<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Introduction
 Dr. Gunter honored
 Legislative acts defining duties...
 Appropriations and operating...
 Functions
 Personnel
 Florida geological survey...
 U. S. geological survey - Florida...
 Activities of the survey
 Investigations in progress on December...
 Future plans
 Samples sent to the survey for...
 Distribution of the publications...
 Public school libraries
 Reference libraries
 Library report
 Scientific meetings sponsored
 Cooperation with other agencie...
 Study of proposed cross-Florida...
 Topographic mapping
 Numerical index to topographic...
 County index to topographic...
 Repeal of section 373.27-Florida...
 Exploratory tests for petroleu...
 Geological survey office and laboratory...
 Need for resources exhibition...
 Florida mineral industry during...
 Rock and mineral producers 1954...
 Producers and distributors of bottled...
 Review of the mineral industry...
 Back Cover














Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000223/00010
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report of the Florida Geological Survey
Physical Description: 11 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1940-1961
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Geology -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation, Florida Geological Survey
Dates or Sequential Designation: 4th (1940)-14th (1959-1960).
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000376187
oclc - 01956611
notis - ACB5800
lccn - sn 87028635
System ID: UF00000223:00010
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    List of Illustrations
        Page 6
    Introduction
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Dr. Gunter honored
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Legislative acts defining duties of the survey
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Appropriations and operating budgets
        Page 15
        Appropriations July 1, 1955-June 30, 1957
            Page 16
        1955 statement of funds available, expenditures and balances
            Page 17
        1956 statement of funds available, expenditures and balances
            Page 18
            Page 19
    Functions
        Page 20
    Personnel
        Page 21
    Florida geological survey personnel
        Page 22
    U. S. geological survey - Florida personnel
        Page 23
        Ground water branch
            Page 23
        Surface water branch
            Page 24
        Quality of water branch
            Page 24
    Activities of the survey
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Electric and geologic logging
            Page 27
        The mobile rig
            Page 27
        Studies by state and federal geological survey personnel and by consultants to the survey published in 1955-1956
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Manuscripts in press or being reviewed for publication
            Page 30
            Page 31
    Investigations in progress on December 31, 1956
        Page 32
    Future plans
        Page 33
    Samples sent to the survey for examination
        Page 34
    Distribution of the publications of the survey
        Page 34
    Public school libraries
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Reference libraries
        Page 37
    Library report
        Page 38
    Scientific meetings sponsored
        Page 39
    Cooperation with other agencies
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Study of proposed cross-Florida barge canal and Sanford-Titusville canal
        Page 44
        Page 44a
        Page 44b
        Page 44c
        Page 44d
        Page 45
    Topographic mapping
        Page 46
    Numerical index to topographic maps
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 48a
    County index to topographic maps
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Repeal of section 373.27-Florida statutes
        Page 52
    Exploratory tests for petroleum
        Page 53
    Geological survey office and laboratory building
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Need for resources exhibition building
        Page 57
    Florida mineral industry during 1954 and 1955
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Rock and mineral producers 1954 and 1955
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Producers and distributors of bottled water 1955-1956
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 84a
    Review of the mineral industry during 1956
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text

04 \i








State of Florida
LEROY COLLINS, Governor


Florida State Board of Conservation
ERNEST MITTS, Director


TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT
OF THE


FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY


Covering Period
January 1, 1955 through December 31, 1956




HERMAN GUNTER
Director and State Geologist




Tallahassee, Florida
1957














FLORIDA STATE BOARD

OF

CONSERVATION


LEROY COLLINS
Governor


R. A. GRAY
Secretary of State


RAY E. GREEN
Comptroller


THOMAS D. BAILEY
Superintendent of
Public Instruction


64781


RICHARD ERVIN
Attorney General


J. EDWIN LARSON
Treasurer


NATHAN MAYO
Commissioner of
Agriculture


ERNEST MITTS
Director






I ^







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL











March 11, 1957


MR. ERNEST MITTS, Director
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

SIR:
Herewith is the Twelfth Biennial Report of the Florida Geo-
logical Survey, a division of the Florida State Board of Conservation.
This report has been prepared by the staff so as to more completely
cover the important developments during the biennium and to serve
as a matter of record. It covers the period from January 1955
to December 31, 1956.
The year 1957 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Florida
Geological Survey and because of this, we are briefly reviewing
the establishment and history of the Survey, some of its accom-
plishments, and a summation of its importance as a State agency.
A significant accomplishment during these fifty years of steady
progress was made possible by the 1955 Legislature which made
an appropriation of $387,800 for the construction of an office and
laboratory building for the Survey. On December 3, 1956, ground
was broken for the construction of this building on the campus
of Florida State University at the corner of West Tennessee Street



64781








4 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

and Woodward Avenue. This gives to the Survey an assurance
of permanency that it has not enjoyed during its first fifty years.
When these facilities can be occupied, certainly during 1957, the
Survey can better prosecute with renewed vigor the research prob-
lems that have been encountered. The facilities available with this
new building will materially assist in this accomplishment.
To conclude on a personal note, I know that you join with
me in a feeling of satisfaction and of pardonable pride as we look
back over the years of the Survey's accomplishments. We have
both, in recent years, had the privilege of being closely associated
with its work and I take this opportunity of expressing to you
my deep appreciation of your cooperation. May the next fifty years
be as rewarding and as fruitful as these which are soon to pass!
Respectfully submitted,
HERMAN GUNTER, Director


~aWs~rr~~E~n~----~=m~p- ~I~---------







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT 5

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page

Letter of Transmittal .......- ..-.... ....-....- .....-...... ....-..... 3
Introduction .....--- ...........- .. ........ .............--............. --.......-- 7
Dr. Gunter Honored .......................................... ..........-.....---.... 9
Legislative Acts Defining Duties of the Survey ..- ..--......................-... 12
Appropriations and Operating Budgets ..........................-- ...... ............ 15
Appropriations July 1, 1955-June 30, 1957................-..........-...... 16
1955 Statement of Funds Available, Expenditures and Balances .... 17
1956 Statement of Funds Available, Expenditures and Balances ..-. 18
Functions .................... ----........--- ---... ...................... .............- 20
Personnel .........................-. .............. .----- -.......-.... ...... ........ 21
Florida Geological Survey Personnel .............-------.......... ...-...........- 22
U. S. Geological Survey-Florida Personnel -.......-- ..-.....-....-................ 23
Ground W after Branch ....................-.........- .................. 23
Surface W ater Branch -.....-...........~.--- ............ .. ............- ....- 24
Quality of W ater Branch .... ................ ... ...................... ..... 24
Activities of the Survey ............... ............... ....... ........... ........ 25
Electric and Geologic Logging ....-..........-............-.............-. 27
The Mobile Rig ........... ...... .......... ....-.......... --........................... 27
Studies by State and Federal Geological Survey Personnel and by
Consultants to the Survey Published in 1955-1956 ................... 28
Manuscripts in Press or being Reviewed for Publication ....--.......-. 30
Investigations in Progress on December 31, 1956 ..............-................ 32
Future Plans ................ .................... ........-- ....... 33
Samples sent to the Survey for Examination .....-........-_.......-............. 34
Distribution of the Publications of the Survey ................. ............. ..... 34
Public School Libraries .........-............ .... .. .- .....- ...- ..-.......... 35
Reference Libraries ................---- .....- ..............- ........-.... ..... 37
Library Report ................... .................. ............-........... 38
Scientific Meetings Sponsored ...........~.--- ....-...... .... ..... ................ 39
Cooperation with Other Agencies ...-......... ....-...........--............ 40
U. S. Geological Survey ...........- .... .................. ... ......... ...... 40
Ground W after Branch ..................... ........ .... .................. 40
Surface Water Branch .....- ..... ...-... ......... .......... ........ 40
Quality of Water Branch ..........................-............. -. 42
U. S. Bureau of Mines ......--- ............... .......-........ 43
University of Florida ............---............... ..... ................. 43
Florida State Board of Health .......-.......... ......... ..................... 44
Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District .......--..... 44
Other Agencies .....--. ...... .........................--. 44
Study of Proposed Cross-Florida Barge Canal and Sanford-
Titusville Canal ..................... ....---..... .................. 44
Topographic Mapping ...........................- .......... ---------... 46
Numerical Index to Topographic Maps ...........--......................... 47
County Index to Topographic Maps ........................ ....................... 49
Repeal of Section 373.27-Florida Statutes .....-............ .........-... 52
Exploratory Tests for Petroleum -..................-..-......... ........-...- 53








6 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Geological Survey Office and Laboratory Building ....--.........-................ 54
Need for Resources Exhibition Building ................. .................. 57
Florida Mineral Industry During 1954 and 1955 .................................. 58
Rank of Southeastern States in Value of Rock and Mineral
Production ...........................- ..........-----.....- 60
Phosphate Rock ....................... ..... ... ...... ..--......... 61
Heavy Minerals ......-......... ....... .... ......... .----------------- 62
Cement ..........-....-...-..........- ... --- -.... -------......- 63
Clay ................- .... .. .... ......-.. .........-------------- 64
Limestone ........-.. .....~........... .............- -..... .---..... 65
Sand and Gravel ...........................................- .......... 65
Petroleum ....----...........-............... ----- ---------......- 65
Peat ........- ..................- ....... ........ .. .. ...-...... ..... 67
Rock and Mineral Producers 1954 and 1955 ..................-......- ............ .. 69
Producers and Distributors of Bottled Water 1955-1956 .............--........ 82
Review of the Mineral Industry During 1956 ...........-..............- ...... ...... 85





ILLUSTRATIONS

Page
Typical Mining Scene in the Land-Pebble Phosphate District .......... Cover
Figure 1 Award of Merit to Dr. Herman Gunter -.............................. 11
2 Location of Observation Wells -.......................
3 Areas of Ground-Water Investigations During 1956
4 Areas Where Ground-Water Reports are Available Between
Pages 44-45
5 Stream Flow Measuring Stations in Operationages 4-4
December 31, 1956 ............................. .. ......
6 Index to Published Topographic Maps .........................facing 46
7 Office and Laboratories for the Florida Geological
Survey, under Construction (March 1957) ........ -- ................... 55
8 Graph of Annual Value of Rock and Mineral Materials
M ined in Florida ................... .........---... .... ........ -........ 59
9 Development and Production Record of the
Sunniland Field, Collier County ................. ........... ........... 66
10 Slash pine plantings on overburdened windows and small
lakes that are suitable for stocking with game fish are
typical results of land use programs designed to return
mined-out areas to productivity .......................................... 67
11 Stand of slash pine planted on a mined-out area under
the land utilization program of the American Agricultural
Chemical Company, Pierce ........----.....-..... ................ ..... 68
12 Mineral Resources and Industries of Florida ...............facing 84
Table 1 Mineral Industry in Florida 1952-1955 ................................. 84
2 Estimated Values of Mineral Production in Florida, 1956 ... 85







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Twelfth Biennial Report
of the
Florida Geological Survey

INTRODUCTION
In 1957 the Florida Geological Survey will have served Florida
for one-half century, through years of office routine, investigation
planning, finance adjusting, letter writing, interviews, conferences,
gathering data on resources and on production and development.
These have been years of hope and despair, but ones of gradual and
steady development of a mutual respect of industry, agriculture
and the people of Florida with the Survey.
The Survey was most fortunate in having as its first State
Geologist, Dr. E. H. Sellards, whose great energy, able training,
and wide scientific interest produced a number of outstanding con-
tributions to the knowledge of our mineral and water resources
and made the infant Survey an acceptable department of the State
government. Dr. Sellards was State Geologist from 1907 to 1919
and, during these 12 years, he published 23 papers on the geology
and resources of the State, including excellent observations on the
phosphate deposits. The youthful Survey concentrated its activities
on compiling the details of stratigraphy and geology and collecting
resource date on phosphates and other minerals, water, road mate-
rials and the remains of former life, all requiring considerable
field work. Several maps illustrating the distribution of rocks,
minerals, water and other natural resources were prepared and
published.
The early acceptance of the Survey resulted from the accom-
plishments of Dr. Sellards and other Survey personnel and reflects
great credit on his indefatigable energy and skillful management
of the meager appropriation of $7,500 per year. The progress,
while measured as great today, was not satisfactory to Dr. Sellards
and the prospects for a permanent progressive Survey seemed so
discouraging, he therefore accepted a more promising offer with
the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, in Austin, Texas, eventually
becoming its director. Upon his retirement, he was made Director
of the Texas Memorial Museum.
Dr. Herman Gunter, the present State Geologist, who has been
with the Survey since shortly after its creation, succeeded Dr.







8 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Sellards in 1919. The appropriations for the Geological Survey
were at first not large and sometimes not sufficient to meet the
demands for service and information, but these have been managed
with economy to serve the State's best interests. Dr. Gunter has
made cooperation with Federal and other State organizations a
leading feature of his planning and where needed he has obtained
the services of specialists to develop the details on resources.
During the orderly procedure of its work schedule, a geological
survey can be expected to develop the details of stratigraphic
sequence, to prepare geologic and mineral resource maps, locate
and describe economically valuable minerals and to encourage
industry to utilize these. During the years the Geological Survey
was directed by Dr. Gunter, regular reports on known minerals,
phosphate, limestone, sand and gravel, peat, rutile, zircon, ilmenite,
clays, soils and water supplies, have been issued; cement, clay,
sand and gravel, phosphate, lime, numerous cement block, several
heavy mineral and many water-supply industries have been helped
in their establishment. Some notice has also been given to land
forms including abandoned shorelines, terraces, the present beaches
of our extremely long shoreline, and to changes in stream courses
as they relate to our geology and structure. A particularly happy
relationship with the public schools has been created, whereby
needed instructional aids are made available and attractive exhi-
bitions of the State's wealth of fossil materials are developed.
Largely through the use of specialists, the extensive and abundant
occurrences of vertebrate and invertebrate fossil remains have
been given appropriate attention.
Florida for many years has been considered as a possible oil
producing state and in 1943 a small low gravity oil field was dis-
covered in Collier County and later a smaller production was
obtained in Dade County. Prior to discovery, the Survey had issued
a number of publications that summarized the stratigraphy and
geology of the State as they relate to oil. A comprehensive yearly
oil and gas exploratory activity summary has been issued. Before
oil was found, the Legislature sought to encourage exploration by
giving a bonus of $50,000 to the discoverer. The recipient of this
bonus, the Humble Oil and Refining Company, in a most generous
action, added $10,000 to the bonus and donated $30,000 each to the
University of Florida and Florida State University.
Resources other than rocks, minerals and water have not been
ignored by the Survey planning. Many geological surveys in earlier







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


days employed botanists or biologists. Florida was among these,
and studies on the vegetation of portions of the State, peat, beach
growths and natural features of southern Florida have been pub-
lished. Because different soils support different vegetations, and
since soils result from decomposed rocks, the vegetative community
pattern is often controlled by the underlying rock; hence, the
identification of plants may assist in mapping the geology.
The State's largest income is from tourists, who are attracted
to the new and often strange rocks, sediments and related resources.
The questions of these inquisitive visitors and of our own citizens
are continuous and include almost every imaginable phase of
geology-Does the artesian water come from West Virginia, are
there underground streams, the thousands of lakes, the good
beaches, large springs rising as rivers, Indian remains, shells and
shell mounds, hardpan, wells? In responding to these, Dr. Gunter,
fortified by patience, an even temperament, and a thorough knowl-
edge of the State and its resources, has caused the Survey to be
recognized as a needed and useful organization from which help
and a courteous reception can be expected.

DR. GUNTER HONORED*
The Florida Geological Survey and Herman Gunter have been
synonymous-the Survey being created in 1907 and the young
geology student being hired shortly thereafter. Together the two
matured. There have been but two State Geologists in Florida-
Dr. Elias Sellards until 1919 and Herman Gunter. It is significant
that the Geological Survey occupies its position as an honored and
respected department because of able direction through difficult
periods. Seldom does a state benefit through the labor of one man
at a respected position for fifty years. In August of 1957, Florida
achieves this distinction, and will have as the head of the geological
department the Dean of the State Geologists, Dr. Gunter having
served in this capacity longer than any present State Geologist.
On December 10, 1943, the Soil Science Society of Florida,
meeting in Gainesville, recognized the considerable service that
Dr. Gunter had then given to Florida in these words:
"Mr. Gunter's contributions to the development of the natural
resources of the State have been numerous and fundamental. He has
worked unceasingly for the conservation and proper use of underground
water supplies. He has made valuable studies of her deposits of clay,
dolomite, monazite and the various types of phosphate. These and other
*Prepared by R. O. Vernon







10 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

studies are being continued and the Bulletins issued by the Survey
present authoritative information with respect to the geology and
natural resources of the State and, as such, are in constant demand by
potential industries seeking locations in the State.
"His record of thirty-seven years of outstanding public service
to the State, his distinguished contributions to her economic geology
and the study of her natural resources, and the scientific and conserva-
tive approach which has characterized all of his work were deemed
worthy of special recognition by his Alma Mater when, in the spring
of the present year he was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor
of Science by the University of Florida.
"In view of the splendid contributions Dr. Gunter has made thru
the years to the development of Florida's agriculture thru his early
and comprehensive work on the location and management of her
water resources, the systematic appraisal and development of her
mineral resources, including her phosphates, his capable direction of
the Soil Survey work in the State since the time of its inception and
the splendid part he has taken in many of the meetings of our Society
of which he is a Charter Member, it is indeed a pleasure and an honor
to dedicate this, the Sixth Volume of the Proceedings, to him in rec-
ognition of the fine public service he has rendered."

The contribution to the State's welfare recognized thirty-eight
years ago continued and on November 13, 1956, the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce recognized Dr. Gunter's fifty years of wise
and unbiased counsel and the value of this in the development of
the State's economy by an "Award of Merit" reproduced in figure 1.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


THE FLORIDA STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE



Award eof 'rit


TO


DR. HERMAN GUNTER
Geologist of the State of Florida



Whose wise and unbiased counsel over the past 50 years has been of
inestimable value to the developers of the State's economy




Presented this thirteenth day of November
Nineteen Hundred Fifty-six, AD.






EXECUTI-VE VJCE PRESIDENT



Attest:! \ .

CORPORATE SECRETARY
V







12 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

LEGISLATIVE ACTS DEFINING DUTIES OF THE SURVEY

The Florida Geological Survey was established by the Legis-
lature of 1907 (Acts of 1907, Chapter 5681, sections 1-8), being
approved by Governor N. B. Broward, June 3, 1907. The law
provides that the Survey shall explore for "minerals, water supply
and other natural resources of the State," and shall prepare reports
and maps covering "description of such surveys and explorations,
occurrence and location of mineral and other deposits of value,
surface and subterranean water supply and power and mineral
waters, and the best and most economical methods of development,
together with analysis of soils, minerals and mineral waters ."
It further provides that whenever "any mineral deposits, or other
substances of value" are discovered, "the owner of the land upon
which such deposits occur" must be notified.

The Geological Survey operated under the original Act, except
for increased appropriations, until 1933 (Acts of 1933, Chapter
16178, sections 1-4), when the Geological Survey, the Department
of Game and Fresh Water Fish and the Shell Fish Commission
were placed within the supervision of a State Board of Conserva-
tion. Two years later, in 1935, the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission was made a distinct department, leaving the Geological
Survey and the Shell Fish Commission in the Conservation Depart-
ment. These two divisions, however, each obtains its appropriations
from the general revenue fund and the administration is distinctly
separate, the Director of the Department of Conservation serving
as the nominal administrative head.

During the 1955-57 biennium the Survey operated in accord-
ance with laws that established the responsibilities and duties of
the department, published as Florida Statutes (1955) 370.04 (6
sections), 370.051 to 370.055 and 377.06 to 377.40.

The duties and responsibilities of the Geological Survey as
given in the creative Act of 1907 were reenacted in the redefinition
of duties of the State Board of Conservation as contained in Laws
of 1953, Chapter 28145. During the same year (Laws of 1953,
Chapter 28253), additional duties and responsibilities were given
to the State Geologist to insure that artesian (flowing) wells shall
be capped, if the water therefrom is not being used. A report of
an inventory of flowing wasteful wells, begun in 1955, is being
published as Information Circular No. 10.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Since its organization, the Geological Survey has compiled
data on the exploration activity in search for oil and gas in Florida.
Much of the information on exploration has been given voluntarily
by the oil and gas operators and these data have encouraged addi-
tional activity in the State. Not until 1945, with the increased
interest in oil prospecting in the State, was a law (Acts of 1945,
Chapter 22819, sections 1-39) enacted to cover the possibilities
of production and to regulate the oil and gas industry. The Florida
Geological Survey, with the State Geologist serving as Assistant
Secretary, has administered the provisions of this law through
the Oil and Gas Division of the State Board of Conservation, under
provisions of 377.08 of the Florida Statutes. The Survey has stored
all rock samples and cores, surveys and forms filed under the Rules
and Regulations adopted under this law as required by 377.22,
Florida Statutes.
In regard to water resources, the State Geological Survey has
continued its interest in these resources, that began with the
organization of the Survey and the publication of its first bulletin,
"A Preliminary Report on the Underground Water Supply of
Central Florida." Attempts to regulate the use of water in Florida
have for the most part been special bills confined to specific counties
having a stated population and to special acts creating local drain-
age districts and empowering these. The areas included in these
laws were local sections where some of the citizens recognized
the needs for some conservation practices and the installation of
reasonable rules covering the use of water. The State Geologist
was designated as the enforcement officer in the Laws of 1929,
Chapter 14581, to regulate water, oil and gas wells in certain
counties, but no appropriations for enforcement were ever granted
and this law could not be made operative.
In 1955 (Acts of 1955, Chapter 29748, sections 1-8) a general
law created a Water Resources Study Commission and directed the
State Geological Survey to assist this Commission in compiling
data on the water resources of Florida.
Water Resources Study Commission: The Commission was
composed of Byron E. Herlong, Chairman, James A. Ball, Jr.,
Vice-Chairman, B. W. Helvenston, Jr., Senator Doyle E. Carlton,
Jr., Senator H. B. Douglas, Representative Roy Surles and Repre-
sentative Harry W. Westberry. Dr. David B. Smith of the Engi-
neering School at the University of Florida was appointed director.
Some member, generally Herman Gunter, Robert O. Vernon or






14 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

W. P. Still, of the Geological Survey, attended every meeting held
by the Commission and Dr. Vernon and Mr. Still were appointed
to the committee to prepare a report on the occurrence of ground
water.
Nine fact-finding committees were appointed to compile data
on phases of the water resources and to recommend a course of
action to conserve these resources or to use them most wisely
should such action be needed. Each committee brought together
the facts regarding a particular category of water resources, in-
cluding: a local water problem inventory; a compilation of the
laws that relate to the legal control and rights to water; establish-
ing the amount and kinds of use of water and estimating future
needs; making an inventory of pollution controls and hazards and
anticipating the problems of possible increases in pollution with
growth of the State; computing the various land uses of Florida;
compiling data on and describing in nontechnical language the
occurrence, quality and distribution of ground and surface waters.
The Commission also recognized the need for an education
committee to disseminate to the public the information compiled
by the fact-finding committees and encourage newspaper assistance
and participation.
The Commission, after review of the inclusive data on water
resources, determined the needs of the State. A series of tentative
conclusions and broad recommendations was presented at public
hearings held in Miami, West Palm Beach, Fort Myers, Tampa,
Pensacola, Tallahassee, Jacksonville and Orlando, and amended
according to the suggestions received from those attending the
hearings.
The final study and recommendations have been printed in
an excellent and comprehensive report entitled "Florida's Water
Resources," copies of which can be obtained from the Water
Resources Study Commission, Gainesville, Florida, and from the
Florida Geological Survey. The eleven final broad recommendations
to be considered by the Legislature are:
1) That a comprehensive water law be established in Florida.
2) That the law preserve insofar as possible the existing rights of
water users in Florida as developed by our present statutes and
case law.
3) That in the law a set of legal definitions be included so as to clarify
existing water law and the rights of our people thereunder.
4) That an agency be established under the State Board of Conser-
vation to administer the comprehensive water law and to assure






TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


the fullest utilization of the State's water resources by research,
planning and implementation. Further, that the Board be instructed
to make periodic recommendations to the Legislature for suitable
programs and legislation based on the Board's findings.
5) That the Board be authorized to exercise regulatory powers over
the use of the State's water resources only after full public hear-
ings are held and a determination made that such regulation is
necessary in the general welfare. Further, that such regulatory
powers include the following functions:
a. To authorize the capture, storage and use of waters, including
flood waters, in excess of existing reasonable uses; and to
authorize the diversion of such waters beyond riparian or
overlying land; and
b. To establish reasonable rules for conservation of water in
regions where diversion of surface or underground waters
exceeds or threatens to exceed the natural replenishment of
such waters or to render them unfit for use by reason of salt-
water intrusion or other causes.
6) That provision be made for appeals to the courts of Florida from
decisions of the Board.
7) That a program be established by the Board to provide the public
with useful and current information on the activities and findings
of the Board and its cooperating agencies.
8) That the Board be authorized to cooperate with Federal, State
and local agencies and with water-use organizations in Florida,
when such cooperation will contribute to the realization of the
over-all water policy developed and administered by the Board.
9) That the Board be authorized to require permits for, and establish
conditions with respect to, all artificial weather modification attempts
within the State.
10) That a State agency be instructed by the Legislature to investigate
the beach and shore erosion problem in Florida and to make recom-
mendations concerning the desirability of establishing comprehensive
beach and shore erosion protection laws.
11) That funds be made available to complete such mapping in Florida
as is necessary to determine the major hydrologic areas of the State.

