Neogene biostratigraphy of the Charlotte Harbor area in southwestern Florida ( FGS: Bulletin 43)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Neogene biostratigraphy of the Charlotte Harbor area in southwestern Florida ( FGS: Bulletin 43)
Series Title:
Geological bulletin - Florida Geological Survey ; 43
Physical Description:
vii, 83 p. : ills. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
DuBar, Jules R
Florida Geological Survey
Donor:
unknown ( endowment ) ( endowment )
Publisher:
Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1962

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Geology, Stratigraphic   ( lcsh )
Geology -- Florida -- Charlotte Harbor region   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Jules R. DuBar.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:

The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
ltqf - AAA1659
notis - AKM4758
alephbibnum - 002036998
oclc - 01720448
System ID:
UF00000231:00001


This item has the following downloads:


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Back Cover
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Spine
        Page 86
Full Text





























QE
99
.A3
D0. 43

















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES


SCI-RNCE ROOM
THIS VOLUME HAS BEEN
MICROFILMED BY THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES








STATE OF FLORIDA


STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION

DIVISION OF GEOLOGY





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Robert 0. Vernon, Director




GEOLOGICAL BULLETIN NO. 43


NEOGENE


BIOSTRATIGRAPHY


OF THE
CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA
IN
SOUTHWESTERN FLORIDA


Jules R. DuBar
University of Houston



Published for
THE FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


TALLAHASSEE


1962













FLORIDA STATE BOARD


OF

CONSERVATION


FARRIS BRYANT
Governor


TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State




BAY E. GREEN
Comptroller




THOMAS D. BAILEY
Superintendmnt of Public instrt.rr.ionr


RICHARD ERVIN
Attorney General




J, EDWIN LARSON
Treau rer




DOYLE CONNER
Cornmissionewr of Agriculture


W. RALPH HODGES
Director







LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


cri4Otla a q10lSit4i ttvvey

Tallahassee

November 15, 1961

Honorable Farris Bryant, Chairman
Florida State Board of Conservation
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Governor Bryant:

The Florida Geological Survey is publishing a paper on thne stratig-
raphy and paleontology of the Charlotte Harbor area, as Florida Geo-
logical Survey Bulletin No. 43. This report is entitled, "Neogene
Biostratigraphy of the Charlotte Harbor Area in Southwestern Florida,"
and was prepared by Dr. Jules R. DuBar, Professor of Geology,
University of Houston.

The report presents added data that will relate to the full under-
standing of the difficult stratigraphic and paleontologic problems of
southern Florida. Part of a successful search for oil is contingent upon
a fuller understanding of these formations.


Respectfully yours,
Robert O. Vernon,
Director and State Geologist










-- /


Completed manuscript received
March 1961
Published for the Florida Geological Survey by
Rose Printing Company, Inc,
Tallahassee, Florida
November 15, 1961







TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
Introduction ....-.............----- ........--------------------.-----------.......--- .---...-- -------------
Location and description of area; .... ... .. ------------- ------...... ------------. -.
Present investigation ---.- -------------------------- -- ---.---- -... -. ---- -----
History of previous work ..-- ---... .. ..-......-.... ............... ~-..........---- - ...............-..... 4
Acknow ledgm ents ..... .............. ..... ....... ... 5-----

Stratigraphy -..........-----------------.......-- -----------................ ------------------ 5
General statement -- ... -...... ....---. ....... ----------------- ---- ------. ----- 5
Stratigraphy along Shell Creek ................. ........ ........... ... -...... .....-- ----- ....-- -- ... 7
General statement --......................... -- ----------------------
Tamiami Formation ..... ...........................................-------- 7
Distribution .--...--- _____----------_ ..... ----..-------------.-------.. ------------- 7
Lithology and fossils --- ........................ .... ----- ------------ ------------------- 7
Thickness ..---- ------..... .....--.- .....---.........--....----.....----..... ---... --.------------ --- -- 7
Caloosahatchee Marl ........... ... ......------------ ------------ ------------- 10
General state ent _....-...- ..........------.---.... --- -------- ------- -- ---------- 10
D distribution ....-- .. ..... ......--- ..... ... .........-- ...--------------- ---------------- ------- -- 10
Lithology .................... ... ..-.............-- ---...------ --- 10
C contacts .......................... ....... -- -.......... ----------- 10
Thickness -. ...--- --........----- .......-. --------------- ---- ..-- ---- ---- ----------- 10
Struc ture ............ ..- ..--..-.....-..- .............. --..........--------- --.---------- -- ... 10
Stratal units ............................-------- --------- ---------- 11
Lower limestone (Unit A ) ..............-- --------- -- ---------- -------- ---- ---- 11
Lower inarl (Unit B) -... -..........-------..... ............---- ----------- ---- 11
Middle limestone (Unit C) ....--- ---... ...---.... ----------------------------- -- 12
Middle marl (Unit D ) -----.....---.... ........ ----------- ------------------ ---------- 12
Upper limestone (Unit E) ..-...... --................ ------------ ---- --- ----- 13
Upper m arl (Unit F ) ---------------------------------------------------- -- ...-- ----------- .. 14
Fort Thompson Formation -.....-..-.......-.. ............ ... ... --- ---------------- 15
Stratigraphy along Alligator Creek -----------------....----------------------------.---.. .......... 16
General statement ..--------- ......-.....___ -...-.. .......... .................. 16
Tamiami Formation .......-------....-.---.-----------.---...-----.......... -... --17
Distribution -----.-----. .----- --.. -.. -------------- -- --17
Lithology and fossils . ......... ...... -----.............----.... ..-.... .......... 17
Thickness .-------.--.-..... ---... --------------- . ..-- --.--.------.----- .17
Caloosahatchee Marl -... ...... ....................------------.... .. -----. -. 17
Distribution ...-......---..-----..-..------.--.....--..- -- -------- -.. 17
Lithology ..-------...- -------...... .......---- --.-- ----------- -- --....... -...... 17
Thickness ..........----...............------ --------.. .... ---- -- --------------------- ---- 17
Contacts .-................------------------- ------------ ------ ------ ------ -.. -- -. ------ IS
Fort Thompson Formation -.. --.---------. -.----- ------ 8--------------------------
Distribution .------ ------------------------------------ 18
Lithology and fossils ..-..--- ------------------------- ... -------------------- --- 18
Thickness ....--.-----.... ------------ . ..---------------------------- --- --- -- ------- 18
Stratigraphy south of Alligator.Creek - ------------ ------------- --- -------- --------. 18
Stratigraphy at WarLn Mineral Springs ......--...- .---..-.----.....--------- 19

Paleo ecology ...- ...-...-..-...... ..-------.. .........------.........------- ------------------------------- ----.. -- 20
General discussion --- ..... ------ ------------------------ .. ...... -- 20
Tamiani Formation .........-...----- .....---- ..--------..--.....--- ----------------------- -- ---- 20
Caloosahatchee Marl-- ---. --- .... .---------- .. 21
General discussion ..- ....--------------------------.. ...----- --- ------ ------------- ---- 21
Shell Creek .....--------- .-------------- -----------.--- --- ------ -- -- 22





Page
Lower limestone (Unit A) .......... ... ..............-- .. ....-------- 22
Lower marl (Unit B) ---...--...........----..........-............. .--------------- 23
Middle limestone (Unit C) ..........--- ---..----.... -------.--------- -----..... ---- 24
Middle marl (Unit D) -.....----. .............----------------..--- --- -...- -.------ 24
Upper limestone (Unit E) .........-...----------..................------------------- 27
Upper marl (Unit F) -.......-......-------------......-----------... -...- ----------- 28
Alligator Creek .--------------..-----------...--- --------- --------------------------------- 32
Fort Thompson Formation --........... ..-..-..------....----.. ......------------. 35
General statement ----........-----.....---.---..---.----..---------.------------------------------ 35
Station D-20 ----------------. .- -- ---------------------------- -- --------------- 36
Station D-7 ....-...--....--------......... ...---------------------------------- --------------- 37
Warm Mineral Springs .--...... .... --..-----... ------------------....-----------.---------- 38
Acline fauna ----.- ---- ..-...-.----- ----------------------- ----- -------------------------- -- ------ 39
Bibliography ---.........-- -- ----------------------....---. -------------------- ------ ---- 45
Appendix .....................................---. -- ------------------------- --- 49
Stratigraphic sections .--------..- ....- .......-----------------------------.....----------------------- 49
Megafossil check list. Charlotte Harbor Area, Florida ---..---........---..-----......... ... 60
Ostracode check list from the Caloosahatchee marl on Shell Creek,
Charlotte County, Florida ---.....--...-.......--...------..-------------- -----------------. 82
Foraminiferal check list fur the Shell Creek Caloosahatchee marl ...------.... 83







ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure Page
1 Location of area studied .. .. -...-....-- ...-- .......__ ..._--__ -- --- ... ............... 2
2 Principal geographic features of the Charlotte Harbor area .--.....----- 3
3 Generalized columnar section for the Shell Creek area ----..---..-----......... 8
4 LAcation of measured sections and localities ....... ..................................... 9
5 Section SC-8 on Shell Creek -.--..---..-------_..-.------------ .... .... -...__...... ..___. 12
6 Ledge of upper Caloosahatchee limestone (Unit E) exposed along Shell
Creek at Station SC-5 ------------... --.... ........................................ 1
7 The upper shell marl (Unit F) at station SC-1 ------------.... -------..--.. -_ 15
8 Station SC-1 in the Karnes Shell Pit near Shell Creek --...---........-...-.._.....-. 16


Plate
I Correlation of measured sections on Shell Creek, Florida ...--..-..------ In pocket
I1 Correlation of measured sections on Alligator Creek, Florida ...-..--- In pocket


Table Page
1 Classification of Neogene formations exposed in the Charlotte Harbor,
Florida area ........_. ........------------------------ ......-..._.--.......-................ 6
2 Most abundant molluscan species in Unit D of the Caloosahatchee Marl
on Shell Creek ..........---......-......-....-..--... -----.... ......... 25
3 Most abundant molluscan species in Unit F of the Caloosahatchee Marl
on Shell Creek ----------------.................- ...--....-----.--.---- ---..................--.. -29
4 Molluscan fauna collected off the enat of Texas at a depth of 54 feet
(Hulings, 1955) ..------..._.---...-. ---------............. ......... .__............._-__._. 31
5 Most abundant molluscan species in the Caloosahatchee Marl on Alligator
Creek ........ .... ..... .........--..........-- ....--. .....--... ...--- --- _---------_------ ............- 33
6 Most abundant molluscan species in the Fort Thompson Formation at
station D-20 -..-.-.....---------- ......-.---...---.--....-..-.... ...-.... ....... 37
7 Check list of milluscan species from Warm Mineral Springs, Sarasota
County, Florida ___--._._ --_._-. -------_.. ---..-.-_---.------....-. 38
8 Aeline molluscan check list -----...------..... ..--------.--... ----------.-----..... 40









NEOGENE BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE
CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA IN SOUTHWESTERN FLORIDA
By
JULES R. DuBAR
INTRODUCTION
LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION OF AREA
The investigated area is located, with the exception of one locality in
southern Sarasota County, in Charlotte County along the east shore of
Charlotte Harbor (fig. 1, 2).
North or south access to the area is gained by U.S. Highway 41.
From the east the area can be reached by U.S. Highway 70 or U.S.
Highway 80.
All the surface lies below an elevation of 50 feet above sea level.
Drainage is southward and westward into Charlotte Harbor principally
by Peace River and its tributaries. Alligator Creek flows into the harbor
near Acline a few miles south of Punta Gorda, and the southern part
of the area is drained by the Caloosahatchee River which reaches the
gulf opposite the southern tip of Pine Island.
According to Parker and Cooke (1944, pi. 8) the area is a part of the
"Sandy Flatlands," which they have described as "lowlying, defectively
drained lands, generally flat though parts on higher terraces are gently
rolling."
PRESENT INVESTIGATION
The aim of this report is to present a stratigraphic and paleoecological
analysis of the Neogene deposits exposed in the vicinity of Charlotte
Harbor in Florida. Information derived from this study added to that
from earlier studies of the Caloosahatchee River area (DuBar, 1958c)
makes possible an accurate interpretation of the depositional environ-
ments and geologic history for an important part of the Neogene of
southwestern Florida.
Field work related to this study was conducted during parts of the
summers of 1953 and 1958 while employed by the Florida Geological
Survey. Special attention was given the excellent exposures on Shell
Creek; however, all other known exposures in Charlotte County, includ-
ing those on Alligator Creek, were visited. All exposures were measured
and sectioned, and approximately 1,200 pounds of sediments and fossils
were collected from more than 20 localities.
In the laboratory, sediments were studied with the aid of a binocular
microscope, and insoluble residue analyses were made of the limestone
units exposed along Shell Creek. The faunas were analyzed stratigraphi-
cally and ecologically with special emphasis being placed on the mol-
lusks, which in all collections constituted the largest part of the fauna.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FOHTY-THREE


LE AREA STUDIED


Figure 1. Location of area studied.


_









NEOGENE STRATICRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR


NORTH


R23E


R2 E


COUNTY
R 23E


1 gj Au_ Ilg


Figure 2. Principal geographic features of the Charlotte Harbor area.


- SOUTH


AREA






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


In addition, collections made by H. H. Winters from Warm Mineral
Springs, and by Charles Locklin from Acline, were studied and arc
discussed in this report.
HISTORY OF PREVIOUS WORK
Apparently the earliest geological work in Charlotte County was done
about 1890 or 1891 by Joseph Willcox, William Healy Dall, and Frank
Burns (Dall and Harris, 1892; Dall, 1890-1903). These men recognized
the Caloosahatchee Marl on Alligator and Shell creeks, and Myakka River.
Their collections of fossil species were listed, figured, and described by
Dall (1890-1903) in his monograph on the Tertiary of Florida.
Matson and Clapp (1909) showed, on a geologic map of Florida,
exposures of the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell and Alligator creeks.
Tucker and Wilson (1932-33) described a molluscan fauna collected
from the spoil piles along a pit located near Acline. This fauna contained
several new species, some with Caribbean affinities and was judged to be
possibly late Miocene in age.
Geologic and Pleistocene shoreline maps prepared by Parker and
Cooke (1944) included Charlotte County, but were very generalized.
In his "Geology of Florida" Cooke (1945) very briefly mentioned
Charlotte County and his geologic map of the state showed the supposed
general distribution of Neogene deposits in Charlotte County.
F. S. MacNeil (1950) listed several species of megafossils collected
from Tamiami and Caloosahatchee exposures located on or near Alli-
gator Creek.
A monograph of Caloosahatchee mollusks was published by Olsson
and Harbison (1953) in which several new species were described from
Shell Creek.
A geologic map of southern Florida prepared by Parker, et al., (1955)
was similar to that of Parker and Cooke (1944), but classified the Ta-
miami Formation as Miocene in age and indicates the formation is
represented in southern Charlotte County by two facies.
Schroeder, Klein, and Hoy (1958) published a geologic map of
southern Florida which is the most detailed yet for Charlotte County.
They apparently were the first geologists to recognize the presence of
the Tamiami Formation on Shell Creek.
DuBar (1958a) briefly mentioned exposures on Alligator and Shell
creeks and (1958c) presented a general discussion of the Neogene strati-
graphy of southwestern Florida.
The "Summary of the Geology of Florida and a Guidebook to the Clas-
sic Exposures" (Puri and Vernon, 1959) includes a composite strati-
graphic section (p. 203-205) for Shell Creek, which was prepared by
DuBar.







NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 5

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Florida Geological Survey, initially under the direction of Dr.
Herman Gunter and later under the direction of Dr. Robert 0. Vernon,
paid the field expenses related to this study. The Survey also supplied
two able field assistants, Mr. Roy Staton, who aided the writer in 1953,
and Mr. V.V.. Vanstrum, who assisted in 1958.
At the National Museum, Neogene megafossil collections and labora-
tory facilities were made available by Dr. Harold Rehder and Mr. Druid
Wilson. Foraminiferal assemblages from two localities were studied and
identified by Mrs. Gene Ross Kellough of the Geology Department at the
University of Houston.
The manuscript was typed by Mrs. Phyllis DuBar and Mrs. Ohma
Bow, secretary to the Geology Department at the University of Hous-
ton. The illustrations were prepared by Mr. Harry Whitehead, draftsman
with the Florida Geological Survey, from rough copy.
STRATIGRAPHY
GENERAL STATEMENT
Beds older than Late Miocene are not shown to crop out in south-
western Florida. In the Charlotte Harbor area the Late Miocene is repre-
sented by the Tamiami Formation; Pliocene deposits are unknown and the
Pleistocene is represented by the Caloosahatchce Marl and the overlying
Fort Thompson Formation. All of the formations are typically unconsoli-
dated, being comprised mainly of soft marls, clay, sands, and shell
remains. The maximum combined thickness of the Pleistocene formations
is probably less than 75 feet and the average is probably less than 25
feet. Thickness of the Tamiami Formation has not been determined inas-
much as its base has not been observed. At all places where contacts
were observed, it was seen that the Caloosahatchee Marl rests uncon-
formably on the Tamiami Formation and is, in turn, unconformably
overlain by the Fort Thompson Formation. The best exposures occur
along Shell and Alligator creeks in the northern part of Charlotte County.
Other exposures are rare and offer little opportunity for study of lateral
variation. All exposures studied occur below the 30-foot contour and thus
are probably located below the Pamlico shoreline (25-30 feet above sea
level).
The ages of the formations included in this investigation have been
discussed in considerable detail in earlier papers by DuBar (1958a,
1958b, 1958c, 1959) and by others; Mansfield, 1939; Parker, et al., 1955;
Parker and Cooke, 1944; Puri and Vernon, 1959; Richards, 1938, 1945,
1959; and Schroeder, Klein, and Hoy, 1958. Evidence derived from the
present study for the most part tends to corroborate the writer's previous
observations.








6 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

The Fort Thompson Formation as used in this report is judged to be
contemporaneous with the Fort Thompson Formation of the Caloosa-
hatchee River area, which has been shown to merge eastward with sedi-
ments placed in the Anastasia Formation by Parker, et al, (1955).
The Anastasia Formation is a distinct lithologic unit composed of
whole and broken mollusk shells, associated microfaunas, and quartz
sand. These sediments compose the coquina of Anastasia Island, Flagler
County, a shell hash or coarse carbonate elastic mixed with quartz sand.
It is proposed that the Anastasia Formation be restricted to this distinct
lithologic type and Fort Thompson Formation be applied to the series of
shell marls, clays, and sands, as described in this report. The Fort Thomp-
son deposits stratigraphically overlie the Caloosahatchee Marl and are
either exposed at the surface or are overlain by a thin layer of relatively
recent soils and sands. All marine sediments that have been assigned to
the Fort Thompson Formation lie below a surface elevation of 25 feet
above sea level; however, nonmarine equivalents are known to occur at
higher elevations.
The classification of Neogene formations of southwestern Florida as
used in this report appears in table 1 below.

TAPLE 1. ('liassifi'tiuii of Neogene Formalnionis Elxposed in fil
Charlotte IHarbor, Florida, Area


Fornmationms


IReeent -_____



Bradyiii


PlHist ove I


Pliocen nh

Miocerne


IOWaF

Sangiunroninrr
I] linorit~iii

Yarmoothian
Kansan
AC ton ian


Thin surfieial sands and nlluvium

No record
Fort Tholmson Formation
No reriord
('l\(.Hsa:lhhl.t \h T Marl


No record


Nebrut-sk tn
Early
No record
Late
Pontiarn ? Tamiami Formation


i--


---'


St :Iges







NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 7

STRATIGRAPHY ALONG SHELL CREEK
GENERAL STATEMENT
Neogene sediments represented by the Tamiami Formation, Caloosa-
hatchee Marl, and Fort Thompson Formation crop out along the banks
of Shell Creek. Most of the exposures are fresh, clean, and fairly
accessible; however, in places unconsolidated sands of the Fort Thompson
Formation have slumped over at least the upper units of the Caloosa-
hatchee Marl.
Individual exposures rarely exceed 15 feet in thickness, and the
average is somewhat less. The maximum composite thickness of all ex-
posed stratigraphic units is approximately 59 feet.
All of the beds are essentially horizontal except where irregularities
in the respective depositional interfaces caused primary dips up to 2.0
degrees or more.
All localities examined lie below the 25-foot contour except station
SC-14 where the surface is about 42 feet above sea level. A generalized
columnar section for Shell Creek (fig. 3) and a map showing the location
of measured sections (fig. 4) follow. Correlation of all measured sections
is given on plate I in the pocket at the back of this report.
TAMIAMI FORMATION
Distribution: Strata assigned to the Tamiami Formation occur along
Shell Creek between stations SC-13, near the east edge of the Cleveland
quadrangle, and SC-11 near the west edge of the Bermont quadrangle.
The stream distance between these two stations is approximately 1.6
miles. The Tamiami deposits in this area represent the top of an ero-
sional high onto and over which Pleistocene sediments were deposited.
Lithology and fossils: Typically the formation is represented by
argillaceous marls and calcareous clays. All the beds are slightly to
moderately consolidated, phosphatic, cream to yellowish in color, and
sparsely fossiliferous. The facies represented is similar to that of the
Alva-Olga area along the Caloosahatchee River (DuBar, 1958c, p. 47-48).
Fossils are mainly oysters of the species Ostrea dispariis and Ostrea
tamiamiensis.
Thickness: The total thickness of the formation is unknown as the
base has not been observed in Charlotte County. The greatest exposed
thickness along Shell Creek is 6.0 feet at station SC-11. In other parts of
southern Florida the thickness has been determined to range from 40
to more than 100 feet (DuBar, 1958c, p. 31).







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


C6 WHITE TO 8MA SAID

Iam
I--&A


c=1
6L.,


YELLOW TO NOWN SAND


UNIT F


-a

.J





I -
CJ
c


UNIT D


cm
=
C


c*
LL.
p-,
C6
S


I SAND


^ : SANDY MAIL


SSANDY LIMESTONE


'.'. v.... ".. "..'..... ........v.... '.-" i
.'.'.l.'..'.'. "."."......
... ........ ... ....... ... .
i"1 7.;. . ".. . . .. .. .. ..v .:- .:- .:
... ... ... ..:.:,.,..... .... . .


. .. ....................
-: :.: j::k -


.A..A.. A 0
:A^^^At


.v ...V........V.
............~ ~! ...~ :i

.V v... ..
vV~vvvaVV


SANIY MARL


SANDY MAIL
COUNIMERATIC
LIMESTONE


- cALICAREOUS CLAY


FEET
12


[A v' AV.A.. AVA
'vA~AAA VXV, ..


oil
VERTICAL SCALE
APPROM


Figure 3. Generalized columnar section for the Shell Creek area.


LU.









UL
-_a
Ch


Lu
, '


GENERALIZED SECTION FOR THE

SHELL CREEK AREA


C= .Ck









NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA


siLl
~- -4-


r
1V













ci


n


C


Wa
Et



laL
*n 'i-






**1;
or





C.


