Citation
Neogene biostratigraphy of the Charlotte Harbor area in southwestern Florida ( FGS: Bulletin 43)

Material Information

Title:
Neogene biostratigraphy of the Charlotte Harbor area in southwestern Florida ( FGS: Bulletin 43)
Series Title:
Florida Geological Survey: Bulletin
Creator:
DuBar, Jules R
Florida Geological Survey
Donor:
unknown ( endowment )
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee, Fla.
Publisher:
Florida Geological Survey
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1962
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vii, 83 p. : ills. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Geology, Stratigraphic ( lcsh )
Geology -- Florida -- Charlotte Harbor region ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Series statement: Geological bulletin - Florida Geological Survey ; 43
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jules R. DuBar.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Marston Science Library
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
AAA1659 ( LTQF )
AKM4758 ( NOTIS )
002036998 ( AlephBibNum )
01720448 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
UMNSIEARMN
STT NVRS y
STTEOFFLRIAV
STT BAD FCOSRVTO
DIISONO GOLG
'FOIAGOOGCLSRE
.oer eion irco




Tt
46




STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Robert 0. Vernon, Director
GEOLOGICAL BULLETIN NO. 43
NEOGENE BIOSTRATIGRAPHY
OF THE
CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA
IN
SOUTHWESTERN FLORIDA
By
Jules R. DuBar
University of Houston
Published for
THE FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
TALLAHASSEE
1962




FLORIDA STATE BOARD

OF
CONSERVATION
FARRIS BRYANT
Governor

TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State
RAY E. GREEN
Comptroller
THOMAS D. BAILEY
Superintendent of Public Instruction

RICHARD ERVIN Attorney General
J. EDWIN LARSON
Treasurer
DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture

W. RALPH HODGES
Director




LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

J'oIatda jeia /ica ;,./ =-vTallahassee
November 15, 1961
Honorable Farris Bryant, Chairman Florida State Board of Conservation Tallahassee, Florida
Dear Governor Bryant:
The Florida Geological Survey is publishing a paper on the stratigraphy and paleontology of the Charlotte Harbor area, as Florida Geological Survey Bulletin No. 43. This report is entitled, "Neogene Biostratigraphy of the Charlotte Harbor Area in Southwestern Florida," and was prepared by Dr. Jules R. DuBar, Professor of Geology, University of Houston.
The report presents added data that will relate to the full understanding of the difficult stratigraphic and paleontologic problems of southern Florida. Part of a successful search for oil is contingent upon a fuller understanding of these formations.
Respectfully yours,
Robert 0. Vernon,
Director and State Geologist




Completed manuscript received
March 1961
Published for the Florida Geological Survey by
Rose Printing Company, Inc.
Tallahassee, Florida November 15, 1961




TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
In tro d u c tio n 1-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Location and description of area 1-------------------------------------Present investigation --------------------------------- ------ ---------- 1
H istory of previous w ork -------------------------------------------- 4
A cknow ledgm ents ------------------------ -------------------- ------- 5
S tra tig ra p h y -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5
G eneral statem ent ----- -------------------- -------------------------- 5
Stratigraphy along Shell Creek ------------------------ ---------------- 7
G eneral statem ent -------------------------------------------------- 7
T am iam i F orm ation ------------------------------------------------ 7
D istrib u tio n -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ----- 7
L ithology and fossils ----------------------------- ---------------- 7
T h ick n ess - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- 7
C aloosahatchee M arl ----------------------------------------------- 10
G eneral statem ent ------------------------------------------------ 10
D istrib u tio n -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 10
L itb o lo g y -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 0
C o n ta c ts -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 0
T h ic k n e ss - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0
S tru c tu re - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - -- 10
S tra ta l u n its -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 1
Low er lim estone (U nit A ) ---------------------------------------- 11
L ow er m arl (U nit B3) -------------------------------------------- 11
M iddle lim estone (U nit C ) -------------------------------------- 12
M iddle m arl (U nit D ) ------------------------------------------- 12
U pper lim estone (U nit E ) ---------------------------------------- 13
U pper m arl (U nit F ) -------------------------------------------- 14
Fort Thom pson Form ation ------------------------------------------ 15
Stratigraphy along Alligator Creek -------------------------------------16
G eneral statem ent -------------------------------------------------- 16
T am iam i Form ation ------------------------------------------ ------ 17
D istrib u tio n -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 17
L ithology and fossils --------------------------------------------- 17
T h ick n ess -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 17
C aloosahatchee M arl ------------------------------------------------ 17
D istrib u tion ----- -- - - -- - - - - - - -- - -- - - -- -- - -- -- 17
L ith o lo g y -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 17
T h ick n e ss --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- 17
C o n ta c ts -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 8
Fort Thom pson Form ation ---------------------- -------------------- 18
D istrib u tio n -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -- - - - --- 18
L ithology and fossils ---------------------------------------------- 18
T h ic k n e ss -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 8
Stratigraphy south of Alligator Creek ------------------------------------18
Stratigraphy at W arm Mineral Springs ----------------------------- 19
P aleo cco lo g y -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -- 2 0
G eneral discussion ----------------------------------- -- ------- -- 20
T am iam i Form ation -------------------------------------------------- 20
C aloosahatchee M arl -------------------------------------- .--------- 21
G eneral discussion --------- --------------------------------------- 21
S h ell C reek - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -- 2 2




Page
Lower lim estone (U nit A ) ----------------------------------------22
Low er m arl (U nit B ) -------------------------------------------- 23
M iddle lim estone (Unit C) ---------------------------------------24
M iddle m arl (U nit D ) ------------------------------------------- 24
U pper lim estone (U nit E ) ----------------------------------------- 27
U pper m arl (U nit F ) -------------------------------------------- 28
A lligator C reek -------------------------- -------------------------- 32
Fort Thom pson Form ation ------------------------------------------- 35
G eneral statem ent -------------------------------------------------- 35
S ta tio n D -2 0 -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 6
S ta tio n D -7 -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- 3 7
W arm M ineral Springs ---------------------------------------------- 38
A clin e fau n a -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 39
B ib liog rap h y -- -- - - - - - - - -- -- -- - - - -- -- - - - - -- - - - - 45
A p p e n d ix -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4 9
Stratigraphic sections --------------------------------------------------- 49
Megafossil check list, Charlotte Harbor Area, Florida --------------------60
Ostracode check list from the Caloosahatchee marl on Shell Creek,
Charlotte County, Florida ------------------------------------------82
Foraminiferal check list for the Shell Creek Caloosahatchee marl -----------83




ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
1 Location of area studied ------------------------------------------- 2
2 Principal geographic features of the Charlotte Harbor area -------------3
3 Generalized columnar section for the Shell Creek area ------------------8
4 Location of measured sections and localities --------------------------- 9
5 Section SC-8 on Shell Creek -- ------------------------------------ 12
6 Ledge of upper Caloosahatchee limestone (Unit E) exposed along Shell
Creek at Station SC-5 --------------------------------------------------13
7 The upper shell marl (Unit F) at station SC-i ---------------------- 15
8 Station SC-i in the Karnes Shell Pit near Shell Creek ------------------16
Plate
I Correlation of measured sections on Shell Creek, Florida -----------In pocket
II Correlation of measured sections on Alligator Creek, Florida ------In pocket
Table Page
1 Classification of Neogene formations exposed in the Charlotte Harbor,
F lo rid a area -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6
2 Most abundant molluscan species in Unit D of the Caloosahatchee Marl
on S h ell C reek ----- ----- ----------- ---- -- -------- -- ----- --- ----- 25
3 Most abundant molluscan species in Unit F of the Caloosahatchee Marl
on Shell G reek -- -- ------- --- -- ----- -- -- --- ------- -- ----- ----- ---- 29
4 Molluscan fauna collected off the coast of Texas at a depth of 54 feet
(H ulings, 1955 ) ------------------------------------------- ---------- 81
5 Most abundant molluscan species in the Caloosahatchee Marl on Alligator
C re e k -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 3
6 Most abundant molluscan species in the Fort Thompson Formation at
statio n D -2 0 -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- 87
7 Check list of molluscan species from Warmn Mineral Springs, Sarasota
C ounty, F lorida -------------------------------------------- ------ 8
8 Acline m olluscan check list --------------------------------- ------40







NEOGENE BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE
CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA IN SOUTHWESTERN FLORIDA By
JULES R. DuBAR
INTRODUCTION
LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION OF AREA
The investigated area is located, with the exception of one locality in southern Sarasota County, in Charlotte County along the east shore of Charlotte Harbor (fig. 1, 2).
North or south access to the area is gained by U.S. Highway 41. From the east the area can be reached by U.S. Highway 70 or U.S. Highway 80.
All the surface lies below an elevation of 50 feet above sea level. Drainage is southward and westward into Charlotte Harbor principally by Peace River and its tributaries. Alligator Creek flows into the harbor near Acline a few miles south of Punta Gorda, and the southern part of the area is drained by the Caloosahatchee River which reaches the gulf opposite the southern tip of Pine Island.
According to Parker and Cooke (1944, pl. 8) the area is a part of the "Sandy Flatlands," which they have described as "lowlying, defectively drained lands, generally fiat though parts on higher terraces are gently rolling."
PRESENT INVESTIGATION
The aim of this report is to present a stratigraphic and paleoecological analysis of the Neogene deposits exposed in the vicinity of" Charlotte Harbor in Florida. Information derived from this study added to that from earlier studies of the Caloosahatchee River area (DuBar, 1958c) makes possible an accurate interpretation of the depositional environments and geologic history for an important part of the Neogene of southwestern Florida.
Field work related to this study was conducted during parts of the summers of 1953 and 1958 while employed by the Florida Geological Survey. Special attention was given the excellent exposures on Shell Creek; however, all other known exposures in Charlotte County, including those on Alligator Creek, were visited. All exposures were measured and sectioned, and approximately 1,200 pounds of sediments and fossils were collected from more than 20 localities.
In the laboratory, sediments were studied with the aid of a binocular microscope, and insoluble residue analyses were made of the limestone units exposed along Shell Creek. The faunas were analyzed stratigraphically and ecologically with special emphasis being placed on the mollusks, which in all collections constituted the largest part of the fauna.
I




2 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

SCALE IN MILES
o 6 12 24 36

LI AREA STUDIED

Figure 1. Location of area studied.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 3
NORTH R23E + R24E
- PUNfTAGORDA
C
03 22 "Arl 24
31 32 33 35
IO IT '

SOUTH R23E SCALE
Figure 2. Principal geographic features of the Charlotte Harbor area.




4 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
In addition, collections made by H. H. Winters from Warm Mineral Springs, and by Charles Locklin from Acline, were studied and are discussed in this report.
HISTORY OF PREVIOUS WORK
Apparently the earliest geological work in Charlotte County was done about 1890 or 1891 by Joseph Willcox, William Healy Dall, and Frank Burns (Dall and Harris, 1892; Dall, 1890-1903). These men recognized the Caloosahatchee Marl on Alligator and Shell creeks, and Myakka River. Their collections of fossil species were listed, figured, and described by Dall (1890-1903) in his monograph on the Tertiary of Florida.
Matson and Clapp (1909) showed, on a geologic map of Florida, exposures of the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell and Alligator creeks.
Tucker and Wilson (1932-33) described a molluscan fauna collected from the spoil piles along a pit located near Acline. This fauna contained several new species, some with Caribbean affinities and was judged to be possibly late Miocene in age.
Geologic and Pleistocene shoreline maps prepared by Parker and Cooke (1944) included Charlotte County, but were very generalized.
In his "Geology of Florida" Cooke (1945) very briefly mentioned Charlotte County and his geologic map of the state showed the supposed general distribution of Neogene deposits in Charlotte County.
F. S. MacNeil (1950) listed several species of megafossils collected from Tamiami and Caloosahatchee exposures located on or near Alligator Creek.
A monograph of Caloosahatchee mollusks was published by Olsson and Harbison (1953) in which several new species were described from Shell Creek.
A geologic map of southern Florida prepared by Parker, et al., (1955) was similar to that of Parker and Cooke (1944), but classified the Tamiami Formation as Miocene in age and indicates the formation is represented in southern Charlotte County by two facies.
Schroeder, Klein, and Hoy (1958) published a geologic map of southern Florida which is the most detailed yet for Charlotte County. They apparently were the first geologists to recognize the presence of the Tamiami Formation on Shell Creek.
DuBar (1958a) briefly mentioned exposures on Alligator and Shell creeks and (1958c) presented a general discussion of the Neogene stratigraphy of southwestern Florida.
The "Summary of the Geology of Florida and a Guidebook to the Classic Exposures" (Puri and Vernon, 1959) includes a composite stratigraphic section (p. 203-205) for Shell Creek, which was prepared by DuBar.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 5
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Florida Geological Survey, initially under the direction of Dr. Herman Gunter and later under the direction of Dr. Robert 0. Vernon, paid the field expenses related to this study. The Survey also supplied two able field assistants, Mr. Roy Staton, who aided the writer in 1953, and Mr. V. V. Vanstrum, who assisted in 1958.
At the National Museum, Neogene megafossil collections and laboratory facilities were made available by Dr. Harold Rehder and Mr. Druid Wilson. Foraminiferal assemblages from two localities were studied and identified by Mrs. Gene Ross Kellough of the Geology Department at the University of Houston.
The manuscript was typed by Mrs. Phyllis DuBar and Mrs. Obma Bow, secretary to the Geology Department at the University of Houston. The illustrations were prepared by Mr. Harry Whitehead, draftsman with the Florida Geological Survey, from rough copy.
STRATIGRAPHY
GENERAL STATEMENT
Beds older than Late Miocene are not shown to crop out in southwestern Florida. In the Charlotte Harbor area the Late Miocene is represented by the Tamiami Formation; Pliocene deposits are unknown and the Pleistocene is represented by the Caloosahatchee Marl and the overlying Fort Thompson Formation. All of the formations are typically unconsolidated, being comprised mainly of soft marls, clay, sands, and shell remains. The maximum combined thickness of the Pleistocene formations is probably less than 75 feet and the average is probably less than 25 feet. Thickness of the Tamiami Formation has not been determined inasmuch as its base has not been observed. At all places where contacts were observed, it was seen that the Caloosahatchee Marl rests unconformably on the Tamiami Formation and is, in turn, unconformably overlain by the Fort Thompson Formation. The best exposures occur along Shell and Alligator creeks in the northern part of Charlotte County. Other exposures are rare and offer little opportunity for study of lateral variation. All exposures studied occur below the 30-foot contour and thus are probably located below the Pamlico shoreline (25-30 feet above sea level).
The ages of the formations included in this investigation have been discussed in considerable detail in earlier papers by DuBar (1958a, 1958b, 1958c, 1959) and by others; Mansfield, 1939; Parker, et al., 1955; Parker and Cooke, 1944; Puri and Vernon, 1959; Richards, 1938, 1945, 1959; and Schroeder, Klein, and Hoy, 1958. Evidence derived from the present study for the most part tends to corroborate the writer's previous observations.




6 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
The Fort Thompson Formation as used in this report is judged to be contemporaneous with the Fort Thompson Formation of the Caloosahatchee River area, which has been shown to merge eastward with sediments placed in the Anastasia Formation by Parker, et al., (1955).
The Anastasia Formation is a distinct lithologic unit composed of whole and broken mollusk shells, associated microfaunas, and quartz sand. These sediments compose the coquina of Anastasia Island, Flagler County, a shell hash or coarse carbonate elastic mixed with quartz sand. It is proposed that the Anastasia Formation be restricted to this distinct lithologic type and Fort Thompson Formation be applied to the series of shell marls, clays, and sands, as described in this report. The Fort Thompson deposits stratigraphically overlie the Caloosahatchee Marl and are either exposed at the surface or are overlain by a thin layer of relatively recent soils and sands. All marine sediments that have been assigned to the Fort Thompson Formation lie below a surface elevation of 25 feet above sea level; however, nonmarine equivalents are known to occur at higher elevations.
The classification of Neogene formations of southwestern Florida as used in this report appears in table 1 below.
TABLE 1. Classification of Neogene Formations Exposed in the Charlotte Harbor, Florida, Area
Stages Formations
Recent Thin surficial sands and alluvium
Wisconsinan No record
Bradyan Fort Thompson Formation
Iowan No record
Pleistocene Sangamonian Caloosahatchee Marl
Illinoisan
Yarmouthian
Kansan No record
Aftonian
Nebraskan
Early
Pliocene No record
Late
Miocene Pontian ? Tamiami Formation




NEOGENE STRATICRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 7
STRATIGRAPHY ALONG SHELL CREEK GENERAL STATEMENT
Neogene sediments represented by the Tamiami Formation, Caloosahatchee Marl, and Fort Thompson Formation crop out along the banks of Shell Creek. Most of the exposures are fresh, clean, and fairly accessible; however, in places unconsolidated sands of the Fort Thompson Formation have slumped over at least the upper units of the Caloosahatchee Marl.
Individual exposures rarely exceed 15 feet in thickness, and the average is somewhat less. The maximum composite thickness of all exposed stratigraphic units is approximately 59 feet.
All of the beds are essentially horizontal except where irregularities in the respective depositional interfaces caused primary dips up to 2.0 degrees or more.
All localities examined lie below the 25-foot contour except station SC-14 where the surface is about 42 feet above sea level. A generalized columnar section for Shell Creek (fig. 3) and a map showing the location of measured sections (fig. 4) follow. Correlation of all measured sections is given on plate I in the pocket at the back of this report.
TAMIAMI FORMATION
Distribution: Strata assigned to the Tamiami Formation occur along Shell Creek between stations SC-1, near the east edge of the Cleveland quadrangle, and SC-11 near the west edge of the Bermont quadrangle. The stream distance between these two stations is approximately 1.6 miles. The Tamiami deposits in this area represent the top of an erosional high onto and over which Pleistocene sediments were deposited.
Lithology and fossils: Typically the formation is represented by argillaceous marls and calcareous clays. All the beds are slightly to moderately consolidated, phosphatic, cream to yellowish in color, and sparsely fossiliferous. The facies represented is similar to that of the Alva-Olga area along the Caloosahatchee River (DuBar, 1958c, p. 47-48). Fossils are mainly oysters of the species Ostrea disparilis and Ostrea tamiamiensis.
Thickness: The total thickness of the formation is unknown as the base has not been observed in Charlotte County. The greatest exposed thickness along Shell Creek is 6.0 feet at station SC-11. In other parts of southern Florida the thickness has been determined to range from 40 to more than 100 feet (DuBar, 1958c, p. 31).




8 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

WHITE TO GRAY SAND
YELLOW TO BROWN SAND
i..,

Z

C
L I--

UNIT 0

I SAND
SSANDY MARL
SANDY LIMESTONE SSANDY MARL
SSANDY MARL
CONGLOMERATIC
LIMESTONE
CALCAREOUS CLAY

FEET
12
8
4
02
VERTICAL SCALE
APPROX.

.,-J
LL LAJ
C.3
= C-,

GENERALIZED SECTION FOR THE
SHELL CREEK AREA
Figure 3. Generalized columnar section for the Shell Creek area.




WEST+
ER24E CLEVELAND QUADRANGLE I BERMONT QUADRANGLE

R25E

1 0.5 0 I MILE
SCALE APPROX.

Figure 4. Location of measured sections and localities.

