Biennial report

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Biennial report
Uniform Title:
Biennial report (1988)
Cover title:
Florida Geological Survey biennial report
Abbreviated Title:
Bienn. rep. - Fla. Geol. Surv. (1990)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida Geological Survey
Publisher:
The Survey
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee
Tallahassee
Publication Date:
Frequency:
biennial
regular
Edition:
1987-1988[15th report]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Geology -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre:
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
serial   ( sobekcm )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
1987/1988-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vols. for <1991/1992-1993/1994> called also: <17-18>.
Statement of Responsibility:
State of Florida, Division of Resource Management, Florida Geological Survey.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:

The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - AJG7269
oclc - 22342552
alephbibnum - 001754280
lccn - sn 90001622
issn - 1052-6536
System ID:
UF00000224:00001

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Biennial report


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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Foreword
        Page vii
        Page viii
    A brief history of the Florida Geological Survey and state geologists
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Public service activities
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Research and regulatory programs
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Additional programs
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Cooperative programs
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Budget summary
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Publications
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Talks by staff members to professional groups
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Educational activities
        Page 26
    Additional professional activities
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Personnel
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text








/


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BIENNIAL REPORT


1987-1988


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1987/88


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State Of Florida
Department of Natural Resources
Tom Gardner, Executive Director



Division of Resource Management
Jeremy A. Craft, Director



Florida Geological Survey
Walter Schmidt, State Geologist





Biennial Report 1987-1988



By
Paulette Bond


Published for the
Florida Geological Survey
Tallahassee
1990


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DEPARTMENT
OF
NATURAL RESOURCES


11

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BOB MARTINEZ
Governor


JIM SMITH
Secretary of State



TOM GALLAGHER
State Treasurer



BETTY CASTOR
Commissioner of Education


BOB BUTTERWORTH
Attorney General



GERALD LEWIS
State Comptroller



DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture


TOM GARDNER
Executive Director








Letter of Transmittal


Florida Geological Survey
August 1990


Governor Bob Martinez, Chairman
Florida Department of Natural Resources
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Dear Governor Martinez:

The Florida Geological Survey, Division of Resource Management, Department of
Natural Resources, herein publishes its Biennial Report for 1987-88. This Biennial
Report marks a continuation of the series that was abandoned in 1960. This
renewed series is intended to improve communication between the Survey and the
geologic and hydrogeologic communities.

Respectfully yours,


Walt Schmidt, Ph.D.
State Geologist and Chief
Florida Geological Survey








Table of Contents
PAGE

Foreword .......................................................... ... .. ......................... vii

A Brief History of the Florida Geological Survey................................... .......... 1

State Geologists.............................................................................................. 1
E. H. Sellards ........................................................................................... 2
Herman Gunter.................................... ................... .......... ............ 2
Robert O. Vernon.................................. ................... ..................... 3
Charles W Hendry, Jr.......................................................... ................ 3
W alter Schmidt ........................................................... ....................... 4
Public Service Activities .................................................................................5

Research and Regulatory Programs.................................................. ............. 7
Geological Investigations.......................................................... .............. 8
M ineral Resources and Environmental Geology..................................... 8
Oil and Gas ............................................................................................. 9
Additional Programs....................................................... ...................... 10
Drilling Program .......................................................................................... 10
Research Library ............................................................................... 11
Geologic Sample Collections .............................................. ........... ... 11
Data Files .................................................................................................... 11
Computer Services ......................................................... ................. 12
Student Assistantship Program ............................................. ........... ... 12
Continuing Education.................................................. ................... 13
Cooperative Programs ...............................................................................14
U. S. M inerals M management Service...................................... ........... 15
Florida Department of Environmental Regulation............................ ... 16
Suwannee River W ater M management District....................................... 16
South Florida W ater M management District........................................ ..... 17





iv








Southwest Florida W ater M management District.................................. 17
St. Johns River W ater M management District......................................... 18
Alachua County.......................................................... ........................... 18
Brevard County........................................................ .............................. 19
Budget Summary ......................................................................................... 19

Publications ..... .......................................................................................21
M ap Series................................................................................................ 21
Reports of Investigations ............................................... ...................... 22
Bulletins....................................................................................................... 22
Information Circulars ................................................... ........................ 22
Special Publications...................................................... ........................ 22
Open File Reports ....................................................... ......................... 22
M miscellaneous Publications...................................... ........................ 23
Papers by Staff M embers in Outside Publications ........................... .... 23
Talks by Staff Members to Professional Groups ..........................................24

Educational Activities ........................................ .............. ...................... 26

Additional Professional Activities ................................................................27
Symposia................................................................................................... 27
M meetings ......................................................................................................... 28
W orkshops................................................................................................ 30
Conferences ............................................................................................. 30
Field Trips ............................................................................................... 31
Personnel.....................................................................................................31
Professional Staff........................................................ ................................... 31
SClerical and Technical Staff........................................... ...................... 33
Research Associates .................................................... ........................ 33
Student Assistants ...................................................... .......................... 33










Florida Geological Survey
Functional Organizational Chart



Governor and Cabinet



Dept. of Natural Resources
Executive Director
(Gardner)



Div. of Resource Management
Director
(Craft)








FOREWORD
The Florida Geological Survey (FGS) traditionally publishes the results of its
research in its publication series. This series includes Map Series, Reports of
Investigation, Bulletins, Information Circulars, Special Publications, and Open File
Reports.

In years past the Survey reported on numerous aspects of its work in the form of
Annual Reports (1908-1933) and Biennial Reports (1933-1960). These reports
were unique in that they provided a continuing record of the Survey's professional
contributions which included, but were not restricted to geological research.
Research results were, of course, presented in the appropriate publication series,
while Annual and Biennial Reports presented a summary of the extended services
and activities of the FGS.

In 1984-1985 the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), parent agency of the
Survey, directed a Task Force to review Florida's geologic data requirements. In
addition, the expectations of the Survey's "user community" were examined and
documented. The Task Force recommended (among others) that the FGS provide
a periodic report reviewing the status of its programs and its staff's activities. The
report was conceived as a means of improving communication between the Survey
and the geologic and hydrogeologic communities. This Biennial Report marks a
continuation of the lapsed Biennial Report Series. It is intended that the report will
provide an overview of the Survey's research, service and educational activities.








A BRIEF
HISTORY OF THE
FLORIDA
GEOLOGICAL
SURVEY

The origin of the Florida Geological Sur-
vey can be traced to the year 1852, when
the office of State Engineer and
Geologist was authorized by the legisla-
ture. "General" Francis L. Dancy, a
former militia officer and mayor of St.
Augustine, was chosen to head this office.
Although Dancy was not trained as a
geologist, his extensive experience in en-
gineering was useful since his mandate
was the drainage of lowlands for agricul-
tural development. In November 1855,
Dancy requested $500 to do soil tests in
various parts of the state, whereupon the
legislature abolished his post.

The discovery in the 1880's of commer-
cially valuable phosphate deposits in
Florida prompted Governor E. A. Perry
to appoint Dr. John Kost, a medical doc-
tor and amateur geologist, as State
Geologist in 1886. Dr. Kost completed
studies of phosphate and other minerals
in 1887. Dr. Kost's request to the legisla-
ture to extend his tenure and duties led
the legislature to once again abolish the
position.

In 1907 enabling legislation was passed
creating an autonomous, permanent
FGS, and an office of State Geologist,
with four support staff positions. The
new Survey was given latitude to formu-
late its own choice of studies and re-
search.

A reorganization of state government in
1933 placed the FGS under the newly-


formed State Board of Conservation.
The Survey remained essentially
autonomous. State government was
reorganized again in 1971. The FGS was
placed in the Department of Natural
Resources and its name changed to the
Bureau of Geology. In 1983 the legisla-
ture reestablished the name "Florida
Geological Survey," leaving unchanged
its position in the department's hierar-
chy. Significantly, during fiscal year
1986-87 the FGS celebrated its 78th year
of service to the state. It is the oldest
state agency functioning under both its
original establishing legislative statute
and its original title.


STATE
GEOLOGISTS

The enabling legislation which created
the FGS allowed the Survey to make fun-
damental decisions concerning the direc-
tion of its research and service activities.
These decisions were guided by a group
of dedicated state geologists who recog-
nized that development of Florida's
natural resources must go hand-in-hand
with environmental protection.
Florida's first state geologist, Dr. E. H.
Sellards, accorded primary importance
to the study of ground-water resources.
His successor, Herman Gunter, em-
phasized conservation of water resour-
ces, recognizing the potential
implications of careless drilling practices.
The third state geologist, Dr. R. O. Ver-
non, extended the Survey's research ef-
forts into the areas of stratigraphy and
paleontology while developing an ag-
gressive program of public education. C.
W. Hendry, Jr. directed a program which
upgraded the state's oil and gas regula-
tions, emphasizing conservation of the








resource along with improved provisions
for environmental protection. Dr. Walt
Schmidt, the current state geologist, has
extended the scope of the Survey's
cooperative research efforts and simul-
taneously has initiated a strong program
aimed at applied research in the areas of
environmental geology and mineral
resources. The biographical sketches
which follow demonstrate the lasting in-
fluence of this group of environmentally
aware, earth science professionals.


E. H. Sellards: 1907-1919

Since passage of the 1907 law, there have
been five state geologists. The first was
Dr. Elias H. Sellards who served as state
geologist from 1907 to 1919. Dr. Sellards
received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from
the University of Kansas and sub-
sequently spent two years as Assistant
Paleontologist with the Kansas Geologi-
cal Survey. On leaving the Kansas Sur-
vey, Sellards became a Fellow of Yale
University where he received his Ph.D. in
1903. He taught geology and mineralogy
at Rutgers University and, in 1904, be-
came an instructor at the University of
Florida.

While at the University of Florida, Dr.
Sellards devoted a considerable amount
of time to the study of Florida's ground-
water resources, a subject of special con-
cern given the state's agricultural
orientation. Water resources studies
subsequently became a primary focus of
the early work done by the Survey staff.
These early studies, which include inves-
tigations of the ground-water supply to
central Florida and a survey of road
materials, were dictated by Florida's
economic needs. In later years, more
emphasis was placed on basic research


and programs were expanded to include
paleontology and general Florida geol-
ogy.

Under Dr. Sellards' guidance, the FGS
continued as a permanent part of state
government. After his resignation in
April of 1919, he joined the Bureau of
Economic Geology of the State of Texas.
His former student and staff assistant,
Herman Gunter, assumed the position of
State Geologist.