I-




.9



U
lc,


s







c




I-
7


LI
, -
co

























a-
i-




















Ga
i r








U
hcll


-i


SOIL


nI


SIIV


S- /Fe
a


Pd




.'.L




s 7


4'7


S0l I







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SUEvEY-BULjETIN FORTY-THREE


CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL
General statement: The Caloosahatchee Marl of the Shell Creek area
probably includes deposits equivalent in age to each of the members
recognized by the writer in the type area; however, the members cannot
be differentiated in Charlotte County. A generalized columnar section for
the Shell Creek area is given in figure 3.
Distribution: Exposures of the Caloosahatchee Marl along Shell Creek
are restricted to the Bermont quadrangle (fig. 4). They are nearly con-
tinuous from the west edge of the quadrangle eastward at least to the
center of the quadrangle (sec. 28, T. 40 S., B. 25 E.), a stream distance
of approximately 4.5 miles. This is the most extensive exposure of the
Caloosahatchee Marl outside the type area.
The formation extends eastward in subsurface from the center of the
Bermont quadrangle at least as far as Bermont, where Caloosahatchee
fossils have been thrown up on the spoil piles of shell pits (Mansfield,
1939, p. 24). Near the west edge of the Bermont quadrangle the Caloosa-
hatchee deposits lap up onto a buried rise in the Tarniami Formation.
Near the crest of the rise in section 25 on Shell Creek the Caloosahatchee
pinches out due, at least in part, to erosion. West of the crest in the Cleve-
land quadrangle, the Tamiami is overlain unconformably by the sands of
the Fort Thompson Formation, the Caloosahatchee deposits being entirely
removed by erosion.
Lithology: Typically the Caloosahatchee sediments are composed
of unconsolidated, sandy marl, marls, and hard sandy limestones, which
are gray, tan or cream in color. Nearly all beds on Shell Creek appear
to be less calcareous ard contain a higher percentage of sand than those
on the Caloosahatchee River.
Contacts: Whenever the base of the Caloosahatchee Marl has been
observed along Shell Creek the formation can he seen to lie unconform-
ably on the Tamiami Formation. Everywhere along the creek the marl
is unconfornnably overlain by unfossiliferous sands of the Fort Thompson
Formation.
Thickness: At no place along Shell Creek is the entire section of the
Caloosahatchee exposed. The maximum exposed thickness of any section
is no more than 15 feet, whereas a composite of creek sections indicates
the formation is actually as much as 30.5 feet in thickness. The maximum
thickness of the type Caloosahatchee Marl is more than 65 feet (l)uBar,
1958c, p. 85), but the average is considerably less.
Structure: The amount and direction of regional dip for the Caloo-
sahatchee Marl cannot be accurately determined from the exposures
on Shell Creek. The dip is undoubtedly very slight (less than 1)






NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AHEA 11

and probably in a southwestern direction. All undulations in the
Caloosahatchee beds appear primary, being controlled by irregularities
of the ancient sea floor.
Stratal units: Dall and Harris (1892, p. 147) recorded the following
generalized section for Shell Creek:

Sundl 12 feet Pleiistcene
(Fort Thompwsn Formation)
Bed with shallow water
fauna including some
Pliocene forms 2 fent Plininee
Limestone 2-3 feel (Caloomshatehee Marl)
Marl, similar to that of
Caloosahatchee River

Studies by the writer serve to differentiate at least six distinct litho-
logic units in the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell Creek (fig. 3). Dall
mistakenly assumed that only one thin limestone occurs in the formation,
whereas actually there are three fairly similar but different limestone
units in the exposed area. The upper two limestone beds divide the
unconsolidated fossiliferous marls into three distinct units. The lower
limestone is conglomeratic and rests uncomfortably on the Tamiami
marl.
The uppermost marl bed of the Caloosahatchee contains a molluscan
fauna which differs from those of the lower units by the absence from it
of many of the most characteristic Caloosahatchee species.
The main stratal units of the Caloosahatchee are identified through-
out this paper by letters assigned to them in the discussion below.
Lower limestone (Unit A): The lower limestone is the basal unit
of the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell Creek. It lies unconformably on the
Tamiami Formation where observed in the vicinity of station SC-11
(sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E.) at the west edge of the Bermont quadrangle.
The maximum thickness of the bed is approximately 3.0 feet.
The basal limestone is conglomeratic (fig. 1), being comprised of a
gray sandy limestone matrix enclosing subrounded pebbles, cobbles and
small boulders of gray or brown limestone. Unidentifiable shell fragments
occur in the matrix and in the cobbles and boulders.
The insoluable residue of a sample of the limestone matrix is 9.0
percent by weight and is composed of approximately 25 percent sub-
angular quartz sand and 75 percent silt and clay.
Lower marl (Unit B): The basal conglomeratic limestone (Unit A)
is conformably overlain by a bed of unconsolidated, fossiliferous marine





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


marl (Unit B) having a maximum observed thickness of 4 feet. The
lowest marl unit is known only from station SC-10 (sec. 25, T. 40 S., R.
24 E.) in the extreme western part of the Bermout quadrangle. The marl
is light olive gray on a fresh surface, sandy, calcareous, and slightly
phosphatic. Fossils are abundant and well preserved, being comprised
mainly of pelecypod and gastropod species, but include a sparse fora-
miniferal fauna.
Middle limestone (Unit C): The limestone of this unit, known only
from station SC-10 (sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E.) where it has a thickness
of 3.0 feet, closely resembles that of the upper limestone (Unit E) and
apparently has been mistaken for it by earlier workers. Unit C is of marine
origin, white, sandy, argillaceous, and contains an abundant fauna of
Caloosahatchee mollusks. The insoluble residue of a sample from station
SC-10 is 16.5 percent by weight and consists mostly of fine to medium
subangular quartz sand, and about 5.0 percent clay.
Middle nutrl (Unit D): The middle shell marl (fig. 5) can be traced
from station SC-10 near the west edge of the Bermont quadrangle east-
ward along Shell Creek to station SC-1 (sec. 29, T. 40 S., R. 25 E.)
where it has been thrown up onto the spoil piles along the pits of the



G




F



E



D


Figure 5. Section SC-8 on Shell Creek,






NEOENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOYITE HABBOR AREA


Karnes Shell Corporation. This is a stream distance of more than 3.0
miles, and about 2.0 miles in an east-west traverse.
Exposures of the marl average about 3 to 4 feet in thickness reaching
a maximum of 11 feet at station SC-9 (sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E.).
At station SC-1 the marl occurs only in subsurface in the bottom of the
pits of the Karnes Shell Corporation.
Most typically the unit is a soft unconsolidated calcareous gray marl,
but at stations SC-9 and SC-8 the upper 1.0 to 5.0 feet is very sandy
and yellowish brown in color.
Caloosahatchee mollusks are abundant and well preserved throughout
the entire unit and at all exposures, but foraniniferal species, ostractles,
and cehinoid spines are most abundant in the lowermost calcareous part
of the unit.
Upper limestone (Unit E): Overlying the middle marl (Unit D)
is the upper limestone (fig. 6) which is the most useful marker bed
exposed along Shell Creek. The bed varies in thickness from 1.0 to 2.5
feet, but can be easily traced from station SC-9 in the western part of
the Bermont quadrangle eastward at least to a point approximately 0.5
mile cast of station SC-7 (sec. 28, T. 40 S.. R. 25 E.). Thus, the unit


Figure 6. Ledge of upper Cnlonsahatulhce limestone (Unit E) exposed along
Shell Creek at station SC-5.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SUHVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


is exposed for a stream distance of more than 4.5 miles and a distance
of nearly 3.0 miles in aTn east-west traverse.
Lithologically the limestone is sandy, hard, and gray, and contains
an abundance of well preserved Caloosahatchee marine mollusks. It
resembles the limestone of Unit C, but differs in being much more sandy.
Insoluble residues from four samples of the limestone range from 86.5
to 49.0 percent by weight with 2 to 10 percent being clay and the
remainder fine to medium, surrounded quartz sand. In general, the
insoluble residue and the clay content of the residue increases eastward.
Upper marl (Unit F): The upper marl is best developed along Shell
Creek between stations SC-9 and SC-1, but it can be traced eastward
on Shell Creek to a point approximately 0.5 mile east of station SC-7
(SENWNWI sec. 28, T. 40 S., R. 25 E.) and occurs on spoil piles
of shell pits at Bermont. This represents a total cast-west distance of about
6.5 miles and a distance along the stream of approximately 4.5 miles.
The unit typically is an unconsolidated sandy, gray, marine shell
marl. The sand is primarily comprised of subrounded, clear, medium-
sized grains of quartz, but includes a small number of rounded, shiny
black phosphorite grains.
The upper marl deserves special mention because its molluscan fauna
differs considerably from that of the lower Caloosahatchee strata. As
indicated, the difference is due mainly to the disappearance of many
of the tropical species found in the lower beds rather than the introduction
of new species. Many of the species of Unit F are unknown in the
succeeding Fort Thompson and Recent faunas. These facts suggest a
cooling of the water possibly related to the initiation of a glacial stage.
Inasmuch as the upper marl lies conformably on the upper limestone
(Unit E) and is in turn unconformably overlain by unfossiliferous Fort
Thompson sands there is little doubt that it is the uppermost Caloosa-
hatchee unit on Shell Creek. The stratigraphic position of Unit F and
its molluscan fauna suggest that it is equivalent to the tipper Caloosa-
hatchee Panope Faunizone at Ortona Locks in the type area (DuBar,
1958c, p. 75). Some characteristic molluscan species which occur in both
faunas are listed below.
Pelecypoda
Anadara hienrsa (Say) Echinochama cornn u (Conrad)
A nomalocardia cataana Dall Eucrassatella speciosa (A. Adimrs)
Charma gardnerae OJson and Harbison Juliacorbula seulata (Gardner)
Chione latilirata athlete (Conrad) Noetia platyura Dall
Chlamys fluserpurpureus (Conrad) Ostrea sculpturata Conrad
Dowinia elegant Conrad Pliatula marginata Say
GCstropoda
Alabina adamsi (Dall) Natica plicatella Conrad
Conu stearnei Conrad Oliva sayana Ravenel
Fasciolaria apicina Dall Strombus alatus Gmelin






NEOCENE STHA'TIGRAPIIY OF THE (HARLOTTE HARBOR AREA


Figure 7, The upper shell marl (Unit F) at station SC-i.


FORT THOMPSON FORMATION
Along Shell Creek the Fort Thompson Formation is comprised of
seemingly unfossiliferous sands. It is postulated that these sands were
deposited close to the shoreline but mainly above sea level. They are in
part equivalent to shell marls of the Fort Thompson found elsewhere in
Charlotte County at lower elevations.
Because the sands are unconsolidated, exposures are commonly
slumped and grown over with vegetation. However, at numerous places
along Shell Creek the sand is freshly exposed. The freshest and most
complete exposures of the sands can be seen in the shell pits of the Karnes
Shell Corporation (fig. 8) where they reach a thickness of 11.0 feet,
Elsewhere along Shell Creek generally not more than 3 feet of the sands
are exposed.
All the sands are comprised predominantly of fine to medium, sub-
angular to surrounded fairly well sorted quartz grains. The color of
the beds is yellow, pale orange to tan or gray. The upper 1 to 3 feet
are comprised of a light gray to white quartz sand which possibly has
been reworked during post-Wisconsinan (Recent) time as it appears to
rest unconformably on the lower sands.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


The Fort Thompson sands extend along the entire length of Shell
Creek, lying upstream from station SC-10 unconformably on the Caloosa-
hatchee Marl, and downstream from station SC-10 unconformably on
the Tamiami Formation,






F









G




Figure 8. Station SC-1 in the Karnes Shell Pit near Shell Creek.
STRATIGRAPHY ALONG ALLIGATOR CREEK
GENERAL STATEMENT
Neogene sediments are exposed discontinuously along the banks of
Alligator Creek from station D-7 (sec. 29, T. 41 S., R. 23 E.) approxi-
mately 0.5 miles west of Acline in Punta Gorda quadrangle eastward
to station D-8 (sec. 26, T. 41 S., R. 23 E.) at Bridge 18 on the South
Prong in Cleveland quadrangle. This is a stream distance of more than
4.0 miles and a distance in an east-west traverse of approximately 2.8
miles. The most continuous exposures occur between U, S. Highway 41
and the dam across Alligator Creek east of Acline (sec. 21, T. 41. S.,
R. 23 E.) in the Punta Gorda quadrangle (fig. 4).
The discontinuous nature of the exposures makes lateral tracing of
individual units difficult and thus detailed studies such as those made
of the deposits along Shell Creek and the Caloosahatchee River are
virtually impossible.





NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 17

All the beds are essentially horizontal; however, there are slight
undulations apparently caused by irregularities on the original sea
floor.
The maximum thickness of the exposures nowhere exceeds 15 feet
and is generally less. The composite thickness is unknown but is
apparently considerably greater than 15 feet.
All of the exposures lie below the 15-foot contour except the deposits
at station D-8 where the surface is about 20 feet above sea level.
A correlation of sections is shown on plate 11 in the pocket at the
back of this report.
TAMIAMI FORMATION
Distribution: The Tamiami Formation is exposed along Alligator Creek
from a point 0.5 mile east of U. S. Highway 41 eastward to the dam,
a stream distance of about 1 mile. It is also known from a ditch at
Bridge 18 on the South Prong of Alligator Creek.
Lithology and fossils: The Tamiami Formation is comprised of clays,
marls, sands, and a few thin limestones. Most of the units, except the
limestone, are only slightly consolidated, and nearly all are at least
slightly phosphatic. Colors range from gray through tan, cream, and
buff. Sands, in general, are most common to the east (i.e., stations D-7
and D-8) with calcareous clays, limestones, and marls predominant
toward the west. Fossils are mainly oysters of the species Ostrea dis-
lprilis and Ostrea tamiamiensis; however, the sands yield great num-
bers of the echinoid Encope tamniamiensis and clusters of the giant
barnacle Balanus concavus, most of which are well preserved.
Thickness: The total thickness of the formation is unknown. The
greatest exposed thickness occurs at station D-5 where approximately
5 feet of the formation rises above low tide level.
CALOOSAIIATCHEE MARL
Distribution: The area of exposure for the Caloosahatchee Marl is
essentially the same as that for the Tamiami Formation, the principal
difference being that the Caloosahatchee Marl extends slightly farther
to the west.
Lithology: At all exposures the Caloosahatchee Marl is represented
by a tan, sandy, unconsolidated marl, being comprised in large part by
well preserved molluscan shells.
Thickness: All along Alligator Creek the Caloosahatchee Marl is thin,
reaching a maximum thickness of approximately 3.0 feet at stations D-6
and D-8, but being represented only by traces in solution pockets at
stations D-5 and D-2.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Contacts: As elsewhere in southern Florida where the base of the
formation has been observed, the Caloosahatchee NMarl lies unconformably
on the Tamiami Formation. The marl is, in turn, unconformably overlain
by sands of the Fort Thompson Formation.
FORT' THOMPSON FORMATION
Distribution: The Fort Thompson Formation forms a blanket over all
the surface that lies below the Parnlico shoreline. It is well exposed all
along Alligator Creek forming the uppermost unit at all stations examined.
Lithology and fossils: As on Shell Creek, all the deposits that uncon-
formably overlie the Caloosahatchee Marl are placed in the Fort Thomp-
son Formation. Along Alligator Creek the formation is most commonly
represented by seemingly unfossiliferous, tan to brown, unconsolidated
quartz sands. The quartz grains are subrounded, fairly well sorted and
predominantly medium in grain size. At station D-7 (see. 29, T. 41 S., R.
23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle) the Fort Thompson includes a 1-foot
bed of unfossiliferous limestone and a sandy, calcareous marl with abun-
dant mollusk shells. At station D-20 (NEfNW3I sec. 21, T. 41 S.,
R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle) the formation is exposed in a shell pit
where it includes, in addition to unfossiliferous sands, two sandy shell
beds totaling 8.8 feet in thickness. The fauna is comprised largely of well
preserved mollusks similar to those of the type Coffee Mill Hammock
Marl member of the Fort Thompson Formation.
Thickness: Along Alligator Creek the maximum thickness of the for-
mation occurs at station D-4 where it measures 8.4 feet. At station D-20,
15.2 feet of the formation are exposed. The average exposed thickness
along Alligator Creek is about 5.0 feet.
STRATIGRAPHY SOUTH OF ALLIGATOR CREEK
Only a few exposures occur along the eastern shore of Charlotte Har-
bor in the area immediately south of Alligator Creek. Exposures are
restricted to marl and sand pits, marinas, drainage ditches, and the banks
of small streams. Nowhere are more than a few feet of sediments exposed
and at most localities only spoil pile materials are available for examin-
ation.
Not much can be said about the stratigraphy of the area without
subsurface data and better exposures; however, a few observations are
worthy of note. Nowhere in the area does the Tamiami Formation appear
to be more than 5 to 10 feet beneath the surface. At most places the
Tamiami is very argillaceous, containing numerous well preserved
oysters; however, near Acline the formation is represented, in part, by
sands bearing a fauna of Encope tamiamwiensis and Balanus concavus.
Deep marl pits near Acline have penetrated shell beds that have yielded






NEOGENE STRATICGAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 19

a large molluscan fauna discussed elsewhere in this paper. At a few
places the Caloosahatchee Marl was observed to overlie the Tamiami For-
nation. At station D-24 (NENEi sec. 30, T. 42 S., R. 23 E.) the
Caloosahatchee is represented by a thin marine limestone containing
nuTmerous vertebrate remains, including teeth of the Pleistocene horse
Equus (Equus) cf. E. leidyi.
Apparently the entire area is covered by a thin bed of unconsolidated
quartz sand and assignable to the Fort Thompson Formation. At several
localities sandy shell marls carrying a late Pleistocene molluscan fauna
were observed beneath the unfossiliferous sands. These beds are perhaps
equivalent to the Coffee Mill Hammock Marl member of the Fort
Thompson Formation.
All the exposures of the area studied by the writer lie below an
elevation of 20 feet above sea level and all are located in the Punta
Gorda SE quadrangle.

STRATIGRAPHY AT WARM MINERAL SPRINGS
At Warm Mineral Springs unconsolidated sands, and marine and non-
marine shell beds are exposed along drainage canals and other exca-
vations. Collections made by Hebebert Winters in 1957 were studied by
the writer.
Warm Mineral Springs is located at Salt Creek about 1.5 miles east of
U.S. Highway 41 bridge across Myakka River in Sarasota County. All
of the area lies below the 20-foot contour.
A generalized stratigraphic section for the area is presented below:
Feet
Sand, quartz, unconsolidated, reddinl brown und gray; no
f Shell marl, marine, sandy, fine to medium grained, uncuinoli-
dated, tan; many mollusk shells and ,mrne vertebrate fossils
including lee h of t lie Pleistocene horse Eqr uls (Equus) leidyi. 0. 0-0. 5
S)Oyster inarI, occurs lo-ally as lenses.- .................. .. 0.0-0.5
Marl, fresh water unctnsolidated, gray; contains mollusks and
vertebrate remaina.. ... ...................... ......... >0. 5


The vertebrate and molluscan fauna plus the evidence of the paleo-
geographic setting and stratigraphic position prove the deposit to be
late Pleistocene in age. Lithologically and faunally the deposits are very
similar to the Fort Thompson Formation in southern Florida and Pinellas
County and are assigned to that formation.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


PALEOECOLOGY
GENERAL DISCUSSION
Paleoecological interpretations included in the following pages are
based almost exclusively on the macrofauna, especially the very abun-
dant mollusks, and on the sediments in which the fauna occurs. Detailed
discussion of conclusions based on the microfauna will await completion
of studies being conducted by Harbans S. Puri and V. V. Vanstrum. The
Caloosahatchee Foraminifera from two Shell Creek stations were identi-
fied by Gene Ross Kellough. With the exception of "Rotalia" beccarii,
none of the species reported by Cole (1931) were observed (appendix).
Collections for this study were made from 29 stations in the Charlotte
I harbor area. Where the physical properties of the stratal units permitted,
the samples were washed, and the macrofauna separated and sorted.
Subsequently, relative abundance of each species in each sample was
determined. In calculating percentages two pelecypod valves were
always counted as one individual.
Many of the molluscan species still live in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf
ot Mexico, and Caribbean Sea, and a high percentage of the extinct
forms differ only slightly from living species of these areas. Thus it is
possible to make comparative studies between the fossil and living
assemblages and to base ecological conclusions heavily on the sub-
sequent deductions. It is assumed, applying the principle of uniformi-
tarianism, that most of the fossils lived in environments similar to those
of their living descendants.
Not as much is known about the ecology of living mollusks as is
desirable, but the recent work of Parker (1956, 1959) and Clench
(1942-1956) has added important information about the mollusks of the
Gulf of Mexico and the western Atlantic. Other important reference
works were discussed by DuBar (1958c, p. 86) il his study of the
Caloosahatchee River area.
TAMIAMI FORMATION
lMost of the deposits assigned to the Tamniami Formation are relatively
lnfossiliferous, making paltNecological interpretation difficult. Typically,
the Tanmiami is comprised of fine grained plastics such as clay, and argil-
laceous linmestones in which specimens of 0strea. sculpturata, )Ostrea
disparilis and Ostrea tarttiarnielsis and molds of other mollusks are
locally common. Such deposits probably were formed in the brackish
water of a lagoon or bay.
At places on Alligator Creek and in pits near Acline, the formation
is represented by a phosphatic quartz sand containing many specimens






NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 21

of the sand dollar Encope macrophora tamianiensis and the giant
barnacle Balanus concavus. It is postulated that these sands represent
deposition in a shallow water, nearshore environment, possibly a sub-
merged sandbar. Both the sands and the finer grained facies probably
represent deposition in a regressing Tamiami Sea.
CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL
GENERAL DISCUSSION
Fossils of the Caloosahatchee Marl in the vicinity of Charlotte Harbor
are generally as well preserved as those of the type area. Breakage seems
mostly related to compaction, and little evidence of abrasion due to
wave or current action is apparent. Delicate structures such as spines,
nodes, and protoconchs are usually preserved; pelecypods are commonly
represented by paired valves and many appear to occupy their original
burrows in the substrata. Mixing of ecologic types is not great, being
much less common than in the Caloosahatchee River area.
Most of the exposures studied contain highly fossiliferous units from
which the fossils are easily extracted. Pelecypods and gastropods are by
far the most abundant fossils in the Caloosahatchee Marl, but scaphopods,
amphineurids, brachiopods, decapods, echinoids, barnacles, corals, bryo-
zoans, foraminifers, and ostracodes are also represented. Twenty 0.5 cubic-
foot samples of the shell marls on Shell and Alligator creeks yielded
79,755 pelecypods and 33,615 gastropods, representing 126 species and
subspecies of pelecypods, 243 species and subspecies of gastropods, and
5 species of scaphopods. A total of 793 species and subspecies of mol-
lusks have been recorded by the writer and other workers from the
Caloosahatchee Marl of the Charlotte Harbor area.
Most of the extant molluscan species live south of Cape Hatteras, but
a few range northward from there. None of the species are restricted to
northern waters, and many occur no farther north than Florida. Most of
the extinct species are very similar to Recent species from waters south
of northern Florida. In general, the typical Caloosahatchee fauna appears
to have lived in a tropical sea. Based on studies of the Foraminifera,
Cole (1931) stated that the minimum temperature of the Caloosahatchee
Sea was 22 C. (71 F.). Most of the Charlotte Harbor area faunas
indicate an inner shelf environment; some are characteristic of outer,
deeper parts of the inner shelf, whereas others are most characteristic of
shallow, near-shore environments where the water was only a few
fathoms in depth. Brackish water faunas similar to those of the Fort
Denaud Marl member of the type Caloosahatchee Marl are unknown
except from the base of the lower marl (Unit B) at station SC-10 on
Shell Creek. Fresh water and land mollusks, echinoids, and corals are






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-TIhREE


also much less abundant in the Charlotte Harbor area than in certain
beds along the Caloosahatchee River.
Most of the fauna occurs in unconsolidated sands or shell marls, but
there are a few thin layers of fossiliferous sandy limestone. In general,
the Caloosahatchee Marl, which is exposed near Charlotte Harbor, is less
calcareous and more sandy than in the type area.
As in the type area, the Caloosahatchee Sea transgressed the Charlotte
I arbor area over a dissected Tamiami terrain. Shoals formed over the tops
of Tamiami highs, and during low stands of the sea, these highs might
have stood above sea level as low islands. Southward from Alligator Creek
the Tamiami Formation stands relatively high throughout a large area,
possibly having acted as a partial barrier between the Caloosahatchee
Sea to the north and that of the type area to the southeast. Thin Caloosa-
hatchee marls are found along the margins of this high area but do not
now extend over the top. Inasmuch as these marginal deposits both to
the north and southeast contain offshore faunas, it appears probable that
the entire high area was once covered by thin Caloosahatchee deposits
which, prior to deposition of the Fort Thompson Formation, were eroded
away.
During low stands of the sea the main shoreline was probably only
a few miles westward, but during the highest stand of the sea, probably
represented by the upper part of the lower marl (Unit B) and the lower
middle marl (Unit D) on Shell Creek, the shoreline lay relatively far
to the west, quite possibly being the Wicomico (90-100 feet above
sea level), which is located approximately 25 miles northwest of the
exposures on Shell Creek. If this supposition is correct, then the maximum
depth of the Caloosahatchee Sea in the Charlotte Harbor area was no more
than approximately 16 fathoms, a figure which agrees well with that sug-
gested by the molluscan faunas. Cole (1931) also estimated that the
maximum depth of the Caloosahatchee Sea was 16 fathoms.
SHELL CREEK
Lower limestone (Unit A): Little can be said about the depositional
environment of Unit A, as it is known only from one locality and the
samples collected contain only fragmented unidentifiable marine mol-
lusks.
Apparently Unit A is comprised of reworked Tamiami limestone
nodules and a fossil hash cemented by calcareous, sandy, argillaceous
mud. It can be concluded from the degree of rounding that the limestone
nodules were transported at least a short distance. The broken shells also
suggest considerable reworking by waves or strong currents. It seems
likely that Unit A formed in shallow near-shore waters of considerable
turbulence.