EAST
+

.>~

z
0
>
0
0
>
03
H
H 0q




10 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL
General statement: The Caloosahatchee Marl of the Shell Creek area probably includes deposits equivalent in age to each of the members recognized by the writer in the type area; however, the members cannot be differentiated in Charlotte County. A generalized columnar section for the Shell Creek area is given in figure 3.
Distribution: Exposures of the Caloosahatchee Marl along Shell Creek are restricted to the Bermont quadrangle (fig. 4). They are nearly continuous from the west edge of the quadrangle eastward at least to the center of the quadrangle (sec. 28, T. 40 S., R. 25 E.), a stream distance of approximately 4.5 miles. This is the most extensive exposure of the Caloosahatchee Marl outside the type area.
The formation extends eastward in subsurface from the center of the Bermont quadrangle at least as far as Bermont, where Caloosahatchee fossils have been thrown up on the spoil piles of shell pits (Mansfield, 1939, p. 24). Near the west edge of the Bermont quadrangle the Caloosahatchee deposits lap up onto a buried rise in the Tamiami Formation. Near the crest of the rise in section 25 on Shell Creek the Caloosahatchee pinches out due, at least in part, to erosion. West of the crest in the Cleveland quadrangle, the Tamiami is overlain unconformably by the sands of the Fort Thompson Formation, the Caloosahatchee deposits being entirely removed by erosion.
Lithology: Typically the Caloosahatchee sediments are composed of unconsolidated, sandy marl, mars, and hard sandy limestones, which are gray, tan or cream in color. Nearly all beds on Shell Creek appear to be less calcareous and contain a higher percentage of sand than those on the Caloosahatchee River.
Contacts: Whenever the base of the Caloosahatchee Marl has been observed along Shell Creek the formation can be seen to lie unconformably on the Tamiami Formation. Everywhere along the creek the marl is unconformably overlain by unfossiliferous sands of the Fort Thompson Formation.
Thickness: At no place along Shell Creek is the entire section of the Caloosahatchee exposed. The maximum exposed thickness of any section is no more than 15 feet, whereas a composite of creek sections indicates the formation is actually as much as 80.5 feet in thickness. The maximum thickness of the type Caloosahatchee Marl is more than 65 feet (DuBar, 1958c, p. 85), but the average is considerably less.
Structure: The amount and direction of regional dip for the Caloosahatchee Marl cannot be accurately determined from the exposures on Shell Creek. The dip is undoubtedly very slight (less than 1)




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 11
and probably in a southwestern direction. All undulations in the Caloosahatchee beds appear primary, being controlled by irregularities of the ancient sea floor.
Stratal units: Dall and Harris (1892, p. 147) recorded the following generalized section for Shell Creek:
Sand 12 feet, Pleistocene
(Fort Thompson Formation)
Bed with shallow water
fauna including some
Pliocene forms 2 feet Pliocene
Limestone 2-3 feet (Caloosahatehee Marl)
Marl, similar to that of
Caloosahatchee River ?
Studies by the writer serve to differentiate at least six distinct lithologic units in the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell Creek (fig. 3). Dall mistakenly assumed that only one thin limestone occurs in the formation, whereas actually there are three fairly similar but different limestone units in the exposed area. The upper two limestone beds divide the unconsolidated fossiliferous marls into three distinct units. The lower limestone is conglomeratic and rests uncomformably on the Tamiami marl.
The uppermost marl bed of the Caloosahatchee contains a molluscan fauna which differs from those of the lower units by the absence from it of many of the most characteristic Caloosahatchee species.
The main stratal units of the Caloosahatchee are identified throughout this paper by letters assigned to them in the discussion below.
Lower limestone (Unit A): The lower limestone is the basal unit of the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell Creek. It lies unconformably on the Tamiami Formation where observed in the vicinity of station SC-li (sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E.) at the west edge of the Bermont quadrangle. The maximum thickness of the bed is approximately 3.0 feet.
The basal limestone is conglomeratic (fig. 1), being comprised of a gray sandy limestone matrix enclosing subrounded pebbles, cobbles and small boulders of gray or brown limestone. Unidentifiable shell fragments occur in the matrix and in the cobbles and boulders.
The insoluable residue of a sample of the limestone matrix is 9.0 percent by weight and is composed of approximately 25 percent subangular quartz sand and 75 percent silt and clay.
Lower marl (Unit B): The basal conglomeratic limestone (Unit A) is conformably overlain by a bed of unconsolidated, fossiliferous marine




12 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
marl (Unit B) having a maximum observed thickness of 4 feet. The lowest marl unit is known only from station SC-10 (sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E.) in the extreme western part of the Bermont quadrangle. The marl is light olive gray on a fresh surface, sandy, calcareous, and slightly phosphatic. Fossils are abundant and well preserved, being comprised mainly of pelecypod and gastropod species, but include a sparse foraminiferal fauna.
Middle limestone (Unit C): The limestone of this unit, known only from station SC-10 (sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E.) where it has a thickness of 3.0 feet, closely resembles that of the upper limestone (Unit E) and apparently has been mistaken for it by earlier workers. Unit C is of marine origin, white, sandy, argillaceous, and contains an abundant fauna of Caloosahatchee mollusks. The insoluble residue of a sample from station SC-10 is 16.5 percent by weight and consists mostly of fine to medium subangular quartz sand, and about 5.0 percent clay.
Middle marl (Unit D): The middle shell marl (fig. 5) can be traced from station SC-10 near the west edge of the Bermont quadrangle eastward along Shell Creek to station SC-1 (sec. 29, T. 40 S., R. 25 E.) where it has been thrown up onto the spoil piles along the pits of the
G
F
E
D

Figure 5. Section SC-8 on Shell Creek.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 13
Karnes Shell Corporation. This is a stream distance of more than 3.0 miles., and about 2.0 miles in an east-west traverse.
Exposures of the marl average about 3 to 4 feet in thickness reaching a maximum of 11 feet at station SC-9 (sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E.). At station SC-1 the marl occurs only in subsurface in the bottom of the pits of the Karnes Shell Corporation.
Most typically the unit is a soft unconsolidated calcareous gray marl, but at stations SC-9 and SC-8 the upper 1.0 to 5.0 feet is very sandy and yellowish brown in color.
Caloosahatchee mollusks are abundant and well preserved throughout the entire unit and at all exposures, but foraminiferal species, ostracodes, and echinoid spines are most abundant in the lowermost calcareous part of the unit.
Upper limestone (Unit E): Overlying the middle marl (Unit D) is the upper limestone (fig. 6) which is the most useful marker bed exposed along Shell Creek. The bed varies in thickness from 1.0 to 2.5 feet, but can be easily traced from station SC-9 in the western part of the Bermont quadrangle eastward at least to a point approximately 0.5 mile east of station SC-7 (sec. 28, T. 40 S., R. 25 E.). Thus, the unit

Figure 6. Ledge of upper Caloosahatchee limestone (Unit E) exposed along Shell Creek at station SC-5.




14 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
is exposed for a stream distance of more than 4.5 miles and a distance of nearly 3.0 miles in an east-west traverse.
Lithologically the limestone is sandy, hard, and gray, and contains an abundance of well preserved Caloosahatchee marine mollusks. It resembles the limestone of Unit C, but differs in being much more sandy. Insoluble residues from four samples of the limestone range from 36.5 to 49.0 percent by weight with 2 to 10 percent being clay and the remainder fine to medium, subrounded quartz sand. In general, the insoluble residue and the clay content of the residue increases eastward.
Upper marl (Unit F): The upper marl is best developed along Shell Creek between stations SC-9 and SC-1, but it can be traced eastward on Shell Creek to a point approximately 0.5 mile east of station SC-7 (SENWNW% sec. 28, T. 40 S., R. 25 E.) and occurs on spoil piles of shell pits at Bermont. This represents a total east-west distance of about
6.5 miles and a distance along the stream of approximately 4.5 miles.
The unit typically is an unconsolidated sandy, gray, marine shell marl. The sand is primarily comprised of subrounded, clear, mediumsized grains of quartz, but includes a small number of rounded, shiny black phosphorite grains.
The upper marl deserves special mention because its molluscan fauna differs considerably from that of the lower Caloosahatchee strata. As indicated, the difference is due mainly to the disappearance of many of the tropical species found in the lower beds rather than the introduction of new species. Many of the species of Unit F are unknown in the succeeding Fort Thompson and Recent faunas. These facts suggest a cooling of the water possibly related to the initiation of a glacial stage.
Inasmuch as the upper marl lies conformably on the upper limestone (Unit E) and is in turn unconformably overlain by unfossiliferous Fort Thompson sands there is little doubt that it is the uppermost Caloosahatchee unit on Shell Creek. The stratigraphic position of Unit F and its molluscan fauna suggest that it is equivalent to the upper Caloosahatchee Panope Faunizone at Ortona Locks in the type area (DuBar, 1958c, p. 75). Some characteristic molluscan species which occur in both faunas are listed below.
Pelecypoda
Anadara lienosa (Say) Echinochama corauta (Conrad)
Anomalocardia caloosana Dall Eucrassatella speciosa (A. Adams)
Chama gardnerae Olsson and Harbison Juliacorbula scutata (Gardner)
Chione latilirata athleta (Conrad) Noetia platyura Dall
Chlamys fuscopurpureus (Conrad) Ostrea sculpturata Conrad
Dosinia elegans Conrad Plicatula marginata Say
Gastropoda
Alabina adamsi (Dall) Natica plicatella Conrad
Conus stearnsi Conrad Oliva sayana Ravenel
Fasciolaria apicina Dall Strombus alatus Gmelin




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA

Figure 7. The upper shell marl (Unit F) at station SC-1.

FORT THOMPSON FORMATION
Along Shell Creek the Fort Thompson Formation is comprised of seemingly unfossiliferous sands. It is postulated that these sands were deposited close to the shoreline but mainly above sea level. They are in part equivalent to shell marls of the Fort Thompson found elsewhere in Charlotte County at lower elevations.
Because the sands are unconsolidated, exposures are commonly slumped and grown over with vegetation. However, at numerous places along Shell Creek the sand is freshly exposed. The freshest and most complete exposures of the sands can be seen in the shell pits of the Karnes Shell Corporation (fig. 8) where they reach a thickness of 11.0 feet. Elsewhere along Shell Creek generally not more than 3 feet of the sands are exposed.
All the sands are comprised predominantly of fine to medium, subangular to subrounded fairly well sorted quartz grains. The color of the beds is yellow, pale orange to tan or gray. The upper 1 to 3 feet are comprised of a light gray to white quartz sand which possibly has been reworked during post-Wisconsinan (Recent) time as it appears to rest unconformably on the lower sands.




16 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
The Fort Thompson sands extend along the entire length of Shell Creek, lying upstream from station SC-10 umconformably on the Caloosahatchee Marl, and downstream from station SC-10 unconformably on the Tamiami Formation.
F

G

Figure 8. Station SC-1 in the Karnes Shell Pit near Shell Creek.
STRATIGRAPHY ALONG ALLIGATOR CREEK GENERAL STATEMENT
Neogene sediments are exposed discontinuously along the banks of Alligator Creek from station D-7 (sec. 29, T. 41 S., R. 23 E.) approximately 0.5 miles west of Acline in Punta Gorda quadrangle eastward to station D-8 (sec. 26, T. 41 S., R. 28 E.) at Bridge 18 on the South Prong in Cleveland quadrangle. This is a stream distance of more than 4.0 miles and a distance in an east-west traverse of approximately 2.8 miles. The most continuous exposures occur between U. S. Highway 41 and the dam across Alligator Creek east of Acine (sec. 21, T. 41. S., R. 23 E.) in the Punta Gorda quadrangle (fig. 4).
The discontinuous nature of the exposures makes lateral tracing of individual units difficult and thus detailed studies such as those made of the deposits along Shell Creek and the Caloosahatchee River are virtually impossible.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 17
All the beds are essentially horizontal; however, there are slight undulations apparently caused by irregularities on the original sea floor.
The maximum thickness of the exposures nowhere exceeds 15 feet and is generally less. The composite thickness is unknown but is apparently considerably greater than 15 feet.
All of the exposures lie below the 15-foot contour except the deposits at station D-8 where the surface is about 20 feet above sea level.
A correlation of sections is shown on plate II in the pocket at the back of this report.
TAMIAMI FORMATION
Distribution: The Tamiami Formation is exposed along Alligator Creek from a point 0.5 mile east of U. S. Highway 41 eastward to the dam, a stream distance of about 1 mile. It is also known from a ditch at Bridge 18 on the South Prong of Alligator Creek.
Lithology and fossils: The Tamiami Formation is comprised of clays, marls, sands, and a few thin limestones. Most of the units, except the limestones, are only slightly consolidated, and nearly all are at least slightly phosphatic. Colors range from gray through tan, cream, and buff. Sands, in general, are most common to the east (i.e., stations D-7 and D-8) with calcareous clays, limestones, and marls predominant toward the west. Fossils are mainly oysters of the species Ostrea disparilis and Ostrea tamiamiensis; however, the sands yield great numbers of the echinoid Encope tamiamiensis and clusters of the giant barnacle Balanus concavus, most of which are well preserved.
Thickness: The total thickness of the formation is unknown. The greatest exposed thickness occurs at station D-5 where approximately
5 feet of the formation rises above low tide level.
CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL
Distribution: The area of exposure for the Caloosahatchee Marl is essentially the same as that for the Tamiami Formation, the principal difference being that the Caloosahatchee Marl extends slightly farther to the west.
Lithology: At all exposures the Caloosahatchee Marl is represented by a tan, sandy, unconsolidated marl, being comprised in large part by well preserved molluscan shells.
Thickness: All along Alligator Creek the Caloosahatchee Marl is thin, reaching a maximum thickness of approximately 3.0 feet at stations D-6 and D-8, but being represented only by traces in solution pockets at stations D-5 and D-2.




18 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Contacts: As elsewhere in southern Florida where the base of the formation has been observed, the Caloosahatchee Marl lies unconformably on the Tamiami Formation. The marl is, in turn, unconformably overlain by sands of the Fort Thompson Formation.
FORT THOMPSON FORMATION
Distribution: The Fort Thompson Formation forms a blanket over all the surface that lies below the Pamlico shoreline. It is well exposed all along Alligator Creek forming the uppermost unit at all stations examined.
Lithology and fossils: As on Shell Creek, all the deposits that unconformably overlie the Caloosahatchee Marl are placed in the Fort Thompson Formation. Along Alligator Creek the formation is most commonly represented by seemingly unfossiliferous, tan to brown, unconsolidated quartz sands. The quartz grains are subrounded, fairly well sorted and predominantly medium in grain size. At station D-7 (see. 29, T. 41 S., R. 28 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle) the Fort Thompson includes a 1-foot bed of unfossiliferous limestone and a sandy, calcareous marl with abundant mollusk shells. At station D-20 (NEINW3'i see. 21, T. 41 S., R. 28 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle) the formation is exposed in a shell pit where it includes, in addition to unfossiliferous sands, two sandy shell beds totaling 8.8 feet in thickness. The fauna is comprised largely of well preserved mollusks similar to those of the type Coffee Mill Hammock Marl member of the Fort Thompson Formation.
Thickness: Along Alligator Creek the maximum thickness of the formation occurs at station D-4 where it measures 8.4 feet. At station D-20, 15.2 feet of the formation are exposed. The average exposed thickness along Alligator Creek is about 5.0 feet.
STRATIGRAPHY SOUTH OF ALLIGATOR CREEK
Only a few exposures occur along the eastern shore of Charlotte Harbor in the area immediately south of Alligator Creek. Exposures are restricted to marl and sand pits, marinas, drainage ditches, and the banks of small streams. Nowhere are more than a few feet of sediments exposed and at most localities only spoil pile materials are available for examination.
Not much can be said about the stratigraphy of the area without subsurface data and better exposures; however, a few observations are worthy of note. Nowhere in the area does the Tamiami Formation appear to be more than 5 to 10 feet beneath the surface. At most places the Tamiami is very argillaceous, containing numerous well preserved oysters; however, near Acline the formation is represented, in part, by sands bearing a fauna of Encope tamiamiensis and Balanus concavus. Deep marl pits near Acline have penetrated shell beds that have yielded




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 19
a large molluscan fauna discussed elsewhere in this paper. At a few places the Caloosahatchee Marl was observed to overlie the Tamiami Formation. At station D-24 (NE,4NE34 sec. 30, T. 42 S., R. 23 E.) the Caloosahatchee is represented by a thin marine limestone containing numerous vertebrate remains, including teeth of the Pleistocene horse Equus (Equus) cf. E. leidyi.
Apparently the entire area is covered by a thin bed of unconsolidated quartz sand and assignable to the Fort Thompson Formation. At several localities sandy shell marls carrying a late Pleistocene molluscan fauna were observed beneath the unfossiliferous sands. These beds are perhaps equivalent to the Coffee Mill Hammock Marl member of the Fort Thompson Formation.
All the exposures of the area studied by the writer lie below an elevation of 20 feet above sea level and all are located in the Punta Gorda SE quadrangle.
STRATIGRAPHY AT WARM MINERAL SPRINGS
At Warm Mineral Springs unconsolidated sands, and marine and nonmarine shell beds are exposed along drainage canals and other excavations. Collections made by Herbert Winters in 1957 were studied by the writer.
Warm Mineral Springs is located at Salt Creek about 1.5 miles east of U.S. Highway 41 bridge across Myakka River in Sarasota County. All of the area lies below the 20-foot contour.
A generalized stratigraphic section for the area is presented below: Feet
Sand, quartz, unconsolidated, reddish brown and gray; no
fossils observed ......................................... 3.0-5.0
Shell marl, marine, sandy, fine to medium grained, unconsolidated, tan; many mollusk shells and some vertebrate fossils
including teeth of the Pleistocene horse Equus (Equws) leidyi. .0. 0-0.5
Oyster marl, occurs locally as lenses ......................... 0.0-0.5
Marl, fresh water unconsolidated, gray; contains mollusks and
vertebrate rem ains ........................ ............... 0.5
The vertebrate and molluscan fauna plus the evidence of the paleogeographic setting and stratigraphic position prove the deposit to be late Pleistocene in age. Lithologically and faunally the deposits are very similar to the Fort Thompson Formation in southern Florida and Pinellas County and are assigned to that formation.




20 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
PALEOECOLOGY
GENERAL DISCUSSION
Paleoecological interpretations included in the following pages are based almost exclusively on the macrofauna, especially the very abundant mollusks, and on the sediments in which the fauna occurs. Detailed discussion of conclusions based on the microfauna will await completion of studies being conducted by Harbans S. Puri and V. V. Vanstrum. The Caloosahatchee Foraminifera from two Shell Creek stations were identified by Gene Ross Kellough. With the exception of "Rotalia" beccarii, none of the species reported by Cole (1981) were observed (appendix).
Collections for this study were made from 29 stations in the Charlotte Harbor area. Where the physical properties of the stratal units permitted, the samples were washed, and the macrofauna separated and sorted. Subsequently, relative abundance of each species in each sample was determined. In calculating percentages two pelecypod valves were always counted as one individual.
Many of the molluscan species still live in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea, and a high percentage of the extinct forms differ only slightly from living species of these areas. Thus it is possible to make comparative studies between the fossil and living assemblages and to base ecological conclusions heavily on the subsequent deductions. It is assumed, applying the principle of uniformitarianism, that most of the fossils lived in environments similar to those of their living descendants.
Not as much is known about the ecology of living mollusks as is desirable, but the recent work of Parker (1956, 1959) and Clench (1942-1956) has added important information about the mollusks of the Gulf of Mexico and the western Atlantic. Other important reference works were discussed by DuBar (1958c, p. 86) in his study of the Caloosahatchee River area.
TAMIAMI FORMATION
Most of the deposits assigned to the Tamiami Formation are relatively unfossiliferous, making paleoecological interpretation difficult. Typically, the Tamiami is comprised of fine grained clastics such as clay, and argillaceous limestones in which specimens of Ostrea sculpturata, Ostrea disparilis and Ostrea tamiamiensis, and molds of other mollusks are locally common. Such deposits probably were formed in the brackish water of a lagoon or bay.
At places on Alligator Creek and in pits near Acline, the formation is represented by a phosphatic quartz sand containing many specimens