APPROPRIATIONS AND OPERATING BUDGETS

The creative Act of 1907 carried a continuing appropriation
of $7,500 annually which was the Survey's budget for several years.
In 1921, the Legislature (Acts of 1921, Chapter 8426, sections 1-14)
created the Budget Commission in order that the State's budgetary
requirements could be handled more realistically to correspond
to expanded programs, changed costs and to give the Cabinet and
Legislature the opportunity to review the work program and ex-
pense of State government. In 1923, the appropriation of the
Survey was increased to $10,345 and the budget has grown rather
modestly to the 1955-57 biennium. Currently the Survey is oper-
ating on a biennial budget of $450,995. The 1955 Legislature gave
the County Commissioners of Baker County permission to enter
an agreement to have certain of its water resources inventoried.







16 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Because the Florida Geological Survey already had a cooperative
agreement with the Federal Survey covering the collection of water
resource data, the Baker County officials increased the Survey's
1955-57 funds and the existing cooperation with the Federal Survey
by $2,400. The preliminary data on this study are available to
the Legislature and to the Baker County officials upon request.

When the Water Survey and Research Division of the State
Board of Conservation was abolished in 1955, several surface water
gaging stations, being maintained in cooperation with the Federal
Survey, were left unfinanced. Because the State Geological Survey
had the largest water resources investigation program, it was felt
that the responsibility of continuing these stations belonged to the
Survey. The funds appropriated to the Geological Survey did not
include money for additional gaging activity and the Trustees of
the Internal Improvement Fund were petitioned to make sufficient
funds available to the Survey to finance these important stations,
so that the resource data record would not be interrupted. The
Survey biennial budget was increased by $14,600 for this purpose.

APPROPRIATIONS
July 1, 1955 June 30, 1957
Current:
The appropriation under which the Florida Geological Survey is currently
operating for the biennium July 1, 1955, to June 30, 1957, follows:
7-1-55 to 7-1-56 to
6-30-56 6-30-57 Total
1. Geological Survey:
(a) Salaries ................... --... .. .$ 84,689 $ 84,690 $169,379
(b) Expenses ......--.-------......... .. 73,600 73,600 147,200
(c) Operating Capital Outlay .....-.. 6,000 6,000 12,000
2. Special:
(a) Enforcing Section 370.051/
370.054, F. S. --................. 20,000 20,000 40,000
(b) Water Survey .......................-- -- 12,708 12,708 25,416
(c) Survey Cross-Florida Barge
Canal from Sanford to Titusville 15,000 ....... 15,000
(d) Flagler and St. Johns Counties
Water Control Survey --......-..... 25,000 ... 25,000
3. Trust Funds:
(a) Internal Improvement Fund .-. 7,300 7,300 14,600
(b) Baker County Commission ......-. 1,500 900 2,400
TOTAL ................-.. ....... ..... $245,797 $205,198 $450,995
Requested:
1. Geological Survey:
(a) Salaries ..-....--.......-......... ... $104,552 $107,732 $212,284
(b) Expenses .-...-------...... ...------. 214,340 184,040 398,380
(c) Operating Capital Outlay ......... -- 13,000 7,500 20,500








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


2. Special:
Enforcing Section 370.051/
370.054, F. S ........... ...... .............. 50,000 50,000 100,000

TOTAL ..................................$381,892 $349,272 $731,164
In addition, an appropriation of $540,500 was requested to construct a Natural
Resources Building.

1955
STATEMENT OF FUNDS AVAILABLE,
EXPENDITURES AND BALANCES

January 1 to December 31


SALARIES
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 -...............-.... --.......-..-. ...$ 6,067.86
General Revenue Release January 1 -.....--..-. 19,262.50
General Revenue Release April 1 ........-............ 19,262.50
General Revenue Release July 1 .---........-......... 21,172.25
General Revenue Release October 1............ 21,059.75

Total Available ................
Expenditures:
Salaries and Wages .....--.....-........ .......

Balance ....... ....-.....--- -----
EXPENSES
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ...... ....................-.............$ 2,460.36
General Revenue Release January 1 .......... 19,200.00
General Revenue Release April 1 ................... 19,200.00
General Revenue Release July 1 ......................- 18,400.00
General Revenue Release October 1 ....--.......... 18,400.00
Encumbrances ............................-.....- 4,734.34


Total Available ---...........-...... .....--
Expenditures: Expenses
Professional Fees and Consultant Service ....$
Communication and Transportation of Things
General Printing and Reproduction Services
Repairs and Maintenance ......-.....-- .............-....-
Travel .......................-......-...........- .
Other Contractural Services .....................
Agricultural, Educational, Medical, Scientific
Materials and Supplies .-.......-..............---...--
Maintenance Materials and Supplies ..................
Motor Fuels and Lubricants ..............................
Office Materials and Supplies ........-- .................
Other Materials and Supplies --..-........ ......
Insurance and Surety Bond? ...........................
Pensions and Benefits ..................... ...-- -........
Rental of Buildings and Equipment ................-
Other Current Charges and Obligations -..........-
Revolving and Working Fund .......... -..........

Total Expenditures-Expenses ---

Balance .............----------.


$86,824.86

75,962.30

$10,862.56


$82,394.70


734.27
2,021.90
7,656.33
1,441.02
6,615.62
13,825.44

1,823.40
421.43
1,459.45
2,280.82
25.54
1,061.89
298.53
6,289.75
148.75
150.00


$76,254.14

$6,140.56








18 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ....................................-- .......$ 7,284.53
Refund Tallahassee Camera Center ....-............... 169.75
Release from Reserve ...................... -------.... ... -- 4,175.00
Transfer from Expenses .................--..... --... -. ..--450.00
General Revenue Release July 1......--................... 6,000.00

Total Available ....---. ...-...... ---------- ------- $18,079.28
Expenditures: Operating Capital Outlay
Books ......--.------.. -----------------. 771.80
Educational, Medical, Scientific and
Agricultural Equipment ----.............-------........---- 2,967.95
Motor Vehicles, Passenger ....-- ........------...-. 2,818.50
Office Furniture and Equipment --..---...--........---- 7,620.82

Total Expenditures ..........--...........----- $14,179.07

Balance .....-.. --........--...----...-.. --------- $ 3,900.21

1956

STATEMENT OF FUNDS AVAILABLE,
EXPENDITURES AND BALANCES
January 1 to December 31
SALARIES
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 .....--...----------.....-..--..--$10,862.56
General Revenue Release January 1 .--......-...... 21,059.75
General Revenue Release April 1 -....-............. 21,059.75
General Revenue Release July 1 ....--.............---- 22,013.00
General Revenue Release October 1 ........-...- 22,013.00

Total Available ------.-..... --.............-------- $97,008.06
Expenditures:
Salaries and Wages --....---------........... ---.. ----- 84,931.35

Balance -------............---------------------------- $12,076.71
EXPENSES
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 .--......-...--.........---.....- ...... $ 6,140.56
General Revenue Release January 1 ............-- 18,400.00
General Revenue Release April 1 ....-...........--.. 18,400.00
General Revenue Release July 1 .-...................--. 18,400.00
General Revenue Release October 1 --..........-----18,400.00
Refund printing SEPM Guidebook ..-........-....... 554.29

Total Available .. --............. .......... ... $80,294.85
Expenditures: Expenses
Professional Fees and Consultant Service ..-..--.$ 1,203.75
Communication and Transportation of Things 1,616.13
General Printing and Reproduction Services .... 4,942.37
Repairs and Maintenance .....-- ...................--------. 2,600.05
Travel ... ----...............-.---------- ----------. 4,544.09
Other Contractural Services --.....-...........--.......--. 49,649.66
Agricultural, Educational, Medical, Scientific
Materials and Supplies ..--------------------. 1,535.22







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Maintenance Materials and Supplies .....--......... 255.16
Motor Fuels and Lubricants .......................... 1,432.37
Office Materials and Supplies ....................... 1,608.11
Other Materials and Supplies ........--....- ..-.... 104.42
Insurance and Surety Bonds ...........--................. 394.99
Rental of Building and Equipment ......-..........- 5,000.00
Dues and Subscriptions .-.......-.. ............. 46.25
Revolving and Working Fund ......................-.. 100.00
Other Current Obligations .............. ............. .. 1,365.00
Total Expenditures-Expenses -.............-. $76,397.57
Balance ...................- ....- .............-....... $ 3,897.28
OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ....- ..........-- ............ .... .. ....$ 5,261.17
Release from General Revenue July 1 ......---.. 6,000.00
Total Available ........- .....-........... ..... .. $11,261.17
Expenditures: Operating Capital Outlay
Books ............. ................. ....... ........... .....$. $ 482.05
Educational, Medical, Scientific, and
Agricultural Equipment ................. .............. 233.54
Motor Vehicles, Passenger -................-........... 1,270.00
Office Furniture and Equipment .......-.......... 191.55
Total Expenditures .................... ............ .. $ 2,177.14
Balance ................... ............ ...... ..-. $ 9,084.03

The biennial budget of $450,995 crowns fifty years of service
that the Geological Survey has been privileged to give to Florida.
Recognition of the contributions made to the State's economic,
industrial and recreational growth through the constantly expand-
ing resource data collection program has been slow in arriving.
During the depression and recovery years of 1933 to 1938,
the Survey experienced many and severe difficulties. Money was
difficult to obtain and the political atmosphere was not conducive
to the development of small, scientific and unbiased State agencies.
However, with the encouragement of tried and true friends, the
Survey was held together through the perseverance and courage
of the director, who served for a time with reduced pay in order
that the Survey might continue. Political interference has not
been experienced since that time, and the Survey is today generally
accepted as a useful and needed implement of the government,
from whom unbiased facts can be obtained.
The Survey is proud of these fifty years of service and of the
confidence of those people whom it serves, as evidenced by the
commendations it has received on the high character of work it
performs.







20 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

FUNCTIONS

The functions of the Florida Geological Survey might be briefly
outlined as follows:

1. To study the geology, map the structure and stratigraphy of the var-
ious formations of the State and to issue reports covering these
studies.
2. To study and publish papers on the individual mineral resources:
a) Since 1929 cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in water-
resource studies has been conducted. Detailed studies of surface
water, ground water and quality of waters, with geological infor-
mation, are made and published.
b) The 1955 Legislature created a Water Resources Study Com-
mission and specified that the Survey should be an advisory mem-
ber. It is functioning in that capacity in gathering data on the
water resources, now published as a report to the 1957 Legislature.
c) Active laboratory and field work leading to the tabulation of data,
and the publication of reports covering the mineral wealth, the
kinds and divisions of rock strata, the attitudes of the rock,
the economic possibilities of development and many other fields
of study are conducted continuously.
3. The 1953 Legislature enacted a law requiring that valves be installed
on all flowing wells and that the water not be wasted. The 1955
Legislature appropriated funds with which an inventory of flowing
wells is being made leading to the enforcement of this statute. A
report on this activity is being issued as Information Circular No. 10.
4. The State Geological Survey administers through the State Board
of Conservation the rules and regulations pertaining to the explora-
tion for oil and gas. Some reports on the geology of the State pertain
to oil and gas occurrence, and an oil and gas activity report is pub-
lished annually as yearly supplements to Information Circular No. 1.
5. Mineral production statistics are tabulated in cooperation with the
U. S. Bureau of Mines and the U. S. Bureau of The Census. Per-
iodically, a minerals resources bulletin is published. Bulletin 24 is
the last published, but a more comprehensive minerals summation
is in manuscript form.
6. The increase in industrial and commercial development of the min-
eral resources is encouraged and assisted, often in cooperation with
other State agencies. Some mineral resources are evaluated in
cooperation with the U. S. Bureau of Mines.
7. The Survey confers with and advises the citizens of Florida and
private, State and Federal agencies on problems of geology and
hydrology. In particular, a very active cooperation exists with the
State Board of Health on public supply and drainage wells.
8. The preparation of all kinds of maps but especially including topo-
graphic and planimetric maps is encouraged and assisted.
9. The Legislature of Florida requires that specimens of minerals and
other natural resources be collected and displayed as industrial and
educational aids to the citizens of Florida.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


PERSONNEL
Responsibilities added to those of the Survey by the 1955
Legislature required additions to the personnel and certain reorgan-
ization of activities. Mr. C. W. Hendry, Jr., who had been assistant
geologist with the Survey since September 1949, was made the
Director of Water Investigations with the responsibility of making
an inventory of flowing wells that could be used to enforce sections
370.051-370.054 of the Florida Statutes. Messrs. George D. Hack,
James A. Lavender, Fred B. Jaicks and Gilbert H. Sears have been
employed to assist in the inventory. Considerable progress has
been made in this inventory, approximately 23 of 45 counties in
which these wells occur having been completed. A very large num-
ber of wells that flow highly saline water and many that are not
used were discovered. A complete report will be made to the
Legislature as Florida Geological Survey Information Circular
No. 10.
Stanley J. Olsen joined the staff of the Florida Geological
Survey, February 1, 1956, as vertebrate paleontologist, after ten
years of service with the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard
University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Mr. Olsen's first task was
to check, classify and put into orderly arrangement the creditable
collection of vertebrate fossils which the Survey had collected
through the years. Mr. Olsen has made rapid and excellent prog-
ress in classifying, cataloguing and orderly storing of such fossils.
In addition, he has made several trips to the field, each resulting
in additions to the Survey collections. This is particularly true
from the prize Thomas Farm locality in Gilchrist County, the
quarries of the Dixie Lime Products Company in the Reddick area,
Marion County, and the caves near Lecanto, Citrus County. With
the encouragement that each trip to these areas brings, we feel
confident that the collections of the Florida Geological Survey can
be built up to reflect much credit on the organization and afford
the citizens of Florida and the public generally much pleasure and
satisfaction when they are exhibited.
From June 25, 1956, until September 15, 1956, Mr. Clayton
Ray, graduate in vertebrate paleontology at Harvard University,
Cambridge, Massachusetts, assisted Mr. Olsen in office, laboratory
and field work on vertebrate collections. This special work was
initiated primarliy in anticipation of moving into the new Survey
office and laboratory building, funds for which were provided by the
1955 Legislature.







22 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PERSONNEL

January 1, 1955 to December 31, 1956

FULL TIME STAFF


Gunter, Herman
Vernon, R. O.
Calver, James L.
Hendry, Charles W., Jr.
Lavender, James A.

Hack, George D.

Yon, James William, Jr.
Bishop, Ernest W.
Puri, Harbans S.
Olsen, Stanley J.
Janson, Andrew R.
Highsmith, Kenneth J.
Murphy, Simmie L.
Still, Wright P.
Miller, F. D., Jr.
Lester, Charles L.
Campbell, Mary R.
Thompson, Ralph D.
Little, E. Corinne
Novak, Mary Cathryn
Shuler, Ruth A.
Coyner, Carolyn S.
Youngblood, Betty L.
Lynn, Billy J.
Knight, Jo Ann
Kirk, Muriel M.
Howe, Bobby Lee
Selling, Charlie
McBride, John
Barnes, M. L.
PART TIME WORKERS
Blow, Suzanne K.
Almore, Mary G.
Jaicks, Fred B.
Sproul, C. Ross
DeBats, Charles M.
Sears, Gilbert H., Jr.
Jernigan, Robert M.
Brenneman, Lionel
Brokaw, J. L.
Emrich, G. H.
Gibbons, Janie M.
Gould, J. C.
Lapinski, W. J.
McIntosh, Eleanor A.
RESEARCH CONSULTANTS
White, William A.
Winters, Herbert H.
Ray, Clayton E.
Pirkle, E. C.
Lund, Ernest
DuBar, Jules
Oglesby, Woodson R.


Director and State Geologist
Asst. Director and Asst. State Geologist
Geologist
Director, Water Investigations
Entered Mar. 15, 1956 Asst. Director,
Water Investigations
Resigned Sept. 30, 1955 Field Hydrologist,
Water Investigations
Assistant Geologist
Entered Nov. 7, 1955 Field Geologist
Paleontologist
Entered Feb. 1, 1956 Vertebrate Paleontologist
Illustrator
Entered Nov. 1, 1955 Draftsman
Entered Aug. 1, 1955 Laboratory Aide
Entered July 1, 1955 Engineering Aide
Resigned Feb. 15, 1956 Accountant
Resigned Sept. 7, 1955 Accountant
Feb. 1956 to May 1956 Bookkeeper-Clerk
Entered May 16, 1956 Accountant
Executive Secretary
On leave Feb. 1 to Apr. 1956 Secretary
Secretary
Entered Dec. 1, 1955 Secretary
Entered July 1, 1955 Secretary
Jan. 1955 to Oct. 1955 Secretary
Sept. 1955 to May 1956 Secretary-Clerk
Librarian
Resigned July 31, 1955 Laboratory Aide
Sample Washer
Retired May 15, 1956 Janitor
Entered June 11, 1956 Janitor


June 1956 to Aug. 1956 Typist
Entered Aug. 1956 Typist
Entered June 1, 1956 Field Geologist
Entered June 1, 1956 Rodman
June 1, 1956 to Aug. 31, 1956 Rodman
June 11, 1956 to Aug. 31, 1956 Field Geologist
March to May, 1956 Draftsman
June to August, 1955 Field Assistant
June 1955 to May 1956 Draftsman
June to August, 1955 Surveyor
Oct. 1955 to Jan. 1956 Typist
June to Aug. 1955 Rodman
July 1955 to Feb. 1956 Field Assistant
July 1955 to Sept. 1955 Typist








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-FLORIDA PERSONNEL

GROUND WATER BRANCH
Office of Staff Engineer-Tallahassee
District Office-Tallahassee
P.O. Box 1233-New Dining Hall Bldg.
F. S. U. Campus, Phone 3-1693


Cooper, H. H., Jr.
Rorabaugh, M. I.
Hoy, Nevin D.
Barclay, Joseph
Brown, Delbert W.
Peek, Harry M.
Barraclough, Jack T.
Essig, Carl F., Jr.
Mills, Luther R. E.
McCoy, Henry Jackson
Teel, John R., Jr.
Clark, Yvonne
Hall, Martha
Koller, Nona


Staff Engineer
District Engineer
Administrative Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineer-Aide
Engineer-Aide
Physical Science-Aide
Engineer-Draftsman
Clerk-Stenographer
Clerk-Stenographer
Clerk-Typist


Miami Area Office
P.O. Box 348, Coconut Grove Station
3316 Pan American Drive


Klein, Howard
Kohout, Francis A.
Lichtler, William F.
Sherwood, Clarence B.
Jackson, Kenneth L.
Voegtle, Henry J.
Meyer, Frederick W.
Hanan, R. V.
Pollard, Laura G.


Geologist-in-Charge
Geologist
Geologist
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineer-Aide
Engineer-Aide
Physical Science-Aide
Physical Science-Aide
Clerk


St. Augustine Field Headquarters
City Building, Room 337
90 St. George St.


Bermes, B. J.
Love, Gilbert W.
Tarver, George R.
Cocoa Field Headquarters
P.O. Box 1331, Melbourne
Foster, James B.


Hydraulic Engineer
Geologist
Geologist



Physical Science-Aide


Daytona Beach Field Headquarters
915 N. Peninsula Ave., P.O. Box 22
Wyrick, Granville G.
Lakeland Field Headquarters
Broderick Building, Room 903
Stewart, Herbert G.
Wetterhall, Walter


Geologist



Geologist
Geologist








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-FLORIDA PERSONNEL

GROUND WATER BRANCH
Office of Staff Engineer-Tallahassee
District Office-Tallahassee
P.O. Box 1233-New Dining Hall Bldg.
F. S. U. Campus, Phone 3-1693


Cooper, H. H., Jr.
Rorabaugh, M. I.
Hoy, Nevin D.
Barclay, Joseph
Brown, Delbert W.
Peek, Harry M.
Barraclough, Jack T.
Essig, Carl F., Jr.
Mills, Luther R. E.
McCoy, Henry Jackson
Teel, John R., Jr.
Clark, Yvonne
Hall, Martha
Koller, Nona


Staff Engineer
District Engineer
Administrative Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineer-Aide
Engineer-Aide
Physical Science-Aide
Engineer-Draftsman
Clerk-Stenographer
Clerk-Stenographer
Clerk-Typist


Miami Area Office
P.O. Box 348, Coconut Grove Station
3316 Pan American Drive


Klein, Howard
Kohout, Francis A.
Lichtler, William F.
Sherwood, Clarence B.
Jackson, Kenneth L.
Voegtle, Henry J.
Meyer, Frederick W.
Hanan, R. V.
Pollard, Laura G.


Geologist-in-Charge
Geologist
Geologist
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineer-Aide
Engineer-Aide
Physical Science-Aide
Physical Science-Aide
Clerk


St. Augustine Field Headquarters
City Building, Room 337
90 St. George St.


Bermes, B. J.
Love, Gilbert W.
Tarver, George R.
Cocoa Field Headquarters
P.O. Box 1331, Melbourne
Foster, James B.