Herman Gunter: 1919-1958

Herman Gunter's association with the
FGS spanned almost 52 years -- a length
of service which is unique. Gunter
graduated from the University of Florida
with a B.S. degree in 1907 and in that
same year joined the Survey staff.
Gunter assumed the position of director
in 1919, with an extensive working
knowledge of Florida geology.

As the FGS's second director, he
changed the survey's emphasis somewhat
by making its reports both more diverse
and more applied in outlook. The FGS's
work was thus closely related to the needs
of state government. In his role as ad-
ministrator, Gunter encouraged
cooperation with the state's public
schools and enlarged the Geological
Survey's museum and library. Gunter
believed that one primary purpose of the
FGS was to provide readily available in-
formation on Florida geology.

Under Gunter's direction, the FGS in-
itiated a conservation campaign aimed at
exposing gross damage to the state's
ground-and surface-water supplies
resulting from careless drilling practices
and misuse of water. His interest in the








preservation of the water resources also
made him a major opponent of the Cross
Florida Barge Canal (originally con-
ceived as a sea level ship canal across
Florida).

Gunter also began work on the investiga-
tion of Florida's mineral resources. He
sought and obtained funding for a
cooperative venture with the U. S.
Geological Survey to complete
topographic mapping of the state.

It was largely by virtue of his efforts that
the legislature authorized and funded the
construction of a geologic center which
included Florida State University's
Department of Geology and the FGS.
The close proximity of the FGS and the
university's Geology Department (across
from each other on the university cam-
pus) has benefited both groups.
Laboratory equipment and library
facilities are shared, encouraging the ex-
change of ideas between geologists and
university faculty members. This
relationship has resulted in employment
opportunities for students at the FGS.
The FGS has benefited from the
availability of knowledgeable and skilled
graduate students who assist staff with
applied research problems.

Gunter's contributions to geologic re-
search were formally recognized by the
University of Florida in 1944, when he
was awarded an honorary Doctorate of
Science. His accomplishments provided
a solid foundation for the future of the
FGS. In recognition of his accomplish-
ments, the FGS building on the campus
of Florida State University was named
the Gunter Building.


Robert O. Vernon: 1958-1971

Dr. Robert O. Vernon succeeded Her-
man Gunter as State Geologist. He
originally joined the Survey as an Assis-
tant State Geologist in 1941. Vernon
received his B.S. from Birmingham
Southern College, his M.S. from the
University of Iowa, and his Ph.D. from
Louisiana State University.

Vernon conducted or participated in a
large number of investigations related
primarily to stratigraphy and paleontol-
ogy of Florida. Under his guidance
cooperative programs in water resource
investigations between the FGS and the
U. S. Geological Survey were expanded.

Recognizing the need for conservation
and protection of Florida's water resour-
ces he emphasized education of the
public. Numerous publications, forums,
and presentations to schools and civic
organizations emphasized the relation-
ship between Florida's water resources
and geology. The Florida statutes relat-
ing to conservation of water resources
are principally the direct result of
Vernon's efforts.

In November of 1971, Vernon resigned
as State Geologist to accept the position
of Director of the Division of Interior
Resources in the Department of Natural
Resources. His recognition of the fragile
nature of Florida's water resources
remains an invaluable legacy.


Charles W. Hendry, Jr.: 1971-1988

Charles W. "Bud" Hendry, Jr., assumed
the post of State Geologist on the resig-
nation of Dr. Vernon in 1971. An
employee of the FGS since 1949, Hendry








held a number of positions including
draftsman, stratigrapher, director of
water resource investigations, and Assis-
tant State Geologist. In addition to earn-
ing his B.S. from Florida State
University, Hendry had the distinction of
receiving the first M. S. degree in geology
awarded by the Florida State University.

Under Hendry's direction the Oil and
Gas Section significantly improved
Florida's oil and gas regulations, provid-
ing better protection for the environment
and conserving oil reserves. In addition,
Hendry established a field office in Jay,
Florida, to coordinate the field inspec-
tion activities of the newly discovered Jay
oil field. Hendry also assisted with the
implementation and development of the
Governor and Cabinet's Big Cypress
Swamp Advisory Committee. This com-
mittee was established by the Governor
and Cabinet in 1971 to review oil and gas
drilling applications. In addition, the
committee drafts recommendations
regarding environmental conservation
and long range development plans within
the Big Cypress. Hendry, as Chief of the
Survey, was designated as Chairman of
the committee, and served in that
capacity for 16 years.

Recognizing the need for geologic data
appropriate to the planning process,
Hendry designed an environmental geol-
ogy map series which would cover the
entire state. These maps presented near-
surface lithologic data in a format acces-
sible to planners lacking extensive
training in the earth sciences.


Walter Schmidt: 1988-Present

Dr. Walter Schmidt was appointed Chief
of the FGS in 1985 and became State


Geologist in 1988 on the retirement of
C. W. Hendry. Schmidt obtained his
B.A. degree from the University of South
Florida in 1972. His M.S. was taken from
Florida State University in 1977 and his
Ph.D. was completed at Florida State
University in 1983. His dissertation
focused on the Neogene stratigraphy of
northwest Florida.

Schmidt joined the FGS in 1975 and
began his work as the district geologist
for northwest Florida. He subsequently
held a number of scientific-administra-
tive positions with the Survey before
being appointed as its chief.

As Chief of the FGS, Schmidt has em-
phasized cooperation between Survey
research geologists and state agencies
which require geologic information in
order to carry out their respective mis-
sions. This cooperation has generated a
number of joint projects in which Survey
geologists of the Geologic Investigations
Section supervise graduate student assis-
tants in the collection and interpretation
of geologic data. In addition, there is a
renewed commitment to such research
areas as paleontology, geochemistry and
geologic mapping.

One of Dr. Schmidt's first acts as Chief
was the creation of the Office of Mineral
Resources and Environmental Geology.
This group focuses its attention on the
preparation of reports and maps in which
geologic data are applied to the solution
of specific problems. The group has
prepared a number of mineral resource
potential maps as a planning aid for the
counties which request them. In addi-
tion, environmental reports will be
prepared for high growth regions and
educational reports are prepared for the








general public on geologic topics of inter-
est.

As the statutes governing various aspects
of oil and gas regulation in Florida have
changed, Dr. Schmidt has overseen ex-
tensive revision of the state's oil and gas
rules. This rule revision is complex in
that it must (in addition to responding to
the statutes) take into account continuing
technological changes associated with
the industry and the heightened environ-
mental awareness of Florida's citizens.

Dr. Schmidt has been active on a number
of boards and committees since becom-
ing Chief. He holds an appointment as
Adjunct Professor with the Geology
Department at Florida State University.
He serves as a board member on the
Florida Board of Professional Geologists
and a member of the Application Review
Committee. He is also a member of the
Advisory Board of the Florida Sinkhole
Research Institute. Additionally, Dr.
Schmidt sits on the Governor's Outer
Continental Shelf Advisory Committee.
He is also a member of both the Con-
tinental Margins Committee and the En-
vironmental Affairs Committee of the
Association of American State
Geologists.



PUBLIC SERVICE
ACTIVITIES

The FGS has mandates in two major
areas related to the geology of the state.
Its first mandate is related to the acquisi-
tion and subsequent utilization of fun-
damental geologic data. In order to
provide a sound basis for both the
development and conservation of
Florida's natural resources, the resour-


ces must first be understood. Thus the
Survey is mandated to collect and inter-
pret geologic data which then becomes
the basis for published reports. It is the
responsibility of the Survey to store and
maintain samples and data derived from
them, so that the information is acces-
sible to various government agencies as
well as industry and other interested par-
ties.

The Survey's second mandate addresses
issues related to the oil and gas industry.
It is the responsibility of the FGS to in-
sure the conservation and prudent
utilization of the state's oil and gas
resources. At the same time environ-
mental impacts associated with the
development of these resources must be
minimized. In order to accomplish these
goals, the oil and gas exploration and
production industries are regulated
through a series of statutes, rules, per-
mits, and inspections.

In order to effectively carry out its man-
dated responsibilities, the FGS must
communicate with its scientific, in-
dustrial and lay constituency. Research
results are routinely available through
the Survey's various publication vehicles
including Map Series, Reports of Inves-
tigation, Bulletins, Information Cir-
culars, Special Publications, and Open
File Reports. Research results are also
presented in talks prepared for profes-
sional conferences and meetings, field
trips, university colloquia and meetings
of interested laymen.

Direct requests for information on
numerous subjects including well data,
sample availability, regional geology,
regional hydrogeology, and paleontol-
ogy, among others, are handled by staff
geologists. These requests are screened








in terms of geographic area and topic so
that they may be referred to the most
appropriate staff member. They
originate from state and federal govern-
ment agencies, consulting firms, and
earth science related industries as well as
concerned citizens. Staff members make
presentations to secondary schools on
various aspects of Florida's geology when
requests for this service are received.

The staff of the FGS Oil and Gas Section
routinely hold public hearings and
workshops. These meetings are adver-
tised in the Florida Administrative
Weekly and local newspapers to insure
that interested persons may plan to at-
tend. The activities of the Oil and Gas
section are discussed more completely in
the section of this document which deals
specifically with the oil and gas program.








RESEARCH AND REGULATORY

PROGRAMS


I I


- --- ~3~~Ce~
-' --~
~i~-------------~CS








The FGS is organized in keeping with its
mandates. The acquisition, main-
tenance, synthesis, and application of
geologic data is handled primarily by the
Geologic Investigations Section and the
Office of Mineral Resources and En-
vironmental Geology. The conservation
of Florida's oil and gas resources along
with the simultaneous protection of its
environment from impacts associated
with the development of those resources
are the major responsibility of the Oil and
Gas Section.


Geological Investigations Section

The Geological Investigations Section
carries out a variety of research projects
throughout Florida. Current projects in-
clude revision of the geologic map of
Florida, various county hydrogeologic
reports, a study of the lithostratigraphy of
the phosphate-bearing Hawthorn Group
and a study of uranium-series isotopes in
peat deposits of Florida. Additional
cooperative programs are discussed else-
where in the text.

The section also consults with other
government agencies since the regional
and local geology of a given area are fun-
damental in the evaluation of numerous
environmental problems. Geologic In-
vestigations handles inquiries regarding
aquifer recharge and contamination,
geologic hazards, minerals mapping, and
problems related to community planning
and development. The group prepares
detailed lithologic logs for wells which
are on file with the Survey. This informa-
tion is added to the Survey's com-
puterized data-base which currently
contains logs for approximately 2,750
wells. This data-base and the programs
designed to manipulate it are currently


used by other governmental agencies and
a number of private firms.