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 21
of the sand dollar Encope macrophora tamiamiensis and the giant barnacle Balanus concavus. It is postulated that these sands represent deposition in a shallow water, nearshore environment, possibly a submerged sandbar. Both the sands and the finer grained facies probably represent deposition in a regressing Tamiami Sea.
CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL
GENERAL DISCUSSION
Fossils of the Caloosahatchee Marl in the vicinity of Charlotte Harbor are generally as well preserved as those of the type area. Breakage seems mostly related to compaction, and little evidence of abrasion due to wave or current action is apparent. Delicate structures such as spines, nodes, and protoconchs are usually preserved; pelecypods are commonly represented by paired valves and many appear to occupy their original burrows in the substrata. Mixing of ecologic types is not great, being much less common than in the Caloosahatchee River area.
Most of the exposures studied contain highly fossiliferous units from which the fossils are easily extracted. Pelecypods and gastropods are by far the most abundant fossils in the Caloosahatchee Marl, but scaphopods, amphineurids, brachiopods, decapods, echinoids, barnacles, corals, bryozoans, foraminifers, and ostracodes are also represented. Twenty 0.5 cubicfoot samples of the shell marls on Shell and Alligator creeks yielded 79,755 pelecypods and 83,615 gastropods, representing 126 species and subspecies of pelecypods, 243 species and subspecies of gastropods, and 5 species of scaphopods. A total of 793 species and subspecies of mollusks have been recorded by the writer and other workers from the Caloosahatchee Marl of the Charlotte Harbor area.
Most of the extant molluscan species live south of Cape Hatteras, but a few range northward from there. None of the species are restricted to northern waters, and many occur no farther north than Florida. Most of the extinct species are very similar to Recent species from waters south of northern Florida. In general, the typical Caloosahatchee fauna appears to have lived in a tropical sea. Based on studies of the Foraminifera, Cole (1931) stated that the minimum temperature of the Caloosahatchee Sea was 220 C. (710 F.). Most of the Charlotte Harbor area faunas indicate an inner shelf environment; some are characteristic of outer, deeper parts of the inner shelf, whereas others are most characteristic of shallow, near-shore environments where the water was only a few fathoms in depth. Brackish water faunas similar to those of the Fort Denaud Marl member of the type Caloosahatchee Marl are unknown except from the base of the lower marl (Unit B) at station SC-10 on Shell Creek. Fresh water and land mollusks, echinoids, and corals are




22 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
also much less abundant in the Charlotte Harbor area than in certain beds along the Caloosahatchee River.
Most of the fauna occurs in unconsolidated sands or shell marls, but there are a few thin layers of fossiliferous sandy limestone. In general, the Caloosahatchee Marl, which is exposed near Charlotte Harbor, is less calcareous and more sandy than in the type area.
As in the type area, the Caloosahatchee Sea transgressed the Charlotte Harbor area over a dissected Tamiami terrain. Shoals formed over the tops of Tamiami highs, and during low stands of the sea, these highs might have stood above sea level as low islands. Southward from Alligator Creek the Tamiami Formation stands relatively high throughout a large area, possibly having acted as a partial barrier between the Caloosahatchee Sea to the north and that of the type area to the southeast. Thin Caloosahatchee marls are found along the margins of this high area but do not now extend over the top. Inasmuch as these marginal deposits both to the north and southeast contain offshore faunas, it appears probable that the entire high area was once covered by thin Caloosahatchee deposits which, prior to deposition of the Fort Thompson Formation, were eroded away.
During low stands of the sea the main shoreline was probably only a few miles westward, but during the highest stand of the sea, probably represented by the upper part of the lower marl (Unit B) and the lower middle marl (Unit D) on Shell Creek, the shoreline lay relatively far to the west, quite possibly being the Wicomico (90-100 feet above sea level), which is located approximately 25 miles northwest of the exposures on Shell Creek. If this supposition is correct, then the maximum depth of the Caloosahatchee Sea in the Charlotte Harbor area was no more than approximately 16 fathoms, a figure which agrees well with that suggested by the molluscan faunas. Cole (1931) also estimated that the maximum depth of the Caloosahatchee Sea was 16 fathoms.
SHELL CREEK
Lower limestone (Unit A): Little can be said about the depositional environment of Unit A, as it is known only from one locality and the samples collected contain only fragmented unidentifiable marine mollusks.
Apparently Unit A is comprised of reworked Tamiami limestone nodules and a fossil hash cemented by calcareous, sandy, argillaceous mud. It can be concluded from the degree of rounding that the limestone nodules were transported at least a short distance. The broken shells also suggest considerable reworking by waves or strong currents. It seems likely that Unit A formed in shallow near-shore waters of considerable turbulence.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 23
Lower nwrl (Unit B): Two depositional environments are represented by the molluscan fauna collected from Unit B. The lowermost part of the bed which occurs below water level at station SC-10 includes a relatively large number of Rangia nasuta and Crassostrea virginica valves, suggesting for that part of the unit an extremely brackish water environment. Above the lower few inches of Unit B the molluscan fauna is comprised of extant species and extinct species most characteristic of offshore, shallow water of the inner continental shelf as defined by Parker (1956, p. 337). In this upper part of the bed typical fresh water, brackish water, land, and strandline species are absent or extremely

rare.
The molluscan species of the lov
Pelecypoda Percent
Anadara rustica (Tuomey and Holmes)P Anomia simplex d'Orbigny .......... P Barbatia taeniata (Dall) ............. P
Caryocorbula leonensis Mansfield ..... 9.1 Chione cancellata (Linn6) .......... 33.0
Crassinella acuta (Dall). .. ....... 2.2
Crassostrea virginica (Gmclin) ....... P Dosinia elegans Conrad ............. P
Fossularca adamnsi (Dall) ............. P
Gouldia of. G. metastriatumn Conrad... 1.5
Gastropoda Percent
Alabina adamsi (Dall) .............. 2.3
Alabina cerithidioides (Dall) ....... 18.2 Brachcythara termninula (Dall) ........ P Colubraria lanceolata aclinica
Tucker and Wilson............... P
Crepidula aculeata Gmelin .......... 2.3
Crepidula maculosa Conrad ......... 2.3 Crucibulum auriculum Gmelin...... 34.3 Fasciolaria scalarina Heilprin......... P Marginella eiulima Dall ............. 3.1
Marginella pardalis Dall .......... 2.6
M elongena sp ......................4.5
Nassarius bidentatus (Emmons) ....... P P Present but

marl (Unit B) are listed below:

Pelecypoda

Percent

?MAulinia sp. (worn fragments).......P Nuculana acuta (Conrad) .......... 4.5
Nucula proxima Say................ P
Ostrea sculpturata Conrad .......... P Phacoides waccamawensis Dall ...... 6.8 Rangia nasula (Dall) ............... P
Tellina sp......................... P
Trigoniocardia wiUllcoxi (Dall) ...... 12.1 Varicorbula caloosae (Dall) ........ 22.6
Gastropoda Percent
Natica canrena Linnd ............... P
Persicula ovula Conrad ............ 2.6
Polystira albida (Perry) ............. P
Rissoina bulimina
Olsson and Harbison........... 2.3
Strombus alatus Gmelin............. P
Tectonatica pusilla (Say) .......... 13.7
Trophon lepidota (Dall) ............. P
Turritella apicalis Heilprin ......... 2.6 Turritella perattenuata Heilprin ... 3.4 Turritella subannulata Heilprin . . 1.1 Vermicularia sp ....................P
less than 1.0 percent

Chione cancellata, the most abundant species in the fauna of upper Unit B, lives today in high salinity waters of bays, inlets, and the shallow shelf, being most characteristic, according to Parker (1956, p. 331), of inlets. Studies of fossil faunas in Florida suggest that during Caloosahatchee time Chione cancellata reached its maximum development, and was then apparently most abundant on the inner continental shelf where it comprised a high percentage of the infauna. Varicorbula caloosae, second in abundance in Unit B, is closely related to the Recent species Varicorbula operculata (Philippi), which lives from the deeper parts of the inner shelf to depths on the outer shelf of at least 250 fathoms




24 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
(Abbott, 1958). Varicorbula caloosae is also common in the outer shelf Bee Branch member of the Caloosahatchee Marl in the type area (DuBar, 1958).
The most abundant gastropod in the fauna is Crucibulumn auriculum found living at least to 54 fathoms on the continental shelf. Other common gastropods such as Alabina cerithioides and Tectonactica pusilla live on the inner shelf to moderate depths. The relative abundance of the genus Turritella, a neritic, quiet water genus, also suggests an offshore origin for Unit B.
All the fossils are well preserved, being little worn or disturbed by wave action, which also suggests a relatively deep water, offshore environment.
Few of the molluscan species with living representatives range north of Cape Hatteras, and some are not known north of Florida. Most of the extinct species are closely related to species which live in Florida, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean waters. Thus, it appears that the water in which the Unit B fauna lived was at least as warm and probably warmer than that off southweastern Florida today.
The bottom in and on which the fauna lived was an unconsolidated mixture of shells and fine to medium quartz sand similar to that found off the southwestern coast of Florida at depths between 5 and 20 fathoms (Gould and Stewart, 1955, p. 5).
Middle limestone (Unit C): The limestone comprising Unit C contains a molluscan fauna that suggests deposition in a warm shallow water environment similar to that for the upper part of Unit B. The fauna identified from station SC-10, the only locality where Unit C is known to crop out, is listed below:
Pelecypoda Gastropoda
Anomnalocardia caloosana Dall Crepidula aculeata Gmelin
Arca wagneriana Dall Crucibulumn auriculumn Gmelin
Chama gardnerae Olsson and Harbison ?Petaloconchus sp. Chione cancellata (Linn6)-relatively Turritella apicalis HIeilprin-relatively abundant abundant
Mulina sp.
Trachycardium sp.
Varicorbula caloosae (Dall)-relatively
abundant
Apparently deposition of Unit C ceased when the supply of quartz sands to the area was greatly reduced. This event would not, of necessity, be related to change in water depth or even proximity to shore. It is possible that a shift in offshore currents or a change in the source area could have changed the rate of sand deposition.
Middle marl (Unit D): The molluscan fauna of Unit D is large and varied and, in general, indicates a warm water, offshore, inner shelf




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 25
environment similar to that postulated for the upper part of Unit B.
The fauna is well preserved throughout the exposed area, and there is little evidence anywhere of significant reworking by waves or currents. The latter observation suggests deposition in relatively deep, quiet water.
Distribution of the most abundant molluscan species is shown in
table 2:
TABLE 2. Most Abundant Molluscan Species in Unit D of the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell Creek
(P Present, but less than 1.0 percent)
Stations
Species _____- _---10 9 8-1la 8-1b 6 5
% % % % % %
Pelecypoda
Anomalocardia caloosana........................... P 3.8 6.1 P
Anomia simplex....................... 2.5 2.6 2.0 P P P
Caryocorbula leoneasis.................. 3.1 6.8 1.4 ............ P
Chionecancellata...................... 21.8 18.7 23.2 7.0 9.1 50.0
Crassinella acuta and C. lunulata ........ 1.5 1.6 P 23.0 17.6 2.4
Fossularca adamsi ..................... P 5.2 1.4 P P P
Ostrea sculpturata...................... 2.8 P 2.7 P P 2.4
Parastarte triquetra.................... 4.0 P 7.1 33.3 32.1 18.1
Phacoides multilineatus................. 6.3 5.0 5.5 9.7 13.9 7.9
Phacoides waccamawensis............... 1.0 2.6 1.6 P P 1.1
Transennella conradina ................. 1.5 ...... P 17.3 17.4 1.7
Trigoniocardia willcoxi................. 7.0 11.1 7.1 ...... ...... 2.1
Varicorbula caloosae .................... 38.6 31.1 39.3 P P 3.9
Gastropoda
Alabina adaminsi....................... 2.4 P 2.6 34.9 35.7 24.0
Alabina cerithidioides.................. 4.8 9.6 1.5 ............ 1.6
Anachis caloosaensis................... 2.4 P 4.0 ...... ..... P
Anachis gardnerae..................... 3.2 2.4 1.1 1.2 ...... 1.2
Caecum spp........................... 6.4 ...... 1.5 4.6 3.5 3.6
Cerithium litharium .................... P ............. 6.2 5.4 P
Crepidula aculeata..................... P 1.6 1.5 P ...... 1.2
Crepidulamaculosa.................... P ...... 1.5 2.7 1.4 P
Crucibulumauriculum.................. 38.3 46.7 40.2 4.2 4.2 P
M arginella eulima..................... 1.1 2.6 1.1 ...... 3.6 P
M arginella pardalis........................... 3.7 3.8 6.5 ...... P
Meioceras cingulatum ............................... 1.5 1.9 9.4 5.6
Olivella m utica........................ 2.4 ............ 8.7 4.2 3.2
Retusacanaliculata.................... P ...... 1.1 12.5 9.4 4.0
Tectonatica pusilla..................... 8.8 4.8 .......................
Teinostoma tectispira................... 1.6 ...... 1.1 1.9 P 2.3
Turritella apicalis..................... P 3.1 ............ ...... P
Turritella perattenuata.................. 1.7 2.0 1.6 P P 1.3
Turritella subannulata.................. P P 4.2 P 1.8 1.6




26 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Other species in addition to those listed in table 2, that are common in Unit D, particularly larger forms, are listed below:
Pelecypoda
Anadara lienosa (Say) Dosinia elegans Conrad
Anadara rustica (Tuomey and Holmnes) Echinochamnia cornata (Conrad) Arca wagneriana Dall facrocallista nimbosa Solander
Bothrocorbula willcoxi (Dall) Nucula proxima Say
Chama gardnerae Olsson and Harbison Nuculana acuta Conrad Chlamys fuscopurpureus (Conrad) Plicatula marginata Say
Gastropoda
Anachis caloosaensis (Dal) Lemnintina decussata (Gmelin)
Busycon contrarium (Conrad) Nassarius cf. N. consensus Ravenel
Conus adversarius Conrad Pyrigiscus spp.
Conus stearnsi Conrad Ringicula floridana Dall
Hanetia mengeana (Dall)
The distribution and relative abundance of the species listed in table 2 indicate a change of environment from east (station SC-5) to west (station SC-10) which, however, is not clearly reflected in the sediments. At station SC-8 the eastern faunal facies vertically overlaps the western facies and at this station the upper (eastern) facies is more sandy than the lower facies (western).
The change in faunal facies from east to west is probably, in part, related to proximity of the shoreline. The western faunas (stations SC-10 and SC-9) and the lower fauna at station SC-8 contain a relatively greater abundance of species judged to indicate offshore or at least relatively deep water conditions. These species include Varicorbula caloosae, Caryocorbula leonensis, Crucibulum auriculum, Turritella
perattenuata, and Turritella apicalis. The eastern faunas (stations SC-5 and SC-6) and the upper layer at station SC-8 contain a relatively greater abundance of shallow water, near-shore species. These species include Anomalocardia caloosana, Crassinella spp., Parastarte triquetra, Phacoides multilineatus, Transennella conradina, Alabina adamsi, Caecum spp., Cerithium lithariumn, Meioceras cingulatum, Olivella mutica, and Retusa canaliculata.
The foraminiferal fauna of the lower bed at station SC-8 was studied and the complete list of species is given in the appendix. The most abundant species are listed below:
Elphidium spp ............................................54 percent
"Rotalia" beccarii vars.................................... 26 percent
Ouinqueloculina spp..........................................9 percent
Cibicides spp...................................... ...... 8 percent
Numerous studies have been made of the Recent foraminifers from the shallow waters of the Gulf of Mexico (Bandy, 1954, 1956; Kornfeld,




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 27
1981; Ladd, 1951; Lankford, 1959; Lowman, 1949; Parker, Phleger, and Pierson, 1953; Phleger, 1951, 1954, 1955; Phleger and Parker, 1951) with the result that much is now known about the ecology of extant species. These studies have demonstrated that a foraminiferal assemblage such as that from Unit D represents shallow near-shore water (less than 100 feet deep) where the salinity possibly was subject to periodic fluctuation.
Rotalia beccarii vars. seem especially adaptable to a wide variety of environments ranging from interdistributary bays where the salinity is very low to the shallow open shelf where the salinity is near normal for open sea water (Lankford, 1959, p. 2078). Bandy (1956, p. 184-185) has shown that "Rotalia" beccarii var. tepida along with Elphidium spp. and Quinqueloculina spp. are among the most abundant and characteristic western Florida shelf species in water out to 40 feet in depth.
In his study of the Gulf of Mexico between Sabine Pass, Texas, and Grand Cheniere, Louisiana, Bandy (1954, p. 132) reported a relatively great abundance of Elphidium spp. and Rotalia spp. from the inner shelf between depths of 80 and 130 feet with the greatest concentration between 30 and 55 feet.
Phleger (1954, p. 608) pointed out that "Rotalia" beccarii vars. and Elphidium spp. are typically open gulf species which can adapt to enclosed environments such as bays where they usually occur with a large fauna of arenaceous foraminifers not recorded from the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell Creek.
The Caloosahatchee foraminifer assemblages need much more
detailed study.
The bottom on and in which the fauna of Unit D lived was an unconsolidated calcareous sandy shell marl very similar to that which today occurs off the west coast of Florida at depths of 5 to 20 fathoms (Gould and Stewart, 1955, p. 5).
It is probably worthy of note that Ostrea scedpturata which occurs in Units B, D and F cannot be considered an indicator of brackish water conditions. The species occurs in definitely brackish water deposits with Crassostrea virginica in the Caloosahatchee type area (DuBar, 1958c), but on Shell Creek and elsewhere it occurs with faunas that are comprised of predominantly normal marine species. It appears then that Ostrea sculpturata tolerated a range of salinity from brackish to normal (8.6 percent), being most common in nearly normal open marine waters where Crassostrea virginica was rare or absent.
Upper limestone (Unit E): The molluscan fauna of Unit E, although relatively sparse, is similar to that of Unit D and indicates a similar




28 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
environmental complex. The sand residue is also very similar to that for Unit D and the greater amount of calcium carbonate is probably attributable to a slower rate of elastic deposition.
The most common molluscan species of the upper limestone (Unit E) are listed below:
Pelecypoda
Anomnia simplex d'Orbigny Fossularca adamnsi (Dall)
Arca wagneriana Dall Phacoides multilineatus Tuomey and
Chama gardnerae Olsson and Harbison Holmes
Chione cancellata (Linn6) Phacoides waccamawensis Dall
Varicorbula caloosae (Dall)
Gastropoda
Cantharus perplexus Olsson and Harbison Olivella mutica Say Crepidula aculeata Gmelin Turritella apicalis Heilprin
Crucibublumn auriculum Gmelin Turritella perattenuata Heilprin
Marginella pardalis Dall
Upper marl (Unit F): Lithologically and faunally Unit F varies little throughout its exposed area, apparently having been laid down under uniform environmental conditions.
The molluscan fauna is large and varied, differing from that of Unit D mainly in the absence from it of many of the characteristic Caloosahatchee species. The latter include such forms as Arca wagneriana, Strombus leidyi, Cypraea problematica, and Turritella perattenuata, judged to represent tropical species that withdrew southward in late Caloosahatchee time with the lowering of water temperature presumably resulting from initiation of a glacial stage.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 29
TABLE 3. Most Abundant Molluscan Species in Unit F of the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell Creek
(P = Present, but less than 1 percent)
Stations
Species .
8-3a 8-3b 6 3-la 3-1b 1 7 14
% %1% % % % % %
Pelecypoda
Anadara transversa ........ 1.2 22.2 13.5 2.5 2.7 9.2 4.4
Anomalocardia caloosana 3.0 5.3 1.2 P P P ...... P
Chionecancellata......... 6.4 35.7 16.4 18.1 8.9 9.4 15.7 19.3
Crassinella acuta and
C. lunulata............ 25.2 ...... 24.8 42.5 31.3 23.7 39.2 35.1
Nuculanaacuta ........... P 1.1 1.2 4.2 1.0 5.8 8.5 .
Parastarte triquetra........ 27.9 7.5 11.6 ............ P P 3.9
Phacoides multilineatus... 6.5 9.4 15.1 17.5 3.7 3.7 13.4 18.1
Phacoideswaccamawensis 6.5 9.4 4.9 3.6 3.3 5.4 6.4 1.0 Transennella conradina... 25.2 2.6 3.2 ...... 1.9 P 1.4 19.0
Varicorbula caloosae....... P 1.1 ............ 36.3 18.6 P ......
Gastropoda
Alabina adamsi........... 32.9 ............ ...... 10.5 ...... P 69.0
Anachis gardnerae........ 4.0 ........... ? 1.3 P 1.8 ......
Caecum spp.................... 7.3 10.5 2.8 15.7 50.5 9.0 1.7
Crepidulaaculeata.............. 9.7 8.2 7.2 5.4 3.5 36.2
Crepidula maculosa....... 3.8 7.3 2.6 5.9 6.8 4.9 3.6 2.1
Crucibulum auricula...... 13.7 33.9 18.7 12.6 19.9 10.5 ...... P
M arginella apicina........ P ...... 8.7 9.5 ...... ? 1.8 1.1
Nassarius cf. N. consensus 2.0 2.7 5.2 ? 1.3 2.0 P P?
Olivellamutica .... ..... 21.3 14.5 5.2 17.0 19.9 6.1 12.6 8.7
Retusa canaliculata ....... 13.7 9.7 13.1 4.3 1.3 1.2 P 3.8
Terebra dislocata ......... ? 2.7 ...... 2.9 1.3 1.2 ...... P
Turritella subannulata..... P .... ..... 1.7 1.5 9.3 ...... 2.1