Hydraulic Engineer
Geologist
Geologist



Physical Science-Aide


Daytona Beach Field Headquarters
915 N. Peninsula Ave., P.O. Box 22
Wyrick, Granville G.
Lakeland Field Headquarters
Broderick Building, Room 903
Stewart, Herbert G.
Wetterhall, Walter


Geologist



Geologist
Geologist








24 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

SURFACE WATER BRANCH
FLORIDA DISTRICT
District Office-Ocala
P.O. Box 607, Building 211
Roosevelt Village, Phone MArion 2-6513
Patterson, Archibald O. District Engineer
Pride, Roland W. Assistant District Engineer
Anderson, Warren Hydraulic Engineer
Charnley, Ray S. Hydraulic Engineer
Heath, Richard C. Hydraulic Engineer
Kenner, William E. Hydraulic Engineer
Meredith, Edwin W. Hydraulic Engineer
Musgrove, Rufus H. Hydraulic Engineer
Cunningham, Ray E. Engineer-Aide
Davis, Arnold I. B. Engineer-Aide
Farmer, Glenn A. Engineer-Aide
Gardner, Milton S. Engineer-Aide
Newbern, Ernest K. Engineer-Aide
Ralph, David L. Engineer-Aide
Woodham, William M. Engineer-Aide
Leake, Frances P. Clerk
MacLain, Helen Jones Clerk
Speir, Florence D. Clerk
Thomas, Robert Laborer
Miami Area Office
P.O. Box 348, Coconut Grove Station
3316 Pan American Drive
Miami 33, Phone Highland 8-4564


Hartwell, James H.
Carter, Albert G.
Galliher, Claiborne F.
Leach, Stanley D.
Beaumont, Edmund L.
Luethi, Doris B.


Engineer-in-Charge
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineer-Aide
Clerk-Stenographer


Sebring Area Office
Third Floor, Highlands County
Court House, Phone EVergreen 6-5771
Murphy, Walter R., Jr. Engineer-in-Charge
Bird, Robert A. Engineer-Aide
Hollingsworth, Violet C. Clerk-Typist
Miller, Charles R. Field Assistant
Markham, Julian E., Jr. Laborer (WAE)

QUALITY OF WATER BRANCH
District Office-Ocala
P.O. Box 607, Building 211
Roosevelt Village, Phone MArion 2-6513


Geurin, James W.
Crooks, James W.
Fincher, Lonny C.
Menke, Clarence G.
Teboe, Louis M.
Wesley, Merle S.
Privett, Alta S.
Eff, Samuel
Law, Berton


District Chemist
Assistant District Chemist
Chemist
Chemist
Physical Science-Aide
Clerk-Stenographer
Clerk-Typist (WAE)
Physical Science-Aide (WAE)
Chemist (WAE)








24 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

SURFACE WATER BRANCH
FLORIDA DISTRICT
District Office-Ocala
P.O. Box 607, Building 211
Roosevelt Village, Phone MArion 2-6513
Patterson, Archibald O. District Engineer
Pride, Roland W. Assistant District Engineer
Anderson, Warren Hydraulic Engineer
Charnley, Ray S. Hydraulic Engineer
Heath, Richard C. Hydraulic Engineer
Kenner, William E. Hydraulic Engineer
Meredith, Edwin W. Hydraulic Engineer
Musgrove, Rufus H. Hydraulic Engineer
Cunningham, Ray E. Engineer-Aide
Davis, Arnold I. B. Engineer-Aide
Farmer, Glenn A. Engineer-Aide
Gardner, Milton S. Engineer-Aide
Newbern, Ernest K. Engineer-Aide
Ralph, David L. Engineer-Aide
Woodham, William M. Engineer-Aide
Leake, Frances P. Clerk
MacLain, Helen Jones Clerk
Speir, Florence D. Clerk
Thomas, Robert Laborer
Miami Area Office
P.O. Box 348, Coconut Grove Station
3316 Pan American Drive
Miami 33, Phone Highland 8-4564


Hartwell, James H.
Carter, Albert G.
Galliher, Claiborne F.
Leach, Stanley D.
Beaumont, Edmund L.
Luethi, Doris B.


Engineer-in-Charge
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineer-Aide
Clerk-Stenographer


Sebring Area Office
Third Floor, Highlands County
Court House, Phone EVergreen 6-5771
Murphy, Walter R., Jr. Engineer-in-Charge
Bird, Robert A. Engineer-Aide
Hollingsworth, Violet C. Clerk-Typist
Miller, Charles R. Field Assistant
Markham, Julian E., Jr. Laborer (WAE)

QUALITY OF WATER BRANCH
District Office-Ocala
P.O. Box 607, Building 211
Roosevelt Village, Phone MArion 2-6513


Geurin, James W.
Crooks, James W.
Fincher, Lonny C.
Menke, Clarence G.
Teboe, Louis M.
Wesley, Merle S.
Privett, Alta S.
Eff, Samuel
Law, Berton


District Chemist
Assistant District Chemist
Chemist
Chemist
Physical Science-Aide
Clerk-Stenographer
Clerk-Typist (WAE)
Physical Science-Aide (WAE)
Chemist (WAE)







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


ACTIVITIES OF THE SURVEY
The work of the Survey during the 1955-57 biennium has, as
always, been directed toward the discovery of new or the expansion
of production of known mineral, water and oil resources that can
be used in an expanding economy for a better life in Florida. The
Survey is a small fact-finding technical agency that is staffed by
a small number of geologists and paleontologists with the neces-
sary semitechnical and clerical help. Much of the work scheduled
for the past biennium was research on the geology, the stratigraphy
and mineral resources of the State. Reports covering these studies
have been published and work now being done or completed in
late 1956 will result in at least 25 publications for 1957-59.
The personnel of the Survey also has contributed to the welfare
of the State in ways other than through research. Problems related
to the geologic sciences are discussed by numerous correspondents
and these letters sometimes require several man-hours to prepare
answers. There have been an unusual number of requests for
addresses, talks and discussions to be organized, presented or
moderated. This is one of our most effective ways to present
pertinent facts to an interested group of citizens. Water has been
of most particular interest to the people, now living with the longest
drought of record.
A considerable amount of time was given to the preparation
of the Water Resources Study Commission Report to the 1957
Legislature. Each meeting, including eight public meetings, held
by the Commission, was attended by at least two Survey members,
and the portion of the report on ground water was organized and
largely written by personnel of the Federal and State Geological
Surveys.
Several research studies were made by scientists on a con-
tractural basis. Four projects were undertaken by students en-
rolled in the graduate schools of universities. Woodson R. Oglesby,
graduate student at Louisiana State University, began a study of
the geology of Dixie and Gilchrist counties, Florida, in 1950. The
results of several months of field work were summarized on a map
of the geology of the counties and in a series of field notebooks.
Because of personal difficulties, Mr. Oglesby was not able to pre-
pare a report on his studies and Dr. Harbans Puri, Paleontologist
with the Survey, undertook the completion of field work and the
preparation of the manuscript in 1956. This report will be pub-
lished in 1957-58.







26 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
E. C. Pirkle, Assistant Professor of Geology at the University
of Florida, undertook the study of a part of the geology of Alachua
County, Florida, as partial requirements for a graduate degree at
the University of Cincinnati. A portion of his field expenses was
paid by the Survey.

Wayne E. Moore has completed the study of the geology and
economic resources of Jackson County. His report has been pub-
lished as Bulletin 37 and was submitted in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree at Cornell
University.

Herbert Winters, while employed by the Survey and later as
a student at the University of California, Berkeley, California,
collected the vertebrate fossils from the Caloosahatchee marl, Glades
and Hendry counties and from the Winter Beach-Luther localities,
Indian River County. He also made a tentative study of a
Cretaceous turtle taken from Core V-5540 from the Amerada
Petroleum Corporation's No. 1 Marie Swenson well in Okeechobee
County.

Dr. Ernest Lund, Associate Professor of Geology at Florida
State University, investigated the possibility of phosphate forma-
tion in the marine sediments adjacent to bird rookeries. A portion
of his field expenses was paid by the Survey and his brief note
on this work will appear in a future Survey publication.

Dr. W. A. White, Professor of Geology at North Carolina
University, has prepared, under the supervision of the Survey, an
analysis of the shape and distribution of our lakes, streams and
land forms. His study will be published as a bulletin.

The work of the Survey is made much more effective, interest-
ing and easier through the use of specialized tools designed to
obtain information in the field. The Widco electric logger records
certain electrical characteristics from which the porosity of for-
mation and other factors can be determined, an interpretation of
the type of rock penetrated by the well can be made, and the changes
in quality of water can sometimes be estimated. From the sub-
surface samples obtained through the use of the Mobile drilling
auger, additional details on the type of unconsolidated sediments
below the ground surface can be obtained for study. In the regular
course of its work the following projects were completed with the
use of these tools:








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


ELECTRIC AND GEOLOGIC LOGGING:
1. Recommendations to Nassau Fertilizer and Oil Company, Fernandina
Beach concerning salt-water contamination, reconditioning a new well
with a cracked casing, and plugging an old well.
2. A permanent record was made of the new supply well for the City of
Jacksonville.
3. A permanent record was made of the new supply well for the City of
Crestview.
4. A permanent record was made of the new supply well for the University
of Florida, Gainesville.
5. Cooperation with State Health Department on City of Wewahitchka water
works wells.
6. Cooperation with Martin County Health Department on supply well for
Key Club concerning salt-water contamination.
7. Several water supply wells were logged and studied for the City of
Orlando.
8. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and geo-
logic studies of Manatee County.
9. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and
geologic studies of Seminole County.
10. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and
geologic studies of Volusia County.
11. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and
geologic studies of Brevard County.
12. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and
geologic studies of Polk County.
13. Several water-supply wells were logged and studied for the City of
Titusville in connection with new well field.
14. A record was made of the new water-supply well for the General
Electric Company, Hague, Alachua County, and recommendations for
casing and development were made.
15. Well cuttings studied and Widco record obtained on water-supply well
for Griscom Plantation, Leon County, to supplement Florida Geological
Survey information on Florida subsurface geology.
16. A permanent record was made of two new supply wells for the City of
Tallahassee.
17. The Architect to the Board of Control was assisted in planning wells
for air conditioning in the new medical center at Gainesville.
18. A deep stand-by fire supply well located in Stuart was surveyed to help
determine plugging procedures.
19. The Plymouth Citrus Products Cooperative, Plymouth, Florida, disposal
well was logged to help in acidizing procedures or to determine if an
additional disposal well was needed.
20. A report of a large cavern in a well being drilled by a Tampa well driller
was investigated and the cavern was not found.
THE MOBILE RIG
1. Logger used to extract core to be used as visual aid for the F. S. U.
Physical Education Department.
2. The stratigraphy of the Thomas Farm fossil locality, Gilchrist County,
was studied to determine extent of the vertebrate beds.
3. Cooperated with the U. S. Geological Survey in an investigation of the
subsurface formations and the hydrology of Brevard County.
4. Cooperated with the U. S. Geological Survey in an investigation of the
subsurface formations and the hydrology of Polk County.
5. Study of the geology of Dixie and Gilchrist counties.








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


ELECTRIC AND GEOLOGIC LOGGING:
1. Recommendations to Nassau Fertilizer and Oil Company, Fernandina
Beach concerning salt-water contamination, reconditioning a new well
with a cracked casing, and plugging an old well.
2. A permanent record was made of the new supply well for the City of
Jacksonville.
3. A permanent record was made of the new supply well for the City of
Crestview.
4. A permanent record was made of the new supply well for the University
of Florida, Gainesville.
5. Cooperation with State Health Department on City of Wewahitchka water
works wells.
6. Cooperation with Martin County Health Department on supply well for
Key Club concerning salt-water contamination.
7. Several water supply wells were logged and studied for the City of
Orlando.
8. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and geo-
logic studies of Manatee County.
9. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and
geologic studies of Seminole County.
10. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and
geologic studies of Volusia County.
11. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and
geologic studies of Brevard County.
12. Cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey in ground-water and
geologic studies of Polk County.
13. Several water-supply wells were logged and studied for the City of
Titusville in connection with new well field.
14. A record was made of the new water-supply well for the General
Electric Company, Hague, Alachua County, and recommendations for
casing and development were made.
15. Well cuttings studied and Widco record obtained on water-supply well
for Griscom Plantation, Leon County, to supplement Florida Geological
Survey information on Florida subsurface geology.
16. A permanent record was made of two new supply wells for the City of
Tallahassee.
17. The Architect to the Board of Control was assisted in planning wells
for air conditioning in the new medical center at Gainesville.
18. A deep stand-by fire supply well located in Stuart was surveyed to help
determine plugging procedures.
19. The Plymouth Citrus Products Cooperative, Plymouth, Florida, disposal
well was logged to help in acidizing procedures or to determine if an
additional disposal well was needed.
20. A report of a large cavern in a well being drilled by a Tampa well driller
was investigated and the cavern was not found.
THE MOBILE RIG
1. Logger used to extract core to be used as visual aid for the F. S. U.
Physical Education Department.
2. The stratigraphy of the Thomas Farm fossil locality, Gilchrist County,
was studied to determine extent of the vertebrate beds.
3. Cooperated with the U. S. Geological Survey in an investigation of the
subsurface formations and the hydrology of Brevard County.
4. Cooperated with the U. S. Geological Survey in an investigation of the
subsurface formations and the hydrology of Polk County.
5. Study of the geology of Dixie and Gilchrist counties.







28 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

STUDIES BY STATE AND FEDERAL GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PERSONNEL
AND BY CONSULTANTS TO THE SURVEY
PUBLISHED IN 1955- 1956
Bishop, Ernest W., 1956, Geology and Ground Water Resources of High-
lands County, Florida, Florida Geol. Survey Report of Investigations
No. 15, 115 pp.
Brodkorb, Pierce, 1955, The Avifauna of the Bone Valley Formation,
Florida Geol. Survey Report of Investigations No. 14, 57 pp.
Calver, James L., 1956, The Fuller's Earth Industry in the Georgia-
Florida District, Mining Engineering, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 393-95.
Georgia Mineral Newsletter, Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 37-44.
Calver, James L., 1956, Mineral Industry, in Florida's Economy-Past
Trends and Prospects for 1970, Vol. 2 of Higher Education and
Florida's Future, Univ. of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp. 71-76.
Division of Water Survey and Research, 1955, Information on Excessive
Rainfalls in Florida, Paper No. 13, 56 pp.
Division of Water Survey and Research, 1955, Development of the Water
Resources of Florida, 1953-54, Report to the Legislature, 16 pp.
Division of Water Survey and Research, 1955, Sand Transfer Across Lake
Worth Inlet, Paper No. 14, 63 pp.
Gee and Jenson, Consulting Engineers, 1956, Traffic Analysis and Esti-
mated Tonnage Prospectus of the Cross-State Florida Barge Canal.
(Mimeographed Report, 58 pp., 3 tables, 5 plates)-on open file at
Florida Geological Survey office.
Gee and Jenson, Consulting Engineers, 1956, The Sanford-Titusville Canal
Estimated Water-Borne Commerce. (Mimeographed report, 10 pp., 1
plate)-on open file at Florida Geological Survey office.
Gunter, Herman, 1955, Oil Activities in Florida During 1954, Florida
Geol. Survey Information Circular No. 1 (revised) 1954 Supplement,
35 pp.
Gunter, Herman, 1956, Oil Activities in Florida During 1955, Florida
Geol. Survey Information Circular No. 1 (revised) 1955 Supplement,
31 pp.
Gunter, Herman, 1956, Florida's Mineral Industry, Florida's Business,
Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 19-23.
Kenner, William E., 1956 (with Eugene Brown), Interim Report on Sur-
face Water Resources and Quality of Waters in Lee County, Florida,
Florida Geol. Survey Information Circular No. 7, 69 pp.
Leutze, W. P., 1956, Encope Michelini from the Pamlico Formation of
Volusia County, Florida, Quart. Jour. Florida Acad. Sci., Vol. 19,
No. 1, pp. 65-67.
Moore, Wayne E., 1955, Geology of Jackson County, Florida, Florida Geol.
Survey Bulletin 37, 101 pp., geologic map.
A general resource paper covering the geology and economic minerals
of Jackson County.
Neill, Robert M., 1955, Basic Data of the 1946-47 Study of the Ground-
Water Resources of Brevard County, Florida. Open file release of the
well inventory in Brevard County available in the offices of the
Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, and in those of the Federal
Survey at Tallahassee and Ocala, Florida.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Olsen, S. J., 1956, A Small Mustelid from the Thomas Farm Miocene,
Breviora, Mus. Comp. Zoology, Harvard Univ., No. 51, 6 pp.
Olsen, S. J., 1956, A New Species of Osteoborus from the Bone Valley
Formation of Florida, Florida ,Geol. Survey Special Publication No. 2,
5 pp.
Olsen, S. J., 1956, The Caninae of the Thomas Farm Miocene, Breviora,
Mus. Comp. Zoology, Harvard Univ., No. 66, 12 pp.
Parker, G. G., 1955 (with others), Water Resources of Southeastern
Florida, With Special Reference to Geology and Ground Water of
the Miami Area, U. S. Geological Survey Water Supply Paper 1255,
965 pp., 24 pls., 223 figs.
Patterson, A. 0., 1955, Surface Water in Florida, Florida Eng. and Ind.
Experiment Station, Bulletin Series 72, Vol. 9, No. 4, pp. 32-34.
Peek, Harry Miles, 1955 (with Robert B. Anders), Interim Report on the
Ground-Water Resources of Manatee County, Florida, Florida Geol.
Survey Information Circular No. 6, 38 pp.
Pirkle, E. C., 1956, The Hawthorne and Alachua Formations of Alachua
County, Florida, Quart. Jour. Florida Acad. Sci., Vol. 19, No. 4, pp.
197-240. Records the presence of large tonnages of low grade phos-
phate in Alachua County.
Price, W. Armstrong, 1955, Correlation of Shoreline Type with Offshore
Bottom Conditions. (Mimeographed report)-on file in the Florida
Geological Survey office.
Puri, Harbans S., 1955, Hermanites, New Name for Hermania Puri, 1954,
Jour. Paleontology, Vol. 29, p. 558.
Puri, Harbans S., 1956, Two New Tertiary Ostracode Genera from
Florida, Jour. Paleontology, Vol. 30, pp. 274-277, pls. 35-36.
Puri, Harbans S., 1956, Facies Faunas and Formations, Jour. Paleonto-
logical Soc. India, Vol. 1, pp. 155-162, 8 figs.
Puri, Harbans S., 1956 (with Robert 0. Vernon), Paleoecology of the
Florida Miocene (Abst.), Jour. Paleontology, Vol. 30, pp. 999-1000.
Puri, Harbans S., 1956 (with Robert O. Vernon), A Summary of the
Geology of Florida with Emphasis on the Miocene Deposits and a
Guidebook to the Miocene Exposures, Florida Geol. Survey, 85 pp.
Reed, Avery H., Jr., 1955 (with James L. Calver), The Mineral Industry
of Florida, U. S. Bureau of Mines Yearbook, Vol. 3, 1952, pp. 248-258.
Simpson, J. Clarence, 1956 (Posthumously), A Provisional Gazetteer of
Florida Place-Names of Indian Derivation, (Edited by Mark F.
Boyd), Florida Geol. Survey Special Publication No. 1, 158 pp., 5
maps.
Theonen, J. R., 1956 (with James L. Calver), The Mineral Industry of
Florida, U. S. Bureau of Mines Yearbook, Vol. 3, 1953, pp. 283-295.
Thomas, H. 0., 1956 (with G. E. Harbeck, Jr.), Reservoirs in the U. S.,
U. S. Geol. Survey Water Supply Paper 1360-A (supersedes Circular
23) pp. 1-99, pl. 1, figs. 1-3.
U. S. Geological Survey, Water Levels and Artesian Pressures in Observa-
tion Wells in the U. S. in 1952, Water Supply Paper 1222, Part 2,
Southeastern States, 260 pp. 40 figs.
U. S. Geological Survey, 1955, Surface Water Supply of the U. S., 1952,
Part 2-B, South Atlantic Slope and Eastern Gulf of Mexico Basins,
Ogeechee River to Pearl River, Water Supply Paper 1234, 364 pp.,
3 figs.







30 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

U. S. Geological Survey, 1955, Surface Water Supply of the U. S., 1953,
Part 2-B, South Atlantic Slope and Gulf Coast Basins, Ogeechee River
to Pearl River, Water Supply Paper 1274, 393 pp., 3 figs.
U. S. Geological Survey, 1956, Water Levels and Artesian Pressures in
Observation Wells in the U. S., 1953, Part 2, Southeastern States,
Water Supply Paper 1266, 275 pp., 47 figs.
U. S. Geological Survey, 1956, Water Levels and Artesian Pressures in
Observation Wells in the U. S., 1954, Part 2, Southeastern States,
Water Supply Paper 1322, 291 pp., 48 figs.
U. S. Geological Survey, 1956, Surface Water Supply of the U. S., 1954,
Part 2-B, South Atlantic Slope and Eastern Gulf of Mexico Basins,
Ogeechee River to Pearl River, Water Supply Paper 1334, 386 pp.,
3 figs.
Vernon, Robert 0., 1955, Safe and Adequate-and You Drink It, Florida
Eng. and Ind. Experiment Station, Bulletin Series 72, Vol. 9, No. 4,
pp. 35-41.
Vernon, Robert 0., 1956, Florida (U. S. 90 and U. S. 98), Field Trip in
"Guides to Southeastern Geology", pp. 86-99, Geological Society of
America, New York.
Vernon, Robert 0., 1956 (with Walter Erwin), Developments in South-
eastern States in 1955, Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bulletin,
Vol. 40, pp. 1272-1282.
Vernon, Robert 0., 1956, A Brief of Ground Water and Geology of the
Suwannee River Area. (Mimeographed report)-on open file in the
office of the Florida Geological Survey, 7 pp.
Vernon, Robert 0., 1956 (with Harbans S. Puri), A Summary of the
Geology of Panhandle Florida and a Guidebook to the Surface
Exposures, Florida Geol. Survey, Tallahassee, Fla., 83 pp.
Wyrick, Granville G., 1956 (with Willard P. Leutze), Interim Report on
Ground Water Resources of the Northeastern Part of Volusia County,
Florida, Florida Geol. Survey Information Circular No. 8, 75 pp.