The Office of Mineral Resources
and Environmental Geology

Florida ranks first in the nation with
respect to production of phosphate rock
and second nationally in the production
of fullers earth, crushed stone and peat.
The Office of Mineral Resources and En-
vironmental Geology maintains com-
munication with the mineral industry in
Florida and .publishes biennial status
reports related to industry activity.

Another aspect of the group's work with
industrial minerals involves the prepara-
tion of mineral resource maps. These
maps were planned to aid counties in the
preparation of comprehensive land-use
plans mandated by the state legislature.
The maps identify areas which are char-
acterized by the potential for mineral
resource development and are accom-
panied by brief explanatory texts.
Smaller inset maps of geomorphology
and terrace deposits along with cross-sec-
tions accompany each text.

Another publication series currently
being planned will target environmental
geology of metropolitan areas which
have experienced high rates of popula-
tion growth. The reports will explore
numerous aspects of geology of each area
as they relate to environmental protec-
tion. It is anticipated that these docu-
ments will be used extensively as a
planning aid since growth must take cog-
nizance of the physical environment.








Oil and Gas Section

The Oil and Gas Section regulates ex-
ploration for and production of oil and
gas in Florida through a system of permits
and inspections. The system of permits
and inspections contains numerous en-
vironmental checks and balances. The
section's main office is located in Tal-
lahassee, with field offices located near
producing fields in north and south
Florida. One field office is in Jay
(western panhandle) and the other is in
Ft. Myers (southwest peninsula). Per-
mits regulated by the section include: ap-
plications to drill oil, gas, or water
injection wells, workover notifications,
plugging and abandonment of wells,
authorization to transport oil or gas from
leases, and applications to conduct
geophysical seismic operations.

Eighteen drilling permits were issued in
1987. Of these, ten were wildcats, though
all but one fell within known oil provin-
ces. The eight remaining permits were
for development wells; five in northwest
Florida and three in south Florida.
There were no permits for saltwater dis-
posal or water injection wells.

Five development wells (4 producers, 1
dry and abandoned) and six wildcats (5
dry, 1 marginal producer) were drilled in
1987. The successful wildcat, Red Rock
Oil and Minerals Corporation Dittman
Estate No. 26-2A, discovery well for
Coldwater Creek Field, was completed
in Santa Rosa County. All five develop-
ment wells were located in existing south
Florida oil fields. Of the wildcats, five
were in northwest Florida and 1 in south
Florida. There were no service wells
drilled for saltwater disposal or for pres-
sure maintenance.


Eleven seismic permits totaling 955 line
miles were issued in 1987. Of these, 608
miles were completed: 338 miles on-
shore using explosives and 270 miles on-
shore using vibratory energy sources. No
offshore work was conducted.

The FGS began considering major
revisions to the Oil and Gas Rules (Chap-
ters 16C-25 through 30, Florida Ad-
ministrative Code) during 1987. The
Department began the process in
December by holding a public workshop
to gather input from other agencies, en-
vironmental groups, industry, and the
public.

The Big Cypress Swamp Advisory Com-
mittee is an ad hoc committee set up by
the Governor and Cabinet to inspect drill
sites and access routes in the Big Cypress
Swamp of south Florida. The Commit-
tee recommends any necessary changes
resulting from environmental concerns
in order to mitigate drilling impacts in
sensitive areas. The Committee is
chaired by the State Geologist and meets
quarterly when there are sites to be in-
spected. During 1987, the Committee
met three times and inspected six drill
sites and associated access routes. In ad-
dition to the Committee meeting, the
FGS also held a public meeting in Jay,
Florida, regarding well spacing for a
proposed Escambia County wildcat well.

Thirteen drilling permits were issued in
1988: ten for wildcat locations and three
for development wells. Half of the
wildcats were in northwest Florida, while
half were in south Florida. All three
development wells were in south Florida.

Seven wildcats and one development
well were drilled in 1988. Six of the
wildcats were dry, but the Walker-Boley,








No. 34-2, Permit 1230, was completed as
a potential producer in Escambia Coun-
ty. At year's end no confirmation wells
had been drilled but the discovery pool
had been named McDavid Field. The
lone development well, also a producer,
was located in Collier County. No ser-
vice wells were drilled in 1988.

The Department issued 25 seismic per-
mits for a total of 1171 line miles in 1988.
Of these, 674 miles were completed and
an additional 243 miles were in process
at years end. Although 64 miles of off-
shore line using airguns was permitted,
no work was conducted.

The rule revisions begun during 1987
continued through 1988. The Depart-
ment held two additional workshops in
March and December, 1988, to gather
more information and input from other
agencies, environmental groups, in-
dustry, and the public. These workshops
also contributed to the rule revisions that
were adopted in June 1989.

The Big Cypress Swamp Advisory Com-
mittee met only once during 1988 and
inspected two drilling sites and as-
sociated access routes in the Big Cypress
Swamp of south Florida. Two other
public meetings were held in Jay, Florida.
Both regarded nonroutine oil well spac-
ing for wildcat wells and were held pur-
suant to Department Rule 16C-26.004
F.A.C.



ADDITIONAL
PROGRAMS

A number of additional programs which
are overseen by the FGS are critical to its
mission. These programs benefit Survey


staff as well as other government agen-
cies, industrial representatives, consult-
ing groups, academic researchers and
interested citizens. The Survey's drilling
program acquires cores from various
locations around the state for in-house
projects as well as for cooperative
projects. The Geologic Sample
Repository contains storage space for
core and cutting samples, allowing this
valuable information to be preserved and
catalogued in a systematic fashion.
Lithologic and geophysical logs are filed
for ease of retrieval at the Gunter Build-
ing in Tallahassee. The Survey's com-
puter system is used to handle the
growing volume of information as-
sociated with geological research and oil
and gas regulation. FGS's research
library allows its users the advantage of
computerized database searches along
with traditional library services geared
specifically to geology. FGS supervises
an active student assistant program in
which qualified graduate students assist
staff members in various ongoing re-
search programs. Continuing education
is a vital program at the Survey, offering
staff advanced educational opportunities
in many affiliated disciplines.


Drilling Program

The FGS maintains an active scientific
drilling program. The state is charac-
terized by very low topographic relief and
data obtained from cores is essential to
the understanding of subsurface stratig-
raphy. A trailer-mounted auger rig is
available for staff use. FGS also owns
and operates a truck-mounted Failing
1500 drill rig which is deployed on a
full-time basis, in various parts of the
state depending on research needs. The
drill rig is operated by a fully licensed








driller and one assistant. During 1987-
1988, 24 cores were obtained, ranging
from 20 to 760 feet in depth, for a total
cored length of 3,791 feet.


Research Library

The Survey's library is an integral part of
its research and regulatory programs. Its
holdings include over 15,000 maps and
aerial photographs, 11,000 government
documents, 2,300 technical books, and a
number of scientific periodicals. The
library has access to GEOREF, a nation-
al computerized information retrieval
system.


Geologic Sample Collections

The FGS maintains separate collections
of well and surface outcrop samples. The
well collection consists of approximately
16,270 sets of samples from research
wells as well as water and oil wells. Most
wells are represented by sets of drill cut-
tings. Some 566 wells are, however, rep-
resented by continuous core (a total of
approximately 133,000 feet). The
sample repository facility occupies about
9,500 square feet, with 17,655 square feet
of shelf space. A small office/lab is avail-
able for use by Survey staff or visiting
scientists.

A collection of approximately 3,200 out-
crop samples and mineral specimens is
maintained by the FGS at its head-
quarters in the Gunter Building. These
samples are cross indexed by formation,
lithology, county, and location. The col-
lection is referred to as the "M-Series."
The "M-Series" is particularly valuable
given Florida's high rate of population
growth and development. Surface ex-
posures of critical lithologies have be-


come inaccessible to researchers with the
continued proliferation of roadways,
shopping centers, parking lots and high
rise housing.

The Survey also maintains a paleon-
tological reference set. This invertebrate
fossil reference set contains over 20,000
specimens of macro-fossils and over
10,000 micro-fossil specimens and is lo-
cated at the Gunter Building. The collec-
tions of Florida typical and/or guide
fossils consist of mollusks, echinoids,
ostracodes, foraminifera, bryozoans,
corals, nannofossils, and diatoms.


Data Files

Wells which are stored at the sample
repository are indexed by accession num-
ber, county, and section, township and
range location. Lithologic logs, drillers
logs, and information sheets which cor-
respond to these wells are filed by county
and accession number in a series of loose-
leaf binders (the "Green Books"). Infor-
mation from the "Green Books" is
gradually being transferred to the
Survey's computerized data base which
currently contains data from ap-
proximately 2,750 wells. Computer ser-
vices are discussed more completely in
another section of this report.

A file of geophysical logs contains infor-
mation for approximately 4,800 wells.
Many (but not all) of these wells have
corresponding lithologic samples avail-
able and are assigned FGS accession
numbers. Geophysical logs represented
include electric (normal, lateral, SP)
natural gamma, caliper, fluid resistivity
or conductivity, temperature, single
point resistivity, acoustic velocity, fluid
velocity, neutron (porosity) and gamma-








gamma (density). In addition, complete
suites of geophysical logs accompany
most permitted oil and gas wells.


Computer Services

The primary focus of computer services
at the FGS is its inventory of geology well
data. This database contains lithologic
descriptions of cores and cutting samples
as well as formational picks. Computer
coding of well data began in 1972. The
database currently contains 62 county
files with approximately 2,750 well
descriptions. An analogous database of
outcrop descriptions was begun in 1987.
It currently contains descriptions of 50
outcrops from 27 Florida counties.

This extensive database provides a
detailed source of information concern-
ing the subsurface geology of Florida.
The computer system written to manage
and use this database is called the Well
Log Data System (written by Bob
Lindquist, GeoLogic Information Sys-
tems, Gainesville, Florida). The system
was written for PC compatibility, provid-
ing FGS and outside users access to the
state wide geologic database. The
BASIC programs which make up the sys-
tem allow for entering and editing data,
and generating both graphic (when com-
bined with Surfer, a separate commercial
software package) and text output of
geologic data. Graphic output includes
structure and isopach maps, geologic
cross-sections, and well location maps.
Additional programs generate geologic
columns for both well and outcrop data.

