


with a black to red-brown color.


These apparently are foreign


material


from


overlying


formation.


The


darker


pieces


effervesced in


dilute


hydrochloric acid and appear to


part


of a carbonaceous limestone.


The red-brown fragments were


apparently


limonite


fragment


from


the same


formation.


MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION
GENERAL
Some of the larger fragments were crushed and examined


with


the


index


liquids


and


a polari


microscope.


Other
were


large
made


fragments


and


studied


were


with


mounted


the


and


two


microscope.


thin


These


sections


micro-


scopic


examinations


confirmed


preliminary


deduced from examination of the fragments with


conclusions
the unaided


eye and furnished further information.


The fragments are from a basic igneous rock which


be classed as a


a basalt


and


diabase.


smaller


The
than


minerals


those


larger than


in a gabbro.


would
those


They


coarse aphanitic and seriate.
with most crystals subhedral.


The structure is
The specimens


holocrystalline


show a


typical


f *v A. A -


m


I I


* IJ


__


1


1' 1




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


MINERALS
PLAGIOCLASE
Plagioclase feldspar is the dominant mineral of the thin


sections.


It composes 40% to 60% of all grains.


In compo-


sition the feldspar varies from andesine to labradorite with


labradorite more abundant.
shows albite twinning, and si


The feldspar almost invariably
mall carlsbad twinning is com-


mon.


Rarely


the


feldspar


shows


zoning.


The


feldspar


relatively unaltered,


but


most


crystals show tiny fractures


along which there has been sericitization.


Some grains show


saussuritization.

PYROXENE


The dominant pyroxene is pigeonite.


It makes up about


25%


to 35


of the slides.


It occurs mostly in short stubby


anhedral crystals intersticially between the feldspar.


Occa-


sionally,
sections


the crystals are subhedral;


can


found.


The


larger


and rarely, eight sided


crystals


show


parting.


Pigeonite is colorless but the abundant inclusions tend to give


brownish


tinge.


Where


these


inclusions


are


closely


spaced,
twinned.


schiller


structure


evident.


Some


crystals


Some of the grains are coarser than the majority.


Hypes-


then


is the dominant pyroxene


in these grains.


It is pale


green and very slightly pleochroic from greenish to pale red.
Inclusions producing schiller structure are commonly present.
Hypersthene crystals are present rarely in some of the grains
composed of smaller crystals.


ACCESSORY


AND


ALTERATION PRODUCTS


Magnetite is the most abundant accessory mineral.


apparently
alteration


titaniferous in
o leucoxene can


some


instances,


be observed.


because


It is
little


Other accessories


are rutile needles in the feldspar, colorless amphibole,


is probably tremolite, and some flakes of biotite.
two minerals are probably alteration products. (


C: nn


which


The latter
theirr altera-


r \nnrl n i-c n- n n4-n1 let nir n a n in4n f n n+O rr nr.a a A




STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


bottom


well.


However


because


thick


lava


flows


also


may be composed of a diabase,


mens came from a


possible that these speci-


thick lava flow.


COMPARISON WITH
Basic dikes are widely dis'


OTHER BASIC DIKES


tribute and have been intruded


at different


times


the


geologic


history


North


America.


Only


the


Rocky


well


established


Mountains


and


will


important
considered


intrusions


trying


east


deter-


mine


the correlation


of the


Florida


diabase.


PRE-CAMBRIAN


DIABASES


Diabase


dikes


common


in pre-Cambrian


rocks.


The


two


most


important


areas


the


Canadian


Shield


and


Adirondack


Mountains.


Moore


has


published


a sum-


mary


the


igneous


rock


the


Canadian


Shield


their


relation
Shield


gold


area.


depo


Moore


states


Basic
. "In


dikes are
my study


abundant


the


Algoman


sequences,


lamphrophyres


were


found


areas


investigated.'
the Algoman,


Moore


like those


also


states


"The


lamprophyres


of later geological systems,


constitute


a group of rocks of


quite


varied


compositions.