NEOGENE STRATIGRAPIIY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 23

Lower nmarl (Unit B): Two depositional environments are represented
by the molluscan fauna collected from Unit B. The lowermost part
of the bed which occurs below water level at station SC-10 includes a
relatively large number of Rangia nasuta and Crassostrea Virginica valves,
suggesting for that part of the unit an extremely brackish water environ-
ment. Above the lower few inches of Unit B the molluscan fauna is
comprised of extant species and extinct species most characteristic of
offshore, shallow water of the inner continental shelf as defined bv
Parker (1956, p. 337). In this upper part of the bed typical fresh water,
brackish water, land, and strandline species are absent or extremely


rare.
The molluscan species of the lower

PelerypfxiA Perrcnt
.inaldara rustira (Tuomey and Holmes)PI
A.nomia simplex d'Orbigny ......... I
Barbatia tarniata (Dall).............. P
('aryororbula leoneuTtis Mlansfild . .9.1
'hione cancellata (jinl) .)......... .33.0
'rassindla anrrlf (Dall) ... ., 2.2
('raneWmtrea virginica (Gmnlin). . P
DoMinia degans C(rirlradl .. ........ ... E
Fowsiusarrfi tamat (Daill) .......... ..
G(mddia cf. G. melastriatlnm Conrad.. 1.5


Gastrojxpda


Perrrent


A. abina iiamnsi (Dull) .............2.3
Alabina cerithidioides (Dall).. .... 1I.2
Br uhrbthara terminda (Dail) ........ P
Cohlbraria lanceolata arfinica
Turker anrd Wiloiin............... P
('repidrda ancueata Gmelin .......... 2.3
C(repidrda marcultw (COnrald ...... .2.3
Crucibrlthim auriruruinm GmClin. . 34.3
Fa.qiolaria raahritnu Eleilprin ......... P
M.arinrhla eru/inim Dull .. ..... .3. 1
Jlarqirw'lra parr/afis Dall .. . .. 2.6
lelonp ena ..... ............. .4.5
fnusanrius bi/lenlatus (lmmons)... . P
P Present but


marl (Unit B) are listed below;

Pcleyjx-Pid Percent
?Jrdinia sp. (worn fragments) ... . P
Nuridana arrda (Conrad) . . 4.5
.Vrucma proxima Say ...... ... . P
Ostrea sculptrata (S nirn. . . . .. P
Phacoides wiafrramtanvesis Dall .. .. 6.8
Ranf ia rmsnia (Dall) . . . -P
Teflina sp.. . . . . . . .
Trifon i(wardia willroxri (Dull) ...... 12.1
Varirrbula raloosae (DillT) - .22.6


Percent


Na'timra crrena Linni.i . . . . P
Persirula or'ida Conrad ........... ..2.
Polyslira albida (Perry) ............. P
Rissoina brdlimitna
O)Isson and HarbiLson ......... 2.3
Strombuos alatus Gnelin ............. .1
Terltonatica punilla (Say) ....... .. 13.7
Trophfn lepidota (Dall), ............ P
Turritella apirati lieilprin .... . .2,i
Tu'rriella perattenuata lleliprin .. .3,4
T'rtrritella subannufala Hleilprin ... 1.1
Ierm i dto aria sp .................. P
le s lihan 1.0 percent


Chione cancellata, the most abundant species in the fauna of
tipper Unit B, lives today in high salinity waters of bays, inlets, and the
shallow shelf, being most characteristic, according to Parker (1956,
p. 331), of inlets. Studies of fossil faunas in Florida suggest that during
Caloosahatchee time Chione cancellata reached its maximum develop-
ment, and was then apparently most abundant on the inner continental
shelf where it comprised a high percentage of the infauna. Varicorbula
caloosae, second in abundance in Unit B, is closely related to the Recent
species Varicorbula operculata (Philippi), which lives from the deeper
parts of the inner shelf to depths on the outer shelf of at least 250 fathoms


Gasirolpmlal






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SUHVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


(Abbott, 1953), Varicorbula caloosae is also common in the outer shelf
Bee Branch member of the Caloosahatchee Marl in the type area ( DuBar,
1958).
The most abundant gastropod in the fauna is Crucibulum auriculum
found living at least to 54 fathoms on the continental shelf. Other
common gastropods such as Alabina cerithioides and Tectonactica pusilla
live on the inner shelf to moderate depths. The relative abundance
of the genus Turritella, a neritic, quiet water genus, also suggests an
offshore origin for Unit B.
All the fossils are well preserved, being little worn or disturbed by
wave action, which also suggests a relatively deep water, offshore envi-
ronment.
Few of the molluscan species with living representatives range north
of Cape Hatteras, and some are not known north of Florida. Most of the
extinct species are closely related to species which live in Florida, Gulf
of Mexico, and Caribbean waters. Thus, it appears that the water in
which the Unit B fauna lived was at least as warm and probably
warmer than that off southwestern Florida today.
The bottom in and on which the fauna lived was an unconsolidated
mixture of shells and fine to medium quartz sand similar to that found
off the southwestern coast of Florida at depths between 5 and 20 fathoms
(Could and Stewart, 1955, p. 5).
Middle limestone (Unit C): The limestone comprising Unit C con-
tains a molluscan fauna that suggests deposition in a warm shallow
water environment similar to that for the upper part of Unit B. The
fauna identified from station SC-10, the only locality where Unit C
is known to crop out, is listed below:
Pelecylxpla Gast nroi lx 12
A.1 tnw orardia raloosana Dull ('rCpidoula a culeaa Gmelin
Area Twagneriana Dall (ru tei rifum uirculum Cineliln
ChanUt Pturdnert' O()lsson an1 IItuI}IiW)n ?Pidafocon-chus sp.
('hione ran cei ait (,iniil-rPelativey Trritriti apicrusi ITeilprin-relatively
abundant abu danli
Mulifa sp.,
Trachyrcardiun sp.
l ur'iorbuhi calhotJ' (I )all)-relai vely
!buritliantI
Apparently deposition of Unit C ceased when the supply of quartz
sands to the area was greatly reduced. This event would not, of neces-
sity, be related to change in water depth or even proximity to shore.
It is possible that a shift in offshore currents or a change in the source
area could have changed the rate of sand deposition.
Middle narl (Unit D): The molluscan fauna of Unit D is large and
varied and, in general, indicates a warm water, offshore, inner shelf







NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLO'tTE HARBOR AREA 25

environment similar to that postulated for the upper part of Unit B.
The fauna is well preserved throughout the exposed area, and there is
little evidence anywhere of significant reworking by waves or currents.
The latter observation suggests deposition in relatively deep, quiet water.
Distribution of the most abundant molluscan species is shown in
table 2:

TABLE 2. Most Abundant Molluscan Species in Unit D of the
Caloosauhtchee Marl on Shell Creek
(P = Present, but less than 1.0 percent)

Stations
Species --
I10 0 8-la 8-lb 6 5

% % % % % %
Pelecypoda'

Anonialocarrfia ralow zna............... ...... ...... P 3.8 6.1 P
Anamia nimplex ....................... 2.5 2.6 2.0 P P P
(Caryocorbula feone sis .................. 3.1 6.8 1.4 ............. P
C'hione ancrellaa ...................... 21.8 18.7 23.2 7.0 9.1 50,0
Crassinella ucutu and C. n fldata, .. . 1.5 1,6 P 23.0 17.6 2.4
Fossdarea adamsai .. .............. P 5.2 1.4 P P P
Ostrea sclpturaia ...................... 2.8 P 2.7 P P 2.4
ParalartI riquetra. .................. . ...4,0 P 7.1 33.3 32.1 18.1
Phacoides multihfineatus .............. 6.3 5.0 5.5 9,7 13,9 7,0
Phacoides waccamawensis ............... 1.0 2. 1-6 P P 1.1
Tranasennella ronradina ................ 1,5 ...... I 17.3 17,4 1,7
Trigoniocardia wilcozi .. .. ...... .. .. 7. 11. 7.1 ..... ..... 2,1
Varicorbula a.loosae ............... .... 38.6 31.1 39.3 P P 3.9
Gastropoda
abi na d uatnm d ....................... 2.4 P 2.6 34.9 35.7 24,0
Altaina cerithidioides .. ............... 4.8 9.6 1.5 ....... ...... 1.6
Anachis caloosaensis.................... 2.4 P 4.0 ............ P
Anarhi Uyardnerei .... .......... ...... 3.2 2.4 1.1 1.2 ..... 1.2
Cuee i spp .......................... 6.4 ...... 1.5 4.6 3.5 3.6
Cerithium hitharirm .................... P .. ... ...... 6,2 5.4 P
Crepidula anptdenila .................... P 16 1.5 P ...... 1,2
(repidula aciedosa ..o .. .. ........ P -- 1.5 2.7 1.4 P
Cruibultum auriculnm.................. 38.3 46.7 40.2 4.2 4.2 P
3Margine/la euima ..................... 1.1 2,6 1. 1 . 3.6 P
A frginella pardalis ..... ...................... 3.7 3.8 6.5 ...... P
Afeioeras cinqdatumn .............. .. ...... . 1.5 1.9 9.4 5,6
Olirefla m utia ........................ 2.4 ........ 8.7 4.2 1 3,2
Retusa ranaticulata ................... P ,. .. 1.1 12.5 9.4 4.0
Tecorun tica pu tisda........ ... , 8,8 4.8 ........... ... .
Teinostomia fectispira.......... ...... 1... 6 ..... 1. 1. 9 P 2.3
Tu'rritefa apicais ..... ............. .. P 3.1 .................. P
Turrilella per n ata....... . . . . . 1.7 2.0 1.6 P P 1,3
Turrileula subannrulata... ............ P P 4,2 P 1.8 1.6
i___






FLOHmDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORT'-THHEE


Other species in addition to those listed in table 2, that are common
in Unit D, particularly larger forms, are listed below:

Pele'ypodla
A nadara hrliosn (Say) Doiin ia eleyans Cuonrad
Anadara rustira (Tuomey and Holmeo ) Echinochamna ronuta (Conrad)
Arra uwanerianra D)ll Macrowallistu nimbona Solander
Bothrororbiua u.nlrori (Dall) Nucula prorima Say
Chayna vardnerae Olsson and IlarhiscITI Nuldana acitta Conrad
('ham fys frunopo rpurern (Cunrad) Phiraftuf marginal Say
(.hit ro poda
A inarhis rnloosaenais (Dall) Leminlina deriussaai (Grnelin)
Buinsyn contrariprm (Conrad) Xasasritus f. N. nnwsrtus Raveniel
(ont s adersarius Conrad Pyrigisrus spp.
C'on us starniI Conrad ingicul/ floridarm Dall
Hanetia mengearn (Dall)

The distribution and relative abundance of the species listed in table
2 indicate a change of environment from east (station SC-5) to west
(station SC-10) which, however, is not clearly reflected in the sediments.
At station SC-8 the eastern faunal faces vertically overlaps the western
facies and at this station the upper (eastern) faces is more sandy than
the lower facies (western).
The change in faunal faces from east to west is probably, in part,
related to proximity of the shoreline. The western faunas (stations SC-10
and SC-9) and the lower fauna at station SC-8 contain a relatively
greater abundance of species judged to indicate offshore or at least
relatively deep water conditions. These species include Varicorbula
caloosae, Caryocorbula leonensis, Crucibulum auriculum, Turritella
perattenuata, and Turritella apicalis. The eastern faunas (stations SC-5
and SC-6) and the upper layer at station SC-8 contain a relatively
greater abundance of shallow water, near-shore species. These species
include Anonmalocardia caloosana, Crassinella spp., Parastarte triquetra,
Phacoides multilineatus, Transrnnella conradina, Alabina adamsi,
Caecum. spp., Cerithium Iitharium, Meioceras cingulatum., Olivella mu-
tica, and Retusa canaliculata.
The foraminiferal fauna of the lower bed at station SC-8 was studied
and the complete list of species is given in the appendix. The most
abundant species are listed below:
KE phidit m . - .. .................... ........ ........ 54 ~ erreen
"Rotalia" herrarii var....... ........................... 26 percent
O tfinulffoc dina % P| .................... . . . . . . . I r n
O" i d~s [ui ....n a )...................... ................ 8 IWer.ent
ibicid n spp.. . . . . . . . . - -. .- -. .- - ...- 8 recent.
Numerous studies have been made of the Hecent foraminifers from
the shallow waters of the Culf of Mexico (Bandy, 1954, 1956; Kornfeld,


26






NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA


1931; Ladd, 1951; Lankford, 1959; Lowman, 1949; Parker, Phleger,
and Pierson, 1953; Phleger, 1951, 1954, 1955; Phleger and Parker, 1951)
with the result that much is now known about the ecology of extant
species. These studies have demonstrated that a foraminiferal assemblage
such as that from Unit D represents shallow near-shore water (less
than 100 feet deep) where the salinity possibly was subject to periodic
fluctuation.
Rotalia beccarii vars. seem especially adaptable to a wide variety
of environments ranging from interdistributary bays where the salinity
is very low to the shallow open shelf where the salinity is near normal
for open sea water (Lankford, 1959, p. 2078). Bandy (1956, p. 184-185)
has shown that "Rotalia" beccarii var. tepida along with Elphidium spp.
and Quinqueloculina spp. are among the most abundant and character-
istic western Florida shelf species in water out to 40 feet in depth.
In his study of the Gulf of Mexico between Sabine Pass, Texas, and
Grand Cheniere, Louisiana, Bandy (1954, p. 132) reported a relatively
great abundance of Elphidium spp. and Rotalia spp. from the inner
shelf between depths of 30 and 130 feet with the greatest concentration
between 30 and 55 feet.
Phleger (1954, p. 608) pointed out that "Rotalia" beccarii vars. and
Elphidium spp. are typically open gulf species which can adapt to
enclosed environments such as bays where they usually occur with a
large fauna of arenaceous foraminifers not recorded from the Caloosa-
hatchee Marl on Shell Creek.
The Caloosahatchee foraminifer assemblages need much more
detailed study.
The bottom on and in which the fauna of Unit D lived was an
unconsolidated calcareous sandy shell marl very similar to that which
today occurs off the west coast of Florida at depths of 5 to 20 fathoms
(Could and Stewart, 1955, p. 5).
It is probably worthy of note that Osirea scadpturata which occurs
in Units B, D and F cannot be considered an indicator of brackish
water conditions. The species occurs in definitely brackish water deposits
with Crassostrea virginica in the Caloosahatchee type area (DuBar,
1958c), but on Shell Creek and elsewhere it occurs with faunas that
are comprised of predominantly normal marine species. It appears then
that Ostrea sculpturata tolerated a range of salinity from brackish to
normal (8.6 percent), being most common in nearly normal open marine
waters where Crassostrea virginica was rare or absent.
Upper limestone (Unit E): The molluscan fauna of Unit E, although
relatively sparse, is similar to that of Unit D and indicates a similar


27






28 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

environmental complex. The sand residue is also very similar to that
for Unit D and the greater amount of calcium carbonate is probably
attributable to a slower rate of elastic deposition.
The most common molluscan species of the upper limestone (Unit E)
are listed below:
Pelecypoda


Anomia simplex d'Orbigny
A rca wagneriana Dall
Chanma yardnerae Olsson and Harbisoi
Chione cancellata (Linne)


Can!harus perplexu.ns lsson and IHarbi
Crepidula acdleala Gmelini
Crucibulum. auriculumi GInelin
Marginella pardatis Dall


Fossularca adamri (Dall)
Phaecides- multilineatus Tuomey and
I Holmes
Pharoides waccamawensis Dall
Varicorbula cularoma (Dal])
Gastropoda
i.mo Olivella. mutica Say
Turrikella apicali-s Heilprin
Tuirritela perallenuata Heilprin


Upper zmarl (Unit F): Lithologically and faunally Unit F varies little
throughout its exposed area, apparently having been laid down under
uniform environmental conditions.
The molluscan fauna is large and varied, differing from that of Unit
D mainly in the absence from it of many of the characteristic Caloosa-
hatchee species. The latter include such forms as Area wagneriena,
Strombus leidyi, Cypraea problematic, and Turritella perattenuata,
judged to represent tropical species that withdrew southward in late
Caloosahatchee time with the lowering of water temperature presumably
resulting from initiation of a glacial stage.






NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA


TABLE 3.


Most Abundant. M'ollusnan Sljpies in Unit F of the
Caloosahatchee Mlarl on Shell Creek
(P = Present, but less than 1 percent.)


Species


Pclec.ylxxi

A iaidara Iranswversa .......
Anomalocardia caloosana ,
Chionm cancellta. ........
Crassinella ariua and
C. lunf .fala.............
NumO ana acuta..........
Paradarte Iriquelra........
Phacoides multifineatus.
Phacoides uwacOamaiunis..
Transennelta conradina....
Varieorbufa raloosue... ...

G astrropo lt

1 labina adamsi ..........
A nachin gardnerae ........
(aecum spp..............
Crepidula cwiuleala........
Crepidula mactuosa ... ,
Cru cibutium a uricula .... .
Mar~inella apirina .....
Nassaria erf. N. consensus.
Olirive a m utica ...........
ReIfna ranalic ata, . .
Terebra diloata ......... ..
T utrrellfa sRitdan naa .... .


8-3a $-2 63>

,'C / C,


1,2
3.0
6,4

25.2
P
27.)9
6.5
6.5
25,2
P


32.9
4.0

' '3.8
13.7

P
2.0
21.3
13.7

P


22,2
5.3
35.7


1.1
7.5
9.4
9.4
2.6
1.1




7.3
9.7
7.3
33.9

2.7
14.5
9.7
2.7


13,5
1.2
16.4

24.8
1,2
11.6
15. 1
4. !
3.2





10.5
8.2
2.6
8.7
8.7
5.2
5.2
13.1


29


St at ions


3-la


2,5
P
18.1

42.5
4.2


3.6






2.8
7.2
5.9
12.6
9.5

17,0
4.3
2.9
1.7


3-lb



2.7
P
8.,9

31.3
1.0

3.7
3.3
1.9
36.3


10.5
1.3
15.7
5,4
6.8
lo, 9

1.3

1.3
1.3
1.5


C1



9.2
P
9.4

23.7
5.8
P
3.7
5,4
P
18.6



P

50.5
3,5
4.0
10. 5

2.0
6,1
1.2
1.2
9.3


7



4.4
4,4

15.7

39.2
8.5
P
13,4
0.4
1.4
P


P
1.8
9.0
36,2
3.6

1.8
P
12,6
P
,.,...,. .


14





19.3

35.1

3.9
18.1
1.0
11)0


1.7

2.1
P
I 1
P?
8.7
3.8
P
2.1


_ _





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Mollusks less abundant than those of table 3, but relatively important
in Unit F are listed below:
Pelcey I (l


Abra aequalis Say
Anadara lienosa (Say)
Anomia simplex d'Orbigny
Brachiodontes erustus (Iinikr)
Cardita arata Conrwad
Cardila frideutat (Say)
Caryocorbula flenensis Mansfield
Chama gardrnrae Olsson anm Harb)ison
Chione yus (Holmes)
Chione latilirata athlete ('onrad
Chi mys fuwopurpureus (Conrad)
Diplodonta acdinis Conrad
DoLinia elegans Conrad
Echinochama cormda (Conrad)


EucrasHatfeia gihbesi (Tourniey and
Holmes)
Fonssuarcs adamsi (Dall)
Glyrymerr arala floridana OlAson and
Harbison
Juiacorbula scutata (Gardner)
A/acrocallista mnaculata (Liinn)
Macrocaltista nmwbosa (Solander)
Merenaria campechienis ( mcliin)
Aftilinia lateralis Say
Noetia platyura Dall
NjVcula proxima Say
Ostrea sculpturata Cottrad
Phacoides nassula ratoosana Dall
Pliranlra marginata Say


Gasi rolxdAa


A nat/his calowaenasis (Dall)
Busyton contrarium (Conrad)
BHuyron pyrum foridarnumi Olaso- aInd
Harbison
Cerithium hitharium Dall
Cerithium Licinia ()lsoni and IHarbison
Crepidula plan Say
Coniu stearnsi Con0rad
Diodora rcaynepmis (Lamlnmrk)


Eupleura caudata sufcidentata Dadl
Fasciolaria apicina Dall
Gibberulina oatliformis (d'Orbigny)
Kurtziella sp.a
Nassarius ribex (Say)
Odostomia app.
Strombus alatus Gmielin
Tectdnadica prsilla (Say)
Terebra conura (Say)


Seaphopoda
Cadulus quadriderntatu Dall Dentai/mn sp.
The extant molluscan species of Unit F and closely related living
representatives of the extinct species are inhabitants of the shallow inner
continental shelf and other near-shore environments. Almost all the species
thrive best where the salinity is near that for the open sea. Most of the
species live abundantly in open ocean water. A few species are best
adapted to enclosed bodies of water such as bays or inlets; these include
Transennella conradina, Parastarte triquetra, Olivella mutica, and Nas-
sarius vibex. Probably all five of these species range into the shallow
open ocean. It is possible that Unit F developed under slightly fluc-
tuating environmental conditions where, at times, the water was more
shallow and the shore was relatively near. It is also possible that currents
could be responsible, in part, for the mixture of bay and shelf species,
and especially of shelf and inlet species. However, the excellent preser-
vation of the shells does not seem to allow for much reworking by wave
or current action.
Many of the species of Unit F have a bathymetric range from low
tide to more than 100 fathoms. These include Cardita tridentata, Chione
latilirata, Ecrassatella gibbesi, Phacoides nassula, and probably some of
the extinct forms. Most of the mollusks, however, seem to have their





NEOCENE STRATIGRAPrH OF THE CHAHRLOTTE HARBOR AREA ,31

peak development in water less than 30 fathoms deep. Hulings (1955)
made a study of the molluscan fauna on the shelf off the southeast coast
of Texas. He reported fatunas from sand and shell bottoms in shallow
depths very similar to those found in Unit F. Listed below (table 4)
is the fauna Hulings reported from his offshore station 40, where the
depth is about 54 feet and the bottom is sandy shell debris.