Two additional computer databases are
maintained by the FGS Oil and Gas Sec-
tion. These include an inventory of oil
and gas well data (approximately 1200


permits) as well as an inventory of about
140 geophysical permits. In-house and
commercial software packages allow for
sorting and tracking of the data in both
databases.

Valuable computer services are available
to FGS staff through the library. Using
DIALOG information service, the FGS
librarian conducts searches for refer-
ences to geologic and hydrologic litera-
ture on the GeoRef, GeoAbstracts,
Water Resources Abstracts, and Science
Citation Index. The librarian can also
contact the LUIS on-line system. This
system accesses the on-line library
catalog for Florida State University and
other State University System (SUS)
libraries.

All computer work at the FGS is ac-
complished on IBM (or IBM-com-
patible) personal computers. Data and
graphic input devices include several
Microsoft mice, one 11" X 17" GTCO
digitizer and one 36" X 48" GTCO
digitizer. Text and graphic output is
through two Hewlett Packard (HP) plot-
ters, two HP Laserjet Series II printers,
and several dot matrix printers of varying
quality. Software used includes in-house
Basic and C programs, the Well Log Data
System described above, shareware, and
standard commercial packages (e.g.,
Lotus 123, dBase IV, Displaywrite IV,
Surfer, DesignCad and AutoCad).


Student Assistantship Program

The FGS sponsors an active student as-
sistantship program which is beneficial
for students and staff geologists.
Qualified graduate students in geology
obtain work experience in a professional
setting while staff geologists, in turn, are








assisted by knowledgeable and motivated
individuals. The assistantship program
was begun in 1974 and has run with minor
interruptions since that time.

Currently, most students are employed
by contract and grant funded studies.
These students conduct research tasks
while under the supervision of profes-
sional geologists on the Survey staff. As
the program has developed, the FGS and
several Water Management Districts
have provided funding for assistants. Ad-
ditional funding sources include the U. S.
Bureau of Mines, U. S. Minerals
Management Service, the Florida
Department of Environmental Regula-
tion and several individual counties. The
number of students employed in a given
year varies with available funding.


Continuing Education

Numerous opportunities for continuing
education are available to staff at the
FGS. The state of Florida maintains a
unique program in which tuition is
waived for state employees enrolling in
job-related university courses on a space
available basis. A number of Survey staff
members have taken advantage of this
program enrolling in related geology,
geography, planning and oceanography
courses.

Attendance at technical short courses is
also encouraged. Staff members have at-
tended courses related to various topics
including hydrology of wetlands, karst
geology, petroleum generation and oc-
currence, modern carbonate environ-
ments, and Florida uplands ecology.
Staff members involved in the regulation
of oil and gas development have attended
courses concerning petroleum produc-


tion, various aspects of seismic data ac-
quisition and exploration, aspects of
cathodic protection, and the application
of borehole geophysical techniques to
ground-water problems.

Survey staff members are also offered a
number of short courses which enhance
job performance. A number of these
courses train employees in the use of
various commercial software packages
including Lotus 1-2-3, Dbase, DOS and
Displaywrite. Supervisory staff have
taken various courses relating to
management techniques and the evalua-
tion of employee performance. Courses
in speed reading, professional presenta-
tions, time management, and profes-
sional writing enhance the effectiveness
of the research staff. Safety related clas-
ses and classes in first aid, CPR, and
defensive driving are available to all in-
terested employees.





COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS


F, v rk


I,//


7 7 /1








The FGS participates in cooperative
programs with federal agencies, other
state agencies, water management dis-
tricts, and individual counties. FGS is
ideally suited to these collaborative ef-
forts since it routinely collects and
processes information pertinent to many
geologic subdisciplines on a statewide
basis. This extensive in-house data base
is immediately available as the founda-
tion for various joint studies. Staff
geologists design projects in conjunction
with their collaborators, hire research as-
sociates and supervise student assistants.
Each project is continually monitored by
the staff geologist who is in charge of it.

Two projects aimed at defining heavy-
mineral resources off coastal Florida
have been undertaken in conjunction
with the United States Minerals Manage-
ment Service. FGS has been actively in-
volved with the Suwannee River Water
Management District (WMD), St. Johns
River WMD, Southwest Florida WMD,
and Alachua County in their cooperative
program with the Florida Department of
Environmental Regulation (DER)
aimed at predicting and defining poten-
tial water contamination. FGS and
South Florida WMD are running a joint
project in which continuous cores are
drilled and described in three south
Florida counties. The Survey is working
in conjunction with Southwest Florida
WMD in a project aimed at improved
management of water resources in
northwest Hillsborough County. FGS
completed a study, in cooperation with
St. Johns River WMD, aimed at the iden-
tification and definition of the
hydrostratigraphy of the surficial aquifer
system in Volusia County. Alachua
County assumed responsibility for most
of the research needed by the county in
conjunction with the Ambient Ground


Water program. Alachua County then
contracted with the FGS for
hydrogeologic research services.
Brevard County also participated in a
cooperative program with the FGS
aimed at upgrading the geologic data
base for the county.


U. S. Minerals Management
Service Cooperative Program

The FGS has been involved with two
heavy-mineral reconnaissance studies in
1987 and 1988. These studies were con-
ducted in cooperation with the U.S.
Minerals Management Service, Texas
Bureau of Economic Geology, Univer-
sity of Texas at Austin and the U.S.
Geological Survey.

The 1987 study was conducted off the
Gulf Coast of northwest Florida and
relied heavily upon data gathered during
a previous FGS/MMS study. Eleven
vibracores were analyzed for
granulometry and heavy-mineral con-
tent. The heavy-mineral concentration
from these cores exhibited a mean value
of 0.3% of the total sediment weight.
Kyanite, sillimanite, zircon, tourmaline,
amphibole, sphene, epidote, staurolite,
garnet, magnetite, ilmenite, leucoxene
and rutile were recovered. The propor-
tion of economic heavy minerals (il-
menite, rutile, zircon, and monazite)
within the heavy-mineral concentrate is
approximately 15%. No economically vi-
able heavy-mineral deposits were recog-
nized and further investigations are
planned for this area.

The 1988 study was the first phase of a
two year study of sediments from the
shoal complex offshore of Cape
Canaveral on the Atlantic Coast. Forty








vibracores collected by the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers and obtained from
the U.S. Geological Survey were
analyzed. Heavy-mineral concentrations
exhibited an average value of 0.36%
weight percent. The heavy-mineral suite
includes, in decreasing order of abun-
dance, epidote, ilmenite, alumino-sili-
cates, zircon, "pyroboles," staurolite,
garnet, tourmaline, rutile, phosphate,
sulfides, monazite, titanomagnetite and
others. Although the total heavy-
mineral concentration is low, the mineral
assemblage is suggestive of a potential
for resources. The economic heavy-
mineral (ilmenite, rutile, zircon and
monazite) content of the heavy-mineral
concentrate is 42%. Ongoing studies
seek to outline areas of high heavy-
mineral concentration, as well as areas
suitable for beach renourishment or con-
struction materials.


Department of Environmental
Regulation Cooperative Program

The Florida Legislature's Water Quality
Assurance Act of 1983 mandated the es-
tablishment of an Ambient Ground
Water Quality Network to aid in the
prediction and detection of contamina-
tion of Florida's ground-water resources.
Administered through the Florida DER,
this legislation provides the funding for
constructing a background ground-water
quality well network statewide. Also in-
cluded within the scope of the Act are
research provisions for defining aquifer
systems based on new and existing
hydrogeologic data, water quality sam-
pling and analysis, as well as in-depth
studies ranking the hydrogeologic pollu-
tion potential of the aquifer system. The
bulk of the hydrogeologic data acquisi-
tion, compilation, and analysis work is


currently being undertaken by the state's
five water management districts and, in
Alachua County, by the Alachua County
Department of Environmental Services.
FGS has actively participated in this pro-
gram through its involvement with
Suwannee River WMD, St. Johns River
WMD, Southwest Florida WMD, and
Alachua County.


Suwannee River Water
Management District Cooperative
Program

The FGS and the Suwannee River WMD
have maintained a successful and
mutually beneficial working relationship
for nearly fifteen years. For much of this
period, the Suwannee River WMD has
funded geology graduate students to
work as research assistants at the FGS,
describing well samples and cores and
coding the lithologic logs into the FGS
computer data base. This arrangement
has worked exceedingly well, resulting in
the addition of much new data on the
geology of the District to the data bases
of both agencies.

As a natural extension of this cooperative
arrangement, the Suwannee River WMD
and FGS entered into a series of contract
agreements to assist the District with its
portion of the Ambient Ground Water
program. Most of the project work is
being carried out by Florida State
University graduate students, hired to
work part-time at the FGS. To date,
these research assistants have described
and computer coded over 50 new Am-
bient Project cores, and conducted a
series of falling-head permeameter tests
on the cored sediments overlying the
Floridan aquifer system within the
Suwannee River WMD. In addition, a








scheme to utilize driller's logs to fill in
areas of otherwise poor well coverage
was established by correlating the local
driller's sediment descriptions to the
standard geologic formations.

Using the existing data on file at the FGS
as well as the new data acquired during
the project, the program has generated
an excellent series of updated environ-
mental, geomorphic, and aquifer pollu-
tion potential maps covering the District.
These maps will be utilized by the Suwan-
nee River WMD in placing future
monitor wells and in determining areas
which need intensive hydrogeologic
study.

The current phase of the project involves
the construction of county-by-county top
of limestone maps on ten foot contour
intervals, mapping the depth and thick-
ness of the intermediate aquifer system
throughout the district, and the computer
coding and input of the remaining un-
coded lithologic cores in the district.
Recent acquisition by the FGS of IBM
personal computers and digitizing equip-
ment has significantly improved the data
compilation and mapping capabilities,
and offers the potential for even greater
data interchange with the Suwannee
River WMD in the future.


South Florida Water Management
District Cooperative Program

In July 1988, the FGS and the South
Florida WMD began a cooperative
project in Lee, Hendry and Collier Coun-
ties. South Florida is experiencing rapid
population growth and sound water
management practices must be predi-
cated on an adequate understanding of
the lithologic units which comprise


aquifer systems. Topographic relief in
these counties is especially low, making
reliable subsurface data an invaluable
asset. The three counties which are tar-
geted by this study are characterized by
sparse data coverage.