The minettes


or mica lamprophyres,


are the most common


with hornblende


types
rarer.
more


next


in order


These


acidic


than


and


dikes


augite


and


olivene


characteristically


ordinary


basalt.


They


varieties


porphyritic


not


much


and


seem


correlate with


the Florida


diabase.


The Adirondack Mountains have many diabase dikes.


Nu-


merous


descriptions


local


occurrences


have


appeared


literature.
survey in
summary


Kemp


1893.


which


and


Marsters


Buddington


has


diabase


made


published


dikes


detailed
.d a mor


regional
e recent


considered.


The


diabase dikes are


younger than


other pre-Cambrian rocks


but do not cut the Cambrian Potsdam


sandstone.


They show


"distinct


chill


zones


(locally


glass)


locally


miarolitic


- -





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


amygdaloidal structure."


dorite


6 The mineral composition is labra-


, plagioclase, augite, and small amounts of hypersthene


and


biotite.


Although


the


porphyritic


and


amygdaloidal


structures characteristic of these rocks are not found in the


Florida sample,


the composition and


diabasic structure


much


more


akin


Adirondack


specimens


than


the


Canadian Shield basic rocks.


DEVONIAN DIABASE


The post Devonian alkaline intrusions of Quebec forming
the cores of the Monteregian Hills have associated with them


many


basic


dikes.


These


are,


according


Adams


7 and


Osborne,


mainly tinguaite porphyries,


camptonites, etcetera.


These dikes are
Florida sample.


much


more alkaline


character than


the


CARBONIFERO US DIKES


There are abundant dikes in New England and New York


basic


authors


character.


with


Carboniferous


They


general


age.


have


agreement


These


been


that


dikes


described


they


are


commonly


various
probably
lampro-


phyres


alkaline


composition


which


classified


mainly


as camptonite and monchiquite. They differ from the Florida
sample both in texture and composition. The latter is most


important from the standpoint of correlation.

TRIASSIC DIKES


Probably


the


best


known


and


most


widespread


the


basic igneous rocks in the east are of Triassic age.


sills


Dikes,


, and flows of this age have been discovered from Nova


Scotia to North Carolina.


The rocks are diabases and basalts.


Fisher made the following statement concerning dikes around


Lewiston, Maine.


"Urry


ported an age of 170


dike


material


from


the


(personal
8 million
Lewiston


communication)


has re-


years for freshly blasted


City


quarry.


states


4-l,.n4- 4-1-.4r. 4r. 4-i-tn ea < nrrn or rmvd-nra frani 4-ha Alin nit lfT+





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


basic dikes of the Lewiston region are property placed in the
Triassic." 0


The


best known


of these


Triassic


basic


rocks


the


Pali-


sade diabase sill.


Frederick


Walker :o has published a detailed


study of this


formation.


The specimen from


the Florida


well


shows


interesting


comparisons


with


Walker's


description.


The fragments from the Florida well represent rock recovered


upper


feet
part


drilling.


some


Therefore


igneous


mass


, they
(dike,


presumably


sill,


or flow)


The


upper part of the Palisades sill is characterized by the


pyrox-


ene


(pigeonite)


Florida


well


according


specimen


Walker


is pigeonite.


The


pyroxene


Hypersthene


occurs


both


the


upper


and


lower


chilled


phase


Palisade


and seems to


part


the


incompatible


diabase.


with


Hypersthene


pigeonite i
is present


with


unchilled
pigeonite


in some grains in


the


Florida


well specimens.


The dominant feldspar of the top of the Palisade sill shows


same


range


in composition


as that


the


Florida


well


while


the feldspar of


the lower part of the


Palis


ades


is more


basic and the central


part more acidic than that of the upper


chilled
seems


zone.


The


very


specimen


similar to


the


Florida


chilled


well


zone


(W-336)


Pali-


sade


diabase sill.


Marsters,"


while


studying


Triassic


dikes


Nova


Scotia


, noted how very similar they were


Kemp's


Triassic


slides from


EARLY


New


TERTIARY


Jersey.