MANUSCRIPTS IN PRESS OR BEING REVIEWED
FOR PUBLICATION
Bermes, Boris J., Interim Report on the Ground-Water Resources of
Flagler County, Florida, to be issued as a Florida Geol. Survey
Information Circular.
Calver, James L., Florida, Chapter in Southeastern Resources Handbook,
Bureau of Business Research, Univ. of Georgia (in press).
Calver, James L., Mining and Mineral Resources, to be published as a
Florida Geol. Survey Bulletin.
Calver, James L., 1956, The Heavy Mineral Industry of Florida, Bur.
Econ. and Bus. Research, Univ. of Fla., Economic Leaflets, Vol. 16,
No. 2 (in press).
DuBar, Jules R., Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Late Neogene
Strata of the Caloosahatchee River Area of Southern Florida, to be
published as a Survey paper.
Hendry, Charles W., Jr. (with James A. Lavender), Interim Report on
the Progress of an Inventory of Artesian Wells in Florida, to be
published as Information Circular No. 10, Florida Geol. Survey.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Hendry, Charles W., Jr. (with J. William Yon, Jr.), The Geology of the
Area Around the Jim Woodruff Reservoir, to be published as a Florida
Geol. Survey paper.
Klein, Howard, Salt Water Encroachment in Dade County, Florida, to be
published as Florida Geol. Survey Information Circular No. 9.
Leve, Gilbert W., Interim Report on the Ground-Water Resources of
Putnam County, Florida, to be published as a Florida Geol. Survey
Information Circular.
Lund, Ernest, Phosphate Concentrations near Bird Rookeries in South
Florida, to appear as a short contribution to geology.
Olsen, S. J., The Lower Dentition of Mephititaxus ancipidens, to appear
in Jour. Mammalogy, Sept. 1957.
Olsen, S. J., Leptarctines from the Florida Miocene, to be published in
an appropriate journal.
Puri, Harbans S. (with Robert O. Vernon), Stratigraphy and Paleoecology
of the Florida Miocene, to be published in the Am. Assoc. Petroleum
Geologists Bulletin.
Puri, Harbans S. (with Woodson R. Oglesby), Geology of Gilchrist and
Dixie Counties, Florida, to be published as a Florida 'Geol. Survey
Bulletin.
Puri, Harbans S., Stratigraphy and Zonation of the Ocala Group, Florida,
to be published as a Florida Geol. Survey Bulletin.
Puri, Harbans S., Recent Ostracoda from the West Coast of Florida, to be
published by the Jour. Paleontology.
Puri, Harbans S., Reclassification, Structure and Evolution of the Family
Nummulitidae, to be published by the Jour. Paleontology.
Raasch, Albert, The Sunniland Oil Field of Collier County, Florida, to be
published as a Survey publication.
Reed, Avery H., Jr. (with James L. Calver), The Mineral Industry of
Florida, U. S. Bureau of Mines Yearbook, Vol. 3, 1955 (in press).
Schroeder, Melvin C. (with Howard Klein and Nevin D. Hoy), Biscayne
Aquifer of Dade and Broward Counties, Florida, to be published as
Florida Geol. Survey Report of Investigations.
Tarver, George R., Interim Report on the Ground-Water Resources of St.
Johns County, Florida, to be published as Florida Geol. Survey Infor-
mation Circular.
Thoenen, J. R. (with James L. Calver), The Mineral Industry of Florida,
U. S. Bureau of Mines Yearbook, Vol. 3, 1954.
U. S. Geological Survey, Annual Water Level Report-1955, to be pub-
lished as a Water Supply Paper.
U. S. Geological Survey, Annual Water Level Report-1956, to be published
as a Water Supply Paper.
Vernon, Robert O., Ground Water as a Resource in Florida's Agriculture,
to be published in the proceedings of the Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida 1956 (in press).
Vernon, Robert 0., New Techniques in Casting and Forming Molds. To
appear in the Jour. Paleontology (in press).
Vernon, Robert 0., 1956, Water Resources as a Factor in Florida Industry,
to be published in the Journal of the Purchasing Agents Assoc. of
Florida (in press).
White, W. A., A Study of the Geomorphic Changes in Streams of Florida,
to be published as a Florida Geol. Survey Bulletin.
Winters, Herbert H., A Lower Cretaceous Trionychid Turtle from Florida,
manuscript on open file with the Florida Geol. Survey.







32 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

INVESTIGATIONS IN PROGRESS ON DECEMBER 31, 1956

In order to properly spread the responsibilities of work through-
out the Survey, the State was divided into five areas and a geologist
assigned to study the rock cuttings taken from all water and oil
wells in a specific area. From these tabulations, it is planned to
combine the results and publish maps on the stratigraphy, struc-
ture, and thickness of formations in Florida. These data will be
helpful in further evaluation of the value and distribution of our
mineral, water, oil and gas resources.
The tabulation of data on and the inventory of water and
mineral resources is continuing, part of it in cooperation with
the Water Resources Division of the Federal Geological Survey
and with the Bureau of Mines. These data help in locating new
supplies of minerals, and production statistics are necessary to
forecast trends in use and production and provide an accurate
record of the quantity being used. Such records are required for
an intelligent industrial, agricultural, and social planning for
expansion and growth.
Nearly all fossil types and figured vertebrate remains have
been located, labeled, catalogued, and safely stored in steel filing
cabinets. The types have been cast and these casts will be deposited
with other institutions and individuals in exchange for types or
casts of types from other areas. The collections of vertebrate
remains will be expanded through cooperation with other paleon-
tologists in the State and by active digging at known or reported
sites. It is planned to completely catalogue all the collections of
the Survey and organize these in safe storage.
Mr. S. J. Olsen has begun a revision of George Gaylord Simp-
son's report of "Fossil Land Mammals of Florida." The nomen-
clature will be brought up to date and the report will be beautifully
illustrated by Mr. Andrew Janson. The Thomas Farm Amphicyon,
a dog the size of a bear, and the Bone Valley Rynchotherium, a
beak-jawed mastodont, are being described for publication.
During the summer of 1955, the Amerada Petroleum Corpo-
ration drilled an exploratory well approximately 12 miles northwest
of the town of Okeechobee, Florida. In the course of this drilling
operation, a well core containing the fragmentary remains of an
aquatic turtle, was brought up from a depth of 9,210 feet. This
core and specimen were obtained from the Lower Cretaceous, Glen







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Rose formation, and, as far as is known, represents the oldest
vertebrate fossil collected in Florida.
Credit for this discovery is due Dr. James Yelvington, geolo-
gist on the well, who told Mr. D. J. Munroe, Sun Oil Company,
of the find. Mr. Munroe notified the Florida Geological Survey,
and Dr. Yelvington made arrangements to donate this important
specimen to the Survey. The specimen is at present being studied
and compared with specimens elsewhere for description in a future
publication.
In anticipation of the eventual appropriation of funds for a
museum or natural resources building, plans of other museums
are being obtained and our needs for space analyzed.
The inventory of flowing wells leading to the enforcement of
Section 370.051-370.054 is continuing. The personnel of the
State and Federal Surveys are coordinating their work with a
resultant saving of time and money. The scope of the program will
be expanded to include all flowing wells and will not be restricted
to those flowing wastefully.
The study of the geology and water resources of Liberty
County, and possibly Leon County, will be started in 1957. Com-
plete data on the economic deposits of these counties will be col-
lected, the geology mapped, and the stratigraphy of the area fully
determined. The information will be published as a bulletin.
Studies of the geology and ground-water resources of several
areas are now underway by State and Federal Survey personnel.
These include resource studies with the field work virtually com-
pleted, or which will be completed during the 1957-59 biennium.
The counties and areas under study include Brevard, Lee, Char-
lotte, Manatee, Volusia, Martin, Seminole, Putnam, St. Johns,
Flagler, Indian River, Polk, Hillsborough, Marion, Columbia, Cen-
tral Broward, and Baker counties, and the Stuart, Lake Placid
and Jacksonville areas. These will all be published in the regular
sequence of publications issued by the Survey.

FUTURE PLANS

The invertebrate collections of the Survey contain invaluable
and irreplaceable types that are not properly stored at the present
time. With the completion of an office building for the Survey
and the purchase of storage drawer units, these shells can be







34 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

properly organized, catalogued, labeled and safely stored. This
organization can begin only after the Survey has hired an inverte-
brate paleontologist adequately trained in chonchology.

The library, the most complete geologic library in the South-
east, will be made available to Florida State University personnel
for reference usage and perhaps for limited lending privileges when
reading rooms are equipped in the Survey building.

Should the Legislature create a Water Resources Department
and expand the water resource data collection program of the
Survey, additional personnel will be needed to serve as liaison
between the two departments and between other State and Federal
agencies having responsibilities in water resources. This expanded
personnel would also serve as trouble shooters in water resource
problems for the Water Resources Department.

SAMPLES SENT TO THE SURVEY FOR EXAMINATION
Samples of rocks, minerals and fossils will be gladly received,
and reported upon. Attention to inquiries and general correspond-
ence are an important part of the duties of the office, and afford
a means through which the Survey may, in many ways, be of
service to the citizens of the State.
The following suggestions are offered for the guidance of those
submitting samples:
1. The exact location (Section, Township and Range, if known) of all
samples should be given. This should be written out in full and
placed on the inside of the package.
2. The statement accompanying the samples should give the conditions
under which the specimen occurs, whether an isolated fragment or
part of a larger mass or deposit.
3. The package should be addressed to the Florida Geological Survey,
Tallahassee. The name and address of the sender should be plainly
written on the outside.
4. Transportation charges should be prepaid.

DISTRIBUTION OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE SURVEY
The publications of the Geological Survey are issued in a
limited edition of 3,000 copies, 2,700 of which are paper bound, and
300 copies are bound in cloth so as to more readily withstand wear
in the larger reference libraries of the nation. To provide as wide a
distribution as possible, it is necessary to limit the number of
copies sent to an individual. One copy is furnished without charge,
and when additional copies of the same report are required, there







34 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

properly organized, catalogued, labeled and safely stored. This
organization can begin only after the Survey has hired an inverte-
brate paleontologist adequately trained in chonchology.

The library, the most complete geologic library in the South-
east, will be made available to Florida State University personnel
for reference usage and perhaps for limited lending privileges when
reading rooms are equipped in the Survey building.

Should the Legislature create a Water Resources Department
and expand the water resource data collection program of the
Survey, additional personnel will be needed to serve as liaison
between the two departments and between other State and Federal
agencies having responsibilities in water resources. This expanded
personnel would also serve as trouble shooters in water resource
problems for the Water Resources Department.

SAMPLES SENT TO THE SURVEY FOR EXAMINATION
Samples of rocks, minerals and fossils will be gladly received,
and reported upon. Attention to inquiries and general correspond-
ence are an important part of the duties of the office, and afford
a means through which the Survey may, in many ways, be of
service to the citizens of the State.
The following suggestions are offered for the guidance of those
submitting samples:
1. The exact location (Section, Township and Range, if known) of all
samples should be given. This should be written out in full and
placed on the inside of the package.
2. The statement accompanying the samples should give the conditions
under which the specimen occurs, whether an isolated fragment or
part of a larger mass or deposit.
3. The package should be addressed to the Florida Geological Survey,
Tallahassee. The name and address of the sender should be plainly
written on the outside.
4. Transportation charges should be prepaid.

DISTRIBUTION OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE SURVEY
The publications of the Geological Survey are issued in a
limited edition of 3,000 copies, 2,700 of which are paper bound, and
300 copies are bound in cloth so as to more readily withstand wear
in the larger reference libraries of the nation. To provide as wide a
distribution as possible, it is necessary to limit the number of
copies sent to an individual. One copy is furnished without charge,
and when additional copies of the same report are required, there







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


is a charge of $1.50 on each copy. In order to serve the greatest
number of those seeking this scientific data, one copy is deposited
in college, university, public, State and Federal agency libraries-
about 500 in the United States and 50 in foreign countries. In
addition, several publications selected as possible reference mate-
rial in the science courses of the public school are offered the
librarian for a permanent file in our junior and high school libraries.
More than 150 schools have obtained a file of these reports.

Also, to further aid the teachers, a set of 18 specimens of
characteristic minerals and rocks found in Florida have been
assembled in a display box especially made for this purpose, and
these are made available to school libraries and individuals at a
nominal charge of $1.00 each, the approximate cost of assembling.

The following libraries in Florida contain publications issued
by the Survey:

PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARIES


Alachua, Santa Fe High
Auburndale High
Baker High
Baldwin Junior High
Bartow High
Bay Harbor, Parker Junior High
Belle Glade Elementary
Boca Grande High
Bonifay
Bethlehem High
Holmes County High
Bradenton Junior High
Brandon Public
Brooker Junior High
Carrabelle High
Clearwater
Belleair Elementary
Clearwater Junior High
St. Cecelia's School
Clermont Public
Cocoa
Cocoa High
Cocoa Junior High
Coral Gables, Ponce de Leon High
Cottage Hill High
Crescent City High
Dade City, Pasco County High
Dania Junior High
Daytona Beach
Campbell Street High
Mainland High
Deerfield Elementary
DeLand Senior High
Dunedin Junior High


Dunellon High
Eagle Lake School
Eau Gallie Public
Eloise Elementary
Enterprise Junior High
Eustis
Eustis Elementary
Eustis High
Everglades, Du Pont Elementary
Fernandina Beach Junior High
Fort Lauderdale
Central High
Naval Air Junior High
Fort Pierce
Dan McCarty High
St. Anastasia Convent
St. Lucie County Junior High
Gainesville
Alachua Co. Professional Library
Gainesville High
Gifford High
Greensboro High
Greenville High
Gulfport, Boca Ceiga High
Hastings High
Hialeah, Mae M. Walters Elementary
Hilliard Public
Hollywood, South Broward High
Homestead, Neva King Cooper
Hosford Junior High
Jacksonville
Bishop Kenny High
Hendricks Avenue Elementary







36 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Jacksonville Children's Museum
John Gorrie Junior
Kirby Smith Junior
Landon Junior-Senior High
Matthew M. Gilbert High
Robert E. Lee High
Jay
Fidelis Junior High
Jay Elementary
Key West High
Kissimmee, Osceola High
Lake Alfred Junior High
Lakeland
Lakeland Junior High
Lakeland Public Schools
(Institute for Veterans & Adults)
Lakeland Senior High
Lake Placid Public School
Lake Wales
Lake Wales Junior High
Lake Wales High
Largo High
Leesburg Senior High
Live Oak
Live Oak Elementary
Suwannee High
Lynn, East Marion School
Macclenny, Glen High
Manatee High
Marathon, Sue M. Moore School
Marianna
Florida Industrial School for Boys
Marianna High
Mayo, Lafayette High
Melbourne High
Miami
Allapattah Elementary
Archbishop Curley High
Central Beach Elementary
Fairlawn Elementary
Ida Fisher Junior High
Kinloach Park Junior High
Little River
Miami Beach Junior High
Miami Edison Junior High
Miami Jackson High
Nautilus School
Robert E. Lee Junior High
Shadowlawn Elementary
Shenandoah Junior High
South Miami Junior High
Sylvania Heights Elementary
Technical High
West Miami Junior High
Miami Springs
Glenn Curtiss Elementary
Miami Springs Elementary
Miami Springs Junior High
Springview Elementary
Molino, Junior High


Newberry High
North Miami, Shady Acres
Ocala Junior High
Orlando
Grand Avenue School
Lake Como Elementary
Memorial Junior High
Pineloch School
Palatka, Putnam High
Panama City
Drummond Park Elementary
Everitt Junior High
Jinks Junior High
Parker School
Palm Beach Junior-Senior High
Pensacola
Annie E. McMillan
Brentwood School
Ensley Elementary
Pensacola High
Perrine, R. R. Moton Elementary
Perry
Perry Elementary
Taylor County High
Plant City, Tomlin Junior High
Port St. Joe Junior High
Reddick Public School
Riverview School
St. Augustine
Ketterlinus High
West Augustine Junior High
St. Cloud High
St. Petersburg
Lealman Junior High
Northeast High
St. Petersburg High
Southside Junior High
Sanford
Crooms Academy
Seminole High
Sarasota
Brookside Junior
Sarasota High
Sarasota Junior High
Seville High
Starke, Bradford County High
Stuart, Martin County High
Summerfield, Lake Weir High
Tallahassee
Elizabeth Cobb Junior High
FSU Demonstration School
FSU School of Education
Leon High
Sealey Memorial
Tampa
Booker T. Washington Junior High
Cleveland Elementary
George Washington Junior High
Memorial Junior High
Oak Grove Junior High








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Wabasso Public
West Palm Beach
Conniston Junior High
Palm Beach High
Royal Palm School
South Olive


Winter Haven
Central Junior High
Winter Haven Senior High
Winter Park High
Yankeetown School
Zephyrhills Public School


REFERENCE LIBRARIES


Babson Park, Webber College
Bartow, Bartow Public
Bay Pines, U. S. Veterans Adminis-
tration Center
Belle Glade, Everglades
Experiment Station
Boca Grande Johann Fust
Community Library
Bradenton, Carnegie Public
Clearwater, Clearwater Public
Clewiston, Clewiston Public
Coral Gables
Coral Gables Public
University of Miami
University of Miami-Geology
University of Miami-Marine Lab.
Daytona Beach
Bethune Cookman College
Children's Museum
Daytona Beach Public
S. Cornelia Young Memorial
DeLand
DeLand Free Public
Stetson University
Eustis, Eustis Memorial
Fellsmere, Marion Fell
Foley, Buckeye Cellulose Corporation
Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale
Public
Fort Myers, Fort Myers Public
Gainesville
Gainesville Public
Florida Park Service
University of Florida
College of Engineering
Agricultural Experiment Station
Department of Geology and
Biology
General Extension Division
Florida State Museum
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
P. K. Yonge
Library of Florida History
Gulfport, Gulfport Public
Jacksonville
Florida State Board of Health
Florida State Chamber of
Commerce
Jacksonville Free Public


Jacksonville University
U. S. Engineers' Office
Lake Alfred
Citrus Experiment Station
Lakeland
Florida Southern College
Park Trammel Library
Lake Park
Palm Beach Junior College
Lake Placid
Archbold Biological Station
Leesburg
Lake Fisheries Experiment Station
Marianna
Florida Caverns State Park
Jackson County Public
Miami
Flagler Memorial
Miami Public
U. S. Geological Survey
Miami Beach, Miami Beach Public
Mount Dora, Mount Dora Public
Ocala
Ocala Public
U. S. Geological Survey
Orlando
Albertson Public
Central Florida Museum
Orlando Junior College
Palatka, Palatka Public
Panama City, Tyndall Air Force Base
St. Augustine
St. Augustine Historical Society
St. Augustine Public
St. Leo, St. Leo Abbey
St. Petersburg
St. Petersburg Junior College
St. Petersburg Public
Sanford, Sanford Public
Tallahassee
A. and M. University
Attorney General's Office
Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission
Florida Development Commission
Florida State Library
Florida State University
Florida State University-Geology
U. S. Geological Survey






38 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Tampa West Palm Beach
Hillsborough County Central and
Historical Museum Southern Florida Flood Control
Tampa Public West Palm Beach Memorial
University of Tampa Winter Haven, Winter Haven Public
University of Tampa-Geology Winter Park
University of Tampa-Biology Rollins College
Vero Beach Winter Park Public
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Zellwood, Hampton DuBose Academy
Vero Beach Public Zephyrhills, Zephyrhills Public

LIBRARY REPORT

Through the years since its establishment the Florida Geo-
logical Survey has acquired a large and comprehensive collection
of books, articles, pamphlets and newspaper clippings on geology
and related subjects. In addition to a broad coverage of general
information on the sciences, the collection contains almost all
geological reports that have been published concerning Florida
to date.

This library has been assembled through the generosity of
individual donors, the U. S. Geological Survey, U. S. Bureau of
Mines, U. S. National Museum and other government agencies.
Our exchanges with other state agencies, scientific societies and
foreign countries are another source of this wealth of material.
In addition to gift and exchange publications, the Survey purchased
books in the amount of $373.15 during the past year; periodical
subscriptions amounted to $263.20 for the same period.

To conserve space a project of binding periodical material was
begun in 1953. In 1956 we spent $400.00 for this purpose. It is
hoped to have all of the series bound in time.
During the past year foreign periodicals which had been in
storage were catalogued and made available for use. Since 1953,
a shelf list of all library material has been made and all publications
have been indexed in a complete dictionary catalogue, with author,
title and subject cards assembled together. The library contains
approximately 40,000 volumes containing most general textbooks,
reference volumes, many thousands of short papers and almost
every paper published on Florida geology and related subjects.

At the death of Robert Burns Campbell, consulting geologist,
his library was presented to the Survey by his brother, Mr. A. D.
Campbell and his sister, Mrs. M. J. Whitmore. This valuable col-
lection consists of approximately 2,000 rare books, technical books







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


and periodicals. Nontechnical material not needed in this library
have been turned over to the Florida State University. Some
duplicate material published by other state agencies is placed with
the Florida State University Department of Geology. Students
from the University make good use of the Florida Geological Survey
library, although due to existing conditions, we are unable to
circulate the books. However, they are welcome to use any publi-
cations in the library and we hope to arrange for adequate reading
rooms in the geological office building now under construction.

SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS SPONSORED
There are numerous problems in the interpretations of the
geology and stratigraphy of Florida and, in particular, in the
complete understanding of the occurrence of State mineral re-
sources. The solution to these problems can sometimes be arrived
at most easily by presenting the problem to groups of scientists
and encouraging their interest, and soliciting their participation
in discussion and research.
Two meetings of geologists in Tallahassee were sponsored in
1956 by the Geological Survey, and a guidebook to exposures of a
portion of the rocks of the State was prepared by personnel of
the Survey. The Southeastern Section of the Geological Society
of America met in the new geology building of the Florida State
University on March 22-24, 1956, jointly sponsored by the Geology
Department of the University and by the Survey. The business
and academic parts of the meeting were held on March 22-23, 1956.
Thirty-two papers reporting the results of studies on the mineral
resources, geology and related subjects were presented.
On March 24, 1956, the Survey conducted a field trip into the
Panhandle to study the principal exposures of rock. There were
202 registrations at the meeting.
The Miocene rocks of Florida are closely related to those of
Louisiana in which large quantities of petroleum occur. Because
the problem of correlation in deep oil tests is necessarily limited
to the small section penetrated by the wells and the sedimentary
and faunal changes can be studied with difficulty, the oil geologists
and paleontologists of the Gulf Coast desired to spend three days
studying the Florida Miocene which is exposed over an extensive
area of the Panhandle. Because of its accessibility, the Florida
exposures attracted the early naturalist and the rocks were sepa-







40 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

rated, described and named before similar rocks of other areas and
the State contains numerous type localities that have become the
standard of comparison for rock of Miocene age elsewhere.
Accordingly, the Survey prepared a detailed guidebook and
conducted a trip to some of the Miocene exposures for 75 members
of the Gulf Coast Section of the Society of Economic Paleontologists
and Mineralogists on May 3-5, 1956. A limited number of guide-
books are available for distribution.

COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES
U. S. Geological Survey
GROUND WATER BRANCH
The Florida Geological Survey and the Ground Water Branch
have been cooperatively engaged in investigations of Florida's
ground-water resources for a number of years. This cooperation
was continued during the 1955-57 biennium. These investigations
are for the purpose of evaluating present ground-water supply
problems and to provide for an orderly development of this
resource.
An important phase of these investigations is the systematic
observation of water levels in selected wells throughout Florida
(see fig. 2). These records of water levels indicate the extent of
the recharge and discharge that occur in an aquifer. They serve
as indicators of conditions which may result in salt-water en-
croachment in coastal areas; and, along with chloride measure-
ments, they can be used to detect and estimate the exact extent
of future contamination.
Areal investigations of the geology and ground-water resources
of various parts of the State were continued during the biennium
(see fig. 3). These investigations, one or two counties being studied
at a time, require several years to complete. The results of each
investigation are published in reports of the Florida and U. S.
Geological Surveys. Figure 4 shows those areas on which ground-
water reports are available.