This project involves the drilling and
evaluation of six continuous cores and
coding of 180 existing longhand geologic
logs within the South Florida district to
computer format with subsequent entry
of these logs into the FGS computer data
base. During 1988 the first core (W-
16242, South Seas #1, 760 feet, TD) was
drilled on Captiva Island, Lee County. In
addition, 30 lithologic logs were coded
and entered into the FGS computer data
base. Evaluation of the cores obtained
through this program and computer
coding is undertaken mainly by student
assistants under the supervision of an
FGS staff geologist.


Southwest Florida Water
Management District Cooperative
Program

Northwest Hillsborough County is an
area of critical concern from a hydrologi-
cal viewpoint. The Southwest Florida
WMD recognizes several factors leading
to this conclusion: 1) commercial and
residential growth in the area is expected
to increase 63 percent by the year 2000;
2) the increased urbanization will
decrease natural recharge to the ground-
water system; 3) ditching and draining
has already resulted in a lowered water
table; 4) 17 lakes in the area require aug-
mentation to maintain their water levels;
and 5) there exists a leaky confining layer
between the surficial and Floridan
aquifer systems. In order to improve
management of its water resources, the








Southwest Florida WMD has under-
taken a multi-phase and multi-discipli-
nary project to determine the safe basin
yield for the northwest Hillsborough
County area.

The Florida Geological Survey has been
contracted by the Southwest Florida
WMD to provide a portion of the
geologic data necessary for this assess-
ment. Forty wells in the study area are
being sampled using a split-spoon
method and the cores are being sleeved
in clear plastic tubing. Upon arrival at
the FGS, selected intervals from these
cores, primarily those representing the
confining unit, will be analyzed for
hydraulic conductivity using falling-head
permeameters. These samples, as well as
the remainder of the core will then be
described and entered into the FGS com-
puterized lithologic data base. Most of
the laboratory and descriptive tasks as-
sociated with this project will be per-
formed by student assistants under the
supervision of FGS staff geologists.


St. Johns River Water Management
District Cooperative Program

The FGS recently completed a joint
project with the St. Johns River WMD
entitled, "A Hydrogeologic Reconnais-
sance Study of the Post-Eocene Uncon-
solidated Sediments of Volusia County,
Florida." Student assistants under the su-
pervision of FGS staff geologists col-
lected geologic and hydrologic data and
produced detailed core descriptions, x-
ray diffraction analyses and carbonate
content measurements. In addition,
laboratory measurements of vertical
hydraulic conductivity, specific yield and
effective porosity were made. These
data were combined with natural gamma


ray logs and aquifer slug tests provided by
St. Johns River WMD in order to provide
clarification of the unconsolidated sedi-
ments in Volusia County.

Rapid urban development in Volusia
County has placed increased demands on
ground-water supplies. Additionally,
development has increased the suscep-
tibility of the surficial aquifer system to
contamination. Although the Floridan
aquifer system is the major source of
ground water for Volusia County, the
surficial aquifer system acts both as a
storage reservoir and also as a source of
recharge to the Floridan. The current
study was designed to identify and define
the hydrostratigraphy of the surficial
aquifer system in Volusia County.

The study separated the post-Eocene un-
consolidated deposits into a lower unit
composed of undifferentiated sandy clay
and shell and an upper unit of undifferen-
tiated sand and clay. Lateral changes in
these lithologies yield local variations in
hydrostratigraphy. Data suggest that lo-
cally two separate water-bearing zones
may exist within the surficial aquifer sys-
tem. In some areas, however, the low
permeability lithologies which serve to
separate and retard water movement be-
tween the two water-bearing zones may
be absent. In these areas the surficial
aquifer system consists of a single water-
bearing unit.


Alachua County

The Alachua County Department of En-
vironmental Services (ACDES) assumed
the bulk of the ground water and aquifer
research for that county in conjunction
with the Ambient Ground Water pro-
gram. Aware of the extensive lithologic








data available at the FGS, the ACDES
contracted a three-part hydrogeologic
research project with the Survey, begin-
ning in 1986.

The initial phase of the project funded
two part-time geology graduate students
to describe and computer code pre-
viously unworked Alachua County well
samples. These data, along with a com-
plete set of the existing coded data base,
were provided to Alachua County to es-
tablish its own lithologic data base.

Part two of the project was aimed at
delineating the relative aquifer pollution
potential in the county. One additional
graduate student was funded through the
contract to research the county topog-
raphy and lithologic logs in an attempt to
establish three zones of aquifer confine-
ment for the Floridan aquifer system. An
aquifer confinement map and report
were produced which defined and
delineated zones of total, partial, and
non-confinement by the sediments over-
lying the aquifer. This report was
provided to ACDES in late 1987, and was
later presented in 1988 as FGS Open File
Report 21 entitled Geologic interpreta-
tion of the aquifer pollution potential in
Alachua County, Florida, by Milena
Macesich.

The third and final phase of the Ambient
contract with ACDES funded four part-
time research assistants to conduct an
extensive analysis of the post-Eocene
sediments overlying the Floridan aquifer
system in Alachua County. These sedi-
ments locally comprise both the inter-
mediate confining unit to the Floridan
aquifer system and the surficial aquifer
system. The FGS core-drilling rig, per-
sonnel, and split-spoon sampling equip-
ment were provided for a three month


period to take a series of ten cores at
selected sites in Alachua County. These
cores penetrated the post-Eocene sec-
tion overlying the Floridan aquifer sys-
tem. Research assistants at the FGS lab
first described each core, then conducted
falling-head permeability tests, x-ray
mineralogy studies, and sieving for grain
size analysis on the split-spoon intervals.
A final report, entitled Characterization
of the sediments overlying the Florida
aquifer system in Alachua County,
Florida, was completed in August of
1988. This report is tentatively
scheduled to be published in the Survey's
Report of Investigations series.


Brevard County

The FGS participated in a cooperative
program with Brevard County during fall,
1988, in which an upgraded geologic data
base was supplied to the county. The
staff of the FGS upgraded the geological
information available for Brevard Coun-
ty through computer coding of lithologic
logs currently on file at the FGS. Coded
logs were entered in the FGS computer
system, allowing efficient access to that
information. The information was sup-
plied on diskette to Brevard County.
Also additional cuttings were described
and entered into the computer system,
augmenting well coverage in areas cur-
rently characterized by sparse data.



Budget Summary

The FGS is funded entirely from the
General Revenue fund each year as ap-
proved by the Florida Legislature. The
requested budget is reviewed by the
Division of Resource Management and
the Executive Director's office of the








Department of Natural Resour-
ces(DNR) before being presented to the
Governor and Cabinet (DNR's Execu-
tive Board). Upon approval of the Board
the budget request is submitted to the
Florida House of Representatives and
the Florida Senate for review by their
Budget Committees.

Budgets approved for the Survey by the
Florida Legislature for fiscal years 1987-
1988 and 1988-1989 are summarized
below. In general, the overall budget has
received increases similar to that of the
national inflation rate over the last 15
years. Five positions have been lost due
to general revenue cuts while two staff
positions were added in response to
added regulatory responsibilities.


Budget Break-down by section:


Administrative Direction and
Support Section (5 staff)

State Geologist, Administrative Assis-
tant, Executive Secretary, Librarian,
Custodian


1987-1988 1988-


19m8


Salaries & Benefits


$ 118,989


Expenses


63,549


$ 153,358

56,264


Operating Capital Outlay


FGS Budget


1987-1988 1988-1989


Salaries & Benefits


$ 893,373
Other Personal Services


Expenses


$1,002,964


Geologic Investigations &
Environmental Geology and
Mineral Resources (17 full-time
staff. 5 part-time)


2 Senior Geologist/Administrators, 9
23,780 23,780 Geologists, 2 draftsmen, 2 drill-rig crew
members, 1 lab technician, 1 secretary, 3
257,260 254,393 research assistants, 1 library assistant and
1 clerk assistant


Operating Capital Outlay


1987-1988 1988-1989


37,750 42,867


Outside Contracts


62,722 92,020


FGS Budget


$ 1,274,885 $ 1,416,020


Salaries & Benefits


$ 491,595 $ 529,360

147,537 151,177


Expenses


Operating Capital Outlay

13,067 12,126


10,623


10,623








Other Personal Services

23,780 23,780


Oil and Gas Regulation and
Conservation (11 staff)


Administrator, 5 geologists,
3 secretaries

1987-1988


2 engineers,


1988-1989


Salaries & Benefits

$ 82,789 $ 320,246


Expenses


46,174 46,952


Operating Capital Outlay

14,060 20,118



PUBLICATIONS

The FGS recognizes that dissemination
of geologic data and research results are
an essential part of its mission as a public
service agency. The Survey publishes
results of staff investigations and inves-
tigations undertaken with cooperating
agencies. Studies which are pertinent to
the geology of Florida which are under-
taken by other earth scientists may also
be published. Results of technical sym-
posia and field guidebooks are also pub-
lished on occasion.

Publications of the FGS are available to
the public for a small fee which covers
postage and handling. If publications are
obtained directly at the FGS offices in
Tallahassee, they are free. All FGS pub-
lications are free to other agencies of city,
county, state and federal government. In


addition, publications of the FGS are
supplied without charge to 55 depository
libraries in Florida, 127 depository
libraries in the U.S. excluding Florida,
and 21 foreign depository libraries.

The FGS maintains an open file series of
publications which may be purchased for
the cost of reproduction. The contents of
the open-file series are listed in the
Survey's List of Publications which is up-
dated annually. Lithologic logs, well
coverage maps, geophysical logs and
maps showing the locations of oil wells
are available for a fee determined by
reproduction costs.

The following publications were issued
by the FGS during 1987-1988.


Map Series (MS)

MS 112 Geology and Waste Disposal in
Florida, 1987. By P. Bond.

MS 113 Mineral Resources of Sumter
County, Florida, 1988. By J. W. Yon, R.
W. Hoenstine, and S. M. Spencer.

MS 114 Mineral Resources of Hernando
County, Florida, 1988. By J. W. Yon, R.
W. Hoenstine, and S. M. Spencer.

MS 115 Mineral Resources of Citrus
County, Florida, 1988. By J. W. Yon, R.
W. Hoenstine, and S. M. Spencer.

MS 116 Mineral Resources of Levy
County, Florida, 1988. By E. Lane, R. W.
Hoenstine, J. W. Yon, and S. M. Spencer.

MS 117 Mineral Resources of Marion
County, Florida, 1988. By R. W.
Hoenstine, E. Lane, F. Rupert, J. W.
Yon, and S. M. Spencer.