DIKES


Along the


Balcones


many basic intrusions.


mately 200 mile


Fault


zone


there


a belt


containing


This belt is known to extend approxi-


and is believed by some geologists to extend


considerably


further


northeast.


Lonsdale 1


has


dis-


cussed


thes


fissure


ligneous
eruptions


rocks


and


associated


he states that the


with


faulting.


intrusions


end


the


Cretaceous


and


extending


into


Tertiary


The


dikes





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX


are basaltic types with a uniform total iron content.


They


have a marked alkaline character with sodium predominating


over potash.


Basaltic types without analcite are rare.


high alkalinity of these rocks differs from the Florida speci-
men and seems to preclude correlation.

CONCLUSIONS


The sample from the Florida


well is an olivine free dia-


The


base.
more


In general the basic dikes of the Canadian Shield are


acidic


than


typical


diabase.


The


dikes


New


England, New York, the Monteregian Hills, and the Balcones
Fault zone are all much more alkaline than the diabase of


the Florida well.


Only two groups of dikes seem to be similar


to the Florida diabase in composition


the pre-Cambrian dikes


of the Adirondack Mountains, and the Triassic dikes found


from Nova


Scotia


North


Carolina.


The


diabase


the


Florida sample agrees surprisingly well in mineral composi-


tion with the upper chilled zone of the Palisade diabase.


The


sample from Florida
as Triassic in age.


Well


(W-336)


is tentatively


classified





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


Appendix


Certain information


concerning the wells which


could not


be incorporated


conveniently


in the


main


body


text is


given for the sake of


completeness.


. MARY


RIVER


OIL


CORPORATION,


HILLIARD TURPENTINE COMPANY WELL


(W-336)


The


first


salt


water


was


encountered


between


and


2230 feet.


A sample of this water was analyzed


by the City


Jacksonville.


1937
this


, by


Malcolm


This


sample


Pirnie.


The


was


collected


following


August
analysis


sample:


Constituents


Total soli<
Total har
Silica (Si'
Iron (FE4
Aluminum
Calcium (


ds
dnei
03)


3S ....C .....-.... .-C.... ..C . .... C .. .. ..- .- ...
S C C C *C S- S S C C C* CC C S C CC CS C C S


Oa) -

:Ca) ......


-* .. C C C .....


Parts per
million
64,340
9,655
56
57.2
463


Magnesium


(Mg)


Sodium


Bicarbonate


Potassium
alkalinity


(Na-K)


19.242


Sulphates
Chlorine


(SO4)
(Cl) ....


3,912
33,600


(NO


DRILLERS


20.77


LOG


MARY'S RIVER OIL CORPORATION


HILLIARD


TURPENTINE


COMPANY


WELL


(W-336)


DEPTH


FORMATION
Surface sand, gray and soft.


Soft


brown sandstone.


Sandy marl with shells.


Lime shell


, blue, hard.


Marl and shell.


Blue,


gray, soft.


Dark gray,


hard lime.


Lime and marl


fossils.


It, I 3 I.,-,--


n r -E





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


DEPTH


FORMATION


Marl


with lime shells.


Hard lime.
Sandy lime.


183-
187-
210-
220-
225-
250-
258-
264-
268-
275-
282-
290-
300-
305-
340-
387-


Hard lime with


Sandy
Hard


Very
Soft,


lime


Set 16"


casing 190'


dark streaks.


with good rainbows.


lime shells.


hard


lime.


dark sandy lime.


Quartz sand,


with sweet water.


Carrying water.


Marl


and lime


Very hard,


Sandy


gra;


shell.
y lime.


lime.


Sandy lime with bed of fossils.
Sandy lime.
Dark sandy lime.
Soft sandy lime.


394- 412


Marl


and lime shells.


412-
417-
420-
425-
470-
480-
483-
500-
505-
512-
525-
540-
565-
568-
590-
600-


Top of Ocala lime.
Soft white lime.


Hard lime.


Soft
Dark
Hard


lime.
gray
lime.


sand.


Soft lime.
Hard lime.


Soft
Very


lime.
hard lime.