30 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Mollusks less abundant than those of table 3, but relatively important in Unit F are listed below:

Abra aequalis Say Anadara lienosa (Say) Anomia simplex d'Orbigny Brachiodontes exustus (Linn6) Cardita arata Conrad Cardita tridentata (Say) Caryocorbula leonensis Mansfield Chama gardnerae Olsson and Harbison Chione grus (Holmes) Chione latilirata athleta Conrad Chlamys fuscopurpureus (Conrad) Diplodonta acclinis Conrad Dosinia elegans Conrad Echinochama cornuta (Conrad)
(
Anachis caloosaensis (Dall) Busycon contrarium (Conrad) Busycon pyrumfloridanum Olsson and
Harbison
Cerithium litharium Dall Cerithium vicinia Olsson and Harbison Crepidula plana Say Conus stearnsi Conrad Diodora cayenensis (Lamarek)

Pelecypoda
Eucrassatella gibbesi (Toumey and
Holmes)
Fossularca adamsi (Dall)
Glycymeris arata floridana Olsson and
Harbison
Juliacorbula scutata (Gardner) Macrocallista maculata (Linn6)
Macrocallista nimbosa (Solander)
Mercenaria campechiensis (Gmelin)
Mlulinia lateralis Say Noetia platyura Dall Nucula proxima Say
Ostrea sculpturata Conrad
Phacoides nassula caloosana Dall
Plicatula marginata Say
Gastropoda
Eupleura caudata sulcidentata Dall
Fasciolaria apicina Dall
Gibberulina ovuliformis (d'Orbigny)
Kurtziella sp.a
Nassarius vibex (Say)
Odostomia spp.
Strombus alatus Gmelin
Tectonactica pusilla (Say)
Terebra concava (Say)

Scaphopoda
Cadulus quadridentatus Dall Dentalium sp.
The extant molluscan species of Unit F and closely related living representatives of the extinct species are inhabitants of the shallow inner continental shelf and other near-shore environments. Almost all the species thrive best where the salinity is near that for the open sea. Most of the species live abundantly in open ocean water. A few species are best adapted to enclosed bodies of water such as bays or inlets; these include Transennella conradina, Parastarte triquetra, Olivella mutica, and Nassarius vibex. Probably all five of these species range into the shallow open ocean. It is possible that Unit F developed under slightly fluctuating environmental conditions where, at times, the water was more shallow and the shore was relatively near. It is also possible that currents could be responsible, in part, for the mixture of bay and shelf species, and especially of shelf and inlet species. However, the excellent preservation of the shells does not seem to allow for much reworking by wave or current action.
Many of the species of Unit F have a bathymetric range from low tide to more than 100 fathoms. These include Cardita tridentata, Chione latilirata, Eucrassatella gibbesi, Phacoides nassula, and probably some of the extinct forms. Most of the mollusks, however, seem to have their




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 31
peak development in water less than 30 fathoms deep. Hulings (1955) made a study of the molluscan fauna on the shelf off the southeast coast of Texas. He reported faunas from sand and shell bottoms in shallow depths very similar to those found in Unit F. Listed below (table 4) is the fauna Hulings reported from his offshore station 40, where the depth is about 54 feet and the bottom is sandy shell debris.
TABLE 4. Molluscan Fauna Collected off the Coast of Texas at a Depth of 54 Feet (Hulings, 1955)

Species

Percentage

Phacoides multilineatus ........ Tectonatica pusilla............
Chione intapurpurea .......... Crassinella lunulata...........
Phacoides amiantus..........
Caecum cooper .............
A nadara transversa.. ....... Ervillia concentrica ...........
Gouldia cerina..............
Semele nuculoides...........
Chama congregata ...........
Macrocallista maculata ........ Nuculana acuta ..............
Bittium varium ..............
Caecum glabrum .............
Anachis avara ...............
Tellina alternata .............
Dosinia discus..............
Vitrinella sp................
Chione grus..................
Plicatula gibbosa .............
Rissoina decussata ............

12.7 9.7 7.0
6.5 6.2
4.9
4.6 4.6 3.6 3.3 3.3 3.2 3.2 2.8 2.7
1.7 1.7 1.6 1.6
1.2 1.2 1.1

Species

Percentage

Retusa canaliculata............
Seila adamsi .................
Turbonilla sp.................
Echinochamina cornuta........ Rhizorus acutus...............
Corbula swiftiana.............
Dentalium amaliense ......... Cerithiopsis subulata ......... Dentalium texasianum ........ M elanella bilineata............
Acteon punctostriatus.......... Anachis obesa................
Chione latilirata.............
Dinocardiumn robustum......... Nucula proxima ..............
Odostomia seminuda...........
Anomnia simplex ..............
Calyptrea centralis...........
Varicorbula krebsiana........ Eontia bisulcata.............
M itrella lhnata ...............
Triphora pulchella...........

A sample of the upper marl from station SC-1 yielded 23 species of Foraminifera listed in the appendix. The most abundant species are listed below:
Elphidium spp............ ........ .................... 46.0 percent
"Rotalia" beccarii vars................................... 21.0 percent
Bolivina pulchella primitiva ............................... 7.6 percent
Bucella hannai........................................ 6.0 percent
Discorbis spp..........................................5.3 percent
M iliolidae ..............................................3.8 percent
Cibicides sp............................................3.0 percent
This fauna is similar to that from Unit D (station SC-8) and probably represents approximately the same ecologic conditions.
Lithologically Unit F is a shelly sand similar to that described by Gould and Stewart (1955, p. 5) as occurring off the coast of southwestern Florida between shore and 10 fathoms.




32 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Thus it appears that the fauna of Unit F lived near shore on the inner continental shelf where enough current activity was available to cause some mixture of inlet, bay and shelf species, but not enough to cause significant damage to the shells. It is also possible that slight fluctuations in environmental conditions during the time Unit F was accumulating would account for the mixing of several ecological types. The maximum depth of water was probably no more than 10 to 15 fathoms and possibly less, so that the corresponding shoreline possibly lay below the Wicomico (90 to 100 feet) shoreline, perhaps being the Penholoway shoreline (72 feet above sea level).
Inasmuch as many of the typical and tropical Caloosahatchee species are absent, it is probable that the fauna of Unit F lived in water somewhat cooler than that of any of the underlying Caloosahatchee units. However, most of the species in Unit F, or the apparent progeny, now live in Floridan waters so that water temperature was probably close to that for southern Florida today. The minimum water temperature was probably not less than 65' F., inasmuch as Chione cancellata and Macrocallista maculata will not survive below that temperature (Pulley, 1955, oral communication).
ALLIGATOR CREEK
The Caloosahatchee faunas that occur along Alligator Creek are similar to those of the lower and middle marls on Shell Creek. However, as pointed out earlier, the section on Alligator Creek is thin and the units of Shell Creek cannot be recognized. In addition, the formation was heavily eroded prior to deposition of the Fort Thompson Formation; thus exposures are discontinuous and lateral tracing of individual units is virtually impossible. Large faunas were collected only from stations D-6 and D-8 although small faunas were collected at stations D-3, D-4, and D-5. Ecological analysis is based primarily on the molluscan species included in these collections.
The most abundant molluscan species in the Caloosahatchee Marl of Alligator Creek are listed in table 5 below.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 33
TABLE 5. Most Abundant Molluscan Species in the Caloosahatchee Marl on Alligator Creek
(P = Present but less than 1.0 percent)
Units
Species
D6-1 D4-2 D4-3 D8-2
Pelecypoda
A bra acqualis (Say)......................... P ....... ? 1.6
Anadara improcera (Conrad) ................. 38.3 P P .......
Anomalocardia caloosana (Dall) .............. 2.9 14.3 17.6 13.5
Cardita arata (Conrad)...................... ? P ? 2.8
Caryocorbidula leonensis Mansfield .............. 2. 1 P P .......
Chama gardnerae Olsson and Harbison........ 3.5 ......:. ....... P
Chione cancellata (LinnD6) .......... ..... .. . 6.5 3.6 8.2 7.3
Crassinella lunulata (Conrad) and
C.acuta(Dall)........................... 2.9 4.1 3.8 7.0
Mulinia of. M. lateralis Say ........ ........ ... 2.9 ........ ........
Laevicardium mortoni Conrad................ ........ P ........ 3.4
N ucula proxim a Say........................ 1.3 ................ ...
Nuculana acuta (Conrad) .................... 8.2 P P P
Parastarte triquetra (Conrad) ................. 2 60.7 61.9 6.0
Phacoides anadonta Say..................... P ..1.6 ...
Phacoides mullilineatus (Tuomey and Holmes) 4.2 2.8 2.5 26.9
Phacoides nassula caloosana Dall ............. 1.6 P ........ P
Phacoides waccamawensis Dall ............... 2.7 P P 3.0
Plicatula marginata Say ..................... 1.9 .....................
Transennella conradina (Dall) ................ 1. 1 7.1 5.3 21.3
Varicorbula caloosae (Dall) .................. .4.6.......
Gastropoda
Alabina adamnsi (Dall)...................... ...... ........ 13.3 46.7
Bittium variumn Pfeiffer ?................. .. 7.3 ........ ...... P
Busycon contrarium (Conrad) ................ P ....... 1.7 P
Caecum floridanum Stimpson................. 7.3 ........ ........ P
Cantharus sp.--immature..... ............... 3.6 ................. P
Cerithium caloosaense Dall ........................... 1.5 ........ .......
Cerithium lithariumn Dall ................... ........ 11.8 ........ P
Cerithium sp ........................ ........ ... ........... 13.3 .....
Crepidula aculeata Gmelin................... 8.1 ................ P
Crepidula maculosa Conrad.................. P ........ 29.1 P
Crucibulumo auriculum Gmelin.................... ... ................ 12.1
Diodora cf. D. cayenensis (Lamarck) ......... 7.3 .......
M arginella amiantula Dall ....................... ... ................ 3.6
M arginella pardalis Dall ................... "3.6 ....... ........ P
M eioceras cingulatum Dall .......................... 11.8 ........ 2.1
M elongena corona Gmelin ................... ........ ........ 3.3 P
M odulus carchedonius (Lamarck) ............. 3.6 ........ ........ P
N assarius sp............................... 3 6 ............... .......
Nassarius vibex (Say) .................................. ........ 2.2
Olivella mutica Say........................ 7.3 ........ 13.3 6.8
Retusa canaliculata (Say).................... 7.3 60.6 13.3 7.8
Ringicula floridana Dall ..................... ............... 13.3
Seilia adamsi H. C. Lea..................... 7.3 ................ 2.4
Strom bus alatus G m elin ..................... 2.6 ........................
Terebra of. T. concava (Say)................. 3.6 ........ ........ ?
T urbonilla sp ............................... ........ 1 .5 ........ ........
Turritella subannulata IHeilprin ............... 3.6 ....... ........ 2.4




84 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Additional mollusks, especially larger species, relatively common in
the Alligator Creek Caloosahatchee Marl are listed below. (Stations
where the species were collected are also indicated.)
Pelecypoda Stations
A imusiumn mortoni (Ravenel) ................................. D8-2
A nadara rustica (Tuomey and Holmes)........................ D6-1, D8-2
Anadara lienosa (Say)......... .................. ....D4-3, D6-1, D8-2
Anadara scalarina (Heilprin) .... ........................... D6-1
Arca wayneriana Dall ....................................... D8-2
Bothrocorbula willcoxi (Dall).................................D8-2
Chlamys anteamplicostatus (Mansfield) ........................... D6-1
Chione latilirata athleta Conrad ................................ D6-1
Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin)................................D8-2
Dosinia elegans Conrad...................................... D6-1, D8-2
Eucrassatella speciosa (A. Adams) ................. ............ D6-1
Glycymeris arata floridana Olsson and Harbison.................. D4-3, D6-1
Macrocallista maculata Linn6 .................................. D4-3, D6-1
Mercenaria campechiensis (Gmelin) ............................ D6-1, D8-2
Miltha caloosaensis (Dall) .................................... D3-2, D8-2
Noetia platyura (Dall) ....................................... D8-2
Panope floridana Heilprin...................................... D6-1
Rangia nasuta (Dall)................................. ......... D8-2
Gastropoda
Bulla occidentalis Adams....................................D8-2
Busycon contrarium (Conrad)................................D4-3, D8-2
Busycon rapum (Heilprin) ?...................................D8-2
Cancellaria conradiana Dall ....................................D8-2
Cantharus perplexus Olsson and Harbison....................... D8-2
Cerithium caloosaense Dall ..................................... D4-2
Cypraea probleminatica Heilprin..................................D8-2
Fasciolaria apicina Dall ...................................... D4-3
Fasciolaria gigantea Kiener ................................... D6-1
Melongena corona Gmelin...................................... D4-3, D8-2
M urex brevifrons Lamarck.....................................D6-1
Murex recurvirostris rubidus F. S. Baker ...................... D8-2
Oliva sayana Ravenel ........................................ D6-1, D8-2
Pyrazus scalatus (Heilprin)..... .............................D8-2
Scaphella fljoridana Heilprin.................................... D5-5
Turbo castaneus Gmelin ................. ....................D6-1
Typhis floridanus Dall ........................................ D8-2
Vermicularia recta Olsson and Harbison ........................ D6-1
As at most other Caloosahatchee localities the fauna is well preserved and varied. Little evidence of reworking by waves or currents is apparent. It is probable that most of the species lived close to their place of
burial.
Comparison of the molluscan species listed above with those of the Shell Creek Caloosahatchee faunas indicates that they lived under essentially the same environmental conditions. The Alligator Creek faunas




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 35
seem most closely related to those of the eastern facies of the Shell Creek Unit D marl. Most of the species are characteristic of a shallow water, inner shelf environment. As in the eastern facies of Unit D on Shell Creek, Anomalocardia caloosana, Parastarte triquetra, Transennella conradina, Olivella mutica, and Retusa canaliculata are among the most abundant species. Typical brackish water species such as Crassostrea virginica and Rangia nasuta are rare, and with the possible exception of Amusium mortoni, deep water, outer shelf species are virtually unknown. The fauna of station D-6 appears to represent slightly deeper water than does the fauna of station D-8. This is to be expected inasmuch as station D-8 lies nearly 3 miles east of station D-6 and was thus somewhat closer to the shore that presumably lay to the east.
The bottom on which the faunas of the Alligator Creek lived was similar to that of the Shell Creek area and seemed to correspond closely to that of the present inner shelf off the coast of southwestern Florida between 5 and 20 fathoms (Gould and Stewart, 1955, p. 5).
FORT THOMPSON FORMATION
GENERAL STATEMENT
All of the deposits of the Charlotte Harbor area which stratigraphically overlie the Caloosahatchee Marl has been assigned to the Fort Thompson Formation in this report. It is possible, however, that the upper 2 to 3 feet of white quartz sands have been reworked relatively recently. Most of the deposits studied are unfossiliferous, unconsolidated quartz sands found below a present elevation of 50 feet above sea level. Unfortunately, the absence of fossils in these beds makes paleoecological interpretation very difficult.
Exposures in the area that carry marine fossils are rare and none are known to occur at an elevation greater than 15 feet above present sea level; thus, all were deposited below the Pamlico shoreline (25 to 30 feet above sea level). As pointed out earlier (DuBar, 1958, and Richards, 1938), the Fort Thompson Formation can be correlated with the making of the Pamlico shoreline.
It is probable that some of the unfossiliferous sands that overlie fossiliferous Fort Thompson sediments were deposited under marine conditions; however, most of the unfossiliferous sands that directly lie on the Caloosahatchee Marl or Tamiami Formation, or lie above the 30-foot contour are probably of nonmarine origin. It is also probable that most of the marine sands were deposited during regression of the Fort Thompson Sea.




36 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
The position of the Pamlico shoreline has been roughly delineated by MacNeil (1950); however, more accurate location of this shoreline can be ascertained from study of topographic maps. Modification of the topography by streams such as Peace River and Shell Creek makes exact placement of the shoreline ambiguous. For instance, Shell Creek apparently has cut its valley headward several miles into the Wicomico(?) terrace which lies above the Pamlico shoreline. If this is true, then the Fort Thompson sands exposed along the headwaters of Shell Creek are probably all of nonmarine origin.
All the Fort Thompson exposures that contain marine fossils are located within a few miles of the Pamlico shoreline. If the surface of the Pamlico terrace has not been warped, the difference in elevation between the base of the Pamlico shoreline (25 feet? above sea level) and the elevation of any Fort Thompson fossiliferous bed should approximate the depth of water in which the faunas lived. The elevations of the tops of the fossiliferous units range from sea level to approximately 15 feet above sea level; thus, considering the thickness of the Fort Thompson sediments, the maximum depth of water was probably no greater than
6 fathoms.
The megafossils of the Fort Thompson Formation are well preserved and show little or no evidence of abrasion by wave or current action. Ecological analysis shows that each fauna lived close to shore on the inner continental shelf where the bottom was composed of quartz sand. The salinity ranged from brackish to normal marine (3.6 percent), the temperature was probably similar to that of water off the southwestern coast of Florida today, and the depth was only a few fathoms at the maximum.
Station D-20: Shell-bearing marine Fort Thompson strata are exposed in the walls of a shell pit located about 0.9 mile north of Alligator Creek (NE3NW3 sec. 21, T. 41 S., R. 23 E.). The excavation at this pit exposes 15.2 feet of sediment of which the lower 9.3 feet contain marine fossils. There are two distinct sandy shell beds divided by a thin band of clay and sand containing only a very few fossils. All the fossils are well preserved and show little evidence of transportation by currents and waves. Mollusks are by far the most abundant fossils; 17 species of pelecypods and 19 species of snails were identified from the lower sandy shell bed; and 8 species of snails and 10 species of clams were identified from the upper shell bed. In addition, the lower shell bed contains a relatively large number of colonial corals near its base.
The most abundant molluscan species in the lower and upper shell beds are listed in table 6.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 87
TABLE 6. Most Abundant Molluscan Species in the Fort Thompson Formation at Station D-20
Stratal Units
Species
D20-1 D20-3
% %
Pelecypoda
Anadara transversa (Say)................................. 6.7 P
Anomia simplex d'Orbigny............................... 3.8 P
Chione cancellata (Linn6) ................................ 49.2 39.2
Ervilia polita Dall ...................................... 2.2
M ulinia lateralis Say................................... 23.8 50.9
Phacoides multilineatus (Tuomey and Holmes) .............. 11.5 3.0
Trigoniocardia willcoxi (Dall) ............................. 1.1 .........1
Gastropoda
Busycon contrariumni (Conrad) ............................. 5.0 2.2
Chrysallida inmacrneili Bartsch...................... ....... 5.0 .........
Crepidula aculeala Gm elin ................. ............. 5.0 .........
Crepidula maculdosa Conrad............................... 15.0
Fasciolaria distans LinnD6 ................................. ......... 1.1
Longchaeus ef. L. marionae Bartsch........................ 5.8 17.7
M arginella apicina Menke ............... ............... 10.0 18.8
M ormnula sp ............................................. 5 .0
Olivella m utica Say...................................... 20.6 18.8
Polynices duplicatus Say........................................... 3.3
Pyrigiscus sp.......................................... 10.6
Retusa canaliculata (Say)............................... .......... 17.7
Seila adaminsi (H1. C. Lea)................................ 5.0 .........
Terebra dislocata Say.................................. 5.6 ..
Turbonilla (Chemnitzia) cf. T'. admeta Bartsch.............. 5.6 .
P=Present, less than 1.0 percent
The molluscan species of station D-20 indicate, for both the lower and upper shell beds, deposition in shallow marine water close to shore. The relative abundance of Olivella mutica and Polynices duplicatus suggests deposition in an inlet, but absence from the fauna of typical brackish water species that generally are swept by currents into an inlet
points to near-shore, open-water deposition.
Elevation at the top of the uppermost shell bed is approximately 10 feet above present sea level, so that water depth at time of deposition probably was no more than 5 fathoms. Distance to the Pamlico shoreline could have been no more than 3 miles.
Station D-7: An exposure of marl on Alligator Creek located about 0.5 mile downstream from the U. S. Highway 41 bridge has yielded a few fossil mollusks which suggest that the deposit should be placed with the Fort Thompson Formation rather than the Caloosahatchee




38 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Marl. The molluscan species from the lowermost bed at this exposure are listed below:
Pelecypoda
Anadara transversa (Say)
Anomia simplex d'Orbigny
Chione cancellata (Linn6)
Chlamys irradians (Lamarck)
Mfercenaria campechiensis (Gmelin)
Gastropoda
Busycon contrarium (Conrad)
The fauna is rather sparse for precise ecological analysis, but suggests a high salinity bay environment and very shallow depths. The overlying sandy limestone resembles intertidal beach rock as described by Ginsberg (1958). The top of the fossiliferous bed is less than 2 feet above present sea level.
Warm Mineral Springs: The deposits at Warm Mineral Springs typically include a lowermost fresh water marl and an overlying marine shell marl. In some places a brackish water oyster biostrome lies between the marine and the fresh water units. All the beds contain vertebrate bones. The molluscan species identified from the marine shell bed are listed below (table 7):
TABLE 7. Check List of Molluscan Species from Warm Mineral Springs, Sarasota County, Florida

Pelecypoda
Abra aequalis (Say) ............
Anadara transversa (Say) ......... Anadara sp. a...................
Anomalocardia caloosana (Dall)... Cardita sp. very close to C. arata
(Conrad) of the Caloosahatchee M arl........................
Chione cancellata (Linn6) ......... Laevicardium mortoni Conrad ..... Macrocallista nimbosa Solander. . Mulinia lateralis Say ............
Nucula proxima Say............
Parastarte triquetra Conrad ....... Phacoides multilineatus Tuomney
and Holmes .................
P licatula sp.....................
Tagelus divisus (Spengler) ........ Tellidora cristata Recluz ......... Tellina sayi Dall ................
Trachycardium isocardia (Linn6) ?. Transennella conradina (Dall)... Transennella cf. T. simpsoni Dall. Venus campechiensis Gmelin.....