TABLE 4.


Molluscan Fauna Collected off the Coast( of Texas
at a lDepth of 54 Feet (Hulings, 1955)


speciesA

PJ6"nW#J,Mui *IHjJP~J-3IUJaPflihrM


P


Teetonatica pusilla..........
('hione intapurpurea. ..........
Crassinella un ulata ...........
Phacoides amiantu .........
Caecumi rooperi. .. .. ..
A nadara tranT.ersa. ....... .
ErTillia ronrentria, .........
Gfrmdia rerina. ..............
Semete nucudoides ..........
('hama congregata ............
Macrocalhlia macura. ......
Nueulana acuta ..............
Riliur tvarium. ............ .
Caerumn g9abrumn...... .....
Anachis aztara .. ... .. ..
Tellina alternata. ... . ..
Do0 inia discus ...............
V itrinella p ............ ... .
Chione grus............. .
Plicatula gildKa. .. ..........
Rissoina derimnata....... .....


percentt age

12.7
9.7
7.0
6.5
6.2
4.9
4.6
4.6
3,6
3.3
3.3
3.2
3.2
2.8
2.7
1.7
1.7
1.6
1.6
1.2
1,2
1.1


Species


Retusa rana/icudata. ..
SHila adanmsi ... ....
Tiurlomnila sp ----.. ---.
Eehinoehamna cornudfa .
Rhizorus acutius .......
C'orbula swiftiana. . .
Dentalium amaliense.
('erithiopsis subulata. .
D)entaliim texasianumm,
Miela nella bilineata .. .
Ar ten priunostriatus. .
A narhis obema ........
Chione latilirota. .. .. .
Dinne)ardium robuatunm.
Nueita proxima. . .
Oiatoinmia sem inutda...
A nomia simplex. -
'alyptrea centralis .
Varicorbala krebsiana.
Eonita bisukcata .
Mifrella lunata ......
Triphora pulchella. .. ,


Percentage


0.9
0.9
0.9
0.8
0,8
0.6
0,6
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.3
0,3
0.3
0.3
0,3
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1


A sample of the upper marl from station SC-1 yielded 23 species
of Foraminifera listed in the appendix. The most abundant species are
listed below:


Elphidium spp,, . . .. ...
"Rotalia" hecearfi vars . . .
Bolivina pulrhella primitivra ,.
Burella/ hannai. ....... .. .
Disworbin spp ..................
M tilia idae .....................
Cibitides sp ....................


.46.0 percent
,21.0 percent,
. 7.6 percent
.. 6.0 percent
. .5.3 percent
.3.8 percent
..3.0 percent


This fauna is similar to that from Unit D (station SC-8) and probably
represents approximately the same ecologic conditions.
Lithologically Unit F is a shelly sand similar to that described by
Gould and Stewart (1955, p. 5) as occurring off the coast of south-
western Florida between shore and 10 fathoms.


--






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Thus it appears that the fauna of Unit F lived near shore on the
inner continental shelf where enough current activity was available to
cause some mixture of inlet, bay and shelf species, but not enough to cause
significant damage to the shells. It is also possible that slight fluctuations
in environmental conditions during the time Unit F was accumulating
would account for the mixing of several ecological types. The maximum
depth of water was probably no more than 10 to 15 fathoms and
possibly less, so that the corresponding shoreline possibly lay below the
Wicomico (90 to 100 feet) shoreline, perhaps being the Penholoway
shoreline (72 feet above sea level).
Inasmuch as many of the typical and tropical Caloosahatchee species
are absent, it is probable that the fauna of Unit F lived in water some-
what cooler than that of any of the underlying Caloosahatchee units.
However, most of the species in Unit F, or the apparent progeny, now
live in Floridan waters so that water temperature was probably close
to that for southern Florida today. The minimum water temperature was
probably not less than 65" F., inasmuch as Chione cancellata and
Macrocallista maculata will not survive below that temperature (Pulley,
1955, oral communication).
ALLIGATOR CREEK
The Caloosahatehee faunas that occur along Alligator Creek are
similar to those of the lower and middle marls on Shell Creek, However,
as pointed out earlier, the section on Alligator Creek is thin and the units
of Shell Creek cannot be recognized. In addition, the formation was
heavily eroded prior to deposition of the Fort Thompson Formation; thus
exposures are discontinuous and lateral tracing of individual units is
virtually impossible. Large faunas were collected only from stations
D-6 and D-8 although small faunas were collected at stations D-3, D-4,
and D-5. Ecological analysis is based primarily on the molluscan species
included in these collections.
The most abundant molluscan species in the Caloosahatchee Marl of
Alligator Creek are listed in table 5 below.


32






NEOGxENx STATCHGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA

TABLE 5. Most Abundant. Molluscan Species in the
CalcHksahatchee Marl on Alligator Creek
(P Present but less than 1.0 percent)


Species


Pelecypoda
Abra ratrqualis (Say) ...., .......... ........
Anadara improcera (Conrad).,- . .. .......
A nomnalocardia caloosana (Dall) .............
Cardita arata (Conrad) ........... ...........
Caryocorbula eonensis Mansfield.............
Chai a gardnerae (JOlsson and Iarbison ........
Chione cancelaita (Linne)) ..................
Crossinella Inuloata (Conrad) and
C. acuta (Dall) ....... .................
Mulinia of. 3. lateralis Say .................
LaerIca.rdiuti mortoni Coirad, ............
N ucula prorima Say........................
Nuculana aeuta (Conrad),........ .......
Paratarte triquetra (Conrad)..... .. .......
Pharoides anadonla Say. ................ ....
Pharoides multilinealus (Tuomey and H1oline.s) .
Pharoides nussuila raloosana Dali . . . .......
Pharoides warcarmatvrnni Dall ...............
Plicatula nmarinata Say ,..................
Tranwen neta conradina (Dal). ................
Varieoribua raloosae (Dall) ..................

GCawtrol> la


Afabina adani (Dall). .................... .
Bittium varirm Pfeiffer ?.....................
Btsy lon confrarilun (Conrad) ................
Ca-enum floridanum Stimpson................
Catadharus sp.-inmmnaturr, ....... . . . .. ..
(Crirfhifmn raloosaenr e Dall..... ..........
Cerithinum. itharin im Dall .... .............. ..
(C'rithiumn sp............................. . .,
Crepidula aculcala Gmelin ...................
Crepidufa macr osa Conrad.................
Crucib hmn a utri.rcd m Gmelin..................
Diodora cf. D. cayLensnis (Lamark) ..........
Murain ella arnianitr a Dall .................. ...
M arginefla pardal is& Dall ... ................
MAfioreras ringuatutn Dall ...... ............. ..
MAfonrena corona Gmelin............... ... ..
Mbdulus carchedonius (Laimarek).............
N ass riri s sp......................... .. .
N assarin i v .ibex (Say) .........................
Of Welfba meutica Say .........................
Retusa ranatiruafaa (Say)............... ...
ICingikcula jloridana Dall..................... ..
Seiia adamsi H. CC.Lea ....................
Strombius /datus GO elin .....................
Terebra ef T, conct a (Say) ...............
Turbonitla sp ......................... . . .
Turriella saibannutfata Heilprin ...............


Un
D16-1 14-2


%
P
38.3
2,9
?
2,1
3.5
6,5

2.9
2.9

1.3
8.2
1.2

4.2
1.6
2.7
1.9
1.1
4.6


7.3
P
7.3
3.6


8.1
P

7,3

3,6

3.6


7.3

7.3
7.3
2.6
3! 6


14.3
P


3.6

4.1





2.8
P
P

7.1


11.8


60 .


3,6 .....


its I
D4- 3 D8-2


p
17,6
i?
P

8.2

3.8


p
61.9
1.6
2.5
P

5.3



13.3


1.7



13.3

29 1




3-3


13.3
13.3
13.3


1.6

13.5
2.8

P
7.3

7.0

3.4
P
6.0
G...O
26.9
P
3,0

21.3



46.7
P
F
P
P
P


P
P
12.1

3.6
P
2.1
P
P

2.2
6.8
7.8

2.4


2,4


: : : :






34 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SUUVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Additional mollusks, especially larger species, relatively common in
the Alligator Creek Caloosahatchee Marl are listed below. (Stations
where the species were collected are also indicated.)


PelecyptAit


Stations


rajr iutnm mortoni (Ravenel) ..........................
A nadara rustic (TuomeIy and Holmeis)..............
A wadara ienosa (Say)............ .. .... .. ....
A nadara scaarina (Tleilpri ) ........................
Ar ea wagueriana Dall ..............................


fothrororbnla willcoxi (Dull). ... .
(.'hlanmys anteampicostats (Mansfield).
('hione latilirata altta (Conurd .......
'rassomtrea rirginira (Gmelini) ........
Djoninia reeqtuns Conrad..............
Erirasaute/la spetiowa (A. Adans) ...,.
Glyeymneris arata floridana Olsson and I
.f acrocallita macu/ala LinO ........
Jl ercrnaria ramn peehiermia (Gmelin)). .
Sfiitha culoosu ien in (Dall)............
Noetia platfyra (IDall) ....... .., .
Panope floridana H teilprin ............
Ifangia nasrfa (Dall) ................


i i l . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .



[u .bisn, .........

. . . . .. . .

..s.............
................


.........DS-2
.1)...D6-, D8-2
. . . . . 1D4-1, D8-2
.........D4-3, Dfi-1, D8-2

...... .108-2
. I D . . D8-2
..... ..... D6-1
..........D 6-1
.......... 8-2
. . .D6-1, D8-2
. ... Di-1
.......... D4-3, D6-1
.......... D4-3, D6-1
.......... )6-1, 08-2
..... ,. D3-2, D8-2
.......... D8-2
......... D 1
.......... D 8-2


Gasl- rojxidj


BH ila ocridenlalti Adarsm ........................ .......... D8-2
iusycon contrarifum (('onradi ) ........................ ....... D4-3, D8-2
HBu yron rapum (Ileilprin) ? ....................,....... ........ D8-2
Canedllaria conradiana Dall .................................. D8-2
'anthrs perpeus Olsnun arnd Jlnrlbisok ....................... DS-2
'erithti m raloosaense Dall ............... ........... ..... .-2
'ypraea problemanzli Heilprin ..................... ............. D8-2
Fasciolaria apirina Dail ............ .............. ...... D4-3
Fas'iioaria gigantea Kiener .... ... .................. .. D6-1
.Metongena corona n(melin ..... ................. ............ D4--3, D8-2
.llurex brerifrons nirrk ....................................... .)6-1
. urer reruirrirof triH rubidur F. S. Baker .................. ..... D8-2
OliM'a Hayana Ravenel ............. .. .... ........,. D6-1, D8-2
Pyrazus scalatus (Heillpin) ............... ............ ....... D8-2
Scaphella floridana TTleilprin .................................. D5-5
Turbo ranstaoners Gmielin ................................... DO--
Trjphis floridamnu I)all .............. ........... ... ... ... D8-2
V1ernricilaria retla O)lson and Harbisonr ....... . ...... 6-1



As at most other Caloosahatchee localities the fauna is well preserved
and varied. Little evidence of reworking by waves or currents is appar-
ent. It is probable that most of the species lived close to their place of
burial.

Comparison of the molluscan species listed above with those of the
Shell Creek Caloosahatchee faunas indicates that they lived under essen-
tially the same environmental conditions. The Alligator Creek faunas





NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY Oa THE CHARLO'rTE HARBOR AREA 35

seem most closely related to those of the eastern facies of the Shell
Creek Unit D marl. Most of the species are characteristic of a shallow
water, inner shelf environment. As in the eastern faces of Unit D on
Shell Creek, Anonalocardia caloosani, Parastarte triquetra, Transennella
conradina, Olivella mutica, and Retusa canaliculata are among the most
abundant species. Typical brackish water species such as Crassostrea
virginica and Rangia nasuta are rare, and with the possible exception
of Amusium mortoni, deep water, outer shelf species are virtually un-
known. The fauna of station D-6 appears to represent slightly deeper
water than does the fauna of station D-8. This is to be expected inasmuch
as station D-8 lies nearly 3 miles east of station D-6 and was thus some-
what closer to the shore that presumably lay to the east.
The bottom on which the faunas of the Alligator Creek lived was
similar to that of the Shell Creek area and seemed to correspond closely
to that of the present inner shelf off the coast of southwestern Florida
between 5 and 20 fathoms (Gould and Stewart, 1955, p. 5).

FORT THOMPSON FORMATION
GENERAL STATEMENT
All of the deposits of the Charlotte Harbor area which stratigraphically
overlie the Caloosahatchee Marl has been assigned to the Fort Thompson
Formation in this report. It is possible, however, that the upper 2 to 3
feet of white quartz sands have been reworked relatively recently. Most
of the deposits studied are unfossiliferous, unconsolidated quartz sands
found below a present elevation of 50 feet above sea level. Unfortunately,
the absence of fossils in these beds makes paleoecological interpretation
very difficult.
Exposures in the area that carry marine fossils are rare and none are
known to occur at an elevation greater than 15 feet above present sea
level; thus, all were deposited below the Pamlico shoreline (25 to 30
feet above sea level). As pointed out earlier (DuBar, 1958, and Richards,
1938), the Fort Thompson Formation can be correlated with the making
of the Pamlico shoreline.
It is probable that some of the unfossiliferous sands that overlie
fossiliferous Fort Thompson sediments were deposited under marine
conditions; however, most of the unfossiliferous sands that directly lie
on the Caloosahatchee Marl or Tamiami Formation, or lie above the
30-foot contour are probably of nonmarine origin. It is also probable
that most of the marine sands were deposited during regression of the
Fort Thompson Sea.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETEN FORTY-THREE


The position of the Pamlico shoreline has been roughly delineated
by MacNeil (1950); however, more accurate location of this shoreline
can be ascertained from study of topographic maps. Modification of the
topography by streams such as Peace River and Shell Creek makes exact
placement of the shoreline ambiguous. For instance, Shell Creek
apparently has cut its valley headward several miles into the
Wicomico(?) terrace which lies above the Pamlico shoreline. If this is
true, then the Fort Thompson sands exposed along the headwaters of
Shell Creek are probably all of nonmarine origin.
All the Fort Thompson exposures that contain marine fossils are
located within a few miles of the Pamlico shoreline. If the surface of the
Pamlico terrace has not been warped, the difference in elevation be-
tween the base of the Pamlico shoreline (25 feet? above sea level) and
the elevation of any Fort Thompson fossiliferous bed should approximate
the depth of water in which the faunas lived. The elevations of the tops
of the fossiliferous units range from sea level to approximately 15 feet
above sea level; thus, considering the thickness of the Fort Thompson
sediments, the maximum depth of water was probably no greater than
6 fathoms.
The megafossils of the Fort Thompson Formation are well preserved
and show little or no evidence of abrasion by wave or current action.
Ecological analysis shows that each fauna lived close to shore on the
inner continental shelf where the bottom was composed of quartz sand.
The salinity ranged from brackish to normal marine (3.6 percent), the
temperature was probably similar to that of water off the southwestern
coast of Florida today, and the depth was only a few fathoms at the
maximum.
Station D-20: Shell-bearing marine Fort Thompson strata are exposed
in the walls of a shell pit located about 0.9 mile north of Alligator Creek
(NEUNWN sec. 21, T. 41 S., R. 23 E.). The excavation at this pit
exposes 15.2 feet of sediment of which the lower 9.3 feet contain
marine fossils. There are two distinct sandy shell beds divided by a thin
band of clay and sand containing only a very few fossils. All the fossils
are well preserved and show little evidence of transportation by currents
and waves. Mollusks are by far the most abundant fossils; 17 species of
pelecypods and 19 species of snails were identified from the lower sandy
shell bed; and 8 species of snails and 10 species of clams were identi-
fied from the upper shell bed. In addition, the lower shell bed contains
a relatively large number of colonial corals near its base.
The most abundant molluscan species in the lower and upper shell
beds are listed in table 6.





NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARRBO AREA


T.tRL: 6. Most Abundant Molluscan Species in the
Fort Tihomion Formation at Station D-20


Species


Pelei'ympoda


Anaulra ra tramrsa (Say).........
Anomia simpler d'Orbigny.........
Chione rancelfata (Linn6). .. . ..
Erriia polite Dull ...............
.If u/ainia aterulis Say ..............
Pharoides mnulilineatus (Tuomey iand
Trifniorwardia trillrori (Dall).......


Holmes).


Gaatropoda


Biusycon contrurium (Conrad). ........
Chrysallida nmarneii Bart sh..,,, ...
Crepidula arrleala Gmelin............
Crepidula mirltdoa (Conradl, ........ .
Farindaria distans Linui ........... ..
Lonfrchaeusf rf. L,. marionas Bartsrl.....
Afarginela apifrina Menke...........
M orm ta sp .................... . ,
O iHellf i nutira Say ..................
Iolyn ire- duplicui s fLy .............
Pyrigi~ s sp. . ... ..............., .
IRetusa cunahlirlata (Say).............
Srita ardamti (H, Lea). .........
Terpbra distorata Say................
Turhtnilla (Chrmnitria) cf. 7'. adinetn B


lartsh. .


Siratal fnits
D20-1 D20-3
% F


6.7
3.8
49,2
2.2
23,8
11,5
.1



5.0
3.0
5.0
15.0

5.8
10.0
5.0
20,6

10.6

5,0
5.6
5.6


p
P
39.2

50.9
3.0




2.2

. . . . .

I].1
17.7
18.8

18.8
I 3.3

. . . . .


I


P=Prese'nt, less than 1.0 percent
The molluscan species of station D-20 indicate, for both the lower
and upper shell beds, deposition in shallow marine water close to shore.
The relative abundance of Olivella mutica and Polynices duplicatus
suggests deposition in an inlet, but absence from the fauna of typical
brackish water species that generally are swept by currents into an inlet
points to near-shore, open-water deposition.
Elevation at the top of the uppermost shell bed is approximately
10 feet above present sea level, so that water depth at time of deposition
probably was no more than 5 fathoms. Distance to the Pamlico shoreline
could have been no more than 3 miles.
Station D-7: An exposure of marl on Alligator Creek located
about 0.5 mile downstream from the U. S. Highway 41 bridge has
yielded a few fossil mollusks which suggest that the deposit should be
placed with the Fort Thompson Formation rather than the Caloosahatchee


- -- -- -





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-TImEE


Marl. The molluscan species from the lowermost bed at this exposure
are listed below:
Prbry :oxla
A nodara tranATrera (Sny)
Anomia simple. d'Orbigny
('hione cacnrellta (Iinn()
('hlays irradians (Lamarek)
.!ercenaria ra tnperhiensis (Gmiilin)
GasI ropoda
rusyron ronfrariurn (C(nrad)
The fauna is rather sparse for precise ecological analysis, but suggests
a high salinity bay environment and very shallow depths. The overlying
sandy limestone resembles intertidal beach rock as described by Ginsberg
(1953). The top of the fossiliferous bed is less than 2 feet above present
sea level.
Warm Mineral Springs: The deposits at Warm Mineral Springs typi-
cally include a lowermost fresh water marl and an overlying marine
shell marl. In some places a brackish water oyster biostrome lies between
the marine and the fresh water units. All the beds contain vertebrate
bones. The molluscan species identified from the marine shell Iwed are
listed below (table 7):
TAiAi.; 7. (Ciek ,ist of Mollwmlusa Speries from Watrm Mineral Springs,
Sarmcta (Countly, Florida


Pelecylxxla


.- ra arq u alis (Say) .............
A nadara fransrersa (Say) .. . .
A tnadara )p. i ............. ... .
A nomaluoardin ralosana (Dall)- .
("ardita sp. very close to (C. arata
(Conrad) of the CalKooahatehee
Marl........ ..............
Chione ranfitlata (Linri1). . . .
Larrircardin mortoni ('onral.. . .
Mauroralhisla nimonau Solander ..
M uhlinia fateralis Say ............
Nnrela prorima Say .............
Parar larte triiietra Co(nir2U .......
Phairoides mullihfneatrin Tuomney
antd I olmes ,................
Plictrdrfu sp ................ ..
Tafrdus di'inuma (Slengler) ........
Tdllidorn rrifstta It Re(uz.... . .
7flipna sayi I all ................
Trachyrard iunm isorardina (Linni') ?.
Transennella crmradina (Dall) .....
Trannrnn"ela f. T'. simp.oni Dall ,
'ern s cnampechirtis G'nelini... - .