Soft lime.


Soft lime


, very porous.


Hard lime.


Soft
Bed


lime.
of fossils.


Hard lime.
Sandy shale


and lime.


Strong gas odor.
Soft lime.


Lime


630-
635-
670-
695-
697-
700-
725-
740-
760-


with shells.


Hard lime.
Soft lime.


Hard


lime.


Hard lime


Hard


with


of fossils.


lime.


Soft lime.
Hard lime.
Soft lime.


795- 800
800- 820
820- 845
845- 855


Color changed from


white


to light


brown,


of fossils.


Hard lime.
Light hard lime, fine grain.
Soft lime.


620- 625






STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES


DEPTH
990-1025
1025-1035
1035-1083
1083-1095
1095-1130
1130-1140
1140-1150
1150-1195
1195-1210
1210-1215
1215-1225
1225-1255
1255-1260
1260-1270
1270-1280
1280-1295
1295-1305
1305-1308
1308-1335
1335-1360
1360-1385
1385-1405
1405-1440
1440-1445
1445-1450
1450-1495
1495-1500
1500-1550
1550-1580
1580-1590
1590-1760
1760-1765
1765-1812


OF WELLS


FORMATION


Grayish brown lime,
Grayish brown lime,


Grayish bri
Gray lime,
Gray lime,
Gray lime,
White lime,


White


own


lime,


soft.
very hard.
soft.
. Set 1135'


lime.


with hard streaks.
with hard streaks,


with


hard


of 10"


with some fossils.


streaks.


casing.


Very hard white lime.
Light brown lime.


Soft streaks,
Brown sandy


Hard gray


Hard


gray


light brown
liftie.


lime.
lime.


shale


lime.


breaks.


Hard brown lime.


Soft


gray


Gray-brown


lime.


lime,


hard.


Gray-brown sandy lime,


Sand


Brown,
Brown,
Brown.


showed


hard,


tested 50


sulphur water.


sand.


soft lime.


soft lime


, hard streaks.


soft lime.


Hard and soft gray


Hard
Lime
Light


brownish


gray


with about 3'


lime.
Slime.
shale.


brown sandy lime.


Light browr
Bright light


Light
Light


brown


i lime,


very


brown lime


lime,


brown lime,


very


hard.
very
soft.


break


Reset 10"


casing 1485'


hard.


of shale.


Light brown lime.
Gray sandy shale.
Light brown lime.


1812


-1826


1826-1835


1835


-1840


Hard,


flinty


1


Brown sandy
Brown sandy


ime,
lime


shows asphalt streaks.
. shows oil.


lime.


1840-1845
1845-1858
1858-1924
1924-1932
1932-1945
1945-1950
1950-1955
1955-1965
1965-1975
1975-1980
1980-1985
1985-2025
2025-2083
'ono nnn/\r


Gray lime.
Gray lime,


soft.


Brown and gray lime, soft.


Brown


and gray


lime,


soft.


Brown and gray lime, soft.
Brown gray lime, hard.


Brown gray


lime, some


Light brown and gray


Still


green shale,


lime,


Good showing oil at 1975.


Light
Oil
Ligl
Bro'


it


brown


gray


showing.
it brown and gray


wn


sandy


lime,
nfl .. A -


lime


lime


shows asphalt and


hard.


hard.


soft.


soft.


hard.
,t4


.. V Atr it t


I





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


TWENTY-SIX


DEPTH


FORMATION


2230-2235
2235-2245
2245-2265
2265-2290
2290-2305
2305-2312
2312-2325
2325-2338
2338-2350
2350-2362
2362-2425
2425-2430
2430-2445
2445-2465
2465-2477
2477-2490
2490-2495
2495-2505
2505-2515
2515-2525
2525-2550
2550-2560
2560-2573
2573-2635
2635-2645
2645-2680
2680-2685
2685-2710
2710-2720
2720-2730
2730-2795
2795-2807
2807-2815
2815-2855
2855-2860
2860-2880
2880-2890
2890-2895
2895-3130
3130-3145
3145-3165
3165-3175
3175-3205
3205-3220


Dark


gray


sandy


Gray brown sandy


Brown


blue


Gray blue sandy


Light
Browr
Gray


Blue
Blue


lime.
lime,


sandy
lime.


soft.
lime.


brown lime.