Gastropoda
A ctaeon sp ....................
Anachis (Costanachis) obesus
(C. B. Adams) sub sp?........
? Anachis sp. a..................
Busycon contrarium (Conrad). .... Busycon pyrum Dillwyn sub sp. a?. Cerithium muscarum Say........ Crepidula plana Say ............
Fasciolaria apicina Dall ?......... Has protoconch sculpture of the Caloosahatchee species
Fasciolaria distans Linn........ Longchaeus cf. L. marionae Bartsch Marginella apicina Menke ........ Melongena corona Gmelin......... Nassarius bidentatus (Emmons)
slender form................
Nassarius vibex (Say) ...........
N assarius sp....................
Olivella mutica (Say) rather slender,
so perhaps is O. pusilla Marrat.. Polynices duplicatus Say.......... Pyrigiscus cf. P. sisphusi Bartsch.. Pyrigiscus cf. P. tellusae Bartsch.. Pyrigiscus sp. a...............
Retusa canaliculata Say.......... Strombus alatus Gmelin (immature) ? Terebra sp .....................
Turbonilla cf. T'. alcmena Bartsch.. Turbonilla sp. a .................

A Abundant C Common FC Fairly Common R Rare

A = Abundant

C Common FC = Fairly Common

R = Rare




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF TIE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 39
ACLINE FAUNA
Molluscan species collected from spoil piles along the sides of a shell pit located about 1 mile southwest of Acline in the Punta Gorda SE quadrangle were first studied by Helen Tucker and Druid Wilson (193233). The fauna included some Caloosahatchee species as well as some restricted to the Miocene, and several new species. Inasmuch as the pit was filled with water, it was impossible for Tucker and Wilson to determine the stratigraphic relations. Consequently, it could not be ascertained if the collections included assemblages from more than one stratum of different ages, or if the fauna were intermediate in age between the Miocene and the Caloosahatchee Marl. It is interesting to note that several other pits located near the one yielding the "Acline fauna" contain sandy and argillaceous facies of the Tamiami Formation with the usual OstreaEncope-Balanus fauna. According to Druid Wilson the pit containing the "Acline fauna" is deeper than the other pits and thus has penetrated a stratum not reached in the others (personal communication, 1958).
Lately, another pit (station D-22) has been opened within 800 feet of the "Acline fauna" pit, and strangely has yielded only the usual Ostrea-Encope-Balanus fauna. Druid Wilson has postulated a facies change between the two pits (personal communication, 1958), but the distance seems insufficient to allow for so great a faunal change. More likely the new pit was not dredged deeply enough to encounter the Acline fauna.
In 1958, the U.S. Geological Survey had the "Acline fauna" pit drained and Druid Wilson with Stanley Olsen of the Florida Geological Survey, made large collections from the walls of the pit. These collections are currently being studied by Mr. Wilson at the National Museum.
Collections made by Charles Locklin from the spoil piles of the "Acline fauna" pit, and perhaps several others in the immediate vicinity, were donated to the Florida Geological Survey where, in 1958, they were studied by the writer. Seventy subspecies and species of pelecypods and 105 species and subspecies of gastropods were identified and are listed with their geologic ranges in table 8.
Casual study of this faunal list immediately discloses that the fauna is ecologically and stratigraphically mixed. Thirty-four species and subspecies are known only from the Acline fauna, 17 appear to be restricted to the Miocene, 72 are post-Miocene, 52 range from the Miocene into the younger strata, 41 are restricted to the Caloosahatchee Marl, 50 range into the Recent, and 2 species are post-Caloosahatchee.
It appears that this collection includes species from the Fort Thompson Formation, the Caloosahatchee Marl, and a facies of the Tamiami Formation. It is possible also that a fauna intennediate in age between that of the Tamiami Formation and the Caloosahatchee Marl is represented.




40 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
TABLE 8. Acline Molluscan Check List
Geologic Range
Species --A M P1 C P R
Species --- ---- -Pelecypoda
Anadara campyla (Dall) X
Anadara chiriquienais (Gabb) X
Anadara lienosa (Say) X X X X X
Anadara rustica (Tuomey and Holmes) X X
Anadara scalarina (Heilprin) X
Anadara sp. A-similar to A. improcera (Conrad) X
Anonmalocardia caloosana (Dall) X X X
Anomia simplex d'Orbigny X X X X X
Arca aquila Heilprin X
Arca wagneriana Dall X
Astarte sp. X
Bothrocorbula willcoxi (Dall) X
Cardium aclinensis Tucker and Wilson X
Cardita arata (Conrad) X X X X
Cardita tridentata (Say) X X X X X
Chama gardnerae Olsson and Harbison X X X
Chama heilprini Cossman X
Chama willcoxi Dall X
Chione cancellata (Linn6) ? X X X X
Chione cribaria Conrad X X X
Chione latilirata athleta Conrad X X X X
Chione cf. C. ulocyma Dall X
Chlamys comparilis (Tuomey and Holmes) X ? X
Chlamys irradians Lamarck X X X X
Chlamys jeffersonius Say X
Chlamys solarioides (Heilprin) X X
Chlamys sp. A. X
Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) ? X X X
Diplodonta acclinis Conrad X X X
Divaricella sp. X
Dosinia elegans Conrad X X X X X
Echinochama cornuta (Conrad) X X X X X
Eucrassatella speciosa (A. Adams) X X X X X
Glycymeris americana (Defrance) X X X X X
Hemimtis magnoliana (Dall) X
Laevicardium laevigatum wagnerianum Olsson and HIarbison? X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 41
TABLE 8. (Continued)

Species
Pelecypoda (Continued) Lucina pennsylvanica Linn6 Macrocallista sp. A (new?) Macrocallista nimbosa Solander Mercenaria campechiensis (Gmelin) Mutinia congesta (Conrad) Mulinia sapotilla Dall Mytilus conradiana d'Orbigny Noetia ponderosa (Say) Nucula proxima Say Nuculana acuta (Conrad) Ostrea meridionalis Heilprin Ostrea sculpturata Conrad Ostrea sp. A.
Ostrea tamiamiensis subsp. A Parastarte triquetra (Conrad) Pecten raveneli Dall Pedalion kecia Tucker and Wilson Phacoides disciformis (Heilprin) Phacoides radians (Conrad) Phacoides sp.
I hacoides trisulcatus (Conrad) Phacoides tuomeyi Dall Plicatula marginata Say Rangia nasuta (Dall) Semele bellastriata Conrad Tellidora lunulata Holmes Tellina cf. T. dinomera Dall Tellina cf. T. sayi Deshayes Tellina sp.
Trachycardium muricatum (Linnd) Trachycardium oedalium (Dall) Transennella sp. Trigonocardia columba (Heilprin)

Geologic Range
A I M [ PI C P I R

x ? X
X X

Varicorbula caloosae (Dall) X I

x I x

X
X
x
X
X
X

x x x x x x

x x X X X X

X
x
x
x
x




42 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
TABLE 8. (Continued)
Geologic Range
Species
A M PI C P R
Gastropoda
Anachis caloosaensis (Dall) X
Architectonica nobilis Rbding X X X X X
Astraea scolopax Olsson and Harbison X
Bulla occidentalis Adams ? X X X
Bulla striata Brugiere ? X
Busycon contrarium (Conrad) X X X X X
Busycon echinatum (Dall) X
Busycon planulatum (Dall) X
Busycon pyrumn floridanum Olsson and Harbison X
Busycon rapum (Heilprin) X
Cancellaria sp. A X
Cancellaria tabulata Gardner and Aldrich X
Cancellaria venusta Tuomey and Holmes X X
Cantharus clarklrillensis (Mansfield) X
Cantharus multangulata (Philippi) X X ? X
Cantharus perplexus Olsson and Harbison X
Cerithium caloosaense Dall X
Cerithium coccodcs Dall X
Cerithium vicinia Olsson and Harbison X
Clathrodrillia ebinina (Dall) X X
Clathrodrillia perspirata (Dall) ? X
Colubraria lanceolata aclinica Tucker and Wilson X
? Columbella sp. A X
Conus adversarius Conrad X X X
Conus ef. C. daucus Hwass X X X
Conus floridanus Gabb X ? X X X
Conus spuroides Olsson and Harbison X
Conus waccamawcnsis B. Smith X X X
Conus waccamawensis subsp. A new ? X
Crcepidula aculeata Gmelin X X X X X
Crepidula fornicata Say X X X X X
Crepidula plana Say X X X X X
Crucibulum auriculum Gmelin X X X
Crucibulum cf. C. imbricatum (Sowerby) X X
Crucibulum multilineatum (Conrad) X X
Crucibulum spinosum Sowerby ?
"Cythara" sp. A X
Cimatosyrinx lunata (Lea) X X X




NEOGENE SITRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 48 TABLE 8. (Continued)

Species
Gastropoda (Continued)

A

Cymatoyrinx lunata aclinica Tucker and Wilson X
Cymatosyrinx sp. A X
Cypraea carolinensis floridana Mansfield ? Dorsanum plicatile (Bdse) Fasciolaria apicina Dall Fasciolaria distans Linn4 Fasciolaria gigantea Kiener Fasciolaria scalarina Heilprin Fusinus caloosaensis Heilprin Fusinus caloosaensis subsp. A X
Hanetia mengeana (Dall) Hanetia vaughani aclinensi (Tucker and Wilson) X
Helisoma conanta (Dall) Lemintina sp. X
Margenella apicina Menke Marginella eulima Dall Marginella mansfieldi (Tucker and Wilson) X
Marginella pardalis Dall Marginella precursor Dall Marginella sp. A X
Melongena corona Gmelin Mitra heilprini saginata Tucker and Wilson X
Modulus carchedonius (Lamarck) Murex macgintyi M. Smith Murcx pomum Gmelin Murex recurvirostris rubidis F. C. Baker Murex salleanus A. Adams Nassarius ribex (Say) Natica canrena (Linnd) M6rch Natica guppyana Toula Oliva sayana Ravenel Oliva sayana immortua Pilsbry and Brown

Oliva sp.
Pyrazus scalatus (Heilprin) Pyrazus scalatus subsp. A Petaloconchus sculpturatus H. C. Lea Physa meigsi Dall Polynices duplicatus Say

Geologic Range M Pl C

X
X

X

X
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

________1----

X X X X X

P R

x ?x
x
x
X
x
x
x

I-]- - -

X
X
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
X
X
X
X
X
x
X




44 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
TABLE 8. (Continued)
Geologic Range
Species
A M Pl C P R
Gastropoda (Continued)
Polynices cf. P. duplicatus Say X X X X X
Polynices subclausa Sowerby X
? Pseudosalpinx sp. A X
Rhinoclavis caloosaensis (Dall) X
Rhinoclavis sp. X
,Scaphella flioridana Heilprin X
Sedilia sp. A X
Strombus alatus Gmelin X ? X X X
Tegula fasciatum (Born) X
Terebra dislocata Say X X X X X
Terebra sp. A X
Terebra sp. C X
Terebra unilineata Conrad X
Terebra unilineata subsp. A X
Trophon lepidota (Dall) X
Turbo rhectogrammicus Dall X
Turritella apicalis Heilprin X
Turritella cookei gladeansis Mansfield X
Turritella pontoni Mansfield X
Turritella pontoni subsp. A new? X
Turritella n. sp. A ? X
Turritella subannulata subsp. A X
Turritella ef. T. wagneriana Olsson and Harbison X
Urosalpinx subsidus Dall X
Vermicularia recta Olsson and Harbison X
Viviparus georgianus (Lea) X X X
Xancus scolymoides Dall X
Kenophora conchyliophora Born X ? X
A -Known only from Acline (age in doubt)
M-Miocene
PIl-Pliocene (includes Waccamaw and Croatan formations)
C -Caloosahatchee Marl
P -Pleistocene (other than Caloosahatchee Marl)
R -Recent




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 45
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Bandy, 0. L.
1954 Distribution of some shallow water Foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico:
U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 254-F, p. 125-140, 4 pIs.
1956 Ecology of Foraminifera in northeastern Gulf of Mexico: U. S. Geol.
Survey Prof. Paper 274-G, p. 179-204, 3 pls. Clapp, F. G. (See Matson, G. C.) Cole, W. S.
1931 The Pliocene and Pleistocene Foraminifera of Florida: Florida Geol.
Survey Bull. 6, 76 p.
Cooke, C. W. (See also Parker, G. G.)
1945 Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 29, 339 p. Dal], W. H. (See also Harris, H. G.)
1890- Contributions to the Tertiary fauna of Florida with special reference to 1903 the Miocene silex beds of Tampa and the Pliocene beds of the Caloosahatchee River: Wagner Free Inst. Sci. Trans., v. 3, 6 pts., 1654 p.
1892 (and Harris, H. G.) Correlation papers-Neocene: U. S. Geol. Survey
Bull. 84, 349 p.
DuBar, J. R.
1958a Age and stratigraphic relationship of the Caloosahatchee Marl of Florida:
Illinois Acad. Sci. Trans., v. 50, p. 187-193.
1958b Neogene stratigraphy of southwestern Florida: Gulf Coast Assoc. Geol.
Soc. Trans., v. 7, p. 129-155.
1958c Stratigraphy and paleontology of the late Neogene strata of the Caloosahatchee River area of southern Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 40,
267 p.
1959 The Waccamaw and Croatan deposits of the Carolinas: Geologic Notes,
v. 3, no. 6, 9 p.
Gould, H. R.
1955 (and Stewart, R. H.) Continental terrace sediments in northeastern Gulf
of Mexico; (in Finding ancient shorelines): Soc. Econ. Paleontologists
and Mineralogists, Spec. Pub. No. 3, p. 2-19. Harbison, Anne (See Olsson, A. A.) Hoy, N. D. (See Schroeder, M. C.) Hulings, N. C.
1955 An investigation of the benthic invertebrate fauna from the shallow
waters of the Texas coast: Masters Thesis, Texas Christian University,
52 p.
Johnsonia
1941- Monographs of the marine mollusks of the western Atlantic, v. 1-3.
1959
Klein, H. (See Schroeder, M. C.) Kornfeld, M. M.
1931 Recent littoral Foraminifera from Texas and Louisiana: Stanford Univ.
Dept. Geol. Contr., v. 1, no. 3. Ladd, H. S.
1951 Brackish water and marine assemblages of the Texas coast, with special
reference to mollusks: Inst. Marine Sci., v. 2, no. 1, p. 129-163. Lankford, R. R.
1959 Distribution and ecology of Foraminifera from east Mississippi Delta
margin: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 43, no. 9, p. 2068-2099,
11 fig., 3 pls.




46 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Lowman, S. W.
1949 Sedimentary facies in Gulf coast: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull.
v. 33, no. 12, p. 1939-1997. MacNeil, F. S.
1950 Pleistocene shorelines in Florida and Georgia: U. S. Ceol. Survey Prof.
Paper 221-F, p. 91-107. Mansfield, W. C.
1939 Notes on the upper Tertiary and Pleistocene mollusks of peninsular Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 18, 75 p. Matson, G. C.
1909 (and Clapp, F. G.) A preliminary report on the geology of Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey 2d Ann. Rept., p. 28-231. Moore, D. G. (See Shepard, F. P.) Olsson, A. A.
1953 (and Harbison, Anne) Pliocene Mollusca of southern Florida: Acad.
Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, mon. 8, 457 p. Parker, F. L. (See also Phleger, F. B.)
1953 (and Phleger, F. B., and Pierson, J. F.) Ecology of Foraminifera from
San Antonio Bay and environs, southwest Texas: Cushman Lab. Foram.
Research Contr., Spec. Pub. 2, 75 p. Parker, G. G.
1944 (and Cooke, C. W.) Late Cenozoic geology of southern Florida with
a discussion of the ground water: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 27, 119 p.
1955 (and others) Water resources of southeastern Florida with special reference to the geology and ground water of the Miami area: U. S. Geol.
Survey Water-Supply Paper 1255, 963 p. Parker, R. H.
1956 Macro-invertebrate assemblages as indicators of sedimentary environments
in east Mississippi Delta: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 40,
no. 2, p. 295-376.
1959 Macro-invertebrate assemblages of central Texas coastal bays and Laguna
Madre: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 43, no. 9, p. 21002166.
Phleger, F. B. (See also Parker, F. L.)
1951 Gulf of Mexico Foraminifera, Part I; Foraminifera distribution: Geol.
Soc. America, mem. 46.
1951 (and Parker, F. L.) Gulf of Mexico Foraminifera, Part II; Foraminifera
species: Geol. Soc. America, mem. 46.
1954 Ecology of the Foraminifera and associated microorganisms from Mississippi Sound and environs: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull.,
v. 38, no. 4, p. 584-647, 28 fig., 3 pl.
1955 Ecology of Foraminifera in southeastern Mississippi Delta area: Am.
Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 39, no. 5, p. 712-752, 40 fig. Pierson, J. F. (See Parker, F. L.) Puri, H. S.
1959 (and Vernon, R. 0.) Summary of the geology of Florida and a guidebook to the classic exposures: Florida Geol. Survey Spec. Pub. 5, 255 p. Richards, H. G.
1938 Marine Pleistocene of Florida: Geol. Soc. America Bull., v. 19, p. 12671296.
1945 Correlation of Atlantic Coastal Plain Cenozoic formations, a discussion:
Geol. Soc. America Bull., v. 56, p. 401-408.
1959 Recent studies on the Pleistocene of the South Atlantic Coastal Plain:
Southeastern Geology, v. 1, no. 1, p. 11-21.




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 47
Schroeder, M. C.
1958 (and Klein, H., and Hoy, N. D.) Biscayne aquifer of Dade and Broward
counties, Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Rept. Inv. 17, 56 p. Sellards, E. H.
1912 Soils and other surface residual materials of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey 4th Ann. Rept., 79 p.
1919 Geologic sections across the Everglades of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
12th Ann. Rept., p. 105-141. Shepard, F. P.
1955 (and Moore, D. G.) Central Texas coast sedimentation, characteristics
of sedimentary environment, recent history and diagenesis: Am. Assoc.
Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 39, no. 8, p. 1463-1593. Southeastern Geological Society
1954 Eighth field trip; carbonate deposits in South Florida, 47 p. Stewart, R. H. (See Gould, H. R.) Tucker, H. I.
1932-33 (and Wilson, Druid) Some new and otherwise interesting fossils from
the Florida Tertiary: Bull. Am. Paleontology, v. 18, p. 39-82. Vernon, R. 0. (See Puri, H. S.) Wilson, Druid (See Tucker, H. I.)