SURFACE WATER BRANCH
The program of investigation of surface-water resources of
Florida by the Surface Water Branch of the U. S. Geological
Survey was continued during the 1955-57 biennium. As of December
31, 1956, continuous records of stage and discharge were col-






TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


elected at 140 gaging stations on streams within the State; contin-
uous records of stage only were collected at 166 gaging stations
on lakes and streams; and discharge measurements at periodic
intervals were made at 45 other sites. Locations of streamflow
measuring stations in operation on December 31, 1956, are shown in
figure 5. This statewide program was conducted in cooperation
with the Florida Geological Survey and other State and Federal
agencies.

One phase of the cooperative program with the Florida Geo-
logical Survey was the continuance of a longtime study of the
flow of artesian springs of Florida, in order to detect trends, if
they develop, that might indicate the rate at which ground-water
use is approaching the available supply. Also some investigations
of lakes are included where such lakes are affected by the artesian
aquifer. This program also is designed to contribute to the knowl-
edge of the total amount of all water available to the State. Con-
tained in this program are the studies of eight major springs and
five lakes, including gaging on continuous or periodic schedules.
The participation by the Florida Geological Survey in the
cooperative surface-water investigations was substantially expanded
during the biennium by the Florida Geological Survey's assump-
tion of State sponsorship of 22 gaging stations on streams in various
areas of the State where no water resources information would
ever have been collected under other programs. Continuous records
of stage and discharge were collected during the biennium at these
stations that are considered vital parts of the State's basic
hydrologic network.
In the fall of 1955 a comprehensive program of investigation
of the surface-water resources of Baker County was begun to
determine the feasibility of developing conservation and recrea-
tional areas in the county. Project gaging stations were estab-
lished on three streams to supplement the data being collected
at index gaging stations in the area. These project stations will
be continued in operation for a limited period until data are
collected in sufficient amount for planning and development of
the proposed conservation areas.
In April and May 1956 a special investigation was made for
the purpose of determining the base flows of a number of ungaged
streams and springs during that critical drought period. The
springs measured during this investigation included many of those







42 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
that were last measured in 1946 and reported in Florida Geological
Survey Bulletin No. 31, "Springs of Florida." Comparison of
discharge values after a 10-year interval provided very worthwhile
information on significant trends brought about by additional
development in certain areas.
Another special project being conducted by the Surface Water
Branch of the U..S. Geological Survey with the help of the Florida
Geological Survey is the preparation of a Compilation Report.
All streamflow records collected in Florida through 1950 are being
reviewed, summarized, and compiled for publication in one U. S.
Geological Survey Water Supply Paper. Some Federal funds were
available and used for this work but were inadequate for completion
of the project on a desirable schedule.

QUALITY OF WATER BRANCH
The Quality of Water Branch of the U. S. Geological Survey
collects information to determine the quantity and character of
the mineral matter in solution in ground and surface waters as
a prerequisite to the selection and development of industrial,
municipal, and agricultural water supplies, and determines sedi-
ment transplanted by streams at various locations.
In Florida, information on the chemical quality of surface
and ground waters is collected in cooperation with various State,
county, city, and Federal agencies.
During the 1955-57 biennium, in cooperation with various
agencies, samples were collected as part of the basic data collec-
tion program at 3 daily stations and at approximately 40 stations
at frequencies ranging from one to 10 samples per year. In con-
nection with water resources investigations of areas of the State,
samples were collected at 3 daily stations and at 10 locations at
frequencies of one to 10 samples per year. Samples were collected
and analyzed from a number of wells in connection with ground-
water investigations in the State. In addition, samples were col-
lected during the low flow period in the spring of 1956 at 130
locations at which discharge measurements were made. These
records will be of great value in indicating quality of water con-
ditions during periods of extremely low flow at these sites.
In cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey during the
biennium, basic data stations included the daily station on the
Suwannee River at Branford, and periodic stations on the With-







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT 43

lacoochee River near Holder and Escambia River near Century,
see figure 5.
In addition to the basic data stations, a daily station was
established on Moultrie Creek near St. Augustine and samples
were collected at 14 stream locations and from 19 wells in con-
nection with the water resources investigations of Flagler, St.
Johns, and Putnam counties being conducted by the Surface Water,
Ground Water and Quality of Water Branches of the U. S. Geo-
logical Survey. Collection of samples during the period of low
flow was made in conjunction with streamflow measurements by
the Surface Water Branch.
U. S. BUREAU OF MINES
Heretofore, the Florida Geological Survey has cooperated with
the U. S. Bureau of Mines in the collection of mineral statistics.
Now, in recognition of the demand for ever-increasing quantities
of ilmenite, rutile, and zircon that will be used by American in-
dustry, the U. S. Bureau of Mines has undertaken, as a portion
of a long term program, an inventory of clay resources and of all
data that have been developed concerning the location of deposits
from which these minerals are obtained. Because Florida ranks first
among the states in production of rutile and zircon, and second in
ilmenite, a considerable portion of the investigation will be conducted
in Florida. One phase of the program will be the assemblage of an
atlas of information containing data on prospect holes that were
drilled in search for heavy mineral sand deposits. It is anticipated
this atlas will aid in the search for new deposits and will help to
eliminate useless expense of prospecting in negative areas. The
Bureau of Mines' program will include evaluation of State and
Federal properties.
The Florida Geological Survey has maintained cooperation
with the U. S. Bureau of Mines for many years and anticipates
continued and increased cooperation with that agency as a result
of the establishment of this field office and laboratory in Tallahassee.
Cooperative studies with the U. S. Bureau of Mines makes it pos-
sible to find answers to problems and questions concerning utiliza-
tion, development, and evaluation of rock and mineral resources
for possible new uses and industrial applications.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
The Florida Geological Survey, in cooperation with Doctors
Robert Bader and Pierce Brodkorb of the Department of Biology,







44 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

began a very active study of the Tertiary vertebrates of Florida
during the biennium.
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
The Florida Geological Survey is frequently consulted by the
State Board of Health on many municipal water-supply problems.
The Geological Survey, in turn, has benefited through the interest
of Board personnel in Survey work. The State Sanitary Code re-
quires that samples of rock cuttings from all public water-supply
and drainage wells must be submitted to the Florida Geological
Survey. All data on public wells that have been forwarded to the
Survey are permanently filed and are available for reference in
solving any problems that might develop.
CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN FLORIDA FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT
The Florida Geological Survey cooperated with the Central
and Southern Florida Flood Control District in the publication of
needed water-supply data available on areas within the District's
responsibility. This included the publication of reports on Lee
and Palm Beach counties, Florida.
OTHER AGENCIES
During the biennium, cooperation between the Survey and
other State agencies has been maintained. A nominal amount of
cooperation existed with the Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission, the Florida Forest Service, the Park Service, the State
Development Commission and the State Road Department.

STUDY OF PROPOSED CROSS-FLORIDA BARGE CANAL
AND SANFORD-TITUSVILLE CANAL
The 84th Congress authorized the U. S. Army Corps of
Engineers to make a study of the economic feasibility of moving
freight along the proposed Cross-Florida Barge Canal. This work
was partially completed when the Florida Legislature of 1955 pro-
vided $15,000 for increasing the scope of these analyses and to
expand the study to include the Sanford-Titusville Canal. The
Florida Geological Survey was directed to employ a firm to make
this study.
The Florida Ship Canal Authority holds title to the U. S. lands
that were acquired for construction of the barge canals, and they
were asked to recommend a firm to make the study and to super-
vise the traffic analysis. Gee and Jenson, Consulting Engineers,
















/@/ -
o s 4f -





00 N / /
\e- 1 4o (


Figure / .













RECORDING GAGES0
G
0 *0









L E-GN ( / 0,
t. *p 0 o, /









v ,0 ->- ."' 1<^ .. 5 -,
f'/' tJ- -
Figure 2. / /, A

LOCATION OF OBSERVATION WELLS & ^, ~
LEGEND "* \
*NON RECORDING GAGES a
RECORDING GAGES /0


S /



c / 0 G









l / S? 3 5


00a~o~0 too o





























Figure 3.

AREAS OF GROUND-WATER
INVESTIGATIONS DURING 1956

Z FIELD WORK IN PROGRESS

g REPORTS IN PREPARATION






























Figure 4.

AREAS WHERE GROUND-WATER
REPORTS ARE AVAILABLE

REPORTS ADEQUATE FOR PRESENT NEEDS

SOLDER REPORTS ON SPECIFIC PROBLEMS;
NOT ADEQUATE FOR PRESENT NEEDS

Z INTERIM REPORTS ON ACTIVE PROJECTS

Z RECONNAISSANCE TYPE REPORTS


-^aaadb,.. ra*,-





























Figure 5.


STREAM FLOW MEASURING STATIONS
IN OPERATION DEC. 31,1956
MEASURING STATION
CHEMICAL QUALITY SAMPLING STATIONS
AS OF DEG.31,1956
DAILY STATIONS
G PERIODIC STATIONS









/


UiCatOLOaIcAL SUMVET
OOAL1.FLA.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT 45
Inc., of West Palm Beach, Florida, were employed to prepare
the report, under direct supervision of the Florida Ship Canal
Authority and with the full cooperation and assistance of the
Jacksonville District, Corps of Engineers.

The tonnages of water-borne commerce anticipated to be trans-
ported by the Cross-Florida and Sanford-Titusville canals were
estimated based on data obtained from the Army Engineers, port
authorities, barge operators, barge terminal operators, towing
companies, and some industries that manufacture or mine products
that could be transported by barge. The data compiled, together
with the conclusions, are contained in two reports, "Traffic Analysis
and Estimated Tonnage Prospectus of the Cross-Florida Barge
Canal" and, "The Sanford-Titusville Canal, Estimated Water-
Borne Commerce." Copies of these reports are available for refer-
ence in the offices of the Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, and
in those of the Florida Ship Canal Authority, Jacksonville.

The survey of traffic indicates sufficient tonnage would be
shipped to justify the construction of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal
and that the Sanford-Titusville Canal will be extensively used as
a commercial waterway, and for pleasure craft as soon as it can
be opened for navigation. The improvements of Canaveral Harbor
and deepening of the channel opens a large area of Central Florida
to the benefits of cheap water transportation via the Sanford-
Titusville Canal.

At least 19 new industrial schedules involving 12 different
products have indicated a desire to locate along the Cross-Florida
Barge Canal, if built. The data indicates that transportation for
all products movable by barge exchanged between the Atlantic
Seaboard and the Gulf Coast and Mississippi Valley will be much
cheaper. Pleasure craft traffic will increase through all canals
and the resulting marine service utilities must expand. Based on
the economic development along canals constructed elsewhere, it
is anticipated that shipyards, shipbuilding facilities, and new vessel
delivery will be greatly expanded.

The construction of the Cross-Florida Barge and Sanford-
Titusville canals would be of special significance to the phosphate
and limestone industries of Florida. Both are capable of movement
by barge and the prospectus of tonnage estimates of phosphate
(p. 34, Cross-Florida Barge Canal) is reproduced below:







46 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

"There is presently moving from Tampa to Norfolk, Baltimore, and
other East Coast ports approximately one-half million tons of phosphate
rock in coastwise vessels. The Cross-Florida Barge Canal, when com-
bined with a protected waterway between Tampa and St. Marks would
provide a first-class inland waterway capable of taking over all of this
tonnage at a notable saving in freight to the users. In addition to
phosphate rock, there would be a considerable tonnage of superphos-
phates and other phosphate chemicals. With the addition of a protected
waterway, the westbound movement of phosphate rock from the Tampa
Area to the Great Southwest and Upper Mississippi and Missouri Rivers'
fertilizer mixing plants would greatly increase if it were not necessary
to use seagoing barges and subsequently transfer to river type barges,
thus making a through movement in river equipment possible. The
return movement of grain, coal, etc., would of course add to the ton-
nages already covered in this report. Mention is made of this situa-
tion merely to point out the importance of this commodity to the gen-
eral Florida Area, particularly the Tampa Area, and to show that
even the state of Florida is not receiving the benefits of a home-
grown product that it should because of lack of transportation
facilities via water for a commodity naturally adapted to that type of
transportation."
Limestone, another major mineral commodity of the State,
is used largely for road base courses, but cheap water transpor-
tation could make the large reserves of high quality limestone
present in Citrus, Levy, and Marion counties available for numer-
ous additional uses and possibly make this product competitive
in plants located adjacent to water transportation.

The recent creation of the Duval County Port and Industrial
Authority and the anticipated development of port facilities for
Jacksonville, and the encouragement for industrial development
in the vicinity of Goat Island will lend considerable support to
the completion of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal, terminating at
Jacksonville, and the Sanford-Titusville Canal.

TOPOGRAPHIC MAPPING

Detailed topographic maps are essential to anyone making a
systematic study of geology and the natural resources of Florida.
The U. S. Geological Survey, Topographic Division, started a map-
ping program in Florida over 60 years ago. This is the basic
mapping program in the State, although other agencies like the
Coast and Geodetic Survey, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, the
General Land Office, the U. S. Forest Service, and Florida State
Road Department have conducted limited mapping projects.

The topographic coverage of Florida so far completed covers
an area equal to approximately 60 percent of the State. The status
of topographic mapping in Florida as of March 1, 1957, appears
in figure 6.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Standard topographic maps are issued in 15 minute or 71/2
minute quadrangles. Each of the individual quadrangles is named.
To facilitate the location of quadrangle maps, a numerical index
to 15 minute quadrangles has been devised (see fig. 6).

Topographic maps can be ordered by quadrangle names from
the Chief of Distribution, U. S. Geological Survey, Washington
25, D. C., at a nominal price of 20 cents per copy. All orders should
be accompanied by check or money order, payable to U. S. Geological
Survey.

In Florida, topographic maps can be obtained from the
following companies:


Fort Pierce:
Gainesville:
Jacksonville:

Tallahassee:

Tampa:


Horton's, 122 North Second Street
Campus Shop and Book Store, University of Florida
The H. & W. B. Drew Company
The Nautical Supply Company, 15 North Newnan Street
Jon S. Beazley, Photogrammetric Engr.,
1903 North Monroe St.
Poston Marine Supply Company, P. O. Box 425


Reference facilities are available in the following libraries
where maps published by the U. S. Geological Survey are deposited:
Gainesville: The University Library, University of Florida
Tallahassee: The University Library. Florida State University


Winter Park:


The Library, Florida Geological Survey
Mills Memorial Library, Rollins College


NUMERICAL INDEX TO TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS

A numerical index to the names of quadrangles for which
topographic maps have been published appear in the Eleventh
Biennial Report. The index numbers correspond to the 15' quad-
rangles and these index numbers appear on figure 6. The following
additional maps have been published since the Eleventh Biennial
Report and should be added to that list:


Name

A Steam Mill ......
C Fairchild ..........

A Sneads ....-.........
B Chattahoochee -.
C Rock Bluff ........
D Sycamore.........-


Series Date

71/2' 1954
7/2' 1955

72' 1954
7' 1955
71/2' 1955
71/2' 1955


C Jasper ............. 72' 1955
D Cypress Creek .. 7' 1955

C Fargo SW ....... 7%' 1955
D Council ............. 7 2' 1955


Name


Lafayette --.......
Lloyd ..............
Woodville --........
Cody --............

Waukeenah ......
Lamont ........---
W acissa ............
Lamont SE ......

Greenville .......
Greenville NE
Greenville SE ..


Series Date
71/2' 1954
71/2' 1954
72' 1954
72' 1954

71/' 1955
712' 1955
7 2' 1955
712' 1955

712' 1954
712' 1954
71/' 1955








48 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


75.




76.





77.




78.




79.




93.

94.




95.




96.







109.

110.




111.


Series

7%'
7'
7'
7'


Date

1954
1954
1954
1954


Name

A St. Marks .......
B St. Marks NE ..
C Sprague Island
D Cobb Rocks ....

A Nutall Rise ....
B Johnson
Hammock ........
C Snipe Island ...
D Marlin Hammock

A Secotan ......----
B Boyd .-------
C Hampton Springs
D Perry ......------

A Day NW ..........
B Day ........
C Fenholloway .---
D Day SE ........

A Dowling Park ..
B Mayo NE .......
C Mayo ------
D Mayo SE ..........

B Rock Island .....

A Okefenokee
Slough ...---
B Warrior Swamp
D Keaton Beach -

A Salem ....---..---
B Cook Hammock
C Salem SW .......
D Clara ---...........-

A Mallory Swamp
NW .........
B Mallory Swamp
NE .-........------
C Mallory Swamp
SW ....------...----
D Mallory Swamp
SE .... ..-.....

B Crooked Point _.

A Steinhatchee ----
B Jena ..---.....--------
C Steinhatchee SW
D Steinhatchee SE

A Cross City West
B Cross City East
C Cross City SW ..
D Eugene ....-....


7'

72'

72'

72'

72'

7'
72'
7'
72'

72'
72'
7'
71/2
71/2'


1954

1954

1954

1954

1954

1954
1954
1954
1954

1954
1954
1954
1954


Name


B Horseshoe Beach 7/2' 1954


72' 1955

7 1954
72' 1955
7' 1955

712' 1954
7%' 1954
71' 1954
7' 1955

72' 1954
72' 1954
72' 1954
712' 1954

7' 1954
712' 1955
712' 1955
7 1955

7%' 1955


72' 1954
7%' 1954
72' 1954

7 1954
7 1954
7Y' 1954
72' 1954


Series Date


A Shired Island ..
B Vista ............
C Suwannee .......
D East Pass ......--

A Manatee Springs
B Chiefland ..........
C Chiefland SW .
D Otter Creek ....

A Bronson ---....-...
B Bronson NE ...
C Bronson SW ...
D Bronson SE ...

B Cedar Key .......
D Seahorse Key ....

A Sumner ..........
B Waccasassa Bay
D Withlacoochee
Bay ............ .....

A Lebanon Station
B Tidewater ........
C Yankeetown ....
D Yankeetown SE

A Romeo .............
B Cotton Plant ...
C Dunnellon ........
D Dunnellon SE ..

B Daytona Beach
D Samsula .........-

A Red Level .......
B Crystal River ..
C Ozello ---...............
D Homosassa ......

A Holder ....-...---
B Tsala Apopka
NE ............
C Lecanto .......-
D Inverness .......-..

A Chassahowitzka
Bay .............
B Chassahowitzka
C Bayport .....----.
D Weekiwachee
Springs .-.......


7' 1955
72' 1954
72' 1954
72' 1954

7' 1954
72' 1954
7 1954
7' 1954

7 1954
7Y' 1955
7 1954
72' 1955

712' 1955
7 2' 1955

712' 1955
712' 1955

7/2' 1955

7/2' 1955
71' 1955
712' 1955
71' 1954

7Y' 1954
712' 1954
7 1954
712' 1954

7 2' 1952
712' 1952

7 1954
7 1954
72' 1954
7 1954


72'

72'
7'
7Y'


72'
7'
7'
7'Y2
7 Y2


1954

1954
1954
1954


1954
1954
1954

1954










4
}'* 4


,9


Jo.
0.*
Ge











/"


INDEX TO PUBLISHED
TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS

* MAPS IN 15'SERIES
MAPS IN 7T2' SERIES
PRELIMINARY MAPS IN 7l'SERIES
(MANUSCRIPT I
D MAPPING NOT COMPLETED
INDEX NUMBERS FOR 15'QUADRANGLES
[] DIVISIONS OF 15' QUADRANGLES


Figure 6.






TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


A
B
C
D
159.
A
B
C
D
160.
A
B
C
D


Name


Series Date

7%2' 1954
712' 1954
71/2' 1954
7%2' 1954

7%2' 1954
712' 1954
71/2' 1954
71/2' 1954

7/2' 1954
7%2' 1954
71/2' 1954
7/2' 1954


COUNTY INDEX TO TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS

County index to the names of quadrangles for which topo-
graphic maps have been published since the Eleventh Biennial
Report:


Name
ALACHUA COUNTY
123.
B Bronson NE ....
CALHOUN COUNTY
27.
C Rock Bluff .....
CITRUS COUNTY
131.
D Withlacoochee
Bay.... --......- -
132.
C Yankeetown ......
D Yankeetown SE
133.
C Dunnellon ........
D Dunnellon SE..
141.
A Red Level ........
B Crystal River ....
C Ozello ............
D Homosassa .......
142.
A Holder .............
B Tsala Apopka
NE ........- ........
C Lecanto ............
D Inverness .........
150.
A Chassahowitzka
Bay .................
B Chassahowitzka


Series Date Name
151.
A Brooksville NW
72' 1955 B Nobleton .........
COLUMBIA COUNTY
36.
7/' 1955 C Fargo SW .-.....
D Council
DIXIE COUNTY


7%'

7%'
7'
71/2'
7%'


7 1/2'

7%'


7Y'
71/2'
71/2'
71/2'


72'


1955

1955
1954

1954
1954

1954
1954
1954
1954

1954

1954
1954
1954


7/2' 1954
7/2' 1954


D Clara ...........


A
B
C
D
111.
A
B
C
D
120.
B
121.
A
B
C
D


Mallory Swamp
SW ..- .............
Mallory Swamp
SE .............

Steinhatchee .--.
Jena ..................
Steinhatchee SW
Steinhatchee SE

Cross City West
Cross City East
Cross City SW
Eugene .........

Horseshoe Beach

Shired Island --
Vista .............
Suwannee -------
East Pass ........


Series Date

712' 1954
712' 1954


7/2' 1955
7 2' 1955


7 1954


71/2'

71/2'

71/2'

71/2'
71/2'

71/2'
71/2'
72'
7Y2'






71/2'

71/2'

71/2'
71/2'
7'
7'
7'

7'
7'
7'

7'

7'


7'


1954

1954

1954
1954
1954
1954

1954
1954
1954
1954

1954

1955
1954
1954
1954


Name
181.
A Dover ...............
B Nichols ...........
C Lithia .............
D Keysville .........
183.
A Eloise ............--
C Alturas ....--...
193.
A Baird ................
B Bowling Green
C Ft. Green ........-
D Wauchula --......
194.
A Bereah ..............


Brooksville NW
Nobleton ....-.....
Brooksville ......
Brooksville SE

Aripeka ............
Port Richey NE
Port Richey ......
Fivay ...............-

Masaryktown ..
Spring Lake ....
Ehren ...............
San Antonio ....


Series Date

7/2' 1955
7/2' 1955
71/2' 1955
7/2' 1955

7/2' 1955
7 1955

7%2' 1955
7%2' 1955
7/2' 1955
71/2' 1955

71 /' 1956








50 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Name
122.
A Manatee Springs
GADSDEN COUNTY
27.
A Sneads ....--....
B Chattahoochee -
C Rock Bluff .......
D Sycamore ..........
HAMILTON COUNTY


C Jasper ........
D Cypress Cre
36.
C Fargo SW
HARDEE COUNTY
193.
A Baird ......
B Bowling Gre
C Ft. Green
D Wauchula
194.
A Bereah .......
HERNANDO COUNTY
150.
A Chassahowit;
Bay ...........
B Chassahowit;
C Bayport ....
D Weekiwache
Springs ......
151.
A Brooksville
B Nobleton ...
C Brooksville
D Brooksville
159.
A Aripeka .....
B Port Richey
160.
A Masaryktow:
B Spring Lake
HILLSBOROUGH COUI
181.
A Dover .-.....
B Nichols .....-
C Lithia .... -
D Keysville -
JACKSON COUNTY


A Steam Mill .......
C Fairchild ........

A Sneads .......
B Chattahoochee
C Rock Bluff .....