R

11
(




It
R
A
R
R
It
(,
It
A

(It
R
It

?-H
A
It
it


Gn(af rojpxiL


A rtraon sp. .....................
A nachis (Costarna'his) obesrun
(C. B. Adams) sub sip? .........
A? tnachi a ftp . a ... ..... ....
Huyctrontt onrarium (Co( n ad). .
Bu-sycon pyrurn Dillwyn sub sp. a?.
(.'erithimni mnsrrum Say. .......
Creph/idua pianr Sy. . . . ... .
Fasriofaria apirina DIll ? .......
IIHas protocunch sculpture of ithe
(Cul(xwahhnatlf ee. si'.Ie
Faslrioaria distant Linn, ........
Longrhaeis ef. L, marionie Bartserh
3M1arinedla apirina NI[enke ........
.1l fonflena corona Chnlin ...... ..
Aamsarius bidenritusaf (Emmonos)
slender form ............ .... .
Nasarius riber (Say) ............
Naslarri's s ....................
OHirdlla rnutica (Say) rather slender,
so perhaps is O. pusilla Miarrat,
PIdn irCes tdupicratta Say, .........
Pyriisrnus ef. P. sisphusi Btrl.k'h,.
Pyriqiscues cf.P.P. telfnsae Brarlsrh..
Pyrifgiscus sp. a ............. .
Re/Pina canalicul/at Say ...........
Strombiox alatus Gmelin (immature)
? Terrbra sp.. . . ..........
Turbontila of. 7'. airmen Bartgh.,
Turbl n illa sp. ai.................


It
FC
R
It

R



It
H



It
F(
R






It
It


R

it

R
It
It
R
R

R


FC( Fairly C'ommon


38


R = Rare


A = Abhundai nt


(C = Commion





NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CIHARLOmTE HARBOR AREA 39

ACLINE FAUNA
Molluscan species collected from spoil piles along the sides of a shell
pit located about 1 mile southwest of Acline in the Punta Gorda SE
quadrangle were first studied by Helen Tucker and Druid Wilson (1932-
33). The fauna included some Caloosahatchee species as well as some
restricted to the Miocene, and several new species. Inasmuch as the pit
was filled with water, it was impossible for Tucker and Wilson to deter-
mine the stratigraphic relations. Consequently, it could not be ascertained
if the collections included assemblages from more than one stratum of
different ages, or if the fauna were intermediate in age between the
Miocene and the Caloosahatchee Marl. It is interesting to note that several
other pits located near the one yielding the "Acline fauna" contain sandy
and argillaceous faces of the Tamiami Formation with the usual Ostrea-
Encope-Balanus fauna. According to D)nid Wilson the pit containing the
"Acline fauna" is deeper than the other pits and thus has penetrated a
stratum not reached in the others (personal communication, 1958).
Lately, another pit (station D-22) has been opened within 800 feet
of the "Acline fauna" pit, and strangely has yielded only the usual
Ostrea-Encope-Balantu fauna. Druid Wilson has postulated a faces
change between the two pits (personal communication, 1958), but the
distance seems insufficient to allow for so great a faunal change. More
likely the new pit was not dredged deeply enough to encounter the
Acline fauna.
In 1958, the U.S. Geological Survey had the "Acline fauna" pit drained
and Druid Wilson with Stanley Olsen of the Florida Geological Survey,
made large collections from the walls of the pit. These collections are
currently being studied by Mr. Wilson at the National Museum.
Collections made by Charles Locklin from the spoil piles of the "Acline
fauna" pit, and perhaps several others in the immediate vicinity, were
donated to the Florida Geological Survey where, in 1958, they were
studied by the writer. Seventy subspecies and species of pelecypods and
105 species and subspecies of gastropods were identified and are listed
with their geologic ranges in table 8.
Casual study of this faunal list immediately discloses that the fauna
is ecologically and stratigraphically mixed. Thirty-four species and sub-
species are known only from the Acline fauna, 17 appear to be restricted
to the Miocene, 72 are post-Miocene, 52 range from the Miocene into the
younger strata, 41 are restricted to the Caloosahatchee Marl, 50 range
into the Recent, and 2 species are post-Caloosahatchee.
It appears that this collection includes species from the Fort Thomp-
son Formation, the Caloosahatchee Marl, and a facies of the Tamiami
Formation. It is possible also that a fauna intermediate in age between
that of the Tamiami Formation and the Caloosahatchee Marl is repre-
sented.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


TAPLE 8. Acline Molluncan Check List


Species


_______________________________________ .- ~


Peleeypoda

Anradara rampiwa {(Dall)
An adam chiriquienag (Gabb)
Anadara iienons (Say)
Anadara ruwtica (Tuomey and IIolmes)


Anadaram caarina (IIHilprin)
Anadara sp. A- similar to A. improewro (Conrad)
Anomatoeardia caioowna (IDall)


Anomia simplex d'Orbiany
Arca aquila Heilprin


Area wagneriana DaHB
As&arr fsp.
Rochrocorbuia wiilcoxi (Dall)


A


x


X


Cardium aclinenmis Tucker and Wilson X
Cardits araoa (Conrad)
Candita tridentoda (Say)
Chama nardnrm Olewo and Harbison
Chama heilprini Collsian
Chama witmleri Dall
Chione ancellata (Linne)
Chione cribaria Conrad
Chionr latiifraoa atlela Conrad
Chion ef. C. arocyma Dall
CAlamly comparifie (Tuomey and HolTmia)
Chlamty irradiana Lamarek
ChaiRmV jfdersoniuit Say


Chfamg solariotdea (Heiiprin)
CMhama ap. A.
Craano trea virginica (Gmilin)
Diplodonta aodini Conrad
Dimrricrla ssu.
Dosinia deLrans Conrad


KEhinwhoama cornuts (Conrad)
Kuera~ardfa sp.i4s4W (A. Adrnaml
Glyvmeriu americana (D)efrance)
Hlmiwwtia masgoiam (I)all)
Leutticardium lae-igotum wagnerianum Olsaun and [larbimon?


X


Geoloaic RanRe



-T -x- ---
bM P1 C P




x
X
X









X X X X'
- x.







-x x x
x x xX
x




X
x x _x x

X X X X
'C ~I 'C-- I -



X X X
x ; X

X

x x x
x


X X X

--x-- -- -- ----
X X





X X X



X X X
~ ~ ~ X x X X ;


SXA X
X X X
X

__ i *;x C


A
X


-t
R







X












X








X


X




x


X





X




x

x
x








NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA

TABLE 8. m(Cot inued)


Species


Pelecypuda (Continued;

Lwcina pennjtovnica Linna
Ma~orocaltita p. A (new?)


MaecroCUista nimbom Solander
Mercenaia campnW t&Ws (Omelin)
Mulinia congeata (Conrad)
MSfinia sapaiUla Dall

lMyti eonmrdina d'Orbigny
Noctia ponderoam (Say)

Nucure proxina Say


Nuitana aruta (Conrad)

Ostra meridionaliRi Heilprin
Osnrea ,rulutrata Conrad

Ostrea p. A.
Ostre raminminainms ulbp A


Geologic Range


I_ I I~


_--- --X--
.1



X

X

X

x


x
; i x
I _

x
I Xx
X _


PI C




-~~ -x-


x x
x x

x ?

x




X X
x x
x x

x
x x


P R


x


x
x






x
x
x
X


X
. .?


X


x

x






x

x
X


Paarterfe tricqfra (Conrad) X X X X X
Peten rameneU I all X X X

PItWion keria Tluker and Wilson X I
Pacwide di~iformis (Heilprin) X X X X X
Pcwnoide radiant (Conrad) X X X X
PhAeoides sp, X
I haeoides trisukrat (Conrad) X : X X X X
Phacwides tuomeyi Dall i X
PlicaHV marpinat Say X X X ?
Rrzlnia nama (Dall) X

Severe beasrriato Conrad X X X X X
TlUidora lunwtat Holmes X X

Telina cf. T. dinonmer Dall X
Tllina ef. T. suay IDeshayes- X
Terlina up X1
TrwAkhyiurdium muariatum (Linnd) ? X X X
Trachyeardium oedalium (Dall) ? X X
TransmnenRa up. X

Triencardia eoIumba (Heilprin) X
Varicorbula caleoas (Dall) X


____ __I


---


-------- -







42 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

TABLE 8. (Continued)


Geologic Rnle
Species
A M PI C P R

Guatruwod

Anachis caloasaenmi (1Dall) X
Archiktelonic nobilis Rdingk X X X X X
Atraea smrfopa Oleson and lHarbij n X
BWta oecidentdia Adainia ? X X X
Bulla srltlr Brugiere ? X
Busycon tontiarium (Conrad) X X X X X
Buscon chinatum (Dall) X
Busrycn planulatam ()all) X
BRuron pyrum jfridanutm Olseon and Harbieon X
Bulrcon rspum (Heilprin) X
Caswrlaria sp. A X
Canceflaria taulata Gardner and Aldrich X
CantedLOia ttnste Tuomey and Holmes X X
Contharus clark8rillensi (Mansfield) X
Canlhars multanpduata (Philippi) X X X
Cantharm perpjtaw Oleson and IHarbisun X
Cariitium coloomenas Dall X
CeritAiumR coeaodes )all X
Cerinthum ridtnia Olason and Harbison X
Clathrodrilia ebiniat (Dall) X
CothrodrTfia perapi ai (Dall) ? X
Colubmrria lnmeolata arlinica Tucker and Wilson X
? Columbella ap. A X
Conum advarmarius Conrad X X X
Conus cl. C. daenus H ass X X X
Conuw firidanus Cabb X ? X X X
Conus saproides Olsun and Harbison X
Conu, wacaumw'enais B. Smith X X X
Conuas uwaccamau'ensis mubsp. A lnew ? X
Crspiddva aculeata Omelin X X X X X
Crepidula fornimta Say X X X X X
Crpidula plana Say X X X X X
Crutibtaum auriculum Gmelin X X X
Crnibltum ef. C. imbricatum (Sowerby) X X
Crncibulum multilineatm (Conrad) X X
Cru cibWum spinosum Sowerhy ?
"Cytham" sp. A X
Cyvto*,yrin. luntaa (Len) X X X






43


NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA

TABLE 8. (Continued)


Species


Gastropoda (Continued)

CVotisOrfn'x lunaia ae inira Tucker and Wilson
Cymatoeyrinz sp. A
Cyvpmz crotinm iis faritdana Mansfield


Geologin Range


A -M




X
x
x


? Dorsanum plicatie (Biae) X
Pawioenria apicina Dall
Fasiolaria distanT Linnt
F'asioWria gigrntea Kiener


Fasciolaria srjorlia Heilprin
FuinusW cahoonMenai Hcilprin


?


X
X


?


C P


X


X
x


X
X


R


X
X


Fturinea caolouenMis auibsp- A X ?
Haneia mengeana (Dall) X
Hianetia autghani aoclnenl i (Tucker and Wilson) X
Helioma conanta (Dall) X
Leminfina up. X
Margendla apicina Menks X X
Marginella eruima Dall X
-- -- --- -
Maroinefla manfildi (Tucker and Wilgon) X
Marginella pardias DaLI X X
MarginAell precuraor Dall X X X
Marginflla sp. A X
Merongena corona Gmelin X X X
MVitra heilprini eafinata Tucker and Wileon X
Modtdus carheRdoniTu (Iamarck) X ? X
Msure margintjyi ML Smith X X X
Murer pomum Gmielin X X X X
Murex recurtifrotris rubidFi F, C, Raker X X X
Murer salleanus A. Adams X
Na~ar'iu ribez (Say) X X X X
Ncaica canrena (Linnd) Mfbrch X X X X X
Naica oupp1yana Toula X
Olitc saaina Ravenel X X X X X
Ofra saayana immortua Pilebry and Brown X
OliCa op. X
Pyrase satlafu (NHeil prin) X
I --- ,- ,-- L - --

Pyroaus saelaiu sub.p. A X
Petalorwahua sculpirajtu II. C. Lea X
Phasa windi Dall
Poalyices dupirtus Say X X X X X







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

TA1HLE 8. ((Corititued)


Geoloeic Rang
Species
A M PI C

Gamtropoda (Continued)

Polya cr f. P. dupwiCatus Say X X X
S---- _. -

Polvnices abeauwa Sowerby X
t Paeudosalpinx sp. A X
Rlhincdaiia coooewsenss (Dall) X
Rhinodaia ap. X
SaphAla flaridana Heilprin X
Sedilbi up. A X
S rambM aJatus Gneklin x x
rdLa fa ciatum (Born) X
Tere'b dilcoae Say X X X

Terebr asp. A X
TOrebr sp. C X
Terebra uniineata Conrad X
Terbra un iineata mubap. A X

Troph na lpidaa (Dcll) X
Turbo rhreogramaicu* Dall X
Tuwritdlla picali Heilprin X
Turritueu cookei plodenseis MaNnfield X
Tsrritela ponroai Manalield X
Turritlia ponrioni UIenhp A new? X
Turrella n. ap. A ? X
TuwriMla subanulata submp. A
TurrieUla ef. T. w fineriana OlBon and Ilarbison X
E. roalpinx ttrbidua Dall X
Vermicidari rwe(l Olopon and Harbison X
Viriparus gOorGianus (Lea) X
Xeanu a eoianmoides Dall X
Yenopwho cErwAyliophora Born X


P R




X X











X X


X X














I-- -










I I -
X X


i x


A -Known only from Acline (ag in doubt)
M-Miocene
PI -Pliocene (includes Waccamaw and Croatan formations)
C -Caloomahetchee Marl
P --Plei4atoene (other than Calocalhatnhlie Nlarb
R -Recent


_ __






NEOGENE STRATIGHAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HA wOR AREA 45

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Bandy, O. L.
1954 Distribution of some shallow water Foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico:
U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 254-F, p. 125-140, 4 pls.
1956 Ecology of Foraninifera In northeastern Gulf of Mexico: U. S. GeoL
Survey Prof. Paper 274-C, p. 179-204, 3 pls.
Clapp, F. G. (See Matson, G. C.)
Cole, W. S.
1931 The Pliocene and Pleistocene Foraminifera of Florida: Florida Geol,
Survey Bull. 6, 76 p.
Cooke, C. W. (See also Parker, G. G.)
1945 Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 29, 339 p.
Dall, W. H. (See also Harris, II. G.)
1894- Contributions to the Tertiary fauna of Florida with special reference to
1903 the Miocene silex beds of Tampa and the Pliocene beds of the Caloosa-
hatchee River: Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., v. 3, 0 pts., 1654 p.
1892 (and Harris, II. G.) Correlation papers-Neocene: U. S. Geol. Survey
Bull. 84, 349 p.
DuBar, J. R.
1958a Age and stratigraphic relationship of the Caloosahatchee Mirl of Florida:
Illinois Acad. Sci. Trans., v. 50, p. 187-193.
1958b Neogene stratigraphy of southwestern Florida: Gulf Coast Assnc. Geol.
Soc. Trans., v. 7, p. 129-155.
1958c Stratigraphy and paleontology of the late Neogene strata of the Caloosa-
hatchee River area of southern Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 40,
267 p.
1959 The Waccamaw and Croatan deposits of the Carolinas: Geologic Notes,
v. 3, no. 6, 9 p.
Could, H. R.
1955 (and Stewart, R. 1.) Continental terrace sediments in northeastern Gulf
of Mexico; (in Finding ancient shorelines): Soc. Econ. Paleontologists
and Mineralogists, Spec. Pub. No. 3, p. 2-19.
Harbison, Anne ( See Olsson, A. A.)
Hoy, N. D. (See Schroeder, M. C.)
Ilulings, N. C.
1955 An investigation of the benthic invertebrate fauna from the shallow
waters of the Texas coast: Masters Thesis, Texas Christian University,
52 p.
Johnsoiia
1941- Monographs of the marine mollusks of the western Atlantic, v. 1-.
1959
Klein, H. (See Schroeder, M. C.)
Kornfeld, M. M.
1931 Recent littoral Foraminifera from Texas and Louisiana: Stanford Univ.
Dept. Geol. Contr., v. 1, no. 3.
Ladd, H. S.
1951 Brackish water and marine assemblages of the Texas coast, with special
reference to mollusks: Inst. Marine Sci., v. 2, no. 1, p. 129-163.
Lankford, R. R.
1959 Distribution and ecology of Foraminifera from east Mississippi Delta
margin: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 43, no. 9, p. 2068-2099,
11 fig., 3 pls.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Lowman, S. W.
1949 Sedimentary faces in Gulf coast: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull.
v, 33, no. 12, p. 1939-1997,
MacNeil, F. S.
1950 Pleistocene shorelines in Florida and Georgia: U. S. Geolt Survey Prof.
Paper 221-F, p. 01-107.
Mansfield, W. C,
1939 Notes on the upper Tertiary and Pleistocene mollusks of peninsular Flor-
ida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 18, 75 p.
Matson, G. C.
1909 (and Clapp, F. G.) A preliminary report on the geology of Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey 2d Ann. Rept., p. 28-231.
Moore, D. G. (See Shepard, F. P.)
Olsson, A. A.
1953 (and Harbison, Anne) Pliocene Mollusca of southern Florida: Acad.
Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, mon. 8, 457 p.
Parker, F. L. (See also Phleger, F. B.)
1953 (and Phleger, F. B., and Pierson, J. F.) Ecology of Foraminifera from
San Antonio Bay and environs, southwest Texas: Cushman Lab. Foram.
Research Contr., Spec. Pub. 2, 75 p.
Parker, G, G.
1944 (and Cooke, C. W.) Late Genozoic geology of southern Florida with
a discussion of the ground water: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 27, 119 p.
1955 (and others) Water resources of southeastern Florida with special ref-
erence to the geology and ground water of the Miami area: U. S. Geol.
Survey Water-Supply Paper 1255, 963 p.
Parker, R. H.
1956 Macro-invertebrate assemblages as indicators of sedimentary environments


Phi


Pic


in east Mississippi Delta: Am. Assoc, Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 40,
no. 2, p. 295-376.
1959 Macro-invertebrate assemblages of central Texas coastal bays and Laguna
Madre: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 43, no. 9, p. 2100-
2166.
eger, F. B. (See also Parker, F. L.)
1951 Gulf of Mexico Foraiiiinifera, Part I; Foraminifcra distribution: Geol.
Soc. America, mem. 46.
1951 (and Parker, F. L.) Gulf of Mexico Foraminifera, Part II; Foraminifera
species: Ceol. Soc. America, mem. 46.
1954 Ecology of the Foraminifera and associated microorganisms from Mis-
sissippi Sound and environs: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull.,
v. 38, no. 4, p. 584-647, 28 fig., 3 pl.
1955 Ecology of Foraminifera in southeastern Mississippi Delta area: Am.
Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 39, no. 5, p. 712-752, 40 fig.
rson, J. F. (See Parker, F. L.)


Puri, H. S.
1959


(and Vernon, R. 0.) Summary of the geology of Florida and a guide-
book to the classic exposures: Florida Geol. Survey Spec. Pub. 5, 255 p.


Richards, H. C.
1938 Marine Pleistocene of Florida: Geol. Soc. America Bull., v. 19, p. 1267-
1296.
1945 Correlation of Atlantic Coastal Plain Cenozoic formations, a discussion:
Geol. Soc. America Bull., v. 56, p. 401-408,
1959 Recent studies on the Pleisttcene of the South Atlantic Coastal Plain:
Southeastern Geology 1, no, 1, p. 11-21.






NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOITE HARBOR AREA 47

Schroeder, M. C.
1958 (and Klein, II,, and Iloy, N. D.) Biscayne aquifer of Dade and Broward
counties, Florida: Florida Ceol. Survey Rept. Inv. 17, 56 p.
Sellards, E. H.
1912 Soils and other surface residual materials of Florida: Florida Geol. Sur-
vey 4th Ann. Rept., 79 p.
1919 Geologic sections across the Everglades of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
12th Ann. Bept, p. 105-141.
Shepard, F. P.
1955 (and Moore, D. G.) Central Texas coast sedimentation, characteristics
of sediiientary environment, recent history and diagenesis: Am. Assoc.
Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 39, no. 8, p. 1463-1593.
Southeastern Geological Society
1954 Eighth field trip, carbonate deposits in South Florida, 47 p.
Stewart, R. H. (See Gould, H, R.)
Tucker, H. I
1932-33 (and Wilson, D)ruid) Some new and otherwise interesting fossils from
the Florida Tertiary: Bull. Am. Paleontology, v. 18, p. 39-82.
Vernon, H. 0. (See Puri, II. S.)
Wilson, Druid (See Tucker, I I.)
















































































































.-a "







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


APPENDIX

STRATIGRAPHIC SECTIONS
Station SC-1. NENE9SWN sec. 29, T. 40 S., H. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle, Char-
lotte County, Florida. Section measured in Karnes Shell Corporation pit approximately
20 yards west of Shell Creek. Color symbols (10 yr 5/4) refer to National Research
Council, Rock Color Chart.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
4 Sand, quartz (99 percent), fine to medium, subangular to angular,
clear, largest grains rounded and slightly frosted, unconsolidated,
well sorted, white; no fossils observed ........................ 3.0
3c Sand, quartz, medium, surrounded, 1-3 percent coarse grains well
rounded, very slightly consolidated, fairly well sorted, moderate
yellowish brown (10 yr 5/4); no fossils observed ............... 2.8
3b Sand, quartz, medium, subangular to surrounded, clear, slightly
consolidated, pale, yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); no fossils ob-
served ..............., .. .... .. ... .... 5.0
3a Sand, quartz, medium, subangular, clear, coarse grains surrounded
frosted, slightly consolidated, dark yellowish brown (10 yr 4/2);
stained black; no fossils observed .......................... 0.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
2 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains medium, subangular to
subrounded, clear, slightly consolidated, very pale orange (10 yr
8/2); very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved, white,
forams common, ostracodes rare ........................... 9.7
Unit E
1 Limestone (collected from spoil pile, apparently underlies bed 1,
but not exposed) marine, sandy, dense, hard, gray (NS) when
fresh, yellowish brown when weathered; insoluble residue 49.0
percent by weight, quartz sand, fine to medium, some grains
slightly frosted, subangular to subrounded, clay 10 percent (est,);
very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved. ............ 1.0
Station SC-2. SWVSWi NW1V sec. 29, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bennont quadrangle, Charlotte
County, Florida. Section measured in Karnes Shell Corporation pit approximately 30
yards south of Shell Creek.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)

Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Fornation
6 Sand, quartz, fine to medium, subangular to surrounded, clear,
well sorted, unconsolidated, white; no fossils observed. ......... 2.0
5b Sand, quartz, medium, surrounded, clear, largest grains frosted,
well sorted, slightly consolidated, dark yellowish orange (10 yr
6/6); no fossils observed .................................. 2.0
5a Sand, quartz, fine to medium, suibangular to subrounded, clear,
largest grains frosted, well sorted, slightly consolidated, very pale
orange, (10 yr 8/2); no fossils observed.......... ... ..... .. 70






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
4 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains medium, subangular to
surrounded, clear, largest grains frosted, fine, rounded black
phosphate grains, grayish orange (10 yr 7/4); very fossiliferous,
well preserved, white, mollusks abundant .................... 4,0
3 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz, subangular, clear, largest grains
rounded and frosted, well sorted, slightly consolidated, very light
gray (5 yr NS); very fossiliferous, well preserved, white, mollusks
abundant, echinoid spines common, forams common including
Elphidium sp ... .................. ......... .......... 5.0
Unit E
2 Limestone, marine, sandy, hard, compact, medium blue-gray (5B
5/1); very fossiliferous, well preserved, random orientation, gray
to white, little breakage, insoluble residue 48.3 percent by weight,
90-95 percent sand, mostly subangular to subrounded quartz,
small percentage black rounded phosphate (1 percent), clay 5-8
percent ................................... ........ .. 1.0
Unit D
1 Marl, sandy, quartz, fine to medium with 1-3 percent coarse grains,
all subrounded to rounded, slightly frosted, calcareous, some small
aragonite (?) crystals, slightly consolidated, very light gray (5 yr
NS) to very pale orange (10 yr 8/2); mollusks abundant, well
preserved, ostracodes rare (collected beneath water from floor or
pit) ........................................... ??