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

APPENDIX
STRATIGRAPHIC SECTIONS
Station SC-1. NENE4SW/'i see. 29, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured in Karnes Shell Corporation pit approximately 20 yards west of Shell Creek. Color symbols (10 yr 5/4) refer to National Research Council, Rock Color Chart.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
4 Sand, quartz (99 percent), fine to medium, subangular to angular,
clear, largest grains rounded and slightly frosted, unconsolidated,
well sorted, white; no fossils observed ........................ 3.0
3c Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, 1-3 percent coarse grains well
rounded, very slightly consolidated, fairly well sorted, moderate
yellowish brown (10 yr 5/4); no fossils observed ............... 2.8
Sb Sand, quartz, medium, subangular to subrounded, clear, slightly
consolidated, pale, yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); no fossils observed .................................................. 5.0
3a Sand, quartz, medium, subangular, clear, coarse grains subrounded
frosted, slightly consolidated, dark yellowish brown (10 yr 4/2);
stained black; no fossils observed .......................... 0.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
2 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains medium, subangular to
subrounded, clear, slightly consolidated, very pale orange (10 yr 8/2); very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved, white,
forams common, ostracodes rare ............................. 9.7
Unit E
1 Limestone (collected from spoil pile, apparently underlies bed 1,
but not exposed) marine, sandy, dense, hard, gray (N8) when fresh, yellowish brown when weathered; insoluble residue 49.0 percent by weight, quartz sand, fine to medium, some grains slightly frosted, subangular to subrounded, clay 10 percent (est.);
very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved ............ 1.0
Station SC-2. SWSW34NW, sec. 29, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured in Karnes Shell Corporation pit approximately S0 yards south of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
6 Sand, quartz, fine to medium, subangular to subrounded, clear,
well sorted, unconsolidated, white; no fossils observed .......... 2.0
5b Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, clear, largest grains frosted,
well sorted, slightly consolidated, dark yellowish orange (10 yr
6/6); no fossils observed .................................. 2.0
5a Sand, quartz, fine to medium, subangular to subrounded, clear,
largest grains frosted, well sorted, slightly consolidated, very pale
orange, (10 yr 8/2); no fossils observed ...................... 7.0




50 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
4 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains medium, subangular to
subrounded, clear, largest grains frosted, fine, rounded black phosphate grains, grayish orange (10 yr 7/4); very fossiliferous,
well preserved, white, mollusks abundant ..................... 4.0
3 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz, subangular, clear, largest grains
rounded and frosted, well sorted, slightly consolidated, very light gray (5 yr N8); very fossiliferous, well preserved, white, mollusks abundant, echinoid spines common, forams common including
Elphidium sp ............................................ 5.0
Unit E
2 Limestone, marine, sandy, hard, compact, medium blue-gray (5B
5/1); very fossiliferous, well preserved, random orientation, gray to white, little breakage, insoluble residue 48.3 percent by weight, 90-95 percent sand, mostly subangular to subrounded quartz, small percentage black rounded phosphate (I percent), clay 5-8
percent ................................................. 1.0
Unit D
1 Marl, sandy, quartz, fine to medium with 1-3 percent coarse grains,
all subrounded to rounded, slightly frosted, calcareous, some small aragonite (?) crystals, slightly consolidated, very light gray (5 yr N8) to very pale orange (10 yr 8/2); mollusks abundant, well preserved, ostracodes rare (collected beneath water from floor or
pit) .................................................... ??
Station SC-3. NWiiNE3,SEii sec. 30, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured in Karnes Shell Corporation pit, 10 yards south of the bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, fine to medium, subangular to subrounded, clear,
well sorted, unconsolidated, white; no fossils observed .......... 3.1
2c Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, clear, largest grains frosted,
fairly well sorted, silt (5 percent), slightly consolidated, light
brown (5 yr 5/6); no fossils observed ........................ 1.7
2b Sand, quartz, medium, subangular, clear, largest grains subrounded and frosted, well sorted, slightly more consolidated than
2c, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); no fossils observed ........ 5.0
2a Sand, quartz, medium, angular to subangular, clear, largest grains
subrounded and frosted, well sorted, moderately consolidated, pale
yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); no fossils observed .............. 0.4
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
lb Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz (95-98 percent) medium, subrounded, clear, largest grains rounded and frosted, well sorted,




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 51
moderately consolidated, few fine black, rounded phosphate grains, grayish orange (10 yr 7/4); very fossiliferous, well preserved, while mollusks abundant, forams rare, ostracodes rare, and echinoid spines rare to common ................................ 4.8
la Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz (95-98 percent) medium, subangular to subrounded, clear, largest grains rounded and frosted, 1-2 percent fine rounded black phosphate, well sorted, slightly consolidated, ivory light gray (5 yr N8); very fossiliferous, well preserved, white mollusks abundant, echinoid spines and forams
rare (probably equivalent to limestone below) ................ 5.0
Station SC-4. NEiNE,SW4 sec. 30, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section on right bank of Shell Creek.
The upper limestone of the Caloosahatchee Marl overlies the
middle marl. No collections were made here.
Station SC-5. SW, 4 NESW% sec. 30, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on right bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Covered
3 Sand ................................................... 12.7
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit E
2 Limestone, marine, sandy, hard, lightly porous, light gray to white
on fresh surface (N8, N9), yellowish gray (5Y 8/1) to dark yellowish orange (10 yr 6/6) when weathered; very fossiliferous, well preserved, white, mollusks common. Insoluble residue 44.1 percent by weight, quartz sand 98 percent; fine, subangular, clear,
clay 2 percent; well sorted ................................. 1.8
Unit D
1 Shell marl, marine, calcareous, sandy, quartz, medium, subangular
to subrounded, clear, few small aragonite (?) nodules, occasional fine, black phosphate grains, well sorted, slightly consolidated, grayish orange (10 yr 7/4); very fossiliferous, well preserved, white to gray, mollusks abundant, forams and ostracodes rare,
echinoid spines fairly common .............................. 6.0
Station SC-6. SE34NWiSW,1i sec. 30, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on right bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Covered
4 Sand ................................................... 11.6
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
3 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz (96-97 percent), medium, subangular, clear, largest grains subrounded and frosted, medium black phosphate (3-4 percent), well sorted, slightly consolidated,




52 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved,
white mollusks abundant, forams rare....................... 4.5
Unit E
2 Limestone, marine, sandy, hard, dense, moderate yellowish brown
(10 yr 5/4); fossiliferous ................................... 1.8
Unit D
1 Marl, marine, calcareous, sandy, quartz grains medium, subrounded; slightly frosted, largest grains rounded and frosted, weathered muscovite flakes rare, well sorted, slightly consolidated, moderate yellowish brown (10 yr 5/4); very fossiliferous, well
preserved, white, mollusks abundant......................... 7.0
Section SC-7. SE,%NW,%NW,% sec. 28, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section on left bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
8 Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, unconsolidated, well sorted,
white; no fossils observed.................................. 0.5
2 Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, unconsolidated, well sorted,
tan; no fossils observed ................................... 5.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
1 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, medium, subrounded, largest grains
more rounded and frosted, fairly well sorted, unconsolidated, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, mollusks well
preserved and abundant, no foraminifers or ostracodes observed 3.0+
Station SC-8. NE,%SEYSEM sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on left bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
4 Sand, quartz, fine to medium, subangular, slightly indurated,
grayish orange (10 yr 7/4); no fossils observed ................ 2.0
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit F
Sc Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains medium, subangular to
subrounded, clear to slightly frosted, well sorted, few grains of blue chert, slightly consolidated, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved gastropod and pelecypod shells abundant, random orientation, no foraminifers or ostracodes
observed ................................................ 3.0
Sb Sand, marine, quartz, medium, subangular to subrounded, well
sorted, slightly consolidated, tan to red-brown, weathers brown on surface; sparsely fossiliferous, mostly Transennella conradina




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 53
well preserved........................................... 0.9
3a Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains, medium, subangular
to subrounded, smaller grains clear, larger grains frosted, 1 percent medium grained black phosphate, poorly sorted, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved, pelecypod
valves slightly lineated N 20* W ........................... 1.5
Unit E
2 Limestone, marine, hard, dense, sandy, moderate yellowish brown
(10 yr 5/4); very fossiliferous, insoluble residue 36.5 percent by weight, quartz sand fine to medium, subangular to subrounded,
slightly frosted, clay 2 to 3 percent of residue .................. 1.0
Unit D
lb Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz, grains medium, subangular to
subrounded, clear, fairly well sorted, moderately yellowish brown (10 yr 5/4); very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, foraminifers,
ostracodes and echinoid spines rare.......................... 1.5
la Marl, marine, calcareous, sandy, fine grained, subangular, clear,
medium grained black phosphate (1 percent); small 32 mm., aragonite (?) needles (2 percent), very pale orange (10 yr 8/2); very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, foraminifers and ostracodes
common ............................. ................. 3.0
Station SC-9. NEMSWESEM sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section on right bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Covered
3 Sand ................................................... 4.5
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit E
2 Limestone, sandy, hard, gray; mollusks common .............. 1.0
Unit D
1 Shell marl, calcerous, sandy, quartz medium, subrounded, coarse
quartz grains (1-2 percent) rounded, frosted, unconsolidated, fine aragonite (?) crystals (2-3 percent) fine, black phosphorite (1-2 percent), pale yellow-brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved, foraminifers, ostracodes, and
echinoid spines common................................... 4.5
Station SC-10. NW3SW3!SEi sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on right bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Covered
4 Sand ................................................... 9.0
Caloosahatchee Marl




54 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Unit D
3 Shell marl, marine, sandy, quartz grains medium, subangular to
subrounded, clear, occasional medium grained, rounded black phosphate, rare, small aragonite (?) needles; light olive gray (5 yr
6/1); mollusks abundant, well preserved, forams common ....... 3.0 Unit C
2 Limestone, marine, hard, porous, sandy, phosphate, quartz grains
fine to medium, with few large grains, small grains angular to subangular, clear, largest grains subrounded and frosted, clay 5 percent (?), white (N9) on fresh surface, strained yellow-brown, insoluble residue 16.5 percent by weight; mollusks abundant and well preserved including Arca wagneriana and Turritella
apicalis ................................................. 1.0
Unit B
1 Marl, marine, sandy, calcareous, moderately consolidated, quartz
grains fine to medium, subrounded, clear, rare, fine, black rounded phosphate grains, fairly well sorted, light olive gray (5 yr 6/1); very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved Chione cancellata and Rangia nasuta common, forams rare ................ 5.0(?)
(Hard limestone ledge observed
4-5 feet below water level.)
Station SC-11. SEiSW, sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on right bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Covered
3 Sand ................................................... 10.0
Caloosahatchee Marl
Unit A
2 Limestone, conglomeratic, sandy, shell hash in matrix; most
shells occur as molds causing limestone to be very porous; matrix yellow-brown (10 yr 8/2); on fresh surface, stained with limonite; pebbles 20-50 mm., pale yellow-brown (10 yr 6/2) containing tiny white mollusk shells, few black grains of phosphorite (1-2 mm.).
Insoluble residue 9.0 percent by weight, of which 25 percent is
sand, 75 percent clay and silt ............................ 2.5
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Marl, argillaceous, fairly well consolidated, porous, cream to
yellow-brown; fossils sparse. Insoluble residue 24.0 percent by
w eight ................................................. 6.0
Station SC-12. SWiNWliSW,4 sec. 25, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on left bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, subangular to subrounded, well sorted,




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 55
less than 5 percent phosphorite and other dark minerals unconsolidated, white (5 yr N9); no fossils observed ................ 7.5
2 Sand, quartz, medium, subangular to subrounded, fairly well
sorted, dark yellow-brown (10 yr 4/2); no fossils observed ...... 0.5 Unconformity
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Clay, sandy, calcareous, phosphatic, moderately consolidated, tan
to cream; mollusks common ................................ 3.5
Station SC-1. NW3iNW,%NW3' sec. 26, T. 40 S., R. 24 E., Cleveland quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured on left bank of Shell Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
2 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, tan to gray; no fossils
observed ............................................... 7.5
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Marl, calcareous, argillaceous, dense, well consolidated, quartz
sand, medium (2-3 percent), rounded black phosphorite grains up to 10 mm., very pale yellow-orange (10 yr 8/2); fossil fragments
white, not comm on ....................................... 4.0
Station SC-14. SEi'SEIi sec. 36, T. 40 S., R. 25 E., northwest of lake, Bermont quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida.
Station SC-14 has fauna similar to that recorded by Mansfield (1939) at Bermont and appears to be uppermost Caloosahatchee
marl.
Station D-2. NEi NE, sec. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section located on right bank of Alligator Creek approximately 150 yards downstream from the dam.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
5 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, white; no fossils observed 2.0
4 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, dark brown; no fossils
observed ............................................... 1.0
3 Sand, quartz, medium to coarse, subrounded, unconsolidated,
brown, mottled orange; no fossils observed ................... 1.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
2 Shell marl, sandy, unconsolidated, tan; fairly fossiliferous, mollusks
common, well preserved with Anomalocardia caloosana, and Parastarte triquetra most abundant ............................. 0.2
Unconformity
Miocene




56 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
1 Sand, argillaceous, quartz, coarse, phosphatic (2 percent), generally unconsolidated, but contains small (1- to 5-inch) pockets of matrix cemented firmly with CaCOo, tan to light gray (N8).
Contains Balanus concavus, and great masses of Encope tamiamiensis fragments .......................................... 3.1
Station D-3. NENE,% sec. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section is located on right bank of Alligator Creek approximately 400 yards downstream from station D-2.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, tan in lower portion, white
above; no fossils observed ................................. 5.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
2 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, medium, slightly consolidated, tan; very
fossiliferous, mollusks, abundant, including Miltha caloosaensis,
Chama gardnerae and Caryocorbula leonensis ................ 2.0
Unconformity
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Marl, argillaceous, calcareous, phosphatic, slightly consolidated,
cream to tan, grades to clay upstream; contains Ostrea sp. and
Encope tamiamiensis ...................................... 1.5
Station D-4. NWHNE,% sec. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle, Punta Gorda, Florida. Section located on left bank of Alligator Creek approximately 150 yards downstream from station D-3.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
5 Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, unconsolidated, gray to tan;
no fossils observed........................................ 8.0
4 Clay, blue, sticky; no fossils observed....................... 0.4
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
3 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, medium to coarse, subrounded, unconsolidated, moderately sorted, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); fossils abundant, well preserved, mollusks predominant, characterized by Chione cancellata, Anomalocardia caloosana, Parastarte
triquetra, and Juliacorbula scutata .......................... 1.0
2 Clay, sandy, phosphatic, unconsolidated, gray to white; mollusks
abundant and well preserved............................... 1.1
Unconformity
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Limestone, arborescent, concretionary, sandy, hard, sand grains
mostly medium, subrounded quartz, with small amount rounded,




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 57
polished phosphate very pale orange (10 yr 8/2); fossil fragm ents abundant .......................................... 1.5
Station D-5. NWINE sec. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section on right bank of Alligator Creek approximately 150 yards downstream from station D-4.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
6 Sand, quartz, medium, unconsolidated, lower 3.0 feet redbrown, gray above ........................................ 4.0
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
5 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, medium unconsolidated, tan, mostly in
solution holes in unit 4 below; mollusks present ............... 0.1
Unconformity
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
4 Limestone, marly, sandy, solution riddled, gray, mottled redorange; Encope tamiamiensis abundant, Balanus comcavus present 0.9
3 Limestone, sandy, soft, gray; contains numerous oysters .......... 0.3
2 Clay, calcareous, sandy, hard, especially near the top, white; no
fossils observed ........................................... 3.5
1 Limestone arborescent, concretionary (as Unit 1, station D-4) 1.0
Station D-6. NW3,.NW/4NE4 sec. 28, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section on right bank of Alligator Creek approximately 200 yards downstream from station D-5 and 20 yards upstream from power lines which cross the creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, unconsolidated, yellow-brown
in lower 3.4 feet, gray above ................................ 4.5
2 Clay, sticky, blue, mottled brownish orange; no fossils observed... 0.8 Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
1 Shell marl, sandy, quartz, fine to coarse, subrounded, unconsolidated, pale yellowish brown (10 yr 6/2); very fossiliferous, mollusks abundant and well preserved ........................... 2.7
Station D-7. NWOSEINE, sec. 29, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section on left bank of Alligator Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz medium, subrounded, fairly well sorted, unconsolidated, tan to gray; no fossils observed ........................ 2.0




58 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
2 Limestone, sandy, hard, dense, hummocky on surface, very light
gray (N8); no fossils observed.............................. 1.0
1 Marl, calcareous, sandy, compact, very light gray: fossils common,
especially Mercenaria campechiensis, Anadara transversa, Chione
cancellata, and Chlamys irradians .......................... 1.5
Station D-8. SEINWiiNE, sec. 26, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Cleveland quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section in drainage ditch approximately 20 feet east of the South Fork of Alligator Creek.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
3 Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, unconsolidated, brown in
lower 4 feet, gray above; no fossils observed .................. 5.5
Unconformity
Caloosahatchee Marl
2 Marl, calcareous, sandy, unconsolidated, gray to cream; very
fossiliferous, mollusks abundant, well preserved ................ 3.0
Unconformity
Miocene
Tamiami Formation
1 Sand, marly, argillaceous, phosphatic, gray; fossils common including Balanus concavus, Encope tamiamiensis, and Ostrea tamiamiensis ............................. ....................... ?
Station D-20. NEM3NW,% sec. 21, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Section measured in shell pit approximately 50 yards southwest of Taylor Street extension.
Bed Description Thickness
(feet)
Pleistocene
Fort Thompson Formation
5 Sand, quartz, medium, subangular to subrounded, clear, well
sorted, unconsolidated, white; no fossils observed............... 2.5
4 Sand, quartz, medium, subrounded, slightly frosted, rare grains of
black phosphate, well sorted, slightly consolidated, moderate yellowish brown (10 yr 5/4); no fossils observed................. 3.4
3 Shell marl marine, sandy, quartz, medium, subrounded, slightly
frosted, well sorted, slightly consolidated, very pale orange (10 yr
8/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved, white, mollusks abundant 4.8
2 Sand, marine, quartz, medium, subangular, clear, largest grains
subrounded and frosted, well sorted, slightly consolidated, moderate yellowish brown (10 yr 5/4) stained dark yellowish brown (10 yr 4/2); grades laterally to a soft plastic brown clay; fossils
rare, mostly mollusks, white, well preserved................... 0.5
1 Shell marl, sandy, quartz (99 percent), medium, subrounded,
clear, medium black phosphate (1 percent), well sorted, slightly consolidated, very pale orange (10 yr 8/2); very fossiliferous, well preserved, white mollusks abundant, forams rare, colonial
corals common in lower part ................................ 4.0




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 59
Station D-21. NW3, sec. 32, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida.
Collections were made from spoil piles along a new pit. The matrix is a phosphatic unconsolidated quartz sand containing abundant specimens of Encope tamiamiensis, Balanus concavus, and
Ostrea disparilis. This is the Tamiami Formation.
Station D-22. SWSWM sec. 33, T. 41 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Exposure in east-west pit on new gravel road just east of State Highway 765.
Collections made from spoil piles. Matrix is a yellowish brown arenaceous clay containing numerous small (2.0-3.0 inches) chert nodules. The fauna is comprised predominantly of specimens of Ostrea tamiamiensis, Ostrea disparilis, Anadara sp., and Balanus
sp. This is the Tamiami Formation.
Station D-23. NE,%NENEK sec. 8, on section corners 8, 4, and 9, T. 42 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Exposure in drainage canal on west side of road.
Collections were made from the bottom of a drainage canal. The matrix is a mixture of unconsolidated tan quartz sand and shells overlain by about 4 feet of unfossiliferous tan quartz sand. The fauna collected included Mercenaria campechiensis and Chione cancellata. Apparently this bed represents the Fort Thompson Formation.
Station D-24. NEMNEM sec. 30, T. 42 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Exposure in borrow pit 0.2 mile west of State Highway 765.
Collections were made from rather old spoil piles arranged along the edges of a borrow pit. Valves of the Tamiami oyster Ostrea disparilis were found scattered over the surface of the piles. In addition, large blocks of a dense, gray limestone were scattered around the area. These limestone blocks contained valves of Miltha caloosaensis, Pecten raveneli and Chlamys fuscopurpureus, colonies of Vermicularia and numerous bone fragments and
teeth of the Pleistocene horse Equus (Equus) leidyi.
Apparently at this locality the Tamiami Formation is overlain by
the Caloosahatchee Marl here represented by a limestone.
Station D-25. NWMSEX sec. 19, T. 42 S., R. 23 E., Punta Gorda SE quadrangle, Charlotte County, Florida. Exposures in marinas at Pirate's Cove approximately 0.6 mile west of State Highway 765.
Collections were made from spoil piles. The matrix consists of a tan, sandy, calcareous clay containing numerous specimens of
Ostrea disparilis and Ostrea tamiamiensis.