Series Date

7/2' 1954



71/2' 1954
72' 1955
7%2' 1955
7'/2' 1955


.. 7/2' 1955
ek 7/2' 1955

..-- 7/2' 1955


... 7%' 1955
en 7V2' 1955
.... 7/2' 1955
.-... 7/2' 1955

...... 7Y2' 1956


zka
...... 7%2' 1954
zka 72' 1954
...... 7' 1954
e
...... 7 2' 1954

NW 71/2' 1954
.. 7 2' 1954
... 71/2' 1954
SE 7/2' 1954

S7/2' 1954
NE 72' 1954

n __ 72' 1954
... 7/2' 1954
NTY

-. 7 2' 1955
.---. 7 2' 1955
... 7 2' 1955
..... 7/2' 1955


72' 1954
712' 1955

712' 1954
7Y' 1955
7' 1955


Name
JEFFERSON COUNTY
56.
B Lloyd ................
D Cody ..............


Waukeenah ......
Lamont .........
Wacissa ......-
Lamont SE ....


A Greenville ........
75.
B St. Marks NE ....
D Cobb Rocks ....
76.
A Nutall Rise ..-..
C Snipe Island ...
LAFAYETTE COUNTY


B Day ........-...-
D Day SE ...........

A Dowling Park __
C Mayo .............
D Mayo SE .........


B Cooks Hammock
D Clara .............
96.
A Mallory Swamp
NW -----
B Mallory Swamp
NE ..........-
C Mallory Swamp
SW -...-----...
D Mallory Swamp
SE ...-
LEON COUNTY
56.


A Lafayette ....
B Lloyd --....
C Woodville .
D Cody ..........
LEVY COUNTY
121.
B Vista ---
C Suwannee -
D East Pass


Manatee Spri
Chiefland ......
Chiefland SW
Otter Creek

Bronson .....
Bronson NE
Bronson SW
Bronson SE


Series Date


7/2' 1954
7 1954

71/2' 1955
7/2' 1955
7/2' 1955
71/2' 1955

7/2' 1954

7 1/2' 1954
72' 1954

7%2' 1955
71/2' 1955


71/2' 1954
71' 1954

71/2' 1954
7 2' 1955
712' 1955

7 2' 1954
712' 1954


72'

7%'

7%'

7'


1954

1954

1954

1954


...7' 1954
72' 1954
7 /2' 1954
. 72' 1954


. 7%2' 1954
S7%' 1954
712' 1954
.... 7 1954

ngs 7/2' 1954
7%' 1954
7 72 1954

71/2' 1954
.. 7 2' 1954
S7%' 1955
72' 1954
7. 72' 1955








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Name
130.
B Cedar Key .......
D Seahorse Key
131.
A Sumner ...........
B Waccasassa Bay
D Withlacoochee
Bay .................
132.
A Lebanon Station
B Tidewater.....
C Yankeetown ....
D Yankeetown SE
133.
A Romeo ...........
LIBERTY COUNTY
27.
C Rock Bluff ........
D Sycamore ........
MADISON COUNTY
57.
B Lamont .......
D Lamont SE -....-
58.
A Greenville ........
B Greenville NE .
D Greenville SE
MARION COUNTY
132.
B Tidewater .......
D Yankeetown SE
133.
A Romeo ----------..
B Cotton Plant ..
C Dunnellon ......-
D Dunnellon SE ..
142.
B Tsala Apopka
NE ..----
PASCO COUNTY
159.
A Aripeka --.._-....-
B Port Richey NE
C Port Richey ....--
D Fivay ................
160.
A Masaryktown ....
B Spring Lake ...-
C Ehren .............
D San Antonio ....
POLK COUNTY
181.
B Nichols ............
D Keysville ..........
183.
A Eloise .............
C Alturas.......


Series




7%'

7'
7/2'
71/2'
7%'
72'

71/2'
7' 1/


Date

1955
1955

1955
1955

1955

1955
1955
1955
1955

1954


7Y' 1955
7/2' 1955


712' 1955
7 2' 1955

7 2' 1954
72' 1954
7 2' 1955


712' 1955
7%' 1954

7 2' 1954
7 2' 1954
7%' 1954
7 2' 1954


7 1954


1954
1954
1954
1954

1954
1954
1954
1954


1955
1955

1955
1955


Name
193.
A Baird ............
B Bowling Green
194.
A Bereah ............
SUMTER COUNTY
151.
B Nobleton .......
SUWANNEE COUNTY
79.
A Dowling Park ..
C Mayo ............
D Mayo SE ......
TAYLOR COUNTY
57.


1

1


C Wacissa ....----....
D Lamont SE ...-..
58.
D Greenville SE
76.
A Nutall Rise ....
B Johnson
Hammock ......
C Snipe Island ....
D Marlin
Hammock ........
77.
A Secotan .......
B Boyd .........-
C Hampton
Springs ........-
D Perry ......-......
78.
A DayNW ..........
B Day ...--
C Fenholloway ...-
D Day SE ..... .-.
93.
B Rock Island ....-
94.
A Okefenokee
Slough ...-........-
B Warrior Swamp
D Keaton Beach
95.
A Salem .......
B Cooks Hammock
C Salem SW ......-
D Clara ..............
09.
B Crooked Point ..
10.
A Steinhatchee ....
B Jena ..-......------


VOLUSIA COUNTY
138.
B Daytona Beach
D Samsula -..---.....-


Series

72'
7%'

72'


Date

1955
1955

1956


7%' 1954


7 2' 1954
7' 1955
7 2' 1955


7 2' 1955
72' 1955

7%' 1955

7 2' 1955

7%' 1954
7 2' 1955

7 2' 1955

7 2' 1954
7 1954

72' 1954
7 2' 1955

7%' 1954
7 2' 1954
7 2' 1954
7 1954

7%' 1955


7 2' 1954
72' 1954
7 2' 1954

7 2' 1954
7 2' 1954
7 2' 1954
7 2' 1954

7 1954

7 /2' 1954
7 2' 1954


7%' 1952
7 2' 1952







52 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Name Series Date Name Series Date
WAKULLA COUNTY 75.
A St. Marks ........ 71/2' 1954
56. B St. Marks NE .. 71/' 1954
C Woodville ...... 71%' 1954 C Sprague
D Cody ............... 7 2' 1954 Island .-............... 7 1954
D Cobb Rocks .... 71' 1954


REPEAL OF SECTION 373.27-FLORIDA STATUTES

The Legislature of 1947 (Acts of 1947, Chapter 24283, sec-
tions 1-3) amended Chapter 373 of Florida Statutes 1941 by the
addition of Section 373.27 which provides that "The State Board
of Conservation shall employ a competent engineer for the purpose
of conducting survey of and into the ground and surface water
conditions of the whole State of Florida for the purpose of
determining, ascertaining and planning an efficient and satisfactory
system of water conservation and flood control." The law went
into effect August 1947 when the State Department of Conserva-
tion's Division of Water Survey and Research was created. A. G.
Matthews, Colonel, U. S. Army Engineers, Retired, was appointed
as Chief Engineer for the Division. Colonel Matthews remained
as Chief Engineer for the Division until June 30, 1955, when the
law creating the Division was repealed by Senate Bill No. 378,
Acts of 1955, Chapter 29812, sections 1-2.

In pursuance of the above act, the State Board of Conservation
transferred to the Florida Geological Survey such portion of
equipment of the above Division as the Survey could appropriately
use. Among such equipment was a small multilith offset press,
process camera, and contact printer which have been found most
useful in photographing and printing interim reports, office forms
and cards constantly needed by a growing office.

The Board of Conservation also transferred all of the files of
rainfall, lake stage and stream gage records to the Geological
Survey. These rainfall records are by far the most complete in
the State, containing the observed hourly or daily records of
approximately 600 active gages that are being kept up to date and
the records of approximately 625 inactive stations. The records
of the active stations are collected from numerous government
agencies, private concerns and individuals and include all gages
known to be active in Florida and parts of Alabama and Georgia.
These records will be published periodically.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


There was also added to the appropriation request for the
1955-57 biennium an item of $25,416 to cover the salary and
expenses of that portion of the duties of the Division of Water
Survey and Research that the Survey assumed. The appropriation
partially pays the expenses of the multilith operation and rainfall,
lake stage and stream gage data gathering programs.

Publications issued by the Division during its activity were
also transferred and those in print are being distributed by the
Survey. These are Water Survey and Research Paper No. 5, "St.
Johns River Basin, 1950"; Paper No. 6, "Chemical Character of
Florida's Waters-1951"; Paper No. 8, "Information on Beach
Protection in Florida, 1952": Paper No. 9, "Salt Water Intrusion
Protection in Florida, 1952"; Paper No. 9, "Salt Water Intrusion
the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control Project-1953";
Paper No. 11, "Summary of Observed Rainfalls on Florida to 31
December 1952"; and Paper No. 12, "Summary of Discharge and
Stage in Suwannee and St. Marys River Basins to 31 December
1950."
The Florida Geological Survey was on December 29, 1955,
designated by the Governor to "perform liaison between the Federal
and State governments in matters relating to Federal river and
harbor projects." This duty was originally performed by the
Division of Water Survey and Research.

EXPLORATORY TESTS FOR PETROLEUM
There has been a disappointing and steadily decreasing interest
in Florida as an oil and gas prospect. By late 1956, the exploratory
activity was so low that most of the major oil companies had
moved their exploration offices to other areas, only a few main-
taining one or two geologists and scouts. The drilling activity by
1957 had been virtually reduced to that necessary to hold leases.
A spurt of activity in the early part of 1955 was spurred by
the development of the Citronelle, Alabama, high-gravity oil field.
This interest carried into peninsular Florida where the Gulf Oil
Corporation, No. 1 State of Florida-Lease No. 826-G was located
on Cape Sable. The declining interest in the State started when
this well was abandoned at a depth of 12,631 feet in October, 1955.
This decline was accelerated when two small marginal wells
discovered in late 1954 at Forty-Mile Bend, northwest of Miami,
were abandoned in the month. These three failures in peninsular







54 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Florida were wells that had been located after extensive refraction
seismology. They were doubly disappointing because a possible new
geophysical finding tool was not proved to be successful.
In 1954, there were 31 completions, two of which were the two
small producers in the Forty-Mile Bend Field. In 1955, only 27
wells were completed; all being dry, they were abandoned together
with the two oil wells of the Forty-Mile Bend Field.
There were only 13 wells completed in 1956, and 11 of these
were in Panhandle Florida. The concentration of activity in the
Panhandle reflected an interest in the possibility of producing oil
from the beds of Lower Cretaceous age, contemporaneous with
those of the Citronelle Field, Mobile County, Alabama. However,
the failure of the Zach Brooks Drilling Company et al, No. 1
Caldwell-Garvin et al unit in Escambia County, a deep test termi-
nating at 12,515 feet, has caused a very careful reappraisal of
leases and information. Some geologists believe that Florida may
be too far downdip for Lower Cretaceous production and there is
a current interest in exploration along the northern parts of the
Panhandle and in southern Alabama.
A more complete summary of the oil and gas activities in
Florida for 1955 and 1956 can be obtained from the annual
supplements of Information Circular No. 1.

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OFFICE AND LABORATORY BUILDING

Throughout the fifty years of its service to Florida, the Survey
has moved six times. At no time have the offices been adequately
equipped to perform the work required by the people and assigned
to the Survey by the Legislature of Florida. The complexities of the
job requirements frequently resulted in the desks of the Survey
personnel being covered by chemicals and equipment necessary
to digest and analyze an economically valuable mineral, study rock
cuttings from water wells while intermittently tabulating the
data on these resources, meeting the public and answering corre-
spondence. The resource data and publications on them, prepared
under these rather trying circumstances, is a testimonial to the
resourcefulness, ingenuity, and devotion of the men the Survey
has been fortunate to be able to employ.
The growth of the Survey, paralleling Dr. Gunter's fifty years
of service, has been appropriately climaxed by the start of con-







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


struction of a building to house the offices and researches of the
Survey (see fig. 7). The 1955 Legislature appropriated $387,800
for constructing and equipping the building. The plans were
drawn by Mr. Guy C. Fulton, Architect to the Board of Control,
and adequate space was provided for all activities of the Survey,
except for space to house the large number of mineralogic, geologic,
and paleontologic specimens the Survey has collected for study
and comparison.
The Survey building, now being constructed, is the second of
three units designed to house the Department of Geology of Florida
State University and the Survey. The first unit was completed
in 1953 and occupied by the Florida State University Department
of Geology. Industrial displays and educational exhibits were to
be organized in a third unit, that was deleted in 1955 from the
appropriation bill. An additional request for funds to complete
this geology center has been sent to the Budget Commission for
presentation to the 1957 Legislature. The architect estimates that
the third unit will cost $540,000. The Survey is required to collect
and display samples of its geologic resources. The grouping of
these buildings unites the activities of researches by the Survey
with the educational purposes of the University so that personnel


Figure 7. Office and Laboratories for The Florida Geological Survey, under
construction. (March 1.957)







56 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
and equipment can be shared with resultant savings to the State.
Interest in our mineral resources will be increased and industry
encouraged to develop these. The instructional job of the University
will be made much easier. The favorable consideration by the
Legislature for funds to complete the center is requested.

The top (second) floor of the Survey building will house the
offices of the Ground Water Branch of the U. S. Geological Survey
and the State Survey's comprehensive library of geologic and
related literature, that will be available to personnel of the Uni-
versity, the Federal Survey, the State Survey, and to other
scientists of the area for reference.

The administration offices and laboratories of the Florida
Survey are on the first floor and the specimen organization and
storage, the preparation laboratories, equipment storage, garage,
and duplicating departments on the ground floor. The ground
floor will also have an isolated office that can be utilized by visiting
scientists who desire to study the Survey's library of rock cuttings
and records of almost 4,200 wells drilled in Florida.

The promising prospects of adequate space for the work of
the Survey makes reflection upon quarters formerly occupied
comforting and former problems of housing amusing and trivial.
The Survey began rather humbly housed in an unused committee
room, fortunately vacant because the Legislature had adjourned
for that year. In the early part of 1908, the coal room for the
State Capitol was remodeled and four rooms were added to the
office space available at the Capitol. Two of these were courteously
assigned to the Survey by Captain R. E. Rose, State Chemist. As
additional responsibilities were given to the State Chemist in 1920,
this space was needed, and the Survey had to find space in a private
office building, no State-owned building being available.

For a short period (1920 to 1923) space was rented in the
back part of the second floor of the Perkins Building on Monroe
Street but upon completion of the west extension of the Capitol
Building, the Survey was given three rooms on the south side of
the lower floor, one room of which was a museum.
In 1927, the Martin Building was built to house the State Road
Department and the Motor Vehicle Commission. The south wing
of the basement was made available to the Survey. The depart-
ment was housed here until forced out in 1939 by the creation







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


of the Florida Highway Patrol and the allotment of the Martin
Building space to the patrol.
Dr. Edward Conradi, President of the Florida State College
for Women, provided space in the recently abandoned "Old Lower
Dining Hall" at the College. Here, we have remained, to the mutual
satisfaction of the Survey, the Women's College and later Florida
State University, through the continued courtesy and cooperation
of Dr. Doak S. Campbell. We anticipate an accelerated growth
of service to Florida in the new building and the cooperation
between the Survey and the University will continue.

NEED FOR RESOURCES EXHIBITION BUILDING
The State Legislative Act of the General Assembly of 1907
(Chapter 5681, section 4) empowered and directed the Florida
Geological Survey to collect and display Florida's mineral and
fossil plant and animal remains. To fulfill this objective, the Surve3
continues to enrich its collections with material secured by Survey
collection and by gifts from its friends. To adequately display and
care for all these treasures, a suitable building is needed for
exhibition and storage. That such a building is needed is indicated
almost daily by the many inquiries from tourists and school children
alike as to where they can see exhibits of Florida's past life or
present day mineral industries. It has been our painful duty to
inform them that the only comprehensive displays of Florida's
fossil life north and west of the Mississippi River are to be found
in Washington, D. C. As far as is known, an adequate Florida
mineral industry exhibit does not exist at the present time.
A request for funds for a natural resources building has been
made to the 1957 Legislature. Such a building would house not
only the more spectacular exhibits of fossil and mineral specimens
that are found within the boundaries of our State, but we feel
that we could invite the mineral industries of Florida to contribute
to working displays that would instruct visitors and school children
as to what is being manufactured or mined by these various com-
panies in Florida and how this is being done. A structure of this
kind would also contain the vast study collections of minerals and
fossils that few of Florida's citizens are aware that we possess.
These specimens are being constantly used by out-of-state agencies,
who require comparison of Florida material in order to complete
their research problems on similar material. Situated as the build-
ing would be, and with changing exhibits, it would attract not







58 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
only out-of-state tourists, but would fill an educational need for
Florida's future citizens, the school children of today. The State's
mineral wealth properly exhibited would attract the interest of
prospectors, mining engineers, investment houses, and industry,
possibly leading toward a continued expansion of our resource
development which will make our economy more stable.
Under the present administration, Florida has and is making
great strides along educational and cultural lines. At this time,
when nearly all thinking is along revenue producing channels, it
might be well to point out that "man does not live by bread alone."


FLORIDA MINERAL INDUSTRY DURING 1954 AND 1955
The value of mineral and rock production in Florida totaled
$106,510,000 in 1954, and $108,917,000 in 1955, according to data
collected by the U. S. Bureau of Mines in cooperation with the
Florida Geological Survey. The mineral and rock commodities
included production of phosphate rock, limestone, fuller's earth,
kaolin, miscellaneous clays, sand and gravel, ilmenite, rutile, zircon,
garnet, staurolite, oyster shell, peat, natural gas, petroleum,
cement, dimensional limestone and lime. The canvassing of com-
panies that produce oyster shell was begun in 1955 and comprises
an important addition to the mineral production of the State. The
10 million dollar decline in the total value reported for phosphate
rock production for 1955 is attributed to the work stoppage of
several weeks duration in the land-pebble phosphate industry. The
continued expansion in the production and value of cement, clay,
limestone, sand and gravel, ilmenite, rutile, zircon, garnet, lime
and peat nearly offset the decreases reported by the phosphate
rock and petroleum production, see Table 1.
Florida's mineral industry continued to increase during 1954
and 1955, with the above noted exceptions, at a rate well above the
national average. The growth of this industry in the State is
shown graphically in figure 8. Florida's rank among the states
as measured by the total value of minerals produced has increased
from 35th in 1940, to 24th in 1954, the last year for which
comparable data are available.








VALUE OF FLORIDA MINERAL INDUSTRY

ANNUAL TREND AND AVERAGE RATE OF INCREASE

110l



TOTAL VALUE RATE OF INCREASE PER YEAR 9 0 3
PHOSPHATE VALUE C ALL MINERAL PRODUCTS 8.4 MILLION .I Q M
PHOSPHATE ROCK 55.0 MILLION s-0




z

RATE OF INCREASE PER YEAR r
ALL MINERAL PRODUCTS 1 4 MILLION
PHIOSPIATE ROCK '06 MILLION E l
______ H:


0....... l*...... ..... .... ..... ............* .-.-.- I. .... ..... ...... ..... .. -. ------- -..... .....
n 0 0 0
Figure. 8 Graph of annual value of rock and mineral materials mined in Florida. These values are
reported by producing companies in the U. S. Bureau of Mines and represent value of their
products at the mine or quarry. Estimates for 1956 are $65,920,000 for phsophate production
and $132,955,000 for the state's total min-eral production.


-10 s







60 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
RANK OF SOUTHEASTERN STATES IN VALUE
OF ROCK AND MINERAL PRODUCTION
1940 1945 1950 1954
Florida 35 31 28 24
North Carolina 33 36 36 33
South Carolina 42 42 42 42
Georgia 34 34 32 32
Tennessee 24 25 26 27
Alabama 18 15 18 21

According to the 1954 census of mineral industries that was
completed by the U. S. Bureau of The Census, working in coopera-
tion with the U. S. Bureau of Mines and in Florida with the Florida
Geological Survey, Florida ranks third among all the states in
the value of nonmetallic mineral mining. Only California and Texas
reported a greater value for their nonmetallic production.

The mining industry has come to the realization that proper
after-treatment and restoration of worked-out areas will be de-
manded by the general public. Proper land utilization requires
that the natural resources extracted from the earth be incorporated
into the economy as efficiently as possible. Urban encroachment
on usable deposits may result in the permanent withdrawal of those
materials from the economy of the community. In order to avoid
such waste, it is necessary that planning boards and other groups
that exercise supervision of industrial development give favorable
classification of such land for mining purposes. In the Miami area
of Dade County, for example, the limestone producers, working in
cooperation with the zoning and planning boards, are developing
quarries according to definite plans and the site will be left in
condition suitable for residential development. In fact, real estate
values are enhanced and higher values will exist after completion
of the quarry operations than existed prior to mining.
An outstanding example of land-use in an abandoned mining
area is found in the northern part of St. Johns County at Ponte
Vedra. Following the termination of mining activities in 1929,
the area that had produced rutile, ilmenite, and other heavy
minerals since 1916, was developed into residential property. Not
only are several hundred homes situated in the original mining
area but the Ponte Vedra Country Club and golf courses are located
on the "mined-out" portion of the property.
All of the operating companies in the land-pebble phosphate
field are very conscious of the value of progressive land conserva-
tion and have programs for utilizing unmined land, as well as







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT 61
realizing return from mined-out properties. Landownership by
the major companies totals more than 300,000 acres in Polk and
Hillsborough counties. Portions of the prospected areas and the
mined-out areas are being operated as tree farms and pasture
(see figs. 10, 11). One company has over 40,000 acres under an
intensive forestry program and selective cuttings have been made
on the slash pines that were planted in 1939. New plantings by
that company are being made at the rate of one-half million trees
per year, and a total of more than 4 million trees have been planted.
Other land-use practices by the phosphate companies include the
establishment of recreational areas and the conversion of mined-
out pits into lakes that may be stocked with fish.
In 1956, one company entered into a large-scale land recla-
mation program that will extend over a five-year period. During
the life of the project, a tract consisting of 700 acres located on
the south side of Lakeland will be reclaimed for residential use.
As in the example of land reclamation completed in 1942 at Ponte
Vedra, and that under way in the Miami area, the creation of
enhanced surface value of real estate is being accomplished with
the cooperation of planning groups and the mining companies.