1 gray
lime, s


shale.
shale,


sandy


lime,


soft.


3ome shale.


small


globules


Light brown lime,


Light
Very


brown lime.


hard


light


som


brown


of asphalt.
e blue shale.


lime.


Very hard gray lime.


Gray and


blue lime.


Dark blue and gray lime.
Grayish blue lime, some blue shale.


Grayish blue
Blue lime, bl


Dark


blue


lime.


ue anhydrite.


lime


Dark blue lime.


Gray


lime


Light gray


Light
Light
Gray


mixed


lime


brown lime.


brown
lime, s


sandy
oft.


some


with
soft.


phosphate


blue


pebbles.


shale.


lime.


Light brown lime.


Dark gray


sandy


lime,


very


hard.


Dark gray sandy lime.


Brown sandy


Light
Buff


Buff


Brow
Buff
Buff


lime,


brown sandy


colored


soft.
lime.


lime.


colored lime, anhydrite.


n


gray


lime,


colored lime,


colored lime


sandy.
sandy.


, sandy,


anhydrite.


Buff colored lime, sandy


Buff
Buff
Buff


colored lime, hard anhydrite.


colored lime,
colored lime.


Bottom


of hard lime.


very hard.


Broken gray shaly lime and sand.


Lime


very


soft.


Gives


but little


sample.


Broken sandy lime and shale, soft.


Broken sandy


lime,


gray.


Very


little sample.


220-3245


3245-3265
3265-3280


3280-3288
R2RR-R2902


Broken
sample.
Broken


sandy


sandy


lime,


lime,


Shelly lime, slacks.


white


pure


very


lime


soft


lime


lime slacks.


slacks.


No sample.


No sample.


Pepper and salt lime, gray hard.
Penner and salt lime. wrav hard.


lime slacks.


Small amount





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS


DEPTH
3716-3725
3725-3730
3730-3733
3733-3748
3748-3865
3865-3882
3882-3915
3915-3929
3929-3935
3935-3944
3944-3945
3945-3958
3958-3963
3963-3983
3983-3985
3985-3990
3990-4008
4008-4012


4012


-4026


4026-4029
4029-4030
4030-4038
4038-4039
4039-4040
4040-4044
4044-4049
4049-4052
4052-4075
4075-4100
4100-4105
4105-4110
4110-4115
4115-4120
4120-4125
4125-4149
4149-4153
4153-4158
4158-4169
4169-4177
4177-4188
4188-4202


FORMATION


Gray


shale


Gray shale,


and
very


lime


breaks.


hard lime.


Very hard lime.


Hard


and stratified.


Very tough


blue


sticky


shale


Lime shells and broken shale.
Gray sticky shale or gumbo.


Gray


or gumbo.


gumbo.


Shale.
Hard lime.
Shale break.
Shale.


Dark shale
Dark gray


Very


hard,


lime


streaks.


lime, shale streaks.


blue


slaty


Very hard, gray shale.


Hard


shale.


lime and shale streaks.


Blue shale,


Hard


shale


sandy.
. lime


showing.
Sandy lime and shale.


Sandy


Gas showing at


streaks,


broken


top of


casing.


formations.


Sand


shale.


Sandy shale, lime shells.


Sandy shale,
Shale.


Shale


Gumbo,
Shale.


Sandy
Shale,
Shale


lime shells,


black


bluish


chunks of


asphalt.


sand.


gray


shale.


gray
and


sand.


Caving shale.


Sandy
Sandy
Lime.
Lime
Lime.


Gray


lime.
lime


shale.


shale.


shaly


lime.


Red rock and red stained shale.


Sandy
Sandy


lime.
lime,


very


hard.


Dark lime.