MS 118 Long-Term Stage Records of
Lakes in Florida, 1987. By D. W. Foose.
Prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey
in cooperation with the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Regulation and
the Florida Geological Survey.

MS 119 Potentiometric Surface of the
Upper Floridan Aquifer in Florida, May
1985; 1987. By G. L. Barr. Prepared by
the U.S. Geological Survey in coopera-
tion with the Florida Department of En-
vironmental Regulation and the Florida
Geological Survey.

MS 120 Mineral Resources of Collier
County, 1988. By J. W. Yon, S. M. Spen-
cer, R. W. Hoenstine, and E. Lane.

MS 121 Mineral Resources of Madison
County, 1988. By S. M. Spencer, J. W.
Yon, R. W. Hoenstine, and E. Lane.

MS 122 Runoff to Streams in Florida,
1988. By R. P. Rumenik. Prepared by
the U. S. Geological Survey in coopera-
tion with the Florida Department of En-
vironmental Regulation and the Florida
Geological Survey.


Report of Investigation (RI)

RI 97 Petrogenesis of Early Mesozoic
Tholeiite in the Florida Basement and
An Overview of Florida Basement Geol-
ogy, 1988. By J. D. Arthur.


Bulletins (B)

B 59 The Lithostratigraphy of the Haw-
thorn Group (Miocene) of Florida, 1988.
By Thomas M. Scott.


B 60 Geology of Wakulla County,
Florida, 1988. By F. Rupert and S. M.
Spencer.


Information Circular (IC)

IC 104 Part I 1985 Florida Petroleum
Production and Exploration, by J. M.
Lloyd and A. V. Applegate; Part II The
Brown Dolomite Zone of the Lehigh
Acres Formation (Aptian) in the South
Florida Basin A Potentially Prolific
Producing Horizon Offshore, 1987. By
A. V. Applegate.


Special Publication (SP)

SP 8 Guide to Rocks and Minerals of
Florida (Revised), 1987. By E. Lane.


Open File Reports (OFR)

OFR 15 The Lithostratigraphy of Nassau
County in Relation to the Superconduct-
ing Super Collider Site Investigations,
1987. By T. M. Scott, unpaginated, 16
fig., 2 tables.

OFR 16 Geology of Union County,
Florida, 1987. By F. Rupert, 13 leaves, 3
fig.

OFR 17 Geology of Bradford County,
Florida, 1987. By F. Rupert, 14 leaves, 3
fig.

OFR 18 The Geology and Geomorphol-
ogy of Gilchrist County, Florida, 1988.
By F. Rupert, 10 leaves, 4 fig.

OFR 19 Geology and Geomorphology of
Levy County, Florida, 1988. By F.
Rupert, 18 leaves, 3 fig.








OFR 20 Leon Sinks Special Interest
Area, 1988. By E. Lane, 5 leaves.

OFR 21 Geologic Interpretation of the
Aquifer Pollution Potential in Alachua
County, Florida, 1988. By M. Macesich,
25 leaves, 3 fig.

OFR 22 The Geology of Wakulla
Springs, 1988. By F. Rupert, 18 leaves, 5
fig.

OFR 23 Florida Caverns State Park,
Jackson County, Florida, 1988. By W.
Schmidt, 7 leaves, 1 fig.

OFR 24 The Geology of Flagler County,
Florida, 1988. By J. D. Arthur, 13 leaves,
3 fig.

OFR 25 The Geology of Collier County,
Florida, 1988. By K. M. Campbell, 14
leaves, 4 fig.

OFR 28 Heavy-Mineral Reconnaissance
off the Gulf Coast of Northwest Florida,
1988. By the Florida Geological Survey,
66 p.


Miscellaneous

Arthur, J.D., Melkote, S., Applegate, J.,
and Scott, T.M., 1988, Heavy-mineral
reconnaissance off the coast of the
Apalachicola river delta, northwest
Florida: A summary and new interpreta-
tions, in, Hunt, M.C., Ratcliff, D.C.,
Doenges, S., and Condon, C., eds.,
Studies related to continental margins-a
summary of year-one and year-two ac-
tivities: p.111-123.

Campbell, K.M., 1987, Geological
analysis of ordinary high water line sur-
vey, Bradley Lake and Little Lake, Citrus


County, Florida, Part III, in An ordinary
high water line survey of Bradley Lake
and Little Lake, Citrus County, Florida:
Staff report, Florida Bureau of Survey
and Mapping.

Campbell, K.M., and Spencer, S., 1988,
Geological analysis of ordinary high
water line survey, Wekiva River, Orange
and Seminole Counties, Florida, in An
Ordinary high water line survey, Wekiva
River, Orange and Seminole Counties,
Florida: Staff report, Florida Bureau of
Survey and Mapping, in preparation.

Green, R., Duncan, J., Seal, T., Wein-
berg, J., and Rupert, F., 1988, Charac-
terization of the sediments overlying the
Floridan aquifer system in Alachua
County, Florida: a report prepared for
the Alachua County Department of En-
vironmental Services.

Rupert, F., 1987, Geology and geomor-
phology of the Sopchoppy River, a report
prepared for the U.S. Forest Service.

Spencer, S., and Rupert, F., 1987, Geol-
ogy of Wakulla County: a report
prepared for the U.S. Soil Conservation
Service.


Papers By Staff Members In
Outside Publications

Arthur, J.D. and Ragland, P.C., 1988,
Early Mesozoic tholeiitic rocks from the
subsurface of Florida: Geological
Society of America Abstracts with
Programs, v. 20, p. 252.

Bond, P.A., 1987, Peatlands and the dis-
tribution of environmental radioactivity:
Geological Society of America Abstracts
with Programs, v.19, p.594-595.








Bond, P.A., 1988, Geology, Government
and Swamps: Geological Society of
America Abstracts with Programs, v. 20,
p. A389.

Copeland, C.W. Jr., Rheams. K.F.,
Neathery, T.L., Gilliland, W.A., Schmidt,
W., Clark, W.C. Jr., and Pope, D.E., 1988,
Quaternary geologic map of the Mobile
4 x 6 degree quadrangle, United States:
U.S. Geological Survey, Miscellaneous
Investigations Series, Map 1-1420 (NH-
16) 1:1,000,000.

Hoenstine, R.W., Lane, E., Spencer, S.,
and O'Carroll, T., 1987, A landfill site in
a karst environment, Madison County,
Florida- a case study, in Beck, B.F., and
Wilson, W.L., eds., Proceedings of the
2nd international conference on
sinkholes and the environmental impacts
of karst: Boston, A.A. Balkema, p.253-
258.

Lloyd, J.M., and Scott, T.M., 1988, in
Braunstein, J., Huddlestun, P., and Biel,
R., Gulf coast region chart, correlation of
stratigraphic units of North America
(COSUNA) Project: American Associa-
tion of Petroleum Geologists.

Mehan, D. and Bond, P.A., 1988, A
hydrogeologic reconnaissance study of
the post-Eocene unconsolidated sedi-
ments of Volusia County, Florida, in
Frazee, J., ed., Proceedings of the third
annual southeastern groundwater sym-
posium: Florida Water Well Association
Technical Division.

Schmidt, W, 1988, Overview of oil and
gas regulations and information in
Florida, in: Transactions, proceedings of
the first conference on oil and gas infor-
mation and data-base management: Ok-


lahoma Geological Survey Special Publi-
cation 88-3, p. 53-55.

Scott, T.M., 1987, The Miocene-Pliocene
of Florida: (abstract) Florida Scientist,
v.50, supplement 1, p. 28.

Scott, T.M., 1988, The Hawthorn Group
in northern peninsular Florida, in Pirkle,
F.L. and Reynolds, J.G., eds.,
Southeastern Geological Society annual
field trip guidebook: Southeastern
Geological Society, p. 16-40.

Scott, T.M., 1988, The Cypresshead For-
mation in northern peninsular Florida, in
Pirkle, F.L. and Reynolds, J.G., eds,
Southeastern Geological Society annual
field trip guidebook: Southeastern
Geological Society, p. 70-73.

Spencer, S.M., Yon, J.W., and Rupert,
F.R., 1988, Fuller's earth deposits in
Florida and southwestern Georgia, in
Proceedings of the 24th Forum on the
geology of industrial minerals, Green-
ville, S.C..



TALKS BY STAFF
MEMBERS TO
PROFESSIONAL
GROUPS

Arthur, J.D., 1988, Early Mesozoic
tholeiitic rocks from the subsurface of
Florida, a talk presented at the
Southeastern Section Meeting of the
Geological Society of America.

Arthur, J.D. and Bond, P.A., 1988, Coas-
tal Plain Research at the Florida
Geological Survey (a poster session),
presented to a United States Geological








Survey (U.S.G.S.) Symposium on Coas-
tal Plain Research, held at Reston, Vir-
ginia.

Bond, P.A., 1987,Peatlands and the Dis-
tribution of Environmental Radioac-
tivity, a talk presented at the Annual
Meeting of the Geological Society of
America, Phoenix, Arizona.

Bond, P.A., 1988, Uranium and Peat-
lands in Florida: a talk presented to
Florida State University, Department of
Geology, spring colloquium series, Tal-
lahassee, FL.

Bond, P.A., 1988, Geology, Government,
and Swamps: a talk presented to the an-
nual meeting of the Geological Society of
America, Denver, Colorado.

Hoenstine, R., 1988, The Ambient
Groundwater Monitoring Program: a
talk presented at Florida State Univer-
sity, Department of Geology, spring col-
loquium series, Tallahassee, FL.

Lane, B.E., 1987, A Landfill Site in a
Karst Environment, Madison County,
Florida-A Case Study: a talk presented to
the Second International Conference on
Karst Hydrogeology, Orlando, Florida.

Rupert, F.R., 1988, Geologic Data from
Wakulla Springs: a talk presented at
Florida State University, Department of
Geology, spring colloquium series, Tal-
lahassee, FL.

Schmidt, W., 1987, Professional
Geologist Registration in Florida-A
Summary and Update: a talk presented
to Southeastern Geological Society as
part of a panel discussion at their quarter-
ly meeting, Plant City, FL.


Schmidt, W., 1988, The Florida
Geologial Survey-a Program Overview: a
talk presented at Florida State Univer-
sity, Department of Geology, spring col-
loquium series, Tallahassee, FL.

Schmidt, W., 1988, Oil, Gas, and Mineral
Development and Florida's Coastal
Seas: Talk presented to the Workshop
on the Future of Florida's Territorial
Seas, a conference sponsored by the
Florida Governor's Office and the
Florida State University College of Law,
Tallahassee, FL.