PHOSPHATE ROCK:
The yearly production of phosphate rock in Florida exceeded
10 million tons in 1954 for the first time in the history of the
industry. The total of all types of phosphate mined during that
year was 10,437,197 long tons which had a value at the mines of
$64,499,877. As a result of a labor strike of four months duration
in 1955, that year's total production was below the peak recorded
in 1954. The value reported by the phosphate industry amounted
to 65 percent of the total value of Florida's mineral products in
1954 and 50 percent for 1955.
After a lapse of 30 years, Armour Fertilizer Works, Inc.
returned to the list of land-pebble phosphate producers late in
1955 but production was delayed and no tonnage was credited to
1955. During 1954, new large-capacity draglines were put into
operation by American Agricultural Chemical Company, Coronet
Phosphate Company, Davison Chemical Company, and International
Minerals & Chemical Corporation. Davison Chemical Company
put into operation a superphosphate plant having a capacity of
200,000 tons. With the building of a 200,000 ton-a-year triple
superphosphate plant, to be completed in 1957 by American







62 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Cyanamid Company, all of the major phosphate producers will
also manufacture fertilizers. In 1955, Davison Chemical Company
installed a new system to remove and stock overburden which uses
draglines and conveyors. International Minerals and Chemical
Corporation and Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation added
to their plant capacity and American Agricultural Chemical Com-
pany began operation of a second electric furnace to produce
elemental phosphorus. Other elemental phosphorus producers
include Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation and Victor Chem-
ical Works. Several companies not mining in the land-pebble field
carried out prospecting programs; these included the American
Metals Company, Spencer Chemical Company and Kaiser Aluminum
Company.
In the hard-rock field, the Kibler-Camp Phosphate Enterprise
continued to be the only producer and the entire production for
both 1954 and 1955 was purchased by Virginia-Carolina Chemical
Corporation. Prospecting activity in the hard-rock field was car-
ried out in both 1954 and 1955 by the Tennessee Valley Authority.
The soft-rock or colloidal clay phosphate companies reported
a production of about 94,000 long tons in 1954, and 70,000 long
tons in 1955. Three of the companies were consolidated in 1955
and the list of producing companies numbered eight at the end
of the year.
The by-products and possible by-products of land-pebble min-
ing and processing continued to interest the large producing com-
panies. The plants in Florida that have uranium extraction units
still number three: International Minerals and Chemical Corpora-
tion (Bartow), Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation (Nichols)
and U. S. Phosphoric Products Division, Tennessee Corporation
(Tampa). It is possible to recover the uranium content in phos-
phate rock by solvent extraction of the uranium from phosphoric
acid. The quantity of land-pebble phosphate that is utilized to
make phosphoric acid accounts for only 10 percent of the produc-
tion. Production data regarding the quantity and value of the
uranium recovered as a by-product of the phosphate industry has
not been made public by the Atomic Energy Commission.
HEAVY MINERALS:
The concentration and separation of heavy minerals found
associated with some beach and dune sands of the State continues
to be an important source for ilmenite, rutile, zircon, monazite,







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


staurolite, and garnet. Sand deposits that contain 3 or more percent
heavy mineral grains are mined, concentrated by removal of the
quartz grains, and separated into rather pure mineral components.
This concentration and separation is accomplished by making use
of the specific gravity differences of the minerals and by their
varied electrical and magnetic properties. Three plants operated
during 1954 and the fourth, the Highland plant of the E. I. du Pont
de Nemours and Company, began operation in March 1955. The
Palm Bay plant of the Florida Ore Processing Company, located
south of Melbourne, Brevard County, was destroyed by fire in
October 1955. A new plant was constructed at Winter Beach,
Indian River County, and reported initial production in 1955 as
the Hobart Brothers Company.
The Crane Company continued exploration for heavy minerals
during 1954 and 1955 along the Gulf Coast of Florida west of
Panama City. The Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation was
active in Nassau County; and Bear Creek Mining Company, a
subsidiary of Kennecott Copper Company, did prospecting in
Bradford, Clay, and Duval counties during 1955. Also in 1955,
the National Lead Company increased its reserves by purchase of
1,800 acres located in Baker, Bradford, Clay and Duval counties.
E. I. du Pont de Nemours substantially increased the acreage under
lease on Trail Ridge by acquiring 18,000 acres situated in Clay
County between the Highland plant and the Trail Ridge plant.
The exploration divisions of other mining companies, as well as
a number of individuals were active in the search for additional
deposits from which heavy minerals could be recovered. This
search has extended over the sand areas of the State, along modern
and ancient coastlines and in the offshore area popularly called
the tidelands.

CEMENT:
The Tampa plant of the General Portland Cement Company,
Florida Portland Cement Division, began production in 1927 and
periodically increased its capacity to 4,000,000 barrels annually.
The plant utilized limestone quarried from near Brooksville, Her-
nando County, for many years but in 1954 a new quarry was opened
in southern Citrus County. The company also produces clay from
a locality in southern Citrus County. In December 1952, the Bun-
nell plant of the Lehigh Portland Cement Company reported initial
production. The plant capacity of 1,400,000 barrels annually of
the original design has been increased and upon completion of







64 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
the expansion program under construction in 1955, the capacity
will reach 2,500,000 barrels. The Lehigh Company utilizes coquina
and staurolite in the manufacture of portland cement.
Both of the producing companies announced plans for building
portland cement plants located west of Miami, Dade County. The
new plant of the General Portland Cement Company has a designed
capacity of 2,500,000 barrels annually, and that of the Lehigh
Portland Cement Company has a designed capacity of 2,000,000
barrels. It is anticipated these plants will be in production late
in 1957 or early in 1958.

CLAY:
The clay industry may be considered under two groups: (1)
common clay production and products and (2) special purpose clays.
Common clays produced in Escambia, Walton, and Gadsden
counties are used in the manufacture of structural clay products.
The Taylor Brick and Tile Company produces face brick, common
brick and building tile at their plant located at Barth, Escambia
County. The Walton Brick and Tile Company, located near De-
Funiak Springs, Walton County, reported a small production of
clay and brick in 1954, followed by a temporary shutdown. During
both 1954 and 1955, common brick were produced by the State-
owned brick plant which is operated by the Apalachee Correctional
Institute at River Junction, Gadsden County. Clay was produced
from a locality in the southern part of Citrus County by the Florida
Portland Cement Division, for its cement mill in Tampa.
Special purpose clays include the production of kaolin from
mines in Putnam County and of fuller's earth from mines in Gads-
den County. Both of the kaolin producing companies, the United
Clay Mines Corporation and the Edgar Plastic Kaolin Company
operated during 1954 and 1955. In the fuller's earth district, the
Floridin Company operated several mines in Gadsden County to
supply their mills at Quincy and Jamieson; the Minerals and
Chemical Corporation of America also operated mines in Gadsden
County to supply clay to their Attapulgus Division plant located
at Attapulgus, Georgia. During 1954 and 1955, the Magnet Cove
Barium Corporation prospected and developed a fuller's earth
deposit situated about three miles north of Havana, Gadsden
County. Shipments from their plant began in December, 1955.






TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


LIMESTONE:
Limestone production recorded a new all time high in 1955,
exceeding the record established in 1954 by two million tons and
nearly four and one-half million dollars. Crushed limestone pro-
duced in 1954 amounted to 14,225,000 tons valued at $16,832,000,
whereas the 1955 production totaled 16,303,000 tons valued at
$21,312,000. Crushed limestone enters into road and highway
construction not only as road metal and aggregate for concrete but
also as the base material on which the highway is constructed.
These, together with concrete products and structural uses, consume
by far the greatest proportion of the limestone produced in the
State. Lime and cement manufacturers utilize important quantities
while rip-rap and railroad ballast account for small quantities.
There has been a continued expansion of pulverized limestone and
dolomite for agricultural use.
SAND AND GRAVEL:
Production of sand and gravel declined both in quantity and
value from 1951, the peak year, through 1954, when 3,468,842 tons
valued at $2,661,152 were reported. The 1955 production reached
a new all time high of 5,065,503 short tons valued at $4,349,148.
Sand production comprised the major portion of the industry
during both years accounting for more than 92 percent of the
volume. Most of the output was utilized in structural uses as
concrete, mortar and in pouring sands, with minor quantities being
used as blast sand, engine sand and railroad ballast.
PETROLEUM:
The discovery well of the Sunniland Oil Field, Collier County,
was brought in September 26, 1943, and was converted to a salt-
water disposal well on May 10, 1946. The last field well was com-
pleted on January 2, 1950. This small field produces from a horizon
about 11,500 feet below the ground surface and the total cumulative
production up to January 1, 1957, was 4,797,721 barrels. The
production record of the field is illustrated graphically in figure 9.
The second oil field recorded in Florida was discovered in
December 1953 with the completion of the discovery well of the
Forty-Mile Bend Field, Dade County. In April 1954, a field well
was brought in but production from these wells was small and the
field was abandoned in September 1955. Production during 1954
amounted to 21,559 barrels and in 1955, 11,289 barrels.


















DISCOVERY ............ .....
U SOLID LINES IND CATE FLOWING *" "n* ***********................... ...................................





o -



0- 250 -i-






2-

Y A 9







z 10--



YEAR 1943 1944 1945 1946 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956


Figure 9. Development and production record of the Sunniland Field, Collier County.


m J


B







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


PEAT:
While peat is grouped under fuels, no peat produced in Florida
is mined as a fuel, rather it is mined and marketed for agricultural
uses. The principal use for peat is as a soil conditioner to improve
the physical characteristics of the soil and to increase the soil's
ability to retain moisture. Peat is also used as a filler in mixed
fertilizers where it acts as a carrier for the primary plant nutrients:
nitrogen, phosphorus and potash. Florida ranks second among
the states in tonnage and value of peat production. In 1954, eight
companies located in five counties reported a production of 37,449
tons valued at $168,004; in 1955, eleven companies located in six
counties reported a total of 61,089 tons valued at $231,829. The
acreage of peat and muck under cultivation amounts to thousands
of acres and this use of peat, while an important factor in its
economic utilization, is not considered in the mining data.


Figure 10. Slash pine plantings on overburden windows and small lakes
that are suitable for stocking with game fish are typical results
of land use programs designed to return mined-out areas to pro-
ductivity. Photograph courtesy of the American Agricultural
Chemical Company.







68 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Figure 11. Stand of slash pine planted on a mined-out area under the land
utilization program of the American Agricultural Chemical Com-
pany, Pierce. Photograph courtesy of the company.








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


ROCK AND MINERAL PRODUCERS
1954 and 1955


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant
CEMENT
General Portland Cement Company
Florida Portland Cement Division
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Tampa Mill
Lehigh Portland Cement Company
FLAGLER COUNTY
Bunnell Mill


CLAY
Common:
General Portland Cement Company
Florida Portland Cement Division
CITRUS COUNTY
Sec. 2, T21S, R19E
Osceola Clay & Topsoil Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Alden Pit-Sec. 15, T2S, R30W
Jackson Pit-Sec. 15, T2S, R30W
Taylor Brick and Tile Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Molino Plant
Walton Brick and Tile Company
WALTON COUNTY
Glendale Road Plant
Non-Commercial:
Apalachee Correctional Institution
GADSDEN COUNTY
River Junction Brick Plant-Sec. 4,
T3N, R6W
Fuller's Earth:
Floridin Company, Inc.
GADSDEN COUNTY
Quincy Plant
Jamieson Plant
Pits: Sec. 18, T2N, R3W
Sec. 7, T2N, R3W
Sec. 9, T3N, R3W
Sec. 8, T3N, R2W
Sec. 11, T3N, R3W
Magnet Cove Barium Corporation
GADSDEN COUNTY
Havana Mine and Plant-Sec. 15,
T3N, R2W
Minerals & Chemicals Corp. of America
Attapulgus Division
GADSDEN COUNTY
Pit-Sec. 15, T3N, R3W


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


X X


X X


X X


X x
X X


X X


X X


X X
X X


Box 1528
Tampa 1, Fla.


Bunnell, Fla.


Box 1528
Tampa 1, Fla.


P. O. Box 649
Pensacola, Fla.


I and Manresa St.
Pensacola, Fla.


DeFuniak Springs, Fla.




Box 548
Chattahoochee, Fla.


P. 0. Box 998
Tallahassee, Fla.


P. 0. Box 677
Havana, Fla.
Developing

Attapulgus, Ga.


X X








70 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant


Kaolin:
Edgar Plastic Kaolin Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Edgar Mine-Sec. 25, T10S, R23E
United Clay Mines Corporation
PUTNAM COUNTY
No. 4 Mine-Secs. 27 & 28, T10S, R23E

DOLOMITE
Crushed:
Dixie Lime Products Company
LEVY COUNTY
Lebanon Quarry-Sec. 12, T16S, R16E
Florida Dolomite Company
SARASOTA COUNTY
Sarasota Quarry-Sec. 1, T36S, R17E
Golden Dolomite Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Red Level Quarry-Sec. 25, T17S, R16E
Manatee Dolomite Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Minton Quarry-Sec. 5, T35S, R18E
Southern Dolomite Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Palmetto Quarry-Sec. 19, T34S, R18E


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


Dimensional (Also, see limestone, dimensional)
Bradenton Stone Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Bradenton Quarry-Sec. 32, T34S, R18E
(Quarry and Mill at Oneco
under development)
Florida Travertine Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Clark's Quarry-Sec. 7, T35S, R18E
(Under development-Formerly
Alclaries Travertine Company)


GARNET
Florida Ore Processing Company, Inc.
BREVARD COUNTY
Palm Bay Plant
(Destroyed by fire 1955)

ILMENITE
E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.
CLAY COUNTY
Highland Plant-Sec. 18, T4S, R22E
Trail Ridge Plant-Secs. 5 & 6, T6S,
R23E
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.
P. O. Box 5492, Jacksonville 7)


X X


X X
X X


Edgar, Florida


P. O. Box 27
Hawthorne, Fla.


P. O. Box 578
Ocala, Fla.

Pembroke, Fla.


P. 0. Box 1193
Orlando, Fla.

P. 0. Box 37
Samoset, Fla.

P. O. Box 23
Bradenton, Fla.



P. O. Box 256
Bradenton, Fla.



Oneco, Fla.


Box 417
Melbourne, Fla.


P. 0. Box 631
Starke, Fla.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


Florida Ore Processing Company
BREVARD COUNTY
Palm Bay Plant
(Destroyed by fire 1955)
The Hobart Brothers Company
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
Winter Beach Plant-Sec. 4, T32S, R39E
Humphreys Gold Corporation
CLAY COUNTY
Trail Ridge Plant-Sec. 13, T2S, R27E
Rutile Mining Company of Florida
and
Titanium Alloy Manufacturing Division
of the National Lead Company
DUVAL COUNTY
Jacksonville Plant-Sec. 13, T2S, R27E
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.
P. O. Box 5492, Jacksonville)

LIME
Dixie Lime Products Company
MARION COUNTY
Reddick Plant
City of Miami
Department of Water and Sewers
DADE COUNTY
Hialeah Plant

LIMESTONE
Crushed:
Alachua Corporation
ALACHUA COUNTY
S. M. Wall Quarry-Sec. 36, T9S, R18E
(Sold to Williston Shell Rock Company)
Belle Glade Rock Company
PALM BEACH COUNTY
South Bay Quarry-Sec. 23, T44S, R36E
Brooksville Rock Company, Inc.
HERNANDO COUNTY
Annutteliga Quarry-Secs. 23 & 26,
T21S, R18E
Burnup and Sims, Inc.
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Peanut Island Mine-Sec. 34, T42S, R43E
Camp Concrete Rock Company
HERNANDO COUNTY
Gay Plant-Secs. 6 & 7, T22S, R19E
Central Quarries, Inc.
SUMTER COUNTY
Sumterville Quarry
Claussen-Laurence Construction Co.
ST. JOHNS COUNTY
Anastasia Quarry


X X



X


X X


P. 0. Box 417
Melbourne, Fla.


Box 1482
Vero Beach, Fla.

Box 753
Starke, Fla.

P. O. Box 5492
Jacksonville, Fla.


X X


X X



X X


P. 0. Box 578
Ocala, Fla.

P. O. Box 316
Coconut Grove Sta.
Miami 33, Fla.


1650 NE 23rd Blvd.
Gainesville, Fla.


P. O. Box 37
Northwest Branch
X X Miami, Fla.


X X



X X


Box 158
Brooksville, Fla.


505 Park Street
West Palm Beach, Fla.


Box 608
Ocala, Fla., and
X X Rt. 2, Brooksville
P. 0. Box 822
Leesburg, Fla.
X X
Augusta, Ga.








72 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant
W. L. Cobb Construction Company
MARION COUNTY
York Quarry-Sec. 26, T15S, R20E
SUMTER COUNTY
Sumter Quarry
E. E. Collins Construction Company
DADE COUNTY
Collins Quarry
Connell and Shultz
LEVY COUNTY
Williston Quarry-Sec. 31, T12S, R19E
Cummer Lime & Manufacturing Co.
MARION COUNTY
Kendrick Quarry-Sec. 24, T14S, R21E
Martin Quarry-Secs. 10 & 11, T14S,
R21E
Deerfield Rock Corporation
BROWARD COUNTY
Deerfield Quarry-Secs. 4 & 9, T48S,
R42E
Dixie Lime Products Company
MARION COUNTY
Plant No. 1 Reddick
Plant No. 3 Kendrick
Driskell and Mayo
PALM BEACH COUNTY
DuBois Quarry-Sec. 31, T40S, R42E
Florida Rock Products Corporation
HERNANDO COUNTY
Lansing Quarry-Sec. 22, T21S, R19E


General Portland Cement Company
Florida Portland Cement Division
CITRUS COUNTY
Storey Quarry-Sec. 35, T20S, R19E
Hallandale Rock Corporation
BROWARD COUNTY
Hallandale Quarry-Sec. 28, T51S, R42E
Handley Construction Company
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Palm Beach County Quarry
Leo Haskins
MONROE COUNTY
Haskins Rock Pit
Hialeah Crushed Stone Company
DADE COUNTY
Dade County Mine-Sec. 35, T52S, R41E
(Purchased by Three Bays Improvement
Co., June 1956)
Hollywood Quarries, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Broward County Quarry


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


X X


X X


X X
X X



X X



X X
X X


1102 N. 22nd St.
Tampa, Fla.

and
Box 2, Hernando
2175 S.W. 32nd Ave.
Miami 34, Fla.

Box 97
Inverness, Fla.

P. O. Box 4640
Jacksonville, Fla.



P. O. Box 781
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.


P. O. Box 578
Ocala, Fla.


Jupiter, Fla.


X X



X X


X X


X X


X X


P. O. Box 4667
Jacksonville, Fla.

Box 1528
Tampa 1, Fla.


Box 781
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

Airport Road
Pahokee, Fla.

726 Caroline St.
Key West, Fla.

2601 NW 75th St.
Miami 47, Fla.


W. Taft Street
and SAL Railway
X X Hollywood, Fla.








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant


Ideal Crushed Rock Company, Inc.
DADE COUNTY
Dade County Pit-Sec. 4, T56S, R40E
T. J. James Construction Co., Inc.
DADE COUNTY
James Quarry
Levy County Lime Rock Corporation
LEVY COUNTY
Quarry No. 1-Sec. 19, T12S, R19E
Quarry No. 2-Sec. 25, T12S, R19E
Quarry No. 3-Sec. 29, T12S, R19E
Live Oak Stone Company
SUWANNEE COUNTY
Live Oak Quarry
(Developing-1955)
Marjax Company
JACKSON COUNTY
Marjax Quarry-Sec. 30, T5N, R10W
Maule Industries, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Prospect Quarry-Sec. 18, T49S, R42E
DADE COUNTY
South Dade
Ojus-Sec. 5, T52S, R42E
Red Road-Lots 1 & 2, T53S, R40E
Tropical-Sec. 22, T54S, R40E
W. P. McDonald Corporation of Florida
HERNANDO COUNTY
Conroc Quarry-Sec. 19, T22S, R20E
Phillip McLeod
ST. JOHNS COUNTY
McLeod Quarry-Sec. 28, T7S, R30E
E. B. Meade and Sons
ST. JOHNS COUNTY
Anastasia Quarry-Sec. 28, T7S, R30E
Meekins, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Meekins Quarry-Sec. 20, T51S, R42E
E. L. Montgomery, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Montgomery Quarry
Murphy and Mills Corporation
DADE COUNTY
Quarry-Sec. 2, T53S, R41E
Quarry-Sec. 22, T54S, R40E
(Sold to Maule, Inc., June 1955)
Quarry-Sec. 32, T51S, R42E
(Abandoned May 1955)
Naranja Rock Company
DADE COUNTY
Naranja Quarry-Secs. 33 & 34, T56S,
R39E


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


X X


X X


X
X
X
x
x
x


X X


X X

X
x
X X
X X
X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


x


X X


5500 NW 37th Ave.
Hialeah, Fla.

1700 NW 119th St.
Miami 47, Fla.

Box 194
Williston, Fla.


P. O. Box 327
Live Oak, Fla.


Marianna, Fla.


5220 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fla.






Box 157
Brooksville, Fla.

Box 673
St. Augustine, Fla.

Box 677
St. Augustine, Fla.

Box 36
Hollywood, Fla.

815 NW 7th Terr.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

2601 NW 75th St.
Miami 47, Fla.





P. O. Box 98
Naranja, Fla.







74 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant


Newberry Corporation
ALACHUA COUNTY
Haile-Sec. 13, T9S, R17E
Ocala Lime Rock Corporation
MARION COUNTY
Kendrick Quarry
Oolite Rock Company
DADE COUNTY
Oolite Rock Quarry-Sec. 23, T54S, R40E
Charles E. Peacock
LEVY COUNTY
Peacock Quarry
Peffer Construction Company
DADE COUNTY
Hialeah Gardens Quarry
Charles E. Phillips
PINELLAS COUNTY
Alverton Road Quarry
E. A. Pynchon
DADE COUNTY
North Miami Quarry-Sec. 29, T52S,
R42E
Road Rock, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Road Rock Quarry-Sec. 20, T50S, R42E
Rozzo Mining Company
BROWARD COUNTY
Quarry-Sec. 4, T48S, R42E
Quarry-Sec. 32, T50S, R42E
Quarry-Sec. 17, T49S, R42E
(Worked out in 1955)
Quarry-Sec. 24, T50S, R43E
(Worked out in 1955)
Seminole Rock Products Company
DADE COUNTY
Red Road Quarry-Sec. 31, T53S, R41E
Medley Quarry-Secs. 9 & 10, T53S,
R40E
Finley P. Smith
Davie
BROWARD COUNTY
Quarry-Sec. 4, T48S, R42E
Snyder Paving Company, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Dania Quarry-Sec. 4, T51S, R42E
Ft. Lauderdale Quarry-Sec. 17, T49S,
R42E
Sumter Lime Products
SUMTER COUNTY
Sumter Quarry-Sec. 18, T20S, R23E
Sunniland Limerock Company
COLLIER COUNTY
Sunniland Quarry-Sec. 29, T48S, R30E


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


X X


X X


X X


P. 0. Box 1588
Jacksonville, Fla.

P. O. Box 842
Ocala, Fla.

P. O. Drawer 868
South Miami 43, Fla.


Williston, Fla.

X
Box 185
Shenandoah Sta.
X X Miami 45, Fla.


X X


X



X X


X X


X X
X X


X X


1307-2nd Ave. SW
Largo, Fla.

P. 0. Box 1921
North Miami, Fla.


2700 W. State Rd. 84
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

1900 SW State Rd: 84
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.






P. O. Box 335
Tamiami Station
Miami, Fla.


Rt. 1, Box 733
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.