Station. SC-3. NWliNEiiSEMi sec. 30, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bennont quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured in Karnes Shell Corporation pit, 10
yards south of the bank of Shell Creek.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)

Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, fine to medium, subangular to subrounded, clear,
well sorted, unconsolidated, white; no fossils observed ........ 3.1
2c Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, clear, largest grains frosted,
fairly well sorted, silt (5 percent), slightly consolidated, light
brown (5 yr 5/6); no fossils observed..... ....... ........ 1.7
2b Sand, quartz, medium, subangular, clear, largest grains sub-
rounded and frosted, well sorted, slightly more consolidated than
2c, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); no fossils observed ........ 5.0
2a Sand, quartz, medium, angular to subangular, clear, largest grains
surrounded and frosted, well sorted, moderately consolidated, pale
yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); no fossils observed. .............. 0.4
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
lb Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz (95-98 percent) medium, sub-
rounded, clear, largest grains rounded and frosted, well sorted,







NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CIHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA

moderately consolidated, few fine black, rounded phosphate grains,
grayish orange (10 yr 7/4); very fossiliferous, well preserved,
while mollusks abundant, forms rare, ostracodes rare, and ech-
inoid spines rare to common ............................ ....
la Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz (95-98 percent) medium, sub-
angular to surrounded, clear, largest grains rotmded and frosted,
1-2 percent fine rounded black phosphate, well sorted, slightly
consolidated, ivory light gray (5 yr NS); very fossiliferous, well
preserved, white mollusks abundant, echinoid spines and forams
rare (probably equivalent to limestone below) ...............


4.8


Station SC-4. NENENSWN sec. 30, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section on right bank of Shell Creek.
The upper limestone of the Caloosahatchee Marl overlies the
middle marl. No collections were made here,


Station SC-5. SW4NEISW1I sec. 30, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermoint
Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on right bank of Shell Creek.


quadrangle


Bed Description Thickness
(feet)


Pleistocene
Covered
3 Sand ........ ........... ....................
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit E
2 Limestone, marine, sandy, hard, lightly porous, light gray to white
on fresh surface (NS, N9), yellowish gray (5Y 8/1) to dark yel-
lowish orange (10 yr 6/6) when weathered; very fossiliferous,
well preserved, white, mollusks common. Insoluble residue 44.1
percent by weight, quartz sand 98 percent; fine, subangular, clear,
clay 2 percent; well sorted. ............... ............

Unit D)
1 Shell marl, marine, calcareous, sandy, quartz, medium, subangular
to surrounded, clear, few small aragonite (?) nodules, occasional
fine, black phosphate grains, well sorted, slightly consolidated,
grayish orange (10 yr 7/4); very fossiliferous, well preserved,
white to gray, mollusks abundant, forams and ostracodes rare,
echinoid spines fairly coniiuon ............. .. . ... ...


12.7







1.8







6.0


Station SC-6. SE'NWSW~% sec. 30, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on right bank of Shell Creek.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)


Pleistocene
Covered
4 Sand ............................. .....................
Calhmsahatchee Marl
Unit F
3 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz (96-97 percent), medium, suh-
angular, clear, largest grains subrounded and frosted, medium
black phiosphatc (3-4 percent), well sorted, slightly consolidated,


11.6








52 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved,
white mollusks abundant, forms rare. ........ . .. ...
Unit E
2 Limestone, marine, sandy, hard, dense, moderate yellowish brown
(10 yr 5/4); fossiliferous .................. ......... .....
Unit D
1 Marl, marine, calcareous, sandy, quartz grains medium, sub-
rounded; slightly frosted, largest grains rounded and frosted,
weathered muscovite flakes rare, well sorted, slightly consolidated,
moderate yellowish brown (10 yr 5/4); very fossiliferous, well
preserved, white, mollusks abundant. ................... ....


4.5


1.8





7.0


Section SC-7. SE1NWINW1 swc. 28, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section on left bank of Shell Creek.


Description


Thickness
(feet)


Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, surrounded, unconsolidated, well sorted,
white; no fossils observed..... ....................... ...
2 Sand, quartz, medium, surrounded, unconsolidated, well sorted,
tan; no fossils observed ........ .. ..................... .
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
1 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, medium, surrounded, largest grains
more rounded and frosted, fairly well sorted, unconsolidated, pale
yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, mollusks well
preserved and abundant, no foraminifers or ostracodes observed


0.5

5,5


Station SC-8. NEiSEiSEK sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on left bank of Shell Creek.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)


Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
4 Sand, quartz, fine to medium, subangular, slightly indurated,
grayish orange (10 yr 7/4); no fossils observed ................
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
Sc Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains medium, subangular to
surrounded, clear to slightly frosted, well sorted, few grains of
blue chert, slightly consolidated, pale yellowish brown (10 yr
6/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved gastropod and pelecypod
shells abundant, random orientation, no foraminifers or ostracodes
observed .............................................
3b Sand, marine, quartz, medium, subangular to subrounded, well
sorted, slightly consolidated, tan to red-brown, weathers brown
on surface; sparsely fossiliferous, mostly TransenneHa conradina


2.0









3.0


Bed






NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 53

well preserved ............. ............. ............... 0.9
3a Shell mar], marine, sandy, quartz grains, medium, subangular
to subrounded, smaller grains clear, larger grains frosted, 1 percent
medium grained black phosphate, poorly sorted, pale yellowish
brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved, pelecypod
valves slightly lineatcd N 20' WV ........................... 1.5
Unit E
2 Limestone, marine, hard, dense, sandy, moderate yellowish brown
(10 yr 5/4); very fossiliferous, insoluble residue 36.5 percent by
weight. quartz sand fine to medium, sihangular to surrounded,
slightly frosted, clay 2 to .3 percent of residue .................. 1.0
Unit 1)
lb Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz, grains medium, subangular to
subrounded, clear, fairly well sorted, moderately yellowish brown
(10 yr 5/4); very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, foraminifers,
ostracodes and echinoid spines rare ................... ....... 1.5
la Marl, marine, calcareous, sandy, fine grained, subangular, clear,
medium grained black phosphate (1 percent); small % mm.,
aragonite (?) needles (2 percent), very pale orange (10 yr 8/2);
very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, foraminifers and ostracodes
com m on ............... ........................ .... .. .. ..0

Station SC-9. NE;SW\'JSE. sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section on right bank of Shell Creek.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)

Pleistocene
Covered
3 Sand ................................................... 4.5
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit E
2 Limestone, sandy, hard, gray; mollusks common, .............. 1.0

Unit D
1 Shell marl, calccrous, sandy, quartz medium, subrounded, coarse
quartz grains (1-2 percent) rounded, frosted, unconsolidated, fine
aragonite (?) crystals (2-3 percv'nt) fine, black phosphorite (1-2
percent), pale yellow-brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous,
mollusks abundant, well preserved, foraminifers, ostracades, and
echinoid spines common. ................ ................. 4.5

Station SC-10. NWXSWNSEL sec. 25, T, 40 S-, R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on right bank of Shell Creek.

Bed 1Description Thickness
(feet)

Pleistocene
Covered
4 Sand .................................................. 9.0
Calonoshatcheu Marl






54 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

Unit I
3 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains medium, subangular to
surrounded, clear, occasional medium grained, rounded black
phisphate, rare, small aragonite (?) needles; light olive gray (5 yr
6/1); mollusks abundant, well preserved, forms common. ......
Unit C
2 Limestone, marine, hard, porous, sandy, phosphate, quartz grains
fine to medium, with few large grains, small grains angular to sub-
angular, clear, largest grains surrounded and frosted, clay 5 per-
cent (?), white (N9) on fresh surface, strained yellow-brown,
insoluble residue 16.5 percent by weight; mollusks abundant
and well preserved including Area wagneriana and Turritella
apicalis ........ ....... .... ... .........
Unit B
1 Marl, marine, sandy, calcareous, moderately consolidated, quartz
grains fine to medium, subroundcd, clear, rare, fine, black rounded
phosphate grains, fairly well sorted, light olive gray (5 yr 6/1);
very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved Chione can-
cerlata and Rangia namuta common, forms rare ...............
(Hard limestone ledge observed
4-5 feet below water level.)
Station SC-11. SE5SW'4 sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle,
County, Florida. Section measured on right bank of Shell Creek.


3.0







1.0





5.0(?)


Charlotte


Description


Thicknrss
(feet)


Pleistocene
Covered


3 Sand ................ ......................... .
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit A


2


Limestone, conglomeratic, sandy, shell hash in matrix; most
shells occur as molds causing limestone to be very porous; matrix
yellow-brown (10 yr 8/2); on fresh surface, stained with limonite;
pebbles 20-50 rmm, pale yellow-brown (10 yr 6/2) containing tiny
white mollusk shells, few black grains of phosphorite (1-2 mm.).
Insoluble residue 9.0 percent by weight, of which 25 percent is
sand, 75 percent clay and silt...........................


Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Marl, argillaceous, fairly well consolidated, porous, cream to
yellow-brown; fossils sparse, Insoluble residue 24.0 percent by
w eight ..................................... .


10.0








2.5




6.0


Station SC-12, SWVNW'iSWV sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on left bank of Shell Creek.


Description


Thickness
(feet)


Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, subangular to subrounded, well sorted,


Bed


Bed






NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHAIO'TTE HARBOR AREA


55


less than 5 percent phosphorite and other dark minerals uncon-
solidated, white (5 yr N9); no fossils observed ... ........... 715
2 Sand, quartz, medium, subangular to surrounded, fairly well
sorted, dark yellow-brown (10 yr 4/2); no fossils observed ...... 0.5
Unconformity
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Clay, sandy, calcareous, phosphatic, moderately consolidated, tan
to cream; mollusks common ................. ........ .. 3.5

Station SC-13. NWNWVNWi sec. 26, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Cleveland quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on left bank of Shell Creek.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)

Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
2 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, tan to gray; no fossils
observed ................................................ 7.5
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Marl, calcareous, argillaceous, dense, well consolidated, quartz
sand, medium (2-3 percent), rounded black phosphorite grains up
to 10 mm., very pale yellow-orange (10 yr 8/2); fossil fragments
white, not common ................................... 4.0
Station SC-I4. SESE4J sec. 36, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., northwest of lake, Bermont
quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida.
Station SC-14 has fauna similar to that recorded by Mansfield
(1939) at Bermont and appears to be uppermost Caloosahatchee
marl.

Station D-2. NElNEI sec. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle, Charlotte
County, Florida. Section located on right bank of Alligator Creek approximately
150 yards downstream from the dam.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)

Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
5 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, white; no fossils observed 2.0
4 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, dark brown; no fossils
observed ......................... .... 1.0
3 Sand, quartz, medium to coarse, surrounded, unconsolidated,
brown, mottled orange; no fossils observed. ................ 1.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchec Marl
2 Shell marl, sandy, unconsolidated, tan; fairly fossiliferous, mollusks
common, well preserved with Anomnuocardia caloosana, and Para-
starte triquetra most abundant ............................ 0.2
Unconformity
Miocene






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


1 Sand, argillaceous, quartz, coarse, phosphatic (2 percent), gener-
ally unconsolidated, but contains snall (1- to 5-inch) pockets of
matrix cemented firmly with CaCOi, tan to light gray (NS).
Contains Balanus concatvns, and great masses of Encope tamiami-
ensis fragments .......................................... 3.1
Station D-3. NE5INE' see. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section is located on right bank of Alligator Creek
approximately 4W( yards downstream from station D-2.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)

Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, tan in lower portion, white
above; no fossils observed ................. ............. 5.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
2 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, medium, slightly consolidated, tan; very
fossiliferous, mollusks, abundant, including Miltha caloosaensis,
Chnama gardnerae and Caryovorbulo leonenxis .......... .... 2.0
Unconformity
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Marl, argillaceous, calcareous, phosphatic, slightly consolidated,
cream to tan, grades to clay upstream; contains Ostrea sp. and
Encope tamkamiensis ...................................... 1.5

Station D-4. NW4NE! sec. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Corda quadrangle, Punta
Gorda, Florida. Section located on left bank of Alligator Creek approximately 150
yards downstream from station D-3.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
5 Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, unconsolidated, gray to tan;
no fossils observed ....... ...... .................... 8.0
4 Clay, blue, sticky; no fossils observed ....................... 0.4
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
3 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, medium to coarse, surrounded, uncon-
solidated, moderately sorted, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2);
fossils abundant, well preserved, mollusks predominant, character-
izLd by Chlone cuncellata, Anomalocardia caloosana, Parastarte
triquetra, and Julicorbaula scutata ........................ 1.0
2 Clay, sandy, phosphatic, unconsolidated, gray to white, mollusks
abundant and well preserved. .................. ............ .1
Unconformnity
Miocenc
Tamiami Formation
I Limestone, arborescent, concretionary, sandy, hard, sand grains
mostly medium, surrounded tuartz, with snldl amount rounded,








NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 57

polished phosphate very pale orange (10 yr 8/2); fossil frag-
m ents abundant .......................................... 1.5
Station D-5. NWV4NEl see. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Corda quadrangle, Charlotte
County, Florida. Section on right bank of Alligator Creek approximately 150 yards
downstream from station D-4,
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
6 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, lower 3,0 feet red-
brown, gray above .. ...... .......... ... .... ............. 4.0
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
5 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, medium unconsolidated, tan, mostly in
solution holes in unit 4 below; mollusks present. ....... .. .. 0.1
Unconformity
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
4 Limestone, marly, sandy, solution riddled, gray, mottled red-
orange; Encope tamiamiensis abundant, Balanus concavuts present 0.9
3 Limestone, sandy, soft, gray; contains numerous oysters. ...... 0.3
2 Clay, caleareiius, sandy, liard, especially near the top, white; no
fossils observed ................................... ..... -3.5
I Limestone arborescent, concretionary (as Unit 1, station D-4) 1.0
Station D-6. NW;NWNEi sec. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section on right bank of Alligator Creek approximately
2()0 yards downstream from station D-5 and 20 yards upstream from power lines
which cross the creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, suibrounded, unconsolidated, yellow-brown
in lower 3.4 feet, gray above ................ .............. 4.5
2 Clay, sticky, blue, mottled brownish orange; no fossils observed... 0.8
Unconformity
Caloosaliatchee Marl
1 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, fine to coarse, surrounded, unconsoli-
dated, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, mol-
lusks abundant and well preserved. .........................,. 2.7
Station D-7. NW'NSENNE,' sec, 29, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Sectioonon left bank of Alligator Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)


Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz medium, subrounded, fairly well sorted, unconsoli-
dated, tan to gray; no fossils observed. .....................


2.0





58


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BUII.ETIN FORTY-THREE


2 Limestone, sandy, hard, dense, hummocky on surface, very light
gray (N8); no fossils observed............................. 1.0
1 Marl, calcareous, sandy, compact, very light gray; fossils common,
especially Mercenaria campechiensis, Anadara transverse, Chione
cancellata, and Chlamys irradians .......................... 1.5
Station D-8. SEKNW~T NEN sec. 26, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Cleveland quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section in drainage ditch approximately 20 feet east of
the South Fork of Alligator Creek.

Bed Description Thickness
{feet)

Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, surrounded, unconsolidated, brown in
lower 4 feet, gray above, no fossils observed .................. 5.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
2 Marl, calearcous, sandy, unconsolidated, gray to cream; very
fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved.. ........ ..... 3-0
Uncon formity
_Miocene
Taniami Formation
1 Sand, marly, argillaceous, phosplatic, gray; fossils common includ-
ing Balanus concavus, Encope tamiamiensis, and Ostrea tamimni-
etles .... . ............... , ............... ......
Station D-20. NEINWN see. 21, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured in shell pit approximately 50 yards
southwest of Taylor Street extension.

Bed Description Thickness
(feet)

Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
5 Sand, quartz, medium, subangular to surrounded, clear, well
sorted, unconsolidated, white; no fossils observed .. ............ 2.5
4 Sand, quartz, medium, surrounded, slightly frosted, rare grains of
black phosphate, well sorted, slightly consolidated, moderate yel-
lowish brown (10 yr 5/4); no fossils observed.................. 3.4
3 Shell marl marine, sandy, quartz, medium, surrounded, slightly
frosted, well sorted, slightly consolidated, very pale orange (10 yr
8/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved, white, mollusks abundant 4.8
2 Sand, marine, quartz, medium, subangular, clear, largest grains
surrounded and frosted, well sorted, slightly consolidated, mod-
erate yellowish brown (10 yr 5/4) stained dark yellowish brown
(10 yr 4/2); grades laterally to a soft plastic brown clay; fossils
rare, mostly mollusks, white, well preserved .................. 0.5
1 Shell marl, sandy, quartz (99 percent), medium, surrounded,
clear, medium black phosphate (1 percent), well sorted, slightly
consolidated, very pale orange (10 yr 8/2); very fossiliferous,
well preserved, white mollusks abundant, forms rare, colonial
corals common in lower part. ..... . ........ .......... .... 4.0







NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHAHLOyTTE HARBOR AREA


59


Station D-21. NWK sec. 32, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle, Charlotte
County, Florida.
Collections were made from spoil piles along a new pit. The
matrix is a phosphatic unconsolidated quartz sand containing abun-
dant specimens of Encope tamiamiensis, Balanus concavus, and
Ostrea di.spriliv This is the Tamiami Formation.
Station D-22. SW)SW1! sec. 33, T. 41 S., R. 2 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Exposure in east-west pit on new gravel road just cast
of State I highway 765.
Collections made from spoil piles. Matrix is a yellowish brown
arenaceous clay containing numerous small (2.0-3.0 inches) chert
nodules. The fauna is comprised predominantly of specimens of
Ostrea tamiamiensis, Ostrea dispariis, Anadara sp., and Balanus
sp, This is the Tamiami Formation.
Station D-23. NENEtNE% sec. 8, on section corners 8, 4, and 9, T. 42 S., R. 23 E.,
Punta Corda SE quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Exposure in drainage canal
on west side of road.
Collections were made from the Iottom of a drainage canal. The
matrix is a mixture of unconsolidated tan quartz sand and shells
overlain by about 4 feet of unfossiliferous tan quartz sand. The
fauna collected included Mercenaria cam pechlensi, and Chione
cancellata. Apparently this bed represents the Fort Thompson For-
mation.

Station D-24. NENEI4 sec. 30, T, 42 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Exposure in borrow pit 0.2 mile west of State Highway
765.
Collections were made from rather old spoil piles arranged along
the edges of a borrow pit. Valves of the Tamiami oyster Ostrea
disparilis were found scattered over the surface of the piles. In
addition, large blocks of a dense, gray limestone were scattered
around the area. These limestone blocks contained valves of
Milth caloosaensis, Pecten raveneli and Chlamys fuscopurpur-
euy, colonies of Vermicularia and numerous bone fragments and
teeth of the Pleistocene horse Equus (Equus) leidyi.
Apparently at this locality the Tamiani Formation is overlain by
the Caloosahatchee Marl here represented by a limestone.
Station D-25. NW1iSE, see. 19, T. 42 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle,
Charlotte County, Florida. Expo)sres in marinas at Pirate's Cove approximately 0.6
mile west of State Highway 765.
Collections were made from spoil piles. The matrix consists of a
tan, sandy, calcareous clay containing numerous specimens of
Ostrea disparilis and Ostrea tamiamiensis.








60 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


MEGAFOSSIL CHECK LIST, CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA, FLORIDA

(T, Tamiamni Formation: B through F, unit. of the Caloonahatehee MNarl on Shell
Creek; X, identified from Locklin Shell Creek collection; L, reported from literature;
Al, Caloosahatchee Marl on Alligator Creek; A2, Fort Thomitson Formation; M, Frank
Burns collection U.S. National Museum.)


Species


Pelecy poda


Ahb, aequali (Say)
Ahinera aequata Conrad
Amuattum mnortoni (Ravenel)
Anaanra cf. A. cumpula (Dall)
An adamr catasarea (Da II)
Anadara improrn'ra (Conrad)
Anadara cf. A. improrra (Conrard)
Antadara Uienoaa (Say)
Anadam megerata Oleson atid IHarliison
Anadara mi fitaa (Dll])


.4 lndar phrWauma (Conrad)
Anadara rietitulata (iCrtelin)
Anadara rrati,-ra (Tuormny and Hlulnif-s)
A mnurdtn allarina a lieilprin)
A nadara ap. a
Anadara sp, b1
Arn A riadai tfrarwfrrys (May)
A rnndoni r alba Link
A .Niadontra itlj.
.4 n imwonta arnr icana I.all
A nomalorr rdia rafilwrimfa ( I )t ll)
A neflrair.'-fdia 1 S ., a
A nomia smintpr d'Orbigny X


A nr.a arqula I I ilrpri rm

Arra catho.eabatrhienMi'r Sheldon
A rvwa wri. '.rrana Dall
? Astarfe undultta drlfidtea (;ardner
Afrira eafruunrme ii. .T )ll l

BireaIm rrrcn t'fri I >)all I
Brubosia taientiala f)al'll


Distribution
B C P E F L X Al A2 M1

X I






x x xx
I - -;





X X X X X
x x


X


X


x


-N


X


x
-x


X


X


X


X


x IX X


X x X


X x

-- -


X
X


X
x


X
x
x
X X
X i-


X X X


x


IX
Ix


X
x


x


NT


X X




X X
X X


x
X





x


x] x


X
Nm


x
X
'-- _--


X


X
x



x






x


x
x
N


x X
X


_____


I


.


I









NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA


SJeCLies


Peleey pola (Continudl)


Bornia cL B. BBlodenerguts ;ardner'
Hornia livica D)lli
Bornia Iata I )all
Bornia trianiffua I)all


Bothrocorbula tvilrori (l)all)
Brikrchiodonttf etrustw (Liinn4)
rac.AiodOflr's r~ ~ernuf OlsoniS l alnd Harbianri
Cardirta asraa (Conragd)
Cardita rath-aria I )all?0
Cardita floridana Conrad
Cardfla prrplans (IConrad)
Carditu perplana abbrrritda Cunrad
Carditi tridrwnata G(y)
Cardit; -1p.