60 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
MEGAFOSSIL CHECK LIST, CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA, FLORIDA
(T, Tamiami Formation; B through F, units of the Caloosahatchee Marl on Shell Creek; X, identified from Locklin Shell Creek collection; L, reported from literature; Al, Caloosahatchee Marl on Alligator Creek; A2, Fort Thompson Formation; M, Frank Burns collection U.S. National Museum.)
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M Pelecypoda
Abra aequalis (Say) X X X X
Aligena aequata Conrad X
Amusium mortoni (Ravenel) X X X X X
Anadara ef. A. campyla (Dall) X X X X
Anadara catasarea (Dall) X X
Anadara improcera (Conrad) X X X X X
Anadara ef. A. improcera (Conrad) X X
Anadara lienosa (Say) X X X X X X X
Anadara megerata Olsson and Harbison X X X
Anadara milifila (Dall) X
Anadara plicatura (Conrad) X
Anadara reticulata (Grnelin) X
Anadara rustica (Tuoinmey and Holmes) X X X X X X
Anadara scalarina (Heilprin) X X X
Anadara sp. a X X
Anadara sp. b X
Anadara sp. c X
Anadara transversa (Say) X X X
Anadonlia alba Link X X X X
Anadontia sp. X
Anisodonta americana Dall X X X
Anomalocardia caloosana (Dall) X X X X X X X
Anomalocardia sp. a X
Anomia simplex d'Orbigny X X X X X X X X
Anligona rugatina (Hleilprin) X X
Arca aquila Heilprin X
Arca caloosahatchiensis Sheldon X
Arca wagneriana Dall X X X X X X X
? Astarte undulata deltoidea Gardner X
Atrina caloosaensis (Dall) X X X
Barbatia irregularis I)all X X X X
Barbatia taeniata (Dall) X X X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 61
Distribution
Species
T B C D E L X Al A2 M
Pelecypoda (Continued)
Bornia cf. B. Bladenensis Gardner X
Bornia lioica D)all X X
Bornia lota Dall X
Bornia triangula Dall X X
Bothrocorbula willcoxi (Dall) X X X X
Brachiodontes exustus (Linn6) X x X X
Brachiodontes venustus Olsson and Harbison X
Cardita arata (Conrad) X x X X X X X
Cardita catharia Dall? X
Cardita floridana Conrad X x X X X
Cardita perplana (Conrad) X X X
Cardita perplana abbreviata Conrad X X
Cardita tridentata (Say) X X X X X
Cardita sp. X
Caryocorbula barrattiana C. B. Adams
Caryocorbula leonensis Mansficd X X x X X X
Chama caloosana Dall X x X X X
Chama gardnerae Olsson and Hlarbison X X x x X X X X
Chama heilprini Cossmann X
Chama sp. X
Chama wilroxii Dall x X X X
Chione cancellata (Linnd) x X X X X X X X X
Chione grus (Holnes) X X x x x X X
Chione latilirata athleta (Conrad) x x X X X
Chione morsitans Olsson and Harbison x X
Chione n. sp. a ? x
Chione sp. a x
Chlamys anteamplicostatus (Mansfield) x X X X X
Chlamys buckinghamensis Mansfield X
Chlamys caloosaensis (D)all) x x X
Chlamys cf. C. comparilis (Tuomey and Holmnes) X
Chlamys fuscopurpureus (Conrad) X x x X X
Chlamys irradians (Lamarck) ix X X
Chlamys irremotis Olsson and Harbison X
Chlamys nodosus (Linn6) ? x x
Chlamys solarioides (Heilprin) x X X X X
Chlamys spp. x X X X
Codakia costata d'Orbigny x x




62 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M Pelecypoda (Continued)
Codakia orbicularis Linn6 X X X X X
Codakia opeciosa Rogers X X X
Codakia sp. X
Cooperella carpenteri Dall X
Coralliophaga coraliophaga Gmelin X
Crassinella acuta (Dall) X X X X X X
Crassinella dupliniana (Dall) X X
Crassinella lunulata (Conrad) X X X X X
Crassostrca virginica (Gmelin) X X X
Crenella divaricata (d'Orbigny) X X X X
Cumingia amydra Olsson and Harbison X X X
Cumingia coarctata Sowerby X X
Cuspidaria mansfieldi Olsson and Harbison X
Cuspidaria ornatissim d'Orbigny X
Cyathodonta semirugosa Reeves X
Cyclinella tenuis Recluz X
Dinocardium robustum (Solander) X X X X
Diplodonta capuloides Gabb X
Diplodonta acclinus Conrad X X
Diplodonta semiaspera Philippi X
Diplodonta soror C. B. Adams X
Divaricella compsa Dall X X X X X X
Divaricella sp. X
Donax fossor Say X
Dosinia discus Reeve X X
Dosinia elegans Conrad X X X X X X
Echinochama cornuta (Conrad) X X X X X X X
Ensitellops elongata Olsson and Harbison X
Ensitellops sp. a X
Ensitellops sp. X
Ervilia polita Dall X X X
? Ervilia sp. X
Erycina carolinensis Dall X
Erycina kurtzi Dall X
Erycina phaseola Olsson and Harbison X
Erycina protracta Dall X
Eucrassatella speciosa (A. Adams) X X X X X
Fabella dalli Olsson and Harbison X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 63
Distribution
Species ..
T B C ) E F L X Al A2 M Pelecypoda (Continued)
Iossularca adamsi (Dall) X X X X X X X X
Gemma magna floridana Olason and Harbison X X
Glycymeris americana Defrance X
Glycymeris arata floridana Olsson and lHarbison X X X X X
Glycymeris pectinata (Gmelin) X X
Gouldia cf. G. cerina C. B. Adams X X
Gouldia floridana Oleson and Harbison ? X
Gouldia metastriatum Conrad ? X X
Gouldia sp. X
Hiatella arctica (Linn6) X
? Hindsiella sp. X
Hyalina arenacea Deshayes X
Isognomon alata bicolor (C. B. Adams) X X X
Juliacorbula scu/ata (Gardner) X X X
Labiosa lineata Say X
Labiosa plicatella (Lamarck) X
Laevicardium laevigatum wagnerianum
Olsson and Harbison X X X X
Laericardium mortoni Conrad X X X X X
Lima caloosana Dall X
Lima scabra (Born) X X
Lima sp. X
Lithophaga sp. ? X
Lucina pennsylvanica Linn6 X X X X X
Macoma sp. a X
Macoma tenta Say X
Macrocallista maculata (Linn6) X X X X
Macrocallista nimbosa (Solander) X X X X
Mactrafragilis Gmelin X X
Mercenaria campechiensis (Gmelin) X X X X X X X
Mercenaria rileyi Conrad X
Mercenaria tridacnoides (Lamarck) X X
Miltha caloosaensis (Dall) X X X X X
? Modiolus cf. M. americanus Leach X
Modiolus ducateli Conrad X
Montacuta floridana Dall X
Montacula petropolitana Dall X
Mulinia caloosaensis Dall X X




64 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M Pelecypoda (Continued)
Mulinia lateralis Say X X X X X X X
Mulinia sapotilla Dall X X X X X
Mulinia undula ])all X X
Musculus lateralis Say ? X
Mysella planulata Stimpson X
Mytilopsis lamellata Dall X
Noetia limula Conrad X X
Noetia platyura Dall X X X X X
Noetia ponderosa (Say) X
Nucula proxima Say X X X X X X X X
Nuculana acuta (Conrad) X X X X X X X
Nuculana sp. smooth form X
Ostrea disparilis Conrad X
Ostrea meridionalis Heilprin X
Ostrea sculpturata Conrad X X X X X X
Ostreoa sp. X
Pandora arenosa Conrad X
Pandora cf. P. crassidens Conrad X
Pandora sp. a new? X
Panope floridana Heilprin X X X X
Papyridea semisculcata Gray X
Papyridea spinosum spinosum Meuschen X
Papyridea spinosum turtoni Dall ? X X
Papyridea sulcata Gray X
Parastarte triquetra (Conrad) X X X X X X X
Pecten ziczac Linnd X
Phacoides amabilis (Dall) X X X
Phacoides anadonta (Say) X X X X X
Phacoides disciformis (Heilprin) X X
Phacoides multilineatus (Tuomey and Hoines) X X X X X X X X
Phacoides multilineatus subsp. a X
Phacoides nassula caloosana Dall X X X X X X
Phacoides pectinatus (Gmelin) X
Phacoides radians Conrad X X X X X X
Phacoides trisulcatus (Dall) X X X
Phacoides waccamawensis Dall X X X X X X X X
Pitar opisthogrammata (Dall) X X X
Pitar ef. P1'. sayana (Conrad) X X X X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA

Species
T B
Pelecypoda (Continued) Pleurodesma floridana Dall Plicatula marginata Say Plicatula sp. a new ? Pseudocyrena dupliniana (Dall) Pseudocyrena floridana (Conrad) Ptieria colymbus (Bolton) Rangia cuneata Gray Rangia nasuta (Dall) X
Rocellaria hians (Spengler) Rupellaria typica (Jonas) Saxicava arctica Linni Semele bellastriata Conrad Semele leana Dall Semele perlamellosa Heilprin Semele purpurascens Grmelin Solecurtus cumingiana (Dunker) Sphenia cf. S. attenuata Dall Spondylus rotundatus Heilprin Sportella constricta (Conrad) Sportella protexta Conrad Strigilla flexuosa (Say) Tagelus divisus (Spengler) Taxocardia floridana Olason and Harbison Tellidora lunulata Holmes Tellidora cristata Recluz Tellina ef. T. agilis Stimpson Tellina aequistriata Say Tellina alternata Say Tellina calligypla Dall Tellina caloosana Dall Tellina decliis Conrad Tellina dinomera Dall Tellina mexicana Petit Tellina sayi (Deshayes) Tellina similis Sowerby Tellina strictolineata Olsson and Harbison Tellina suberis Dall Tellisa sp. a

Distribution CDEF L
x
x x x

x I x

X A1




66 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

Species
Pelecypoda (Continued) Tellina sp. b
Tellina sp. c
Tellina sp. d
Tellina sp. f
Tellina spp.
Tellina tampaensis Conrad Tellina tayloriana Sowerby Thyasira trisinuata d'Orbigny Trachycardium dalli (Heilprin) Trachycardium egmontianum (Shuttleworth) Trachycardium emmonsi (Dall) Trachycardium isocardia (Conrad) Trachycardium cf. T. muricatum (Linnd) Trachycardium oedalium (Dall) Trachycardium sp. Transennella caloosana Dall Transennella conradina (Dall) Transennella sp. a new ? Trigoniocardia columba (Heilprin) Trigoniocardia willcoxi (Dall) Varicorbula caloosae (Dall)

T B I C

Distribution D E FL
X
X

X

X X

Verticordia emmonsi Dall X
Gastropoda
Acmea punctulata Gminelin X
Acmaea sp. a new ? X
Acteon punctostriatus (C. B. Adams) X X X
Adeorbis concava H. C. Lea X
Adeorbis exacua Conrad X
Adeorbia supranitidus Wood X
Aerotrema sp. x
Aesopus cf. A. stearnsi Tyron x
Alabina adamsi (Dall) X X X X X X
Alabina cerithidioides (Dall) X X X X X
Alabina sp. a X
? Alvania sp. X
Amnicola floridana convexa Pilsbry X x
Amnicola lerodes Pilsbry X X

X A A2

X X

m




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 67
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M Gastropoda (Continued)
Amnicola omphalotropis Pilsbry X
Ampullaria hopetonensis Lea X
Anachis avara amydra Dall X X
Anachis caloosaensis (Dall) X X X X X
Anachis camax Dall X X X
Anachis cf. A. camax Dall X X
Anachis clewiistonensis M. Smith ? X
Anachis fenestrata (C. B. Adams) X
Anachis gardnerae Olsson and Harbison X X X X
Anachis gardnerae escarinata
Olsson and Harbison X X X
Anachis sp. X
Anticlimax annae Pilsbry and Olsson X
Anticlimax calliglypta (Dall) X X
Anticlimax locklini Pilsbry and Olsson X
Anticlimax sp. a new ? X
Arene gemma (Tuomey and Holmes) X X
Arene sp. a X
Arene sp. b X
Arene tricarinata (Stearns) X
Aspecla engonata (Dall) X X X X
Aspella senex Dall X X X
Assiminea afjinis d'Orbigny X X
Assiminea auberiana d'Orbigny X X
Astraea longispina (Lamarek) X
Astrea precursor Dall X X X
Astyris lunata Say X
Astyris fusiformis d'Orbigny X X
Astyria multilineata Dall X
Astyris profundi Dall X X
Aotyris profundi minor Dall X X
Astyris profundi permagna Dall X
Atys obscuratus Dall X X
Atya sandersoni Dall X X X
Atys subscuratus subsp. a X
Ayrgocythara sp. a new ? X
Bailya intricatus (Dall) X
Bailya roycei (Smith) X




68 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2M
Gastropoda (Continued)
Bartschella cf. B. parkeri Bartsch X
Bittium podagrinum Dall X X X X
Bittium sp. a X
Bittium varium Pfeiffer X X X X X
"Bittium" sp. X X
Brachycythara sp. a new ? X X
Brachycythara terminula (Dall) X X
Bulla occidentalis Adams X X X
Bulla cf. B. occidentalis Adams X
? Bulla sp. juvenile ? X
Bulla striata Brugidre X X X X
Bulla striate attenuata Dall X
Busycon contrarium (Conrad) X X X X X X
Busycon echinatum (Dall) X X
Busycon maximum Conrad X
Busycon planulatum (Dall) X X X
Busycon pyrum (Dillwyn) X X X X
Busycon pyrum floridanum Olsson and Harbison X X X
Busycon rapum (Heilprin) X X X
Busycon sp. X X
Bythinella nickliniana attenuata Haldeman X X
Caecum cf. C. cinctum Olsson and Harbison X X
Caecum cooperi S. Smith X X
Caecum cornellum Dall X X X X
Caecum cf. C. flemingi Gardner and Aldrich X
Caecum floridanum Stimpson X X X X
Caecum floridanum subsp. ? X X X
Caecum imbricatum Carpenter X X X X
Caecum imbricatum subsp. b new ? X X
Caecum imbricatum subsp. ? X X
Caecum n. sp. a ? nude form X
Caecum n. sp. b ? X
Caecum regulare Carpenter X X X X X
Caecum sp. X
Caecum tortile Dall ? X
Calliostoma euconulum Olsson and Harbison X
Calliostoma jujubinum Gmelin X X
Calliostoma prejujubinum Olsson and Harbison X X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 69
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X A1 A2 M
Gastropoda (Continued)
Calliostoma roseolum permagnum Dall X X
Calliostoma seminolum Olason and Harbison X X X
Calliostoma n. sp. a ? X
Calliostoma sp. b X
Colliostoma spp. X X X
Calliostoma willcoxianum Dall X X X X
Calodisunlus retiferus (Dall) X X X
Calyptraea centralis (Conrad) ? X X
? Campsodrillia sp. a X
Cancellaria conradiana Dall X X X X X X
Cancellaria venusta Tuomey and Hohnes X X
Canth arus floridana (Conrad) X X
Cantharus floridana attenuata (Dall) X
Cantharus multangulata (Philippi) X X X
Cantharus n. sp. a X
Cantharus perplexus Olsson and Harbison X X X X X
? Cantharus sp. a X
Cantharus sp. b X
? Cantharus sp. X
Cerithidea pliculosa (Menke) X
Cerithidea turrita Stearns X
Cerithiopsis brassiea Olsson and Harbison X
Cerithiopsis dauca Olsson and Harbison X
Cecrithiopsis emersoni persubulata Gardner X X X
Cerithiopsis floridana Dall X
Cerithiopsis greeni C. B. Adams X
Cerithiopsiis modesta Adams X
Cerithiopsis scaliphus l)all X
Cerithiopsis sp. a X
Cerithiopsis sp. d X
Cerithium algicola C. B. Adams ? X
Cerithium callisoma D)all X
Cerithium caloosaene Dall X X X X X
Cerithium caloosaensis heilprini Dall X
Cerithium coccodes Dall X X
Cerithium floridanum M6rch X X
Cerithium glaphrea Dall X
Cerithium litharium Dall X X X X X




70 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Distribution
Species
T B C 1) E F L X Al A2 M Gastropoda (Continued)
Cerithium muscarum Say X X
Cerithium spp. X X
Cerithium of. C. preatratum Olsson and Harbison X
Cerithium sp. X X
Cerithium sp. a x
Cerithium triticium Olsson and Harbison X
Cerithium ricinia Olsson and Harbison X X
Cerodrillia perpolita (Dall) X X
Cerodrillia simpsoni (Dall) X X
Cerodrillia simpsoni recticostata Fargo X
? Cerodrillia sp. X
Cheilea equestris Linnd X
? Cheilea sp. X X
Chrysallida of. C. locklini Bartsch X
Chrysallida macneili Bartsch X
Clathrodrillia acurugata (Dall) X
Clathrodrillia ebinina (Dall) X X X
Clathrodrillia ostrearum (Stearns) X X X X
Clathrodrillia ostrearum abundans (Dall) X
Clathrus antillarum (deBoury) X
Clathrus rupicolum (Kurtz) X
Clathrus sp. X X
Cochliolepsis holmesi Dall X
Cochliolepsis sp. a X
? Cochliolepsis sp. X
Cochliolepsis striata Dall X X
Colubraria lanceolata Menke X X X
Colubraria lanceolata aclinica Tucker and Wilson X X
Columbella cosmia Dall X X
Columbella rusticoidea Heilprin X
Compsodrillia ef. C. aphanitoma (Dall) X
Compsodrillia drewi pinellas Fargo X
Compsodrillia pylonia Fargo X
Conus adversarius Conrad X X X
Conus daucus Linn6 ? X X X
Conus floridanus Gabb X X X X X
Conus pealii Green X X
Conus pygmaeus Reeve X X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 71
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M Gastropoda (Continued)
Conus stearnsi Conrad X X X X X
Crassispira perrugata (Dall) X
Crepidula aculeala Gmelin X X X X X X X X
Crepidula aesop Dall X X X
Crepidula convexa Say X
Crepidula fornicata Say X X
Crepidula maculosa Conrad X X X X X X
Crepidula plana Say X X X X
Crepidula rhyssema Olsson and Harbison X
Crucibulum auriculum Gminelin X X X X X X X X
Crucibulum costataum Say X X X
Crucibulum imbricatum (Sowerby) X
Crucibulum spinosum Sowerby X X
Crucibulum sp. X X
Cryoturris cf. C. serta Fargo X
Cyclotremiscus bartschi (Mansfield) X X
Cyclotremiscus beaui bicarinata (Guppy) X
Cyclotremiscus fargoi Olsson and Harbison X
Cyclotremiscus gunteri (Mansfield) X X
Cyclotremiscus olssoni Olsson and Harbison X X
Cylichnella sp. a new ? X X
Cylichnella bidentata d'Orbigny X
Cylichnella cf. C. gabbi (Dall) X X
Cymatosyrinx aepynota acila (Dall) X
Cymatosyrinx lunata (Lea) X X X X X
Cymatosyrinx moseri (Dall) X
Cymatosyrinx myrmecoon (Dall) X
Cymatosyrinx pagodula (Dall) X
Cymatosyrinx perpolita (Dall) X
Cypraea problematica Heilprin X X X X X
Cypraeolina lachrimula (Gould) X
"Cythara" balteata Reeve X
"Cythara" sp. a X
"Cythara" sp. b X
Daphnella cingulata Dall X X
Daphnella elata Dall X X
Daphnella modesta Dall X
Daphnella sp. a X