2-4209


4209-4212


4212


-4215


4215-4220
4220-4227
4227-4232


-4260


Sandy


lime.


Brown sandy
Sandy shale.
Shale.
Lime.


Lime
Shale.


lime.


hard.


4260-4266


Sandy shale.





100 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN TWENTY-SIX

DEPTH FORMATION
4331-4333 Shale and sand streaks. Oil showing.
4333-4375 Gumbo or sticky shale.
4375-4385 Blew tools up in casing 350'.
4385-4435 Gumbo and sticky shale.
4435-4437 Lime and pyrite, very hard.
4437-4445 Gumbo or shale.
4445-4461 Light shale.
4461-4463 Black shale and asphalt.
4463-4485 Shale with green streaks, lime shells.
4485-4515 Sticky shale, light gray in color.
4515-4528 Shale and little sand.
4528-4534 Sand.
4534-4550 Sand. (At 4547' black saturated oil sand.)
4550-4560 Sand, salt water.
4560-4562 Dark shale ........
4562-4587 Heaving sand.
4587-4588 Lime and gravel.
4588-4615 Red sand, hard.
4615-4635 Purple sand rock.
4635-4645 Black shale, very hard. Set 6%" casing.
4645-4670 Black shale, very hard.
4670-4680 Black shale.
4680-4730 Black shale, very hard.
4730-4745 Sand, very hard.
4745-4762 Sand and black shale, very hard.
4762-4764 Lime shell.
4764-4795 Black shale. Oil showing.
4795-4800 Sand, very hard.
4800-4814 Sand, brown in color.
4814-4820 Hard rock.
4820-4821 Hard lime, shell.
4821-4824 Hard rock, black in color, determined as diabase.
Total depth-4824 feet.


CITY OF QUINCY WATER WELL (W-4)

The files of the Florida Geological Survey contain a
driller's log of the City of Quincy water well to a depth of
898' feet. The well was deepened eventually to 1395 feet, but
the driller's log of the deepened portion was not submitted.
That portion of the driller's log which is available follows:

DEPTH FORMATION
0- 15 Sand and clay.
15- 90 Sticky blue clay.
90- 93 Blue mud.
93- 95 Lime rock.
95-100 Sticky white mud.
100-110 Blue mud.
110-115 Gray mud.
115-120 Gray sticky mud.
120-122 Lime rock.
122-132 Sticky clay.
132-138 Gray sticky mud.
138-145 Fine white sand.
145-150 Blue mud.





STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC STUDIES OF WELLS 101


DEPTH FORMATION
150-160 Sticky blue mud.
160-169 Blue mud.
169-170 Rock.
170-175 Blue mud.
175-176 Rock.
176-189 Blue mud.
189-200 Hard, dry sand.
200-202 Blue clay.
202-207 Brown lime rock.
207-215 Hard brown lime.
215-220 Gray lime.
220-228 Sticky mud.
228-230 Lime rock.
230-245 Gray lime rock.
245-250 Lime rock.
250-264 Gray mud.
264-266 Gray rock.
266-280 Gray mud.
280-288 Sticky blue mud.
288-291 Blue shale.
291-300 Lime rock.
300-315 Hard rock.
315-319 Blue sticky mud.
319-325 Dark gray lime.
325-333 Sticky blue marl.
333-336 Blue marl.
336-346 Hard limestone with chalk.
346-355 Hard blue limestone.
355-370 Limestone.
370-380 Hard gray limestone.
380-388 Soft chalky lime.
388-404 Hard limestone.
404-451 Limestone.
451-475 Brown flinty limestone.
475-500 Brown limestone (water bearing).
500-505 Hard white limestone.
505-535 Hard brown limestone.
535-555 Hard white limestone.
555-595 Shelly white limestone.
595-605 Hard limestone.
605-613 Limestone, water bearing.
613-625 Limestone.
625-630 Hard limestone.
630-635 Honey-comb coral.
635-663 Hard limestone.
663-673 Hard lime.
673-745 Limestone.
745-751 Brown flint.
751-898 Hard limestone.



























PLATES 1-29


_____