Carfwrnebulta barraliana C. B. Adams
C'aryforrbulrs lrf nfmi'a Mnnsfisldd
Cha mt coafoosena I )all
Chama oQnrdneu, Ol]Hsm andiI larbhinn


Distribution
SB C E V L X Al A2






x


N


Chita jhe prihid CuFrrannn
ChAama sp.
Chamn Priflrvii Iall


Chicne ranmrellata (Linn) X X
('Aionnr ru s IIohiIs) X

ChAione latilirala thlMtul (Con'ail)
Clrunt mor#itana OlMon and Ilarbison


CAonrle pp. a

CAklamy antrampicolatfus (MansieLfkd I

Chriamtu burkirngthamensif Manefiield
('rfam ta tcalor)r nSia lI alli
('blames e. C. comparilis {Tuuney tanil lHolties)
Chiamyp fusropurrrrw ((I'Cunra)


Chlamhnp irradians i La.anrek)
Chlamyj irremot a 01mon andi Ilurbiaon
Chlamj, nodsun!uAR ],ijnf)
Chlamyt aoar-iaideR (I lilprin)
Cbin ruspap. ,
Codakia cvcata d"Orbi(ny


X



X
i


X


x









x --
XX
X


X
X


.X

XI X


X X
x x
F


X


X
X X
X\


X






xx




x
x

_


X
X


x





X
X



x
X
X


X X

X X


X
x


x

X


X


x
XC


X


x

X x
X x
x x

x
- K-u


X


X
x


X
X
X
X
X


x
x
X
x
X
'C


X X


X X


x x x
--\I

X
'X
x
x x
X X X
X


X


X


M


A


Ix

--xI--


X X


X


x




x
x






x
X












x

x
x
X
X


X


X


X


X








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


DiJftribution


Spe .ies
T

Pelcrypds (Cuontinued)

Codakia ofriedaris Linn :
Codakia n period Kopern
Codakia sp.
Cooperella carprntrri al 11
Coralhophaog coraliophaua Gne]in
Crsaainetta acuta (Dall)
Cra4inella dupliniana (Dall)
Cro minela tnudata (Conrad)
Craeosfrer vir-inira (C.melin)
Crenrdla diraricata (d'Orbigny)
Cumingia amydra Oleaon and HarbimMn
Cumingia coar taa Sowerby
Cu7nidaria manaflddi Olsain and Harbion
Cuspidaria ornisaiims d'Orbigny
CyAthodonto rffe'minw Reeves
Cycdineia tenuds Rteluz
Dinoaardium robusaum (Solander)
I)iptodota Ceapdoide Gabbi
Dinjldonta ac.rlinus Cn(ro
Diplodonta ormiaspera Philimip
Diplodonta sorer C. B AdamsI
Diworirdla comrp i )alll

Ditoaricela sp,
Donor lfoaor Suy
iDouinia discua Reeve
Dosinia Lepgrfn ('onrad
irkin-hamo Ec orniaa ((Conrtad)
Ensirtlops cdonoata O]lw-i and I-l Harhiaon


rEnfilrops sp. a
KEaitelops ap.
krtiia poiita I all
7? rritia sp-
Erucina rarornieain I)alD
Eryctna kurtw i Dali
Erycima pharolsa Ol]aeoti alid Harhij)n
Eryci'n profraco Dall
Eucrassatella speciom (A. Adamus)
Faketa dali Olsmon and [farbison


x




x


X


I I


X
X X
X X :X


x


N


X


Distribution


X


X X
X


* K


XI


I x

X


X X
X


x
X


X
X


m-- ...

:x x




x
I x
X



X X


--


CD E F L
,- Z --- _______











x x
X




I x
S x x







x
X X X
X


x x x




Xx






X IX




x x x
x i


X Al A2M




X Xi X
X X

X
xx


X
x
ix x
x






IX
x
x x



x









-I --
x
x


x x x


X


_I


I__






NEOCENE STRATIGRAPIY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA


species


PeLecy r ld (Continued)

Foaaulaira adamri (I)all)

Gemma maigna floridana Olion and Htarlbi.on
(lymemrri amecricana Defrance
Giycymeris arrta fliaridna Olssul anid Harbrtis
GtBrymeria pectinata (Gimelin)
Gotddia ef. G. crina C. B. Adtams
Gouidia floridana OleeJun and Hurlbisou
Gouldia mctastriatum Conrad
Godudia e;.

Hialrdla arcfica !.innd4)
? HiFnhicilI ap.
Hyalina afre nara I)esihayes
Iognoenoan atain birotor (C, H, Adains
Juliarorbut scruata (Gardner)
Labiona i?4eala .Say
Labiosa plicateita (l-amarck)
tL Wlicardrum /Medgatium uganerj'iairzW
OGlson and lHarbiaon
l.1rit'cadiurn mortoni Conrad
Lima calo anua Dall

Lima scbra (Born)


Lithophaga si, 7
Lbuina pennsybaniea Linn#
Maromia s. a
Macoma tenrta Say
MacTrowalhita maeulata (Linn&)
Mafoenaflisto nimbon a (Solander)
A tieMr fragilis O melin
AMercerari'a eampeckiensin (Gmelin)


Merceetaria ri' yi Conrad


Mercnaria tridarno-idnr (LaTmarck)
MilthA c&alvosarnsis (Dall)
? Mudiaous of. MA. awericacus Leach
Modiorus ducaldi Conrad
Maonaeura floridana i)alt
Molacuia petropolitana Dall
AMuliria culoasurnris Dal[


I )stribut
T B C I) E F




SX X X X


x


x
,4

-x-


X


X
X


x
X


X


x
x
X
X


X


X



.


ion
L


X A A2 M


X
xx


x x


x x


X



X
X

X
X
x


x
K

X
x
--I- I- -


x
X
X


--! _
X-i- X X
X


X


X'


X


X


X


x


X







x

x
x
X

X


x


X


x x

x


x x

X X

x X


x x--


X X
X
X


X


x

x
x
x
x
x
X

X









x
x

X


~


__ __II








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Distribution


.T B C


Pelte'yxida (Continued)


.MUditfia l*rlirrm Say

.11Udinia pOtilfa lill


Mhldimia unduln I all
-UVitjumi lJtra6ti Say ?
A/rpee tfanlubI Stjit,,]r iir

M f ilovsis iwm lllata ])Al
No;ri flimula C('inrad

A'ofia ,pailirrsa Dall
.rorfia pjnerroen fSay)


TJwufa procri'mi uay

NA'-ulana acula {Colratd)


XIX


X

X


.Swei.e


IC


Dx


X












X

X


uICMa isU r 3| Conrath fXrp

Ostrro dispariia Conrai X I
- ________ -__ _______ ________I -______ _______


Oarea mcridional s reki]irinu

Odrea acilpturata Conrad

Osatr sp.
Pandora arrnosa Cunrud

Pandora cf. E. rranerdrna Counrmd

Pandora s'i, a new?

Panopr florinann HeillPrini

P'apridea uemim'ul'catai (.;ray

Papurrdea spinosum apinosulrm [Mcausrhen

/'apyridea spino-sum furfonmi lala ?
lPapyridea sulkata Grray

i'aradTarIc trirqurra (Ccoumidl

P'Y'ten zi'raz Linui6

Phawoides anmabiis ( Dully)

Plwo ides nrjwfonta i$y1
Phwordcs drsaiformr illIriliiin:,

Phf 'wide s mFudt inintl Ii:Tirrn' LL I iHolumii'
Pkhatrrdr-' mul itf'lrdus silnii. L

Pk'aroids isue r /at oe4tna Dull
P 'hitoridf r .rr irtnr .;s I( in,'lil:)

Pharemid w rr&drlr .im Ci fl r i
I'h.iiarddvt .'.if.Ilrttrfir.' ])all ) l
'Pafa'.ides .tar.N rumit. rnsfit I )a] I

Pfitar opisthoogrmmara f I )]

Pilar cf. P. sea;aupa f(Xnradl1


X


x


Ix


X


S --
F L X At A2




X X X
X X X

X

X
-- .- ..

X I
I'


X X
x x

XX






X


X
N


* I;

* I_~


--I-.-
x








X
X









x
X


X

.-. x -


X


x









X


x


X




-x-
X





N
-- -X

X X

X

...
x

x N


N


X
X

X


X


X
I- --


X


----~----~------


- --


--


Sx X

X X X X
X X
X X X

x




x x x






x
x

XX X

x


x

x x





x
X





--- --- "--



X X X




.x I -







NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA


l~Yeies


Poltyinmda (Continued)

Ple'rddcrama floridana )alli
Pticatula marvitnatd Say
Plireatfa .]. a new ?
P,'Lftdac'yrenfa duptirpnian ( ])all)
I*Paudr yrena floridana ('Cmnrad)
IeriFa eomlfmbua (Htiltan)
Ranoin runeala (; ray
Iianria Pinta i(Dall)
irri 'aria hiranGt (SX]nCflgLer)
Itprflaria typinea (Icanan


Sarirca.'r arftir'- 1. inn
A'i.melr bhlfaIn ria' C.(nrad
Scmel. trana lif)ll
Srrnrle jwrameiln ow HeiLprin
Senmel purJlmramn'-r (imelin
,Sol~rurfus ru miniana ( bunker )
,Sphrrni cf a. tfiutIuaa I)a]l
Spondvl~e reil udatws Heilplrin


Spurfrcla roqtflridrt (tCornralil
Sportfela prYIrfa Conrali
Striaflfa f r-? oa (tay


Tagcfru drlriwu (Siiunglt'r)
Taxocardia floridana Otson and liarbimon


Trflidera lun ulatu Hol ries
Tell'idors critola Rtchl u
Tclfrna -f, wciia Stiimppson
Tellina aovuisn'trta Say


Tellina aternatua Say
Trtlina cafllpfpta I)all
Tdhe a ncoz eana Dall
Trllina drecir-r CoUtral


Trflina dincimrra I)all
Tellina mErr-atna Petit.
Tclina *ni (DflleIhayr)
Tetlna simiia SHowerby
Tef tina utrir'-tineata Olason and Harbison


Tceilwa s~urir* lall
TciiH p. a


Distribution
T H C.' ) E f 1. X Al











X X X-
I x .x


S X XX




.X X X X
-- --- ---


x
X


X


x x





X
x


x


X
X
x--


xX
X i X

x x








IX
x xX

Ix





XX
i

'1 . N .


x
x


x
X

X


A2





X


'I


x



X
X
x


Ix


X
X



x
X


x
X


x
x


x

x x

x X



xx
x
X


x X


1


----


1_


I~








66 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


SDistribution


SPed~l od (CntiueF Ld)
Felecypoda (Continued)


______________________________ -_____ ................I...... 1 __ __ I


Telling sp. b
Tdlina sp. e
TdhinM op. d
Tellina sp. f
Tellna gapp.
Tdeina tampwmai Conrad


Tedin lavloriana fSowerby


x


-- 1 I


Th wiira trisinuata d'Orbigny
7TraG Y rardium da fi (Heilprin)
Tracehyardium regmontinum (Shuttleworth)
Trachyrardium cmmontn (I)all))


X
x


X
x
xu


I--


---I


Trachycardium i~ardia (Conrad)
Trachycardium f., T. iuaricatum (Linn)
TrGcAyJardfif ofdati~um (Dall}
Trackhardium isap. X

Trantenelltia caJooaanG Dall
Trmian netfla ronradina (Dall)
Trantnnerda sp. a, .w ?
Tigciiocarfdia columba (Heilprin)
Trioonioarrdia u-if ktoi (Dall) X
Vari(vrbufa raloome (Dall) X X
Verfkiordia emmfntsi Dall
Gaatropu.da
Arnme pundcdata Gmni[n
Acmaro sp. a InLw ?
Actean puncFtotriorlru (C- Adama)
Ad-orbis ronraMa IH. C. Lea
Ade~rbia exaeua Conrad
Adof~bis tspranitidse Wood
A roltrem ap,
Aropua cf A.- aearvTai Tyron
Alabina adamni (Dall) X
Alabina erithidioides (Dal]) X
A.4bina ap. a
? AklOnia sp-
Amrir:ana flioridana conv Rea Pilsbry
.4 minieoa erodes Pilabry


XI
X




X ; X


X


x x






x x
X X


X X



XX X

X X
x x
x x x








x
_YX "x










x l


X
X
X


X
x
x






x


x




x
x
X



X
X


X




X
X


x x



-x---- ------



xI




ix
X X
X X


X X


X
--I -- --

X i
xx X


X X
_--_ x
l I i


N


x


X X
--I--
SX x






XX


x
I - --



S X







x
x







NEOCENE STRATICRAPHY OF THE CHAIU.COITE HARBOR ABEA 67


Species


Gastroidxa (Conti nued)

Amnicola omphalotropis Pilabry
Amprularin'a 4petonenmis Lea


Anachis awmra amudra DI
Anarhia rcdomse- ia (Da
Anothis er mx IDa11


ii)


Anachit cf. A. ca.max. Dall
Anwahia eieuiatonentisa M. Smithi ?
Anachis fTne(trafa (C- B. Adams)
Anachi gardncrae Olsan and Harbison


Anfahit Pardntrar eacarintat
Olaon and Harbimn I
Anachis stp.
Anticlitax annae Pilabry and Ol&swn
Antidinar raligiypta (Dall)
Antidcimar locklini Pilsbry and OJason
Anticlim.r ap. a new ?

--..L -
Ar*t n gmma (Tuomey and Holmc's I
Arene sp. a
Arene s. b
Are e tricarinata (Starns)
A pe.?a ngonata (-Dall
Aspfla cr;ne DIll
Aassimine afinis d'OrbiKtny


A eiminea auberiana d'Orbigny
Astrame Tongi~pina ([Laniarek
Aatrea prerursor I)all
Atlyria lunala Say
Afltyris fuaiformia d'Orbigny
Astyris multliineata I)Dll


Astriu profundi Duill
Astyris profundi minor Dall
Asturit pr t di pcrmwuna Dall
Aryt obeuratus ]Dall


Atys sandersoni Dall
Atya subacuraua ibap. a
AyrpgewtrOa ap. a new ?
Bailya intricatu (Dall)


Bailya roeei (AmJth)


Distribution
T RB : ) F L X

I I


x


x







x


x
X
X X



XI
x
x
x


x X
x
X
Si

= -I

-~-~ -- :'C


x


I
\


; X
. I-- -
iX


I Ix





x




Sx




X X
X X


Al A2 M


x


X

-- -
X



x


x
X


x
X
Xi
a[--1 .


X .


x


I X
X

x


x


X


x
x
x


X


X

X
Ix


X

-___ __- I


x

S x
X


Ix
X



x
'C


=t


''




-~Li- i ----


II


''U


_f








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Sp cia


Castrnpoda (Continuked)

HrtfMheli cOf. H, p "rkeru Bartaci


Biltium pudon'rinm IDall


Biltism ap. a


TB C


Bittium rarium Priffcer
"Bjlium" Lp.
BfrawiryhdAra as. a new
Brachyduthara trrnut~a (IDfll)


Buila ocidrntali. Adar e
Bulta cf. B. occidentalis Adams
7 Bntfa sp. juvenile ?
Bulfa strifa Hnrgire
BullE stria alfrnuat 1)all
Buaycon ronirartum (Counraci)
Bfuaroa ehiprattm (Dall)
RBuflr mnrimnum Conrad
Bustorn parrlnuum (D)lsL)
Bumron pyrum (D'Itwynl
BuaDyon pyrum laoridanum Olson and Hiarbison


Bhtayc n rapum (l dlprin)
Busur na .|
Bayhindla nit-kliniana altetua/a ialdumlan
Caeum cf. C. einrlum flison and fiarhiaon
Caecum cooprn' S. rmith
Udrecta cornellum Dall
Caecum re. flemirtg9 Gardner and Aldricv'


Coarum fluridaniwm Stimpeon


Caecum floridanum subep. ?
CO cum imnbriraum Carp.ienter
Caneum imbricaium subp. b new ?
Cew umn imbriealum suaip. ?
Caruin n. s]p. a 7 nude form
Curcum n. s- h- ?
Carcum rroulare. Carlpwnter
Carcum syp
C'aecum tortile Dall ?
Co'alioa oama euconudum Olsutn and Harhisuon


Calli


C


-I--j_


Distribution
I) E V L X


x
x

X
X

x
X









x
X
X


X


_________I-. -


X
X




X


x


x


X
x





x x

-I -


I I I IXx


X
X


X


ortoma ij ubin um Ginelin


Calfirslama prejujnbinum Oleson and IHarbison


X


X


X





X


Al IA2
--I...


X





X
X


X
X


X X

X


x x

x x


X X
x x


x
~X




x
x x
x


M


X


x x x
X XX
x x
x x
x
x
X X X X
x


x
Ix
x x

x xI


---- -- - --


-


x
* '; x











x











x


x
X

X

X


I x


icall m }ubnu G e







NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 69


Distribution
species --
T C 1) lE F L X Al A2 M

(;aqtropoda (Colninured)

Cafliostoma ruecolumr permagnum iall X X
CaliofSnftoa arminolum Olasmn anrd Harbiasn X X X
Cailliotonma n, sp. a ? X
Cadthosoma p, b X
erflire im tt Ripp. X X X
Calhostemu wrrlrWariaMua IDall X X X X
Catldi scrlus retiferu (]DalI) X X X
Culyuptrara rnitrala (C:'onrad) X 1 X
? Campaodr'lia pi, a X
Cancritaria oniradiana Dall X ,X X X X X


Canreilaria imunlfa Tuiorney an,] Holmiess
Canrtharse foridana nr(Cr runri)
Cantiharua florrdanu ateIPuata (Dal]) MA A


Contharte mtultangulaua (Philiprpi) ., i ik.
Conaharnu ., ip. fa
Canthtarua perplcrue Olesmn and Ilarbiiunl
*I f' L t -. Ou C


* ,...EruI,..*n J r* n i., 4. |
Cantharus 1.. ib
" Cantharus uh. i,

Cn'rifthfia lit'iuloa (MEnk')
Cerithidra turrtfa Stearn-
Cefnhio tp bnraica Olswil and Itarbium
Crrifhiop.ei daura Olsson and Harbisun
Crrithiopeis emeronl prrstbulala Gardncr
Crrif iol'is floridana Dall
Crrithiopais Frerni ('. B. Adams
CerithiopRis modesla AdiLin !
Crrithfvr k.enliphu.I Dall]
Crrth iopsia sp. a,
C(?rttlh topi ap. f 3


Ccritkium otnirtda C, H. Adams
Cerithium calltrsma 1l11
Cernilhium raloosaern [Dal
Cerilhium cafiooarnftN f heilpirii IDall
Cerfithum cocc4de Dall
Ceritflhm floridanum Mirchi
Crithium olaphrm DIall
CerLithium lithariumn Dall


- ... I


-I- _I


x


xI


x


x x


-xi-x-


X
X

X
X X


x
X


x
xx


X


X


X


. x
X
X
x


x
X


X


X X


X
X


X




x
X

x
x




x




x

x
x
x
x

~X


X


I


x j


_I_


i=


I


x' X







70 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--



.;tiecies
T ( B

Gastr owda (Cuntinue4)


Cerithium muoarum Say
Cerithhum app.
Certithium f.- C- preatrartum Olwomn and Harhbion
Cerithium sp.
Cerithium p. a
t'rithium nfTiciu OLwrot andi Harbiiuon
Cerithium rtlinia Oisson and Harlbisun
Cerodritlia perpolita (all)D
Ceradrillia simpsoni (Dalls
Cerodrillia timpsoni rtctiosicta Fargo
? Crrdrila ap.
ChAilea qawetri Linn6
? Cheileo si,
CAryhsalida ef. C. i0kclini BartQetE
Chryalo ida nmeneili Bartne.h
Clathrodritia aeruralta (Da)l i
Clathrodrillia ebinina (Dab t
Clathrodrillia oasrearum (Stearns)
Clathrodrillia otrearum abundans (Ia Ll)
ClAn ran aoillorum (deBoury)
Clothris rupi'olum (Kurtz)
ClehUrua ep.
Corliovpuii hotlmemi Dull


? Cochliotepis op.
Cchhoiepi* eria fl all
Calubraia anretaOtaf Menke
Colubaria laneeaoalt a diit Tucker and W ilon
Columbedalt raa i)aill
CoaL mtAe La ricoida Heilprin


Comtpn0drillia of. C. aphan*domar (Ilall)


Compaodrillia dr-'i pindJeA Fargo
Compaodrillia pylOwia Far g


Cona advertariua Conrad
Conas daucus Linni
Conus floridanum Gabb


Coma peali Grewn
Coanu pygmaeu Rorve


BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Distribution


I I















-i-


F 1 L X Al A2 M


C D E








X





.- I--
I-.