72 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2M
Gastropoda (Continued)
? Daphnella sp. X
Didianema duplinensis comes
Olsson and Harbison X
Diodora calocsaensis (Dall) X X
Diodora cf. D. caloosaensis (Dall) X X X
Diodora carditella (Dall) X X X
Diodora carditella petasa Olsson and Harbison X
Diodora cayenensis (Lamarck) X X X X X
Diodora floridana Gardner X X X
Diodora nucula (Dall) X X
Diodora sp. X
Discohelix sp. a X
"Drillia" albomaculata Dall X
"Drillia" ebur Reeve X
"Drillia" perspirata Dall X
"Drillia" sp. a X
"Drillia" sp. c X
"Drillia" spp. X
Emarginula pilebryi Dall X X
Engina floridana Olsson and Harbison X X
Engina turbinella Kiener X
Epiecynia multicarinata Stimpson X X
Epilonium ef. E. foliareicostum (d'Orbigny) X
Epilonium frielei (Dall) ? X
Epitonium lineoto (Say) X X
Epitonium turriculum (Sowerby) X
Erato maugeriae Gray X X X X X X
Euglandina rosea (Ferussac) X
Euglandina truncata (Gmelin) X
Euplcura caudata (Say) X X X
Eupleura miocenica intermedia Dall X
Eupleura sp. a X
Fasciolaria apicina I)all X X X X X X
Fasciolaria distans Linn X
Fasciolaria gigantfea Kiener X X X
Fasciolaria scalarina iieilprin X X X X
Fasciolaria tulipa Linn6 X
Ficuse papyralia (Say) X X X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 73
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M
Gastropoda (Continued)
Fontigens palaea Pilsbry X X
Fontigens plana (Aldrich) X X
"Fontigens" spp)). X X
Fossarus anonmala C. B. Adams X X
Fusinus caloosaensis Heilprin X X X X
Fusinus caloosaenis florida
Olsson and Harbison X
? Gastrocopia sp. a X
Gelasinostoma elegantula (Dall) X X X X
Gelasinostoma radiata (Dall) X
Gibberulina ovuliformia (d'Orbigny) X X
Glyphostoma gratula Dall X
Glyphostoma gratula incile Watson X
Glyphostoma polysculptum Fargo X
Glyphostoma scopes Dall X X
Glyphostoma watsoni Dall X
Gyraulus parvus (Say) X
Hanetia mengeana (Dall) X X
Helisoma conanti (Dall) X X X X X
Helisoma dissioni (Dall) X X X X
Helisoma scalare (Jay) X
Helisoma sp. X
-~. .. - - - - - - -
Hemitoma retiporosa (Dall) X X X
Hydrobia amnicoloides Pilsbry X X
"Hydrobia" spp. X X X
Ithycythara kellumi Olsson and Harbison X X
Ithycythara psila (Bush) X
Kurtziella cerina Kurtz and Stimpson X
Kurtziella limontella margaritifera
Olsson and Harbison X X
Kurtiziella limontella subsp. X
Kurtziella stellata Stearns x
Kuriziella sp. a X
"Kurtziella" spp. X X
Lemintina decussata (Ginmelin) X
Lemintina mcgintyi Olsson and Harbison X X
Lemintina sp. X
Liostricata acuta Sowerby X
Longchaeus crenulatus (Holmes) X




74 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE

Species
Gastropoda (Continued)

Longchaeus cf. L. marionae Bartsch Longchaeus sp. a Longchaeus sp. Lucapina suffusa Reeves

Lucapina textaranea Olsson and Harbison Lucapinella limatula Reeves Lucapinella talanteia Olsson and Harbison Macromphalina pierrot Gardner ? Macromphalina sp. Mangelia cerinella Kurtz and Stimpson Mangelia mclantica Bush Mlangelia cf. M. melantica Bush Mangelia plicosa C. B. Adams Mangelia quadrata Reeve Marginella acusve.ta Olsson and Harbison

Marginella amiantula Dall Marginella apicina Menke Marginella aureocincta Stearns Marginella arena avenacea Deshayes ? Marginella ef. M. bella Conrad Marginella caloosana Olsson and Harbison Marginella cf. M. clenchi M. Smith Marginella denticulata Conrad Maroinella eulima Dall Marginella floridana Dall Marginella laevalleana d'Orbigny Marginella limatula Conrad Marginella onchidella Dall Marginella oruliformis d'Orbigny Marginella pallida Donovan Marginella pardalis Dall Marginella pinellasensis Olsson and Harbison Marginella polyspira Olsson and Harbison Mlarginella precursor Dall Marginella prunum Omelin Marginella styria Dall Marginella virginica Conrad Marginella willcoxiana Dall

T B C

Distribution
DE F LX
Xx
x
i2

xKxxx

X X

Al A2 M
X
X
x

X

X IX




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 75
Distribution
Species -- -T B C D E F L X Al A2 M
Gastropoda (Continued)
Marginella spp. X X
Meioceras cingulatum Dall X X X X X
Meioceras nitidum Stimpson ? X
Meioceras sp. a X
Melanella calkinsi Olsson and Harbison X X
Melanella conoidea (Kurtz and Stimpson) X X
Melanella conoidea nisoformis
Olsson and Harbison ? X
Melanella locklini Olsson and Harbison X
Melanello spp. X X X
Melongena corona Gmelin X X X X X
lMenetis alabamensis avus (Pilsbry) ? X
Mitra heilprini Cossman X X X X
Mitramorpha cincia Dall X X X X
Modulus carchedonius (Lamarck) X X X X
Modulus modulus (Linnd) X X
Monilispira bigemma (Dall) X
Monilispira leucocyma (Dall) X X
? Monilispira cf. M. leucocyma (Dall) X
Mormula sp. X
Murex brevifrons Lamarck X X X X
Murex cellulosus Conrad X X X
Murex macqintyi M. Smith X
Murex mesonius Sowerby X
Murex pomum Gmelin X X X X X
Murex recurvirostris rubidus F. C. Baker X X X
Murex salleanus A. Adams X X X X
Murex textilis Gabb X X X
Murex sp. X
? Nannodiella sp. X
Nassarina dalli Olsson and Harbison X
Nassarina glypta Bush X X
Nassarius ambigua antillarum d'Orbigny X X
Nassarius bidentatus (Emmons) X X X X X

X X
X
x .
N

Nassarius caloosaensis Dall Nassarius consensus (Ravenel) Nassarius ef. N. consensus (Ravenel) Nusarius floridensis Olsson and Harbison




78 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M
Gastropoda (Continued)
Nassarius lapenotierei Dall X X
Nassarius locklini Olsson and Harbison X X
Nassarius sp. a X
Nassarius sp. b X X
Nassarius sp. c X
Nassarius sp. d X
Nassarius sp. e X
Nassarius spp. X X X
Nassarius vibex (Say) X X X X X X
Natica canrena Linnd X X X X X X
Natica plicatella Conrad X X X
Natica sp. X X
Neritina edentula Dall X
Neritina sphaerica Olsson and Harbison X
Niso willcoxiana Dall X X
Odostomnia (Chrysallida) sp. X
Odostomia (Evalea) sp. X
Odostomria (Heida) caloosaensia Dall X X
Odostomia (Scalenostoma) sp. X
Odostomia (Trabecula) sp. X
Odostomia spp. X X
Oliva sayana Ravenel X X X X X
Olivella mutica (Say) X X X X X X X X
Olivella nitidula Dillwyn X
Olivella prefloralia Olsson and Harbison X
Olivella rotunda Dall X
Olivella sp. a X X
Oscilla biseriata Gabb X X
Oscilla sp. b X
? Paludestrina sp. Parvliturboides avitus Pilabry X X
Periploma angulifera Philippi X X
Perplicaria perplexa Pall X X X
Persicula ovula Conrad X X
Petaloconchus floridana Olsson and Harbhison X X
Petaloconchus varians d'Orbigny X X
Phasianella pulchella C. B. Adams X X
Phos parvus intricatus Dall x




NEOCENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 77
Distribution
Species
T B C E F L X Al A2 M
Gastropoda (Continued)
Physa meigsi D)all X X X
Physa sp. X
Polygyra microdonta Pfeiffer X
Polynices duplicalus Say X X X X X X
Polystira albida (Perry) X X X X
Pterorhytis fluviana Dall X X X
Pyramidellids X
Pyrazus scalatus (Heilprin) X X X X
Pyrigiscus cf. P. parkeri Bartsch X
Pyrigiscus sp. a X
Pyrigiscus sp. b X X
Pyrigisrus spp. X X X X
Pyrigiscus cf. P. yama Bartsch X
Pyrgocythara coxi Fargo X
Retusa canaliculata (Say) X X X X X X
Retusa sulcata d'Orbigny X
Retusa sp. X
Rhinoclaris ealoosaensis (Dall) X X X
Rictaxis myakkanus (Dall) X X
Rimula cf. R. caroliniana Dall X
Ringicula floridana Dall X X X X
Ringicula cf. R. floridana Dall X
Ringicula guppyi Dall X X
Rissoa athymorhyssa Dall X X X
Rissoa callistropha I)all X
Rissoa geraea Dall X
Rissoina browniana d'Orbigny X
Rissoina bulimina Olsson and Harbison X X X
Rissoina cancellata Phil;ppi X
Rissoina chesneli Michaud X
Rissoina decussata planata Dall X
Rissoina fargoi Olsson and Harbison X
Rissoina floridana Olsson and Harbison X X
Rissoina laeigata C. B. Adams X X X
Rissoina liriope Olsson and Harbison X X
Riseoina parkeri Olason and Harbison X
Rissoina spp. X X
Rubellatorma rubella Kurts and Stimpson X




78 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M
Gastropoda (Continued)
Scala sayana Dall X
Scaphella floridana Heilprin X X
Sedilia acuciwncta (Dall) X
? Sedilia aphanitoma (Dall) X X
Sedilia hoplophorus (Dall) X
Sedilia ef. S. hoplophorus (Dall) X X
Sedilia cf. S. ochoida Fargo X
Sedilia piscator (Dall) X
Sedilia podagrina (Dall) X
Sedilia podagrina elongata (Dall) X
Sedilia schmismatica (Dall) X X
Sedilia sedilia (Dall) X
Sedilia sigela (Dall) X
? Sedilia sp. X
Sedilia sp. a X
Seila adamsi (H. C. Lea) X X X X X
Sigaretus carolinenais Dall X
Sigaretus multiplicalus Dall X
Sigatica semisulcata Gray X
Sinum polandi M. Smith X
Smaragdia merida Dall X X
Solariorbis funiculus (Dall) X X X
Solariorbis opistelotlus (Dall) X X X
Strombiformis dalli Gardner and Aldrich X X
Strombiformis cf. S. biconica Gardner X
Strombina gunteri Mansfield X
Strombus alatus Gmelin X X X X X X X X
Strombus leidyi Heilprin X X
Strombus pugilis Linn6 X X
Succinea luteola Gould X
Sulcularia prosulcata Gardner X X
Syntomodrillia cf. S. scissurata (Dall) X X
Tectonatica pusilla (Say) X X X X X X X
Tectonatica sp. X
Tegula fasciatum (Born) X
Teinostoma cf. T. altum Pilsbry X
Teinostoma calliglyptum Dall X X
Teinostoma carinicallus Pilsbry and McGinty X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 79
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M Gastropoda (Continued)
Teinostoma cf. T. cocolitoris
Pilsbry and McGinty X
Teinostoma cryptospira Verrill X
Teinostoma goniogyrus Pilsbry and McGinty X
Teinosloma milium Dall X X
Teinostome tectispira Olsson and Harbison X X X X
Terebra concava (Say) X X X X
Terebra dislocata Say X X X X X X X
Terebra protexta Conrad X
Terebra sp. a X
Terebra spp. X X X
Tricolis umbilicata (d'Orbigny) X
Triforis mirabilis C. B. Adams X
Triforis modesta C. B. Adams X X
Triforis nigrocincta C. B. Adams X X
Trigoniostoma sericea (Dall) X X X X
Trigoniostoma tenera (Philippi) X X X
Triphora bartschi (Olsson) X
Triphora bolax Olsson and Harbison X
Trivia floridana Olsson and Harbison X X
Trivia islahispaniolae petrela
Olsson and Harbison X
Trivia globosa Gray X
Trivia pediculus (Linnd) X X X
Trivia suffusa Gray X X
Trivia sp. a new ? X
Trophon lcpidota (Dall) X X X X
Turbo castaneus Omelin 3 X X X
Turbo castaneus crenulatus Gmelin X X
Turbo rhectogrammicus Dall X X X
Turbonilla 2 sp. X
Turbonilla (Chemnitzia) cf. T. admeta Bartsch X
Turbonilla (Chemnitzia) sp. X
Turbonilla (Chemnitzia) sp. a X
Turbonilla (Chemnitzia) 4 sp. X
Turbonilla (Dunkeria) sp. X
Turbonilla (Strioturbonilla) sp. X

Turbonilla sp. a Turbonilla spp.

X
X




80 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
Distribution
Species
T B C D E F L X Al A2 M
(Castropoda (Continued)
Turritella apicalis Heilprin X X X X X X X
Turritella apicalis cingulata Heilprin X
Turritella apicalis mediosulcata Heilprin X
Turritella apicalis tensa Dall X
Turritella perattenuata Heilprin X X X X X X
Turritella perattenuata obsoleta Dall X
Turritella pontoni Mansfield X X X
Turritella sp. a X
Turritella subannulata Heilprin X X X X X
Turritella subannulata acropora Dall X X
Turritella subannulata burnsi Dall X X X
Turritella subannulata princisa Dall X
Turritella wagneriana Olsson and Harbison X X
Typhis floridanus Dall X X X
Urgartea locklini Bartsch X
Urosalpinx perrugatus Conrad X X X
Urosalpinx sp. a X
Urosalpinx subsidus Dall X X X X
Urosalpinx trossulus Conrad X X
Vasum horridum Heilprin X X X X
Vasum locklini Olason and Harbison X
Vermetus sp. X
Vermirularia recta Olsson and Harbison X X X
Vermicularia sp. X X
Vermicularia spirata Philippi X X X
Vermicularia woodringi Olsson and IHarbison X
Vexillum healyi Fargo X
Vexillum holmesi (Dall) X
Vexillum sp. a new ? X
Vexillum willcoxi (Dall) X
Vitricythara elata (Dail) X
Vitricythara micromeris (Dall) X X
Viriparus geogianus (Lea) X X
Voleula tritica Olsson and Harbison X
Xancus reoina (Heilprin) X X X X
Xancus scolymoides Dall X X X
Xenophora conchyliophora Born X X X




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 81

Species
Scaphopoda
Cadulus quadridentatus Dall Dentalium caloosaense Dall Dentalium carolinetnse Conrad Dentalium ceratum Dall Dentalium disparile d'Orbigny Dentalium eboreum Conrad Dentalium oleacinum Dall Dentalium prisma Dall Dentalium spp.
Amphineura Chiton burnsi Dall Chiton sp.
Brachiopoda Discinisca lugubris Gould
Cirripedia
Balanue concavus Brown Balanus sp.
Decapoda
Petrochirus bouvieri Rathbun
Echinoidea
Encope macrophora tamiamiensis Mansfield

T B

Distribution E F L
x
x

X Al I A2 I M

X
X X X X X X X _X
X
Ix
x
xxx xxxI~ xxix i l l ili




82 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-BULLETIN FORTY-THREE
OSTRACODE CHECK LIST FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE
MARL ON SHELL CREEK, CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA (Identified by H. Puri, 1959)

Actinocythereis exanthemata
(Ulrich and Bassler)
Acuticythereia laevissima (Edwards) Aurila conradi (Howe and McGuirt) Campylocythere sp. Climacoidea pleurata Puri Climacoida sp. Cyprideis sp. Cytheretta sahnii Puri Cytheromorpha warneri
Howe and Spurgeon Cytherura elongata Edwards Cytherura johnsoni Mincher

Unit Unit D F

Cytherura n. sp. Cytherura wardensis
Howe and Brown Haplocytheridea bassleri Stephenson Hulingsina ashermani
(Ulrich and Bassler) Loxoconcha doryandae Puri Loxoconcha reticularis Edwards Reticulocythereis floridana Puri Orionina bermudae (Brady) Puriana n. sp. Puriana rugipunctata
(Ulrich and Bassler)




NEOGENE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR AREA 88
FORAMINIFERAL CHECK LIST FOR THE SHELL CREEK CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL (All Unit D species from SC3-la; all Unit F species from SC1-1; Cole's collection is from 32 miles upstream from Washington's place.)

Species
Amphistegina gibbosa d'Orbigny A ngulogerina occidentalise
(Cuslhmnan)
Archaias angulataus
(Fichtel and Mloll) ? Articulata sp. Astaculus sp. Bolirina floridana Cushman Bolivina pulchella primitira
Cushmnan Bolivina sp. a Buccella hannai
Phleger and Parker Cibicides deprimus
Phleger and Parker ?
Cibicides floridanus (Cushman) Cibic ides 10 Cibicides sp. Discorbis floridana Cushman Discorbis floridensis Cushman Discorbis sp. Elphidium discoidale (d'Orbigny) Elphidium fimbriatulum
(Cushman)
Elphidium gunteri glavestonensis
Kornfeld
Elphidium incertum (Williamson) Elphidium incertum mexicanum
Kornfeld
Elphidium sp.

Unit Unit D | F

Species
Globigerina sp. Guttulina problema d'Orbigny Lagena substriata Williamson Loxostoma gunteri Cushman Orbulina universa d'Orbigny Peneropolis proteus d'Orbigny Quinqueloculina fusca
H. B. Brady
Quinqueloculina lamarckiana
d'Orbigny
Quinqueloculina seminula
(Linnd)
Quinqueloculina subpoeyana
Cushmnan ?
Quinqueloculina sp. a Quinqueloculina spp. Reussella spinulosa (Ruess) Rotalia beccarii Linn6 Rotalia beccarii (Linni)
var. ornata Cushman Rotalia beccarii (Linn6)
var. tepida Cushman
Sorites marginalis (Lamarck) Spiroluculina dentata
Cushman and Todd Spiroloculina reticulosa
Cushman
Triloculina linneiana d'Orbigny
var. caloosahatcheensis Cole Vertebralina cassis d'Orbigny







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

EAST

7 ^

FORT THOMPSON

CALOOSAHATCHEI

FEET

U
6
3
0
APPROX.SCALE

COVERED
PLEISTOCENE
FORT THOMPSON FORMATION
L SANDS,WHITE,TAN,YELLOW-BROWN
CALOOSAHATCHEE MARL

UNIT U, SANDY MAR
UNIT U, SANDY LIME V V UNIT H, SANDY MARL
UNIT U, LIMESTONE
UNIT U, SANDY MARL
UNIT U, LIMESTONE
MIOCENE
TAMIAMI FORMATION
CALCAREOUS CLAY

L
STONE
BRECCIA

Plate I. Correlation of measured sections on Shell Creek, Florida.

WEST

ON SPOIL PILES

BULLETIN NO. 48







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY BULLETIN No. 43

WEST

|ViV WATER LEVEL
LEGEND
FORT THOMPSON FORMATION SAND

SANDY LIMESTONE SANDY SHELL MARL BLUE CLAY CALOOSAHATCHEE FORMATION SANDY SHELL MARL FOSSILIFEROUS SANDY CLAY TAMIAMI FORMATION SHELLY MARL OSTREA-ENCOPE-BALANUS MARL SANDY LIMESTONE
CLAY
CONCRETIONARY LIMESTONE

Plate II. Correlation of measured sections on Alligator Creek, Florida.

EAST

FEET

W.z

APPROX. SCALE
APPROX. SCALE

BULLETIN No. 43

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

E







. It i 6*




_,01 wjjojy ,w w A T
'rt
And ks 1% VAX,
"o,
1'4 ,Z L oI v AS to
-I,7 "ZI44 *z,
vs
IT
41
&WIWI 0 Yom
T"T .0,
A., *4, 41, ....................
4' -, __ I Q!, ;
o
n TVA
4, -i4
Whsl a"a wit out U
J
o I to, X41 law Aw""Yowlk4l
A
_lj
Nrl not
is
RAN




Full Text