Schmidt, W., 1988, Florida Stratigraphy
and Hydrostratigraphic Units, and the
Lithologic Descriptions We Compile-A
Need for Standardization: a talk
presented to a workshop to review the
Ambient Groundwater Program of the
Department of Environmental Regula-
tion, Tallahassee, FL.

Schmidt, W., 1988, Applied Geological
Research; a Re-Emphasis Facing Most
State Surveys: a talk presented as part of
a panel discussion, U.S. Geological Sur-
vey, Coastal Plain Research Workshop,
Reston, Virginia.

Schmidt, W., 1988, A History of the
Florida Geological Survey and Current
Review: A talk presented to the Univer-
sity of Florida, Department of Geology,
colloquium series.

Schmidt, W., 1988, Overview of Florida
Oil and Gas Geology: a talk presented to
the Florida-Minerals Management Ser-
vice Task Force on Oil Spill Risk Assess-
ment in South Florida, St. Petersburg,
FL.

Scott, T.M., 1987, The Lithostratigraphy
of the Hawthorn Group (Miocene) of








Florida: A talk presented to the quarterly
meeting of the Southeastern Geological
Society, Tallahassee, FL.

Scott, T.M., 1987, The Geological His-
tory of Florida with Special Reference to
the Hawthorn Group: A talk presented
to the combined meeting of the
American Institute of Professional
Geologists and American Institute of
Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum
Engineers, Bartow, FL.

Scott, T.M., 1988, The Florida Geologi-
cal Survey: Its Library and Data Collec-
tions: a talk presented to the
Government Documents Section of the
Florida Library Association at its annual
meeting, Miami, FL.

Scott, T.M., 1988, The Florida Geologi-
cal Survey: Its Library and Data Collec-
tions: a talk presented at the library of
the University of South Florida, Tampa,
FL.

Scott, T.M., 1988, The Geology of
Florida and the Hawthorn Group: A talk
presented to the Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
Brooksville, FL.

Scott, T.M., 1988, The Origin of Florida's
Phosphorites- Historical and Modern
Perspectives: A talk presented to the
Geology Section of the American In-
stitute of Mining, Metallurgical and
Petroleum Engineers Technical Sym-
posium, Lakeland, FL.

Scott, T.M., 1988, Fossils, Rocks and
Minerals-The Geology of North Florida:
a continuing education course offered
through the Florida State University
Center for Professional Development,
Tallahassee, FL.


Spencer, S.M., 1988, Fuller's Earth
Deposits in Florida and Southwestern
Georgia: A talk presented to the 24th
Forum on the Geology of Industrial
Minerals, Greenville, South Carolina.



EDUCATIONAL
ACTIVITIES

Arthur, J.D., 1987, Igneous Rocks and
the Florida Basement: a talk presented to
8th grade honor students, St. Petersburg,
FL.

Arthur, J.D., 1987, Interview by the As-
sociated Press concerning the effects of
earthquakes in the western U.S. on
Florida's water table.

Arthur, J.D., 1988, Participant in the
'Career Shadowing' program, Tallahas-
see, FL.

Arthur, J.D., 1988, Dinosaurs: a talk
presented to elementary students, Tal-
lahassee, FL.

Arthur, J.D., 1988, Staffed exhibit on
Florida Geology: Fossils and Minerals
Program, Florida State Museum,
Gainesville, FL.

Arthur. J.D., 1988, Karst Geology: an in-
house talk presented to the staff of the
Florida Geology Survey, Tallahassee,
FL.

Arthur, J.D., 1988, X-Ray Fluorescence
Theory and Sample Preparation Techni-
ques: a seminar at the Geology Depart-
ment, Florida State University,
Tallahassee, FL.








Bond, P.A., 1987, Environmental Geol-
ogy: a talk presented at the Smith-Wil-
liams Service Center, Tallahassee, FL.

Bond, P.A., 1987, Radon in Florida: an
inhouse talk presented to. the staff of the
Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee,
FL.

Bond,P.A., 1988, A Hydrogeologic
Reconnaissance Study of the Post-
Eocene Unconsolidated Sediments of
Volusia County, Florida: A talk
presented to the Brevard County Sum-
mer Science Institute, Brevard Com-
munity College, Cocoa, FL.

Campbell, K.M., 1987, Testimony on
geological analysis of ordinary high water
line determination for Bradley and Little
Lakes, Citrus County, Florida, for an ad-
ministrative hearing on that subject.

Lloyd, J.M., 1988, Florida Karst Geology,
a talk presented to elementary students,
Schluck's School, Tallahassee, FL.

Schmidt, W., 1987, Florida Geological
Survey-Program Overview and Project
Summaries: an in-house talk presented
to the newly elected Executive Director,
Department of Natural Resources, Tal-
lahassee, FL.

Schmidt, W., 1987, Florida Geological
Survey-Program Overview and Project
Summaries: an in-house talk presented
to the newly elected Commissioner of
Education, Department of Education,
Tallahassee, FL.


ADDITIONAL
PROFESSIONAL
ACTIVITIES

Symposia

May, 1987, Symposium on Natural
Radiation and Technologically En-
hanced Radiation in Florida, Daytona
Beach, FL.

May, 1987, Symposium on the geology of
the early Mesozoic Basins of eastern
North America: U.S. Geological Survey,
Reston, Virginia.

November, 1987, Symposium on studies
related to Continental Margins: Minerals
Management Service, The University of
Texas at Austin, Texas and the Texas
Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin,
Texas.

November, 1987, Exclusive Economic
Zone Symposium: Reston, Virginia.

March, 1988, Symposium on the
Geotechnical Applications of Ground
Penetrating Radar, Gainesville, FL.

October, 1988, Third Annual
Southeastern Groundwater Symposium:
Orlando, Florida.

September, 1988, Geographic Informa-
tion Systems Symposium- Integrating
Technology and Geoscience Applica-
tions: Sponsored by the National
Academy of Science, the U.S. Geological
Survey and the Association of American
State Geologists, Denver, Colorado.

October, 1988, The 1988 Symposium on
Radon and Radon Reduction Technol-








ogy: Sponsored by the U.S. Environmen-
tal Protection Agency, Denver,
Colorado.


Meetings

January, 1987, Quarterly Meeting of the
Southeastern Geological Society:
Gainesville, FL.

February, 1987, Quarterly Meeting of the
American Institute of the Florida section
of the American Institute of Professional
Geologists: Tallahassee, FL.

March, 1987, U.S. Geological Survey-
State Geological Survey Eastern Cluster
Meeting: Sponsored by the U.S.G.S.,
Morgantown, West Virginia.

March, 1987, Meeting of the Florida sec-
tion of the American Institute of Profes-
sional Geologists: Tallahassee, FL.

May, 1987, Forum on the Geology of
Industrial Minerals: North Aurora,
Ilinois.

May, 1987, Big Cypress Swamp Advisory
Committee Meeting: Naples, FL.

June, 1987, U.S. Army Corps of En-
gineers Interagency Meeting: Jackson-
ville, FL.

June, 1987, Annual Meeting of the As-
sociation of American State Geologists:
Traverse City, Michigan.

June, 1987, U.S. Army Corps of En-
gineers Monthly Permit Review Meet-
ing: Jacksonville, FL.


June, 1987, Annual Meeting of the Ad-
visory Board of the Florida Sinkhole Re-
search Institute.

October, 1987, Annual Meeting of the
Geological Society of America: Phoenix,
Arizona.

November, 1987, Big Cypress Swamp
Advisory Committee Meeting: Naples,
FL.

November, 1987, Monthly Meeting of
the Alabama Oil and Gas Board: Tus-
caloosa, Alabama.

December, 1987, Quarterly Meeting of
the Southeastern Geological Society:
Plant City, FL.

December, 1987, Meeting of the Florida
House of Representatives Natural
Resources Committee: Tallahassee, FL.

December, 1987, Meeting of the Inter-
state Oil Compact Commission: Santa
Fe, New Mexico.

January, 1988, Meeting of the Under-
ground Injection Practices Council:
Charleston, South Carolina.

February, 1988, U.S. Geological Survey-
State Geological Survey Eastern Cluster
Meeting: Birmingham, Alabama.

February, 1988, Quarterly Meeting of the
Ambient Groundwater Program: St.
Johns River Water Management Dis-
trict, Palatka, FL.

February, 1988, Meeting of the Florida
Board of Professional Geologists: Tal-
lahassee, FL.








February, 1988, Meeting of the Examina-
tion Committee, Florida Board of
Professional Geologists: Tampa, FL.

March, 1988, Annual Meeting of the
American Association of Petroleum
Geologists, Houston, Texas.

March, 1988, Meeting of the Florida
Board of Professional Geologists: Tal-
lahassee, FL.

March, 1988, Meeting of the American
Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and
Petroleum Engineers: Bartow, FL.

April, 1988, Southeastern Section meet-
ing of the Geological Society of America:
Columbia, South Carolina.

April, 1988, Quarterly Meeting of the
Southeastern Geological Meeting, Tal-
lahassee, FL.

April, 1988, Quarterly Meeting of the
Florida Section of the American Institute
of Professional Geologists: Tallahassee,
FL.

May, 1988, Annual Meeting of the
Florida Academy of Sciences: Tampa,
FL.

May, 1988, Meeting of the Application
Review Committee, Florida Board of
Professional Geologists: Tallahassee,
FL.

May, 1988, Quarterly Meeting of the Am-
bient Groundwater Program: Suwannee
River Water Management District, Live
Oak, FL.

June, 1988, Annual Meeting of the As-
sociation of American State Geologists:
Lexington, Kentucky.


June, 1988, Meeting of the Examination
Committee, Florida Board of Profes-
sional Geologists: Tampa, FL.

July, 1988, Meeting of the Florida Coas-
tal Resources Interagency Advisory
Committee: Tallahassee, FL.

July, 1988, Meeting of the Application
Review Committee, Florida Board of
Professional Geologists: Tallahassee,
FL.

July, 1988, Meeting of the Florida Board
of Professional Geologists: Tallahassee,
FL.

August, 1988, Quarterly Ambient
Groundwater Quality Meeting: Florida
Department of Environmental Regula-
tion, Tallahassee, FL.

August, 1988, Geographic Information
Systems: A meeting convened by the
Director of State Lands and Florida
Resources and Environmental Analysis
Center (FREAC) Tallahassee, FL.