X















x








x


x


X
x x
x



x
x
x


x -


x
X






-- X
X x
.. .... i...




x :x


x


x



x
I--
X







x
x

x
Xt

X


X










X
X








x
x
x


x
X







x











x


---


xx

x --I--i.. x-
X


x
X

X
x
x x
x x
x
x

x

x
X
x


X Xx

N


; -- --


_=--I







NEOCENE STRATIGRAPIIY OF TIIE CIARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 71


S peiies


Gastropoda (Continued)

ContMu i.arnai ConradL
Crnespir. perrugata (Dall)
Crepidla a culeala (G:nelin
C'reppidula arsop Dall
Crpi'dula caonera Say
Crspidtda fornicata Say
Crepidula m~u'teaa Conrad
Crepidula plana Sny
Crepldula rhyssema Olmaon and Harbison
Crwuib~ um azric-Wum Gimulin
CrutibuumR costataum Say


Di)itribution
T B C D E F L X Al A2





X
X XIX X X X X
x x x x x x x-
X x


x
x x x x x x


x


Crwucilmum imbric.ateu (.Sowerby)
Cr.tibtum 'rpinoum Sewerby
CrtnPbulum sp.
Crofttrri ci, C, arrta Fargo
Cyclotrsmiacua 6rfrwhi (Mansfild)
Cyrlar misaeu beaui biarinMta (Gulppy)
CycWtrmiru i /aroai Olmon and Harbison


CyrlAremiscus ounteri (Mansfield)
C yotremisus doewoni Olaon and Harbiaon
C'idichsea p. a new ?
Cylichanla bidfniata d'Orbgny


Cvlic~ndea cf. C. gpobb (Dall)


Cymatasyrir. arpywnoa act'a (l)a]l)
Cyvmatosrini lunata (Lea)
Cymat~dr rin.r moasri (Dll)
Cynmaaioanrnr m rmeRoO (Dall)


Cna~mouiynrtr pk3Qrdt4 (Dal) -_ __


C'ymat4Myri. psrpoldta (Dall)
C.praie praoIeiatWir HEilprin
Cyproeolina iachrimulr (Gould)
"CytAar&" batwata Re eve


"Cthara" sp. a
"CLthram" sp. b


Daphnetm cineulata DaU
DepaneAda srfa Dall
Daphnedt modeMts DaU


I ______________


I I -


DphAnvta sp. a


M







X
X
X


x
Y


x
X X X X X X X
X X X




x x
X
, X ~ x
X X

X X

x
X
x x
-- -- - -2.

x x





. ..._x -_ -x -
X





: x

x

x


xx
X X X







x x
x
X
x X
x I

-- ~ X --K ___ __ _


I


I


m








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Species


Gatropunda (untilnued)

? LD phnbla ap,


Didiarrema drupi'ne eriA rPmre
OIbon and Harhion
ihodora roecesaenasi (Dail)
Diudmro cf. D. coliooarraa (Dall)
Diodora earditffa (DIal)
ihodom carditella peaasa Olaan and Harbison
Diodora camenrien is ( Lnarck)
Diodora fiorrdana Gardner
Dodeitrm tN.Md (IDal)
Diodra d p.
DHacoakehli ap. a
"Drillia" albomardata Dall


T IB


1 I
Ix


Di-ttribution
C D E F L X Al A2 M


I -1~~1Iii


X


x x














X x
X X-I


X





X


"Driltin" ebur Reeve
"DritUian" pwrpiro(a Dall
"Drlli fa' S. f
"Drilia" Hp. r
"'Drilia" p[p. X
Emarainuta pitabryi all
Envintra oridano Olmun and Ilarbion
REntina furbi'n' Ki(ner


Epia~r~na mrtfitarrnati Stimnluon
Epitlnitm cf. E. fdi'e'icratTum (d'Orbirny)
Epirotium fidelei (I Dll) ?
Epitonium lineota ('ay)
Epitonium turricutum (Sowerby)
E-ro mauweriae Gray


Eula rdinra rowa (Feriusnar
AuFgrndpi4o frunca.a (OGrclinl
KtegUu4urda rmdolat (SNLy
ftP~nur miWr ric. intrmerdia aJll
EupltMra sp. a
'flarl/aria pic'ii ] )a>Ill
Faseiolari dia tara Linn
Faseiotlaria ofgaintea KiEner
Fasciolria seaoarina IIdjlprin
FamiMfaria tdipa Linn6
Fin'e papyrmitI (Say)


-- I


X


x


X
X

X
X


x









X
X=


X-


x
x
x




x


x
X
X

X
X
X

X


x


X
x


x
x
X
X
X


Ix


X
X


X X
X'X




.... =
X X


x i
X
X
X


x












X


x x x
x *





X
XI X




X
x x
x -----




-x-
'C"


72


-I








NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARILOTE HARBOR AREA


Species


Gtatro tia (Continued)

Fotnligtns palace Pilabry
F'oa Iiens plana (Aldrich)
"Fonftigeins" opp.
Foasaru anomala C. B. AclamR
Futins eFrcloaranis IleiJprin
Fusinus coolsaensia florida
Olsaon and liarbison
? Gat rfopta op. a
CGlasinoatoma eleganftda (I)all)
GetasinasomsnA rdfira (1 )a11}
Gibbe tlina ortdiformis (d'Orbipmy)

OGlphnOseaftr grfulda Dall
(flytpheamata gra-ula incil Watsonl
GlIvphatnomwt P :Os:ulpftum Farpu
(tlyphoutoma Woiptfe Da]l
Ofphootaom watasoni Dall
--. -_ .
G(yraulse parru-m (Sai')
Han-tia senreana (Dall)
Hldisana conasli (Dall)
Helisoma diastoni (iJ)ll)
Helimoma wcaare (.lay)
Hflisonma [>p.
Hemtir.ms rvtiporas (haill)
f ydrobia amnnicloidre Pilsbry

"Hidrbiol" Bsp.
Ithiarlhara keSumi Olson and Harbison
Ith~ythara pnila (Buah)
Kurtielfa ceritna Kurtz and Stimpson
Kurt ielta timnreldta margaritiffra
Ola]sn and Harbiaon
Kurttielia timotarUa eubep-
KUrtfidf r l rflal Stearns

Ktrflidno sp. a
"K crf 'dlTa" pp.

L'mwintina decsuwto (Gimelin}
Lcminitna meginQyi OlBsn and Harbison
LrmiRtina sp.
Liosarireaa areua Sowerby
Lonahaneit crendatas (Holmes)


Distribution
B C D E F L X Al A2 M




X X
X X
X X

x x
Xi X X X

iv


73


"~








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-TIIREE


Gastropoda (Continued)


LonecAL~aeua Ci. L. mqrionae flan~ch


Djitribu
T B C D E F



'_


LnhreRlwhu op. a
LageAoaeus up.
Luaptnc auffusa Reeves
Lucapina tetarmanc O1saon and Harbison


Lauapindea Iimatula Reeves
Lucapindel talanteia Olsnmn and Harliaun
Mafromphuina pierrot Gardner
? Macramplalina hp.


Mangelia cerindla Kurtz and StJinpaunl -
Mangelia mdcanlira Bush
Mafnigela et M. tmeantira Bush
Mtangdta pfliera C. H. Adamsrn
Man he a quadrata Reeve
Margvtnda neureNta O ulaon and Ilarbion
Marrindlla amiantula Dall
-Martnella apiina Menko
M-orgineila aureoncisea Steams
M-Iarwtinea arena armaeea Deahaytsa
.Mfarindtla cf. M. bel a Conrad


Marginedl caleosasta Ol(on and Harl
Margfnella t. M.c dehi M. Sumilth


Marginftta debniu ido Conrad
MarginlEa entlima Dlil


Mar pinlUa foridana Dall
MarOpi tda fa trolon d'Orbigny
MargindTl Inmatula Conrad
.Afriftntl/a onehiddla Dali


f orginella oruiformia d'Orbigny
J.arVindla paltida Donovan


Mfarinefla pardlis DIall
.far*itla pinefrla'onsi Olsson and H
Mfargnriaa polyipira JOlssn and Hart
Ma.ridflia prfrtOr Dall


Margindea prunum Grinlin
Malrineffa stfria Dall
AMargincao rtrynica Conrad
MargindRa uillfoziana Dall


bison







-;- -.....---i





[ Xrb ir
[arbisno.m


ii~on


-I


X x


Ii


X





X
X


X









X
,.C


xIx
X X


X









X


___ I


74


tioa
L X AM A2 M



x rX




X
x




x
X



XX
X
x X
x
x


x x
ix
-]- i--l







xxxI x
x
x
x x
X X X X X
x
X



X X


x

x
'C




x
x X

Xx

X X


X

x


x

x ---x x
XX X


m m n


:= _I=I_


m


h


__


E


--








NEOGENE STBATIGIAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARnOR AREA


Species --
T
..-- -.. I---
GaAtropoda (Continued)

MaroineUa app.
Meioreras cingulalum Dall
Meiacera tiidum Stimpon ?
Meiocerfs sp. a
Metanet a alklinsi Olson and Ilarbion
Mfelanellas conide (Kurtz and Stimpeon)
Medanellta contdea nisoformia
Olscon and Harbison ?
Afelnandea locklini Olsson and Harbiaon
Mdlanella spp,.
Medonnma corona Gmelin
Meneiff alabomenani arus (Pilabry) ?
Mitra heilprini Coseman
iAfiramorpha cinca Dall
Modulus carchedoanit (LaEnarrk)
Afodtu, modulua (Liann)
Mondispira bgemma (Dall)
Montlispira leucocyma (Dall)
7? Monitipira cl. M. leucocyma (UDall)
Mvorlmuia sp.
Aturex breriffrons Lamarek
Mure: cellodsrus Conrad
Mutrex mtacintyi M. Smith
Murar mne4oniua Sowerby
M-irex pomum Gmelin
Murex reurniroamrida rubidua F. C. Baker
Murex ~aleanus A. Adams
Mure: trexlis Gabb
MWurez sp.
? Nannoditta sp.
Nasari'na dol Oleaon and E[arbison
NVasrina glypta Bush
Nasanriu ambigua antillarum d'Orhigny
Now.arinu bideMnit (Emmons)
Nassariu ealoomsaenei Dall
Na4sriu consensus (Ravenel)
N saariusa c. N. contnsnus (Ravenel)
Naawriwu Aorideniis OlDwn and Harbison


Distribution
B C D E F L X Al A2 M




X X
X X X X X
x x xx -x
-- x
X
x


X X
xx

x
x
X X

X
X
X X X




_x .. .x
x x x X

x X x x
SX X
X
X X X X








x x x X
x X
x x x

x
x
X X X X X
Xi X X
x x xx x
SX X X X
Sjx x xk


X
S ix

x x


x XXXI x

X X


X
x x
x
? x x


75


__







76 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Diatrihulion
Species
T B C D FE F L X A ] A2 M


(;atropnda (Continued)

NaTunrigus fape.yirn'ri Dal X X
,V~Meriu iIet.fin Ol]mn and Harhigon X X
Nfmariuf L1. ft X
n .ariu b sp- X X
% r dt ; tA LUL n X








Nartia phUatfa Conrad
Ar.ia sp. d X
.A'drtin all t|n, e l X
NVsearim ne ti X X X
NIHwari'uI ribt l Si.v) X X X X X X





Nfrit a frinofen sua 1ift1l X
Neritina spA aerrita OIeaun andl Hfarbison X
Xio wicoro'rrana DIall X X
OdMwomia (CArymflidat sp. iX
Odostomia (Eraleal sp. X
Odootamin (Hetida) elsaf enania I)I] X IX
(thioflmia ({Sianlmeoma) s. X

Odr-7omiao (Trab uda) sp. X
Odotromni spp. X X
Olira ayi Ravenel X X X X X
fOlrl4ia mali' (Say) X X X X X X X X
(firfIta ritfdfua I)illwyn X

Ohirrla prreforaio Olsaon and Iuarbison X
Oirvella roaunda DaM[ X.
Ofihl4t 'p. a X X
ftcilla b1.riram (;abl) I X X

O.rila 81.., b X I
? i'aludrstrina st. Ib X

P'arriturboides aritts Pilsbry X X
Periploma awtffulffera P1hiiippii X X
PrrpdiarnI' prr.rbn DIull : X X X
I' rMic uIa orda Courrad X X
'etoatlonrehus .oridana Olseon and ]Iarbhin IX : X
Pea lornfcAus rariat id'Orhb; A' Xi X
Phatiat~fla ptIIC'lfak C. B. Adgrn i X X
Pho pr, j*rus irTlr'ea Df)ll X









NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHAaLOTTE HARBOR AREA 77


Distribution
Species I- F M
T B C I) I E F L X Al A2 M

(istrorwimo (Continued)

I'hyva meigi Iall X X X
Phyar sp. X
I'olIJ ntmirrodrnta Pfciffer X
I'lYFtires duplirati Sxy X X X X X
JPalaiira atlida (Perry) X XX X
Pierorhmtis fluiana Dal] X X X

Pyromidefids X
Pyra acw alatteu (Heilprin) X X X X


Pyrigirsus cf. P. parkrri Barlsi I X
Pyrigiscup ap. a X
Pynrigisru el,. b X X

I'urioirus swp. IX X
Pyririscus ef. P. yama Bartreh X

Purcythnara coir Fargo
et nlu canalfirutd a (Say) I X X
Refusa sndata d'Orbil ay
RehearO sI.

Rhintdatoris ecaowosearnii (Dall) X
Rieta.ri mjyakkanus 4 Dail)
Rimula cf. R. raroltiana JDall
Rinccuta florfdana DaIll X X
Ringi ru cf, R. l.foridana Dail
Ringintda sguppyi Dall
kigoa athymorhytaa Dall
Risosa catltmropha I )Dal
Riaswo geewa >all
Rissoina browniana d'Orbigny
Rissoina bulimina Olsasn and [larbison X X ,
Risn iina canrellats Phil;pi i
Rieaoina rA snrefi Michaud

Rioitna dcrUsata planuaa Dall
Rissaina furgoi Ol~son and Hlarbison
Rismeina jloridana Olamn and lHarbison X
Risemina lariagat C. B- Adame X

fiswina liriope Oleon and Harbison X
Rineina parkeri Olmon and Harbisun

Rist a Krtp. Xnd
Rubelljtoma rulbelta KTmrtz and Stijmpon I


- -- i I I---


X X




X X X X
x
IX

X X--

X X
xx

X


X


xx X

X

Ix
X

X
I X

X
X
IX

X X
X




xX
I I








78 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Distribution
Species
T C 1) E F L X Al A2M

Gastropoda (Continued)

Saa aasyana Dal
&apfttta foriden4 Heilprin X
Sediti ancuinct (Dall) X
? Sedtio aphanitoma (Dall) X X
kediria hoplotAoni (Dall) X
SediJo of. S- AopEophoru: (Dalli) X
Sedilia if. 8. ohoida Fargu X
-- --
ediiia piweUor (Dall) X
odilia podoorina (Dall) i X
Srdiiia podaarina elonfais (Dall) X X
Sedi'ia AchmAirm' ira (I Jail) X X
S.diia smdilia (1a) l) .. X


,ediia sigelo (Dall)
? Sedilia sp.
.Seddia sp. a
Sitaadamusi (H. C, I-a)
Sigareld caroainentie JDall
.Sigaretu.a muttiplictus Dall
SijoWia jzstemi caia Gray


- -- .-I


Sinum polandi M. Smith
Smaro tia merida Dall 3
SoIarior-bi ftuntet;u (Dall)
Souariorbia opitlEdol (Dall)
Sltrombiformij daHi Gardner and Aldrich
LStUmnbiformin cf. S. bicoMica Gardner
Strombtna gnrteri Mansfield
LStromUmb ala~i Gmclin X


Strotmibr tleidyi Ileilprin
tronmbiu pagitia Linn=
Sucinea lumolas Goild


- -I* I I


Suulain'o prmueiwta Gardner
SyTtomodrillia ef, S, w isturta (DlIl)
Tectanatica priffa (Say)


X


Ix




X









X
x


x
x



i x
- IX
X
x- -


X


Tectonatcea sp.
Tetda fasciatum (Burn)
Teitomaisa c. allrum Pilabry
Teinostoma callityptum Dall
Ttinotorma earinticats Pilibry and McGinty
1


SX


x


x
K


X X



----

I -


x




x

x
X




X
X


x

X
K


X
X
X
X

X

X
X
;x



X X








--------
X
X


k
x


-2 -


X




X X X


X

---



X
X







X

-






S-
x X

__ .


-- -'----


=II









NEOCENE STRATICRAPHY OF TIIE CHARLOTTE HARBOR ABEA


(Gasrrorodx {Continued)

Trinoamluma .r. T. c o lrist
Pilsbry and McGLnly
T"eidnoloa a errpaqfpim Verrill
Tlrinstoaoma gototus PLlabry and McG inty


Teinoetoma wmuium D11a
Teiwatoima trctiepra Olason and llarblson
Terebma comca (Sy)
Terebra dialwera Say
Terebra prote fa Conrad


-.
Trebr na p. a
Tenrbra app.
Tricoiz umbificata (d'Orbigny I


Triforis mirabilh C, B, Adams
rTrifonm wdrstu C. R. AdaLns
Trifan6r nigratinr C. B. ALItrEL
Tragonioroma erite (Dall)
Tr7genioea oma tnera (Philippi)
Triphora barktrhi (Olson)
Triphora bhia Olason and Harbison


Triria fionrdana Olkeuan nml HArhiwju
T''ria iiakhispant:oal petlrid
OL4eum and Hurbmun
Triria plobosa Gray
Trieia pedicutlu (Linn#)
Thria ~affusa Gray
Triria sp. a now ?

TrmopAn lzidora (Dall
Turbo raatanmru Gnbelin
Turbo rtalanens reumluatua Giirlin
Turbo riecltoiraumniet Dalt
Turbaondl c E sp.
Turbaomlla (Chtmnitni) cf T. admfta Barua.h
Turb&nilla (Ch~emnitsia) ap.
Tuvrb iha (Chemnnfitai) op. a
Turbo, nia ('mCAmitnia) 4 ap-
Turbonilla (Dunkeria) ap.
Tw(rbRni (&riotibostilla) ap.
TurbmviM'a up. a


Turbnilla epp,


Distribution
.T B C D E F L X A A2





Sx


. .--- .
''* i x


X


x
x x







x
x x
X





- i i- i


X


x
X
x-


X-X K
x x x x




Ix i
x
x
X
K

K


x
X

x
X
X
X


x
x


X


- I-.< _ K -






X X
x xX X
x






l .. ..

i X x x ,X
: X X ; i
X X


X

X
iX
x
x
x



-- ..
xx
x x
X
X X XX


x
X
x
x
K


x


X
X-


I-


x
x
x


x
x


x

I_-


I







80 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


Species


'Cast ropoda (Continued)


Turitdlea apicais Ileilrin X
Tuirrfelta apicalis finulata Hellprin
Turritefla apicalia mediaerucat Heilprin
Turjitelfa apiralis tensa Dall
Turritfla perattenuata IHilprin X
T'rritela perattenuata obsmleta Dall
Turnriella P)OLaOi .Mansfield X
Turritefra sp. a
Turrifteld tubarTndata Hfjlp>rin X
Turritella subannuRatl areopara Dall
Turritella subannulata burnti Dall
Turriteta rubannulata prinriaa Dall
f'uritelma vagneriana Olson and Harbison
Tphide fflordanus I alll
Iroar/ta locklini Bartsch
UrosalpinX perrugat u Conrad
S'raaipinz* ep. a
S'raalpinitr au sidus Dall
U'roealpinrx troesul Conrad


Vasum horridum Heitprin
Vuarm oc'klini Olrmon and IHarbiaon
!'ermetus s
I'Ftmicularia recla Olmsnn and Harbison
iV-rmrntdaria sp. X
Vcnirmiaruria slnrata Philippi
Vermicsuaria woodrinni Olmesn and TIarbimon
Ve.ritlum healyi Fargo
l'e.rittam hlmesi (Dall)
eI',iUum sp. a u"npw ?
Verillum wi'filri ( Ial]) i
Vitlri~thra data (Dall)
V'iric~ta ra micromeris (Dall)
V'r'ipar tfeogiafnua (IetA)
Volrus rifitca Olbfn and Harbison


Xancus repina (Heilprin)
Xancus arolymo-fdra Dal]
.V erfphora concrfiophora Born


___ _I I


x




x
x


X


X
x


x


X
x


x


x
x


X

X
X

x
x


X



X x


x
x
.X X


X


X


x










X




X


X
x


Distribution
C D E F L X Al A2 .M




x x x x x x


X
X







X X X X X

x x


xx

x x

x


x X


x -
x~ -I x


I


I








NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 81


Distribution
Sperie"
T H C. I) E F I. X Al A2 M

Selphopoda

Cdiulue quadridcntatwu Iall X X X
Dentalium calmao n er DalL X x X X X
___ -. __.
Dentalium earolinertse Conrad X
Dlaoito um rertiu m )Dal X X X
Dcntidium disparile d'Orbigny X
Dentalium eborrum Conrad X X X
DI)talut arnciftwn lD81ll X X X
Deni nium prnhrma Dnil X X X
Dentalium spp. X X
A mphineura
Chitraa Imrn I)all X
CAfton s|. X
Brachliuioda
I-uri'ni'ra ugbria Gould I I X
Cirril]edia
Balanus coecarus Brown X
Balan p. X X X X X X X X
I )eclapoda
Petrorhirmu abourieri Rathbutn X
Echinnidea
Enrop marrephro lor tmimirns;. MaTnsfielhl X








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE


OSTRACODE CHECK LIST FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE
MARL ON SHELL CREEK, CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA

(Identified by H. Puri, 1959)


Acinvep fhTrci eranthemoata
(Ulrich and Baisleri


Aculitythere-is lairusima (Edwards)

Awuria conradi (Iowe and McGuirt)

Campldorythere sp.

CHimawoidea pentrafa PuLr


Chimacoida sp.

Cypride i sp.

Cytherrela Wahnii PurL

fCythefltvnmorpha rn4ri
Howe and 6purgeon

Cytherura eltngaa Edwards

Ctherura johaoni n Mincher


Unit Uni L
I) F

|Cythrrura n. ap.


* *

aI


S
a


*


Catherurm ararnsit I
Howe and RBrown

Haploc~yeridea bassleri Stephenn I *

Hulingina ashermani
(Ulrich and Baseler)


LezoconAa deoryanda Pu ri

Loxeconasn rlietdWari# Edwards


Re ticuloethtreia floridana Plri

Oriodina hermudae (Brady)

Puriana n. ep.


PTUrianc rTaipnd at
(Ulrich and Raseler)


* I


*


* I | '


Unit
F
*

*


___ __ _ ~I~








NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 83


FORAMINIFERAL CHECK LIST FOR THE SHELL
CREEK CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL

(All Unit I) specks from ISC- I; all IUnit. F species from SCI-1; I lCole's collection Jis
from 34. mliles upst1ream from Washington's pla-e.)


unit
Species e1


Amphiidegina gibbosa d'Orbigny

AL rnuloorina ocridenlalies
(CushtmBn)

A rrcaras anmudola u
(l:ichtel and Mcoll'
? Articrolao l.l,
S .p.



lRuirina puh'hella primtti'ra
Crti& nfl11 C

Boifinia sp. a

Bwrdlia hannai
Ple iLer and Parker

Cibi ides deprnim
Pllkevr and Parker ?

Cibridre ftoridanw i.Cusliman I

Cibicide 10


Unit
F


N Ni


Cole,

N


X


X




I-- -
i-- .


X

X


Cibieider ap.


Dircorbia floridana Cushman

Disrorbia floridensir CuLishiman

Discorbi a p.

Etpthdium discoidair (d'Orbigny) X

Elphidium flmbriatulum
(Cuehman) X

Elphidism gntteri plaivatournsats
Kumrneld

Elphidium inerrtum (Williamsnm)

EIlpidium incertum mezicanum
Kurnfcld X


Elphidium up.


X -
x l

---- i --.--


X
x~ ^


Speries

Globigerina ip.

Gvutuiina priblema d'Orbigny

Lagen sublrina W illianinnn

Loaotomr a o-tuteri C'uhnman

OrbuLllna univerga d'Orbigny

Pener olia vi-mous d'Orbigny

Quinrtfordi na ufsca
H. B- Brady
Qurinr~riwhcmpia ?amarrkiana
d'Orbigny


Quinq1'7/'(El'n. ffsminula
ILininat

(Cinquelocuina suboryitii
Cushmitan ?


------ Quinquar!cwuina ap. a
X :
Quinquelocuana app.
X I-arl sp (R
--- --- Reuaeia sinueosa (Ruievsl


X i
-- Rotalia bercarii Linn
X i-- -____--____ -
-- - --. Rotalia becarrii (Linn)
X -var. ornata Cuahmran

X kRoalia becratii (Linn4!
S.-..- var. tepida Cuishman

ASrile marginalis (La marc k
I --'-
X i Spfrolawuina dental
S* Cuhmnan and Todd
- --- I
X !Spirolatuitia rFticutofs
Cushman
X .- --. -....--------
I lWlwduia itinneiana d'Orbienny
var. eakaosahalcheenais Cole
- .- 'tt.bratina cas'is d'Orbigny
x


U.nit















X




X
I-
N--

X


Unit Cole,
F ur

x
x

X

X

X



x
-- -- --
Nj -


N


X
X

X

X
N- -


X
I I


!--- -x
X '
i . -..
iY


X

X


_





...-^.^*d'AIg~l l











. *..
CF


S7.Y


.1


.
L-
c, *
























































































































































































































































WMAMP