August, 1988, Meeting of the Examina-
tion Committee, Florida Board of
Professional Geologists: Tallahassee,
FL.

September, 1988, Meeting of the Florida
Board of Professional Geologists: Tal-
lahassee, FL.

September, 1988, Meeting of the Ex-
amination Committee, Florida Board of
Professional Geologists: Tallahassee,
FL.

October, 1988, Annual Meeting of the
Geological Society of America: Denver,
Colorado.








October, 1988, Meeting of the Applica-
tion Review Committee, Florida Board
of Professional Geologists: Tallahassee,
FL.

October, 1988, Quarterly Meeting of the
Southeastern Geological Society:
Gainesville, FL.

October, 1988, Meeting of the Solid
Waste Management Advisory Commit-
tee: Orlando, FL.

November, 1988, Meeting of the Ap-
plication Review Committee, Florida
Board of Professional Geologists: Tal-
lahassee, FL.

November, 1988, Quarterly Meeting of
the Ambient Groundwater Program:
Southwest Florida Water Management
District, Tampa, FL.

November, 1988, Annual Meeting of the
National Cave Divers Association: High
Springs, FL.

November, 1988, Annual Meeting of the
American Institute of Hydrology:
Tampa, FL.

December, 1988, Meeting of the Levy
Board of County Commissioners: Bron-
son, FL.


Workshops

April, 1987, Friends of Aeromagnetic
Mapping: A workshop sponsored by the
U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Vir-
ginia.

June, 1987, Radon Geology Workshop:
A workshop sponsored by the U.S.
Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.


June, 1987, Workshop on Offshore Min-
ing: Sponsored by Manasota 88,
Longboat Key, FL.

June, 1987, Karst Hydrology Workshop:
Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.

July, 1987, Local Government Com-
prehensive Planning Workshop: Spon-
sored by the Department of Community
Affairs, Tallahassee, FL.

July, 1988, Rules Workshop: Sponsored
by the House-Senate Joint Administra-
tive Procedures Committee, Tallahassee,
FL.

April, 1988, Workshop on the Future of
Florida's Territorial Seas: Tallahassee,
FL.

June, 1988, Ambient Groundwater
Workshop: Sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Environmental Regulation for
cooperating water management districts
and counties.


Conferences

January, 1987, Annual Florida Water
Resources Conference: Tallahassee, FL.

March, 1987, Conference on Phosphate:
Sponsored by the American Institute of
Mining Engineers, Lakeland, Florida.

October, 1987, First Conference on Oil
and Gas Information and Data Base
Management: Norman, Oklahoma.

October, 1987, Annual Water Manage-
ment Conference: Tallahassee, FL.

January, 1988, Managing Florida's Water
Quality for Tomorrow's Needs: spon-










scored by the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL.

April, 1988, Conference on the Future of
Mining: Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

October, 1988, Conference on Phos-
phate: Sponsored by the American In-
stitute of Mining Engineers, Lakeland,
FL.

October, 1988, Annual Water Manage-
ment Conference, Tallahassee, FL.

November, 1988, 2nd Conference on En-
vironmental Problems in Karst Terranes
and Their Solutions: Sponsored by the
National Water Well Association, Nash-
ville, Tennessee.


Fieldtrips

January, 1988, Field trip to Leon Sinks
Geological Area: Sponsored by the U.S.
Forest Service, Apalachicola National
Forest, Leon County, FL.

February, 1988, Annual fieldtrip of the
Southeastern Geological Society:
Orange Park, FL.



PERSONNEL

Professional Staff

Jonathan D. Arthur, Geologist II,
Geologic Investigations Section, B.S.,
Florida State University, 1982, Ph.D.
Candidate, Florida State University. Re-
search Interests: Geochemistry, igneous
petrology and hydrogeology.


Paulette Bond, Geologist II, Geologic In-
vestigations Section, B.S., West Virginia
University, 1971, M.S., University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1974,
Ph.D. Candidate, Florida State Univer-
sity. Research Interests: Low tempera-
ture geochemistry and environmental
geology. Licensed Professional
Geologist, State of Florida.

Kenneth M. Campbell, Geologist II,
Geologic Investigations Section, B.S.,
Old Dominion University, 1975, M.S.,
Florida State University, 1979. Research
Interests: Cenozoic stratigraphy and
sedimentation and coastal processes.
Licensed Professional Geologist, State of
Florida.

Robert S. Caughey, Professional En-
gineer I, Fort Myers Field Office, B.S.,
University of Arizona, 1976. Research
Interests: Cenozoic stratigraphy and
hydrogeology. Licensed Professional
Geologist, State of Florida

Lawrence D. Curry, Administrator, Oil
and Gas Section, B.S., University of
South Florida, 1973. Licensed Profes-
sional Geologist, State of Florida.

Don L. Hargrove, Engineer III, Oil and
Gas Section. Geophysical permits field
observers coordinator.

Ronald W. Hoenstine, Geologist III, Of-
fice of Mineral Resources and Environ-
mental Geology, B.S., University of
Florida, 1967, M.S., University of
Florida, 1974, Ph.D., Florida State
University, 1982. Research Interests:
Hydrogeology and environmental geol-
ogy. Licensed Professional Geologist,
State of Florida.








Scott Hoskins, Geologist II, Jay Field Of-
fice. B.S., Florida State University, 1985.

Richard A. Johnson, Geologist II,
Geologic Investigations Section, B.S.,
University of Florida, 1971, M.S.,
University of Florida, 1974. Research
Interests: Cenozoic stratigraphy.
Licensed Professional Geologist, State of
Florida.

Burke Edward Lane, Geologist III, Of-
fice of Mineral Resources and Environ-
mental Geology, B.S., University of
Delaware, 1966, M.S., Pennsylvania
State University, 1968. Member: Solid
Waste Management Advisory Commit-
tee, State of Florida. Research Inter-
ests: Hydrogeology, environmental
geology and karst. Licensed Professional
Geologist, State of Florida.

Alison M. Lewis, Librarian II, B.A.,
Florida Atlantic University, 1980, M.S.,
Florida State University, 1981.

Jacqueline M. Lloyd, Geological Super-
visor I, Geologic Investigations Section,
B.S., Florida Atlantic University, 1976,
M.S., University of Chicago, 1979. Re-
search Interests: Petroleum geology,
carbonate petrology and Mesozoic
stratigraphy. Licensed Professional
Geologist, State of Florida.

Harold B. "Pete" Parker, Geologist III,
Jay Field Office, B.A., Miami University,
1950, M.S., Miami University, 1951.
Member: Florida Board of Professional
Geologists, Examination Development
Committee. Certified Petroleum
Geologist, American Association of
Petroleum Geologists. Licensed Profes-
sional Geologist, State of Florida.


Joan Ragland, Geologist II, Oil and Gas
Section, B.A., State University of New
York at Geneseo, 1973, M.S., University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1976.
Research Interests: Seismic exploration,
igneous geochemistry and petrology.
Licensed Professional Geologist, State of
Florida.

Frank R. Rupert, Geologist II, Geologic
Investigations Section, B.S., Florida At-
lantic University, 1976, M.S., Florida
State University, 1980. Research Inter-
ests: Cenozoic micropaleontology and
biostratigraphy and hydrology.
Licensed Professional Geologist, State of
Florida.

Walter Schmidt, State Geologist and
Chief, B.A., University of South Florida,
1972, M.S., Florida State University,
1977, Ph.D., Florida State University,
1983. (*Committee memberships listed
with biography in State Geologists sec-
tion). Research Interests: Cenozoic
stratigraphy, hydrogeology, environmen-
tal geology and paleogeography.
Licensed Professional Geologist, States
of Florida, South Carolina and North
Carolina. Certified Professional
Geologist, American Institute of Profes-
sional Geologists.

Thomas M. Scott, Geological Supervisor
II, Geologic Investigations Section, B.A.,
University of South Florida, 1971, M.S.,
Eastern Kentucky University, 1973,
Ph.D., Florida State University, 1986.
Member: Florida Board of Professional
Geologists, Geology Examination Com-
mittee. Research Interests: Stratig-
raphy, hydrogeology, clay mineralogy,
environmental geology, and phosphate
geology. Licensed Professional
Geologist, State of Florida, Certified








Professional Geologist, American In-
stitute of Professional Geologists.

Steven M. Spencer, Geologist II, 'Office
of Mineral Resources and Environmen-
tal Geology B.S., Florida State Univer-
sity, 1981. Research Interests:
Economic geology. Licensed Profes-
sional Geologist, State of Florida.

Charles H. Tootle, Petroleum Engineer
I, Oil and Gas Section, B.S., Louisiana
Technical University, 1961, M.S.,
Louisiana Technical University, 1964,
Ph.D., Louisiana Technical University,
1971. Research Interests: Petroleum
resources and exploration. Licensed
Professional Engineer, State of Florida
and Louisiana.

J. William Yon, Jr., Geological Super-
visor II, Office of Mineral Resources and
Environmental Geology, B.S., Florida
State University, 1951, M.S., Florida
State University, 1957. Research Inter-
ests: Economic geology and
micropaleontology. Licensed Profes-
sional Geologist, State of Florida, Cer-
tified Professional Geologist, American
Institute of Professional Geologists.


Clerical And Technical Staff

Brenda J. Brackin, Secretary Specialist

Cynthia A. "Cindy" Collier, Secretary
Specialist, A.A.S., Tallahassee Com-
munity College, 1975.

Peter M. Dobbins, Administrative Assis-
tant II, A.A., Santa Fe Junior College,
1981.

Joan V. Gruber, Secretary Specialist


Jessie L. Hawkins, Custodian

Richard Howard, Laboratory Tech-
nician I

James P. Jones, Engineering Technician
III

Ted B. Kiper, Engineering Technician
III, B.S., Florida State University, 1988.

Barbara E. McKamey, Secretary
Specialist

Sandra "Sandie" Ray, Administrative
Secretary, A.A., Chipola Junior College,
1970.

Frank Rush, Laboratory Technician I
(OPS)


Research Associates

Joseph F. Donoghue, Ph.D.

Bruce W. Nocita, Ph.D.


Student Assistants

David T. Allison

Jay Brandes

Melanie R. Carpenter

C. Renee Cooper

Melissa L. Doyle

Joel G. Duncan

Roger B. Durham

Robert E. Fisher








Richard S. Graves

Richard C. Green

Mark S. Groszos

Margaret M. Lehey

Milena M. Macesich

Katherine A. Milla

Mary T. Olivier

Thomas L. Seal

Jay M. Weinberg