P. 0. Box 1199
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.


P. O. Box 6
Sumterville, Fla.

Box 1547
Fort Myers, Fla.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant
Suwannee Limerock Company
SUWANNEE COUNTY
Ralph Quarry-Sec. 32, T5S, R14E
Charlie Toppino & Sons, Inc.
MONROE COUNTY
Stock Island Quarry
Troup Quarries, Inc.
DADE COUNTY
Kendall Quarry-Sec. 15, T55S, R40E
Perrine Quarry-Sec. 29, T55S, R40E
United Limerock Company
LEVY COUNTY
Williston Quarry
W. & M. Construction, Inc.
LEVY COUNTY
Raleigh Quarry-Sec. 24, T12S, R18E
West Florida Lime Company
JACKSON COUNTY
Cottondale Quarry (Developing)
Williston Shell Rock Company
ALACHUA COUNTY
Buda Quarry-Sec. 32, T8S, R17E
Haile Quarry
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
Dell Quarry-Sec. 32, T4S, R11E
R. H. Wright & Son, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Wright Quarry
Zinki and Smith, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Quarry-Sec. 31, T48S, R42E

Non-Commercial:
Palm Beach County Highway Dept.
PALM BEACH COUNTY
County Quarries

Dimensional:


Bradenton Stone Company, Inc.
(Dolomite)
MANATEE COUNTY
Bradenton Quarry-Sec. 32, T34S, R18E
(Mill at Oneco under development
1956)
Florida Travertine Company (Dolomite)
MANATEE COUNTY
Clark's Quarry-Sec. 7, T35S, R18E
(Under development-Formerly
Alclaries Travertine Company)
Keystone Art Company
MONROE COUNTY
Windleys Key Quarry


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address
Branford, Fla.

X X


X X


X X
X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


Box 787
Key West, Fla.

P. 0. Box 168
Miami 33, Fla.


P. 0. Box 4667
Jacksonville, Fla.

Williston, Fla.


Cottondale, Fla.


Box 600
Ocala, Fla.




Box 781
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

Box 2004
Pompano Beach, Fla.



Box 2429
West Palm Beach, Fla.



P. O. Box 256
Bradenton, Fla.




Oneco, Fla.




684 NW 7th Street
Miami, Fla.







76 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant
Native Stone, Incorporated
DADE COUNTY
Ball Quarry


Oyster Shell:
Bay Dredging & Construction Co.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Dredge-Lease No. 639
Duval Engineering & Contracting Co.
DUVAL COUNTY
Dredge
White Shell Corporation
DUVAL COUNTY
Dredge

MONAZITE
Florida Ore Processing Company
BREVARD COUNTY
Palm Bay Plant
(Destroyed by fire 1955)
Humphreys Gold Corporation
DUVAL COUNT-Y
Jacksonville Plant-Sec. 13, T2S, R27E
Owned by: Rutile Mining Company of
Florida and National Lead Company

NATURAL GAS
Humble Oil and Refining Company
COLLIER COUNTY
Sunniland Field-Sec. 13, T48S, R29E
and Secs. 18, 19, 20, T48S, R30E

PEAT
Agricultural Organics Corporation
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Seffner Pit-Sec. 2, T29S, R20E
Arnold Soil Company
BROWARD COUNTY
Ft. Lauderdale Pit
Daetwyler Peat Mine
ORANGE COUNTY
Pine Castle Pit
Fernwood Humus Company
ORANGE COUNTY
Zellwood Pit
Glen St. Mary Nurseries Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Florahome Pit-Sec. 11, T9S, R24E
Jack O. Holmes, Inc.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Tampa Pit


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


X X


X X



X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


Box 252
Miami 43, Fla.



P. O. Box 1484
Tampa 1, Fla.

Box 1588
Jacksonville, Fla.

1746 E. Adams St.
Jacksonville, Fla.



Box 417
Melbourne, Fla.


Box 5492
Jacksonville 7, Fla.


Box C
Everglades, Fla.


Rt. 1, Box 25
Seffner, Fla.


P. O. Box 558
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

Rt. 7, Box 535
Orlando, Fla.

P. O. Box 183
Zellwood, Fla.

Glen St. Mary, Fla.


P. 0. Box 417
Tampa 1, Fla.







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant
Norman R. and G. M. Latham
PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach Pit
Mulford-Hickerson Peat Humus Corp.
ORANGE COUNTY
Apopka Pit
Palatka Peat Humus Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Florahome Pit-Sec. 11, T7S, R24E
Southern States Nurseries, Inc.
PUTNAM COUNTY
Florahome Pit-Secs. 2 & 11, T9S, R24E
Tropical Peat Moss Company
HAMILTON COUNTY
Jasper Pit


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address
P. 0. Box 165
West Palm Beach, Fla.


X X


X X


X


X X


P. O. Box 156
Apopka, Fla.

P. O. Box 404
Palatka, Fla.

Macclenny, Fla.


P. O. Box 428
Jasper, Fla.


PETROLEUM

Humble Oil and Refining Company
COLLIER COUNTY
Sunniland Field-Sec. 13, T48S, R29E
and Secs. 18, 19, 20, T48S, R30E
Gulf Oil Company
DADE COUNTY
Forty-Mile Bend Field-Sec. 16, T54S,
R35E, and Sec. 18, T54S, R36E
(Abandoned 1955)

PHOSPHATE ROCK

Hard Rock:
Kibler-Camp Phosphate Enterprise
CITRUS COUNTY
Sec. 17 mine, T17S, R19E
Soft Rock or
Colloidal Clay:
The Camp Phosphate Company
(The Delta Phosphate Company)
CITRUS COUNTY
Hernando Mine
The Howard Phosphate Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Inverness Mine
The Kellogg Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Hernando Mine-Sec. 23, T17S, R19E
The Loncala Phosphate Company
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Fort White Mine
GILCHRIST COUNTY
Mona Mine-Sec. 25, T10S, R16E


X X



X X


X X


X X


X X


Box C
Everglades, Fla.


P. O: Drawer 2100
Houston, Texas


Box 608
Ocala, Fla.


Ocala, Fla.


Box 3028
Orlando, Fla.

P. 0. Box 665
Ocala, Fla.

Box 338
High Springs, Fla.







78 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant
Pedrick and Bernard
MARION COUNTY
Morrison Mine-Sec. 25, T14S, R19E
Soil Builders, Inc.
CITRUS COUNTY
Mincoll Mine-Sec. 23, T18S, R19E
The Sun Phosphate Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Sec. 34 Mine-T17S, R19E
(Previously reporting as:
Knight & Bevis
Seaboard Phosphate Company
Globe Phosphate Company)
The Superior Phosphate Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Bar Mine-Sec. 20, T17S, R19E

Land Pebble:
The American Agricultural Chem. Co.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Boyette Mine-Sec. 14, T31S, R21E
POLK COUNTY
South Pierce tract, No. 12 Mine,
Sec. 31, T31S, R24E
American Cyanamid Company
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Sydney Mine-Sec. 28, T29S, R21E
POLK COUNTY
Saddle Creek Mine-Sec. 36, T28S, R24E
(To be abandoned)
Orange Park Mine-Sec. 22, T27S, R24E
(Under development)
Armour Fertilizer Works, Inc.
POLK COUNTY
Bartow Mine-Secs. 11 & 12, T30S, R24E
Coronet Phosphate Company, a Division
of Smith-Douglas Company, Inc.
POLK COUNTY
Tenoroc Mine-Secs. 26, 35, 36, T27S,
R24E
Davison Chemical Company, a Division
of W. R. Grace & Company
POLK COUNTY
Bonny Lake Mine-Sec. 33, T29S, R24E
Pauway Mine No. 4-Sec. 33, T28S, R24E
International Minerals & Chem. Corp.
POLK COUNTY
Achan Mine-Sec. 23, T30S, R23E
Noralyn Mine-Sec. 25, T30S, R23E
Peace Valley Mine-Sec. 10, T31S, R25E
Swift and Company
POLK COUNTY
Varn Mine-Sec. 31, T31S, R26E
Watson Mine-Secs. 5, 8, 9, T32S, R25E


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address
Dunnellon, Fla.

X X


X X


X X


X X



X X
X X


X X
X X


Box 368
Dunnellon, Fla.

Dunnellon, Fla.


Box 476
Dunnellon, Fla.


Pierce, Fla.


Brewster, Fla.


Bartow, Fla.


P. O. Box 790
Plant City, Fla.



P. 0. Box 471
Bartow, Fla.



P. O. Box 867
Bartow, Fla.



P. O. Box 200
Bartow, Fla.








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant
Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation
POLK COUNTY
Clear Spring Mine-Sec. 27, T39S, R25E
Homine Mine-Sec. 3, T31S, R25E

RUTILE
Florida Ore Processing Company
BREVARD COUNTY
Palm Bay Plant
(Destroyed by fire 1955)
The Hobart Brothers Company
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
Winter Beach Plant-Sec. 4, T32S, R39E
Rutile Mining Company of Florida
and
Titanium Alloy Manufacturing Division
of the National Lead Company
DUVAL COUNTY
Jacksonville Plant-Sec. 13, T2S, R27E
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.,
P. O. Box 5492, Jacksonville, Fla.)

SAND AND GRAVEL
ABCO Concrete Company
BREVARD COUNTY
Melbourne Pit
(Ceased operation on Aug. 1955)
All-Florida Sand Company,
Unincorporated
PUTNAM COUNTY
Interlachen Pit-Sec. 21, T10S, R24E
Asa Maige Sand Company
LEON COUNTY
Norfleet Pit-Sec. 36, T1N, R1W
E. E. Boone Construction Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Bell's Head Dredge
Brewton Engineering Company
BAY COUNTY
Mill Bayou Pit
Campbell Sand & Gravel Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Flomaton Mine-Sec. 22, T5N, R30W
C. & P. Dredging Company
BREVARD COUNTY
Micco Dredge
(Ceased operations 1954)
Cato Sand Company
BAY COUNTY
Mill Bayou Pit
Central Sand Company
LAKE COUNTY
Tavares Pit


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address
Nichols, Fla.

X X
X X


X X



X


P. O. Box 417
Melbourne, Fla.


Box 1482
Vero Beach, Fla.

P. 0. Box 5492
Jacksonville, Fla.


X X


X X




X X


X X


X


X X


X X


X



X X


X X


Box 846, Airport
Melbourne, Fla.



P. O. Box 4667
Jacksonville, Fla.

409 W. Gaines St.
Tallahassee, Fla.

Rt. 7, Box 378
Pensacola, Fla.

P. 0. Box 1039
Panama City, Fla.

Pt. 1, Box 89
Flomaton, Ala.

Box 101
Palm Bay, Fla.


Box 21, Springfield Sta.
Panama City, Fla.

P. O. Box 1175
Tavares, Fla.








80 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

K. C. Chapman
VOLUSIA COUNTY
Holly Hill Quarry-Sec. 37, T15S, R32E
Clark Sand Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Pensacola Pit-Sec. 37, T2S, R30W
Davenport Sand Company
POLK COUNTY
Davenport Pit-Sec. 24, T26S, R27E
Des Rochers Sand Company, Inc.
DADE COUNTY
Cape Florida Pit
Diamond Interlachen Sand Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Interlachen Pit-Sec. 21, T10S, R24E
F. A. Edwards Sand Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Manatee River Dredge
Florida East Coast Railway
ST. LUCIE COUNTY
St. Lucie Pit
Florida Gravel Company
GADSDEN COUNTY
Dredged from Apalachicola River
Hauspr Concrete Company
VOLUSIA COUNTY
Volusia County Pit
A. E. Hoffman
OSCEOLA COUNTY
Hoffman Pit
Hoyt Sand and Muck
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Pit-Sec. 20, T41S, R43E
Ideal Crushed Stone Company, Inc.
DADE COUNTY
Dade County Pit-Sec. 4, T53S, R40E
Johnson Sand Company
LEON COUNTY
Norfleet Pit
Keuka Sand Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Keuka Pit-Sec. 29, T10S, R24E
Keystone Sand Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Grandin Pit-Sec. 8, T9S, R24E
Lake Wales Concrete Sand Company
POLK COUNTY
Lake Wales Pit-Sec. 10, T30S, R28E


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


X


X X


X X


X X


X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


547 N. Ridgewood Ave.
Daytona, Beach, Fla.

901 Dominquez
Pensacola, Fla.

P. O. Box 350
Lake Wales, Fla.

3660 NW North River.
Drive, Miami 42, Fla.

P. O. Box 4667
Jacksonville, Fla.

Ellenton Road
Palmetto, Fla.

St. Augustine, Fla.


P. O. Box 156
Chattahoochee, Fla.

33f1/2 W. Michigan
DeLand, Fla.

Skees Road
West Palm Beach, Fla.

Box 50
Lake Park, Fla.

5500 NW 37th Ave.
Hialeah, Fla.

1002 S. Adams St.
Tallahassee, Fla.

Box H
Edgar, Fla.

47 W. Forsyth St.
Jacksonville, Fla.


P. O. Box 707
Lake Wales, Fla.








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

Lake Wales Independent Sand Company
POLK COUNTY
Independent Pit-Sec. 4, T30S, R28E
Largo Washed Sand Company, Inc.
PINELLAS COUNTY
Largo Pit-Sec. 25, T29S, R15E
MacCalla Brothers, Inc.
POLK COUNTY
Auburndale Pit
Mammoth Sand Company
POLK COUNTY
Lake Wales Pit
Middle Florida Sand Company, Inc.
LEON COUNTY
Tallahassee Pit-Sec. 5, T13N, R1W
Oak Ridge Sand Company, Inc.
POLK COUNTY
Achan Pit
Perry's Sand Company
OKALOOSA COUNTY
Ft. Walton Pit
Sand Lake Development Company
DADE COUNTY
Tarbert Pit
Jose N. Suarez
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Suarez Pit
The Suwannee River Sand Company
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
Dell Pit-Sec. 8, T4S, R11E
Standard Sand and Silica Company
POLK COUNTY
Standard Pit-Sec. 27, T26S, R27E
E. C. Thompson
VOLUSIA COUNTY
Barbour Pit-Sec. 37, T15S, R32E
United Clay Mines Corporation
PUTNAM COUNTY
Crossley Mine-Sec. 27, T10S, R23E
B. M. Walker
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
Vero Beach Pit
Ward Gravel Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Century Pit-Sec. 22, T5N, R30W
White Sands & Materials
VOLUSIA COUNTY
White Pit


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


X X


415 N. Scenic Hwy.
Lake Wales, Fla.

P. O. Box 677
Largo, Fla.

Box 791
Winter Haven, Fla.

Pembroke, Fla.


P. O. Box 922
Tallahassee, Fla.

P. O. Box 2565
Mulberry, Fla.

Box 525
Ft. Walton Beach, Fla.

260 NW 27th St.
Miami 37, Fla.

1708 Jetton Ave.
Tampa, Fla.

Drawer C
Foley, Fla.

P. O. Box 35
Davenport, Fla.

109 S. Hollywood Ave.
Daytona Beach, Fla.

P. O. Box 27
Hawthorne, Fla.

1945 18th Ave.
Vero Beach, Fla.

Route 1
Flomaton, Ala.

Box 1168, New Smyrna
Beach, Fla.








82 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant
STAUROLITE


Production
Reported
1954 1955 Address


E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc.
CLAY COUNTY
Highland Plant-Sec. 18, T4S, R22E
Trail Ridge Plant-Secs. 5 & 6, T6S,
R23E
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.,
P. O. Box 5492, Jacksonville, Fla.)
ZIRCON
Florida Ore Processing Company
BREVARD COUNTY
Palm Bay Plant
(Destroyed by fire 1955)
The Hobart Brothers Company
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
Winter Beach Plant-Sec. 4, T32S, R39E
Humphreys Gold Corporation
CLAY COUNTY
Trail Ridge Plant-Sec. 13, T2S, R27E
Rutile Mining Company of Florida
and
Titanium Alloy Manufacturing Division
of the National Lead Company
DUVAL COUNTY
Jacksonville Plant-Sec. 13, T2S, R27E
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.,
P. O. Box 5492, Jacksonville, Fla.)

PRODUCERS AND DISTRIBUTORS
1955-1956


X X
X X


X X



X


X X


P. O. Box 631
Starke, Fla.


P. O. Box 417
Melbourne, Fla.


Box 1482
Vero Beach, Fla.

Box 753
Starke, Fla.

P. O. Box 5492
Jacksonville, Fla.


X X


OF BOTTLED WATER


(Companies not canvassed for production data)


Name and Address
American Products & Equipment Company
3003 W. Broward Boulevard
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Blue Crystal Bottled Water
1219 19th Place
Vero Beach, Florida
Carbo Bottlers, Incorporated
2815 Hillsborough Road
West Palm Beach, Florida
Crystal Pure Water Company
1754 New Tampa Highway
Lakeland, Florida
Crystal Rock Water Company
1510 18th Avenue North
Lake Worth, Florida
Crystal Springs Water Company
7580 NE 4th Court
Miami 38, Florida


Location of Water Source
Broward County


Indian River County


Palm Beach County


Polk County


Palm Beach County


Volusia County-Spring located
at Orange City








TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT 8:

Name and Address Location of Water Source
Crystal Water Company Sarasota County
1221 1st Street
Sarasota, Florida
Curlew Wells Bottled Water Broward County
113 NE 3rd Avenue
Pompano, Florida
Deep Rock Water Company, Incorporated Palm Beach County
314 Flamingo Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida
Flamingo Water Company Seminole County
P. O. Box 845
Sanford, Florida
Good Hope Water Company, Incorporated Duval County-Riverview, Fla.
Box 3036, Station F
Jacksonville, Florida
Klear Water Company Palm Beach County
710 South Swinton Avenue
Delray Beach, Florida
Misto Water Company Pinellas County
1828 1st Avenue South
St. Petersburg, Florida
Orange City Water Company Volusia County
244 East Graves Avenue
Orange City, Florida
Perfection Water Company Sarasota County
1525 4th Street
Sarasota, Florida
Pinehurst Spring Water Company Sarasota County
South Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, Florida
Polar Water Company Orange County
1111 Virginia Drive
Orlando, Florida
South West Florida Distributors, Inc. Lee County
1305 Second Street
Fort Myers, Florida
Syfo Water Company Dade County
12955 NE 14th Avenue
North Miami, Florida
Tripure Products Company Dade County
3355 NW 73rd Street
Miami 47, Florida









MINERAL INDUSTRY IN FLORIDA 1952-1955


MINERAL PRODUCT (1)


Clays (including kaolin and
fuller's earth)
Clay sold or used in cement
manufacture
Diatomite
Lime
Natural Gas, 1,000 cu. ft.
Oyster Shell
Peat
Petroleum, 42 gal. bbls.
Phosphate Rock-long tons
Land Pebble -long tons
Hard rock -long tons
Soft rock -long tons
Sand and Gravel
Stone (except limestone for
cement and lime)
Ilmenite
Rutile
Zircon
Undistributed

Total


1952


I-


Quantity Value


112,113 $ 1,985,587

86,000 86,000


(2)
15,000

23,729
591,855
9,205,138
9,036,237
85,900
83,001
4,154,613
7,836,634

(2)
(2)
(2)


(3)
1,000

154,164
(3)
54,085,524
52,931,460
662,289
491,775
3,848,077
9,577,541

(3)
(3)
(3)
13,226,587

$82,878,000


1953

Quantity Value


148,000

109,911


(2)
34,000

27,678
541,284
9,330,952
9,185,971
68,200
76,781
3,731,432
9,428,959

151,109
6,475
21,234


$ 2,842,448

109,911


(3)
2,000

185,524
(3)
56,587,790
55,575,120
537,400
475,270
3,199,368
11,309,421

2,322,451
702,791
793,685
14,453,548

$92,336,000


1954

Quantity Value


371,948

(2)


(2)
35,000

37,449
548,000
10,437,197
10,288,332
78,990
93,956
3,468,842
14,225,356

157,157
7,305
17,959


$ 3,337,130

(3)


(3)
2,900

168,004
(3)
64,499,877
63,301,900
622,440
575,537
2,661,152
16,832,066

2,411,823
869,677
820,041
14,913,943

$106,517,000


1955

Quantity Value


412,766

(2)


(2)
35,000
724,342
61,098
490,000
8,747,282
8,586,294
91,200
69,788
5,065,503
16,303,625

(3)
(3)
28,913


$ 4,815,855

(3)


(3)
4,000
1,653,669
231,829
(3)
53,640,301
52,545,200
733,800
452,301
4,349,148
21,312,339

(3)
(3)
1,425,641
23,868,651

$108,917,000


(1) Reported in short tons unless indicated otherwise.
(2) Data not available.
(3) Value included under "undistributed".


I I ~I























-~4.


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
HM ir.r.i ,.'.1er, DIr ,lI r


MINERAL RESOURCES AND INDUSTRIES


OF FLORIDA


* .1
'


LEGEND

RESOURCE AREAS
Ther ara6 are qeer.oiral ara urwrepn re me dorrI er,. malerall
of iurfrc, l'oe.ahl r.
DOLOM, ITE
LIMeST.E S TE
PE AT
SAPD
S.ANE' WIT, '*L.AY 6& HA / 'A LT
SANrD SHELL a CLAY
SAND SHELL & MARL
SArN SHELL "COUiNA'
SAND CLAY a LIMLETONE
PHOSPHATIrC SANDi & C:LAYS.
LIMESTONE & FULLERS EARTH

INDUSTRIES
Each Ir-duesry Symbrjl i-,aiclQI 0a oauCing mire, quadr r or
lar.i No alarmpr 1 1as b.een made to "ho*w Iactivea na abanaonea
ocarllons Clay localaIIes Ilor hlch publIsned aola are orallable are
repdesbr.Iea by aparoDrIare s nTDgIB
SAND a GRAVEL
PEAT

LIMESTONE
Quarry A
DOLOMITE
Quarry
CLAY
Mine
LOCAaIII
KAOLIN
Mir.e
Localiry
FULLERS EARTH
Mine
LOCCIIIT n
Localli I
PETROLEUM
Field
PnOSPHAfrE, L AND PEBBLE
Mire
PHOSPHATE.SOFT ROOC
Mi-. 1-
PHIOSHATE.nrARu ROCK
HEAVY MINERAL SAND .
Mine

Plan
LIME
Kpln.
Kgl~:r DCHn t I


1956

Compiled from reports by the U. S.
Bureau of Mines, the U. S. Bureau
of the Census, U. S. Geological
Survey, and file data of the Florida
Geological Survey.


BI


--*'


7.

*-B








n '.Fac-our


.M


FLORIDA GOELOLcAL SUItEY SE MAP


I YIWtMETERS


Figure 12.


Ia


BY
JAMES L. GALVER


i 1


I
I -
I

p"- ~E~I~ "
V







TWELFTH BIENNIAL REPORT


REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY DURING 1956

The mineral industry of Florida continued to expand during
1956 with total mineral production estimated at $132,955 or 22
percent above 1955, according to data supplied to the U. S. Bureau
of Mines and the Florida Geological Survey. Table 2 contains the
preliminary production values for 1956.

Marketable production of phosphate rock increased 20 percent
in tonnage and 23 percent in value above 1955 to 10,500,000 tons
valued at $65,000,000. Crushed limestone, the second most im-
portant mineral product of the State in terms of production and
value, totaled 17,303,000 tons valued at $24,123,000, an increase
of 6 percent in tonnage and 13 percent in value. The portland
cement industry increased 7 percent in tonnage and 2 percent in
value, but more important is the expansion program that includes


ESTIMATED VALUE OF MINERAL PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA,
1956


(u


Mineral


Clays ................... ... ....
Natural gas, 1000 cu. ft.
Oyster shell .................-....
Peat ......-..--...... ...........
Petroleum, bbls.............-
Phosphate rock, long tons
Sand and gravel ...--....--....
Stone (exclusive of
dimension stone) .-.........
Zirconium-zircon concentrates
Undistributed: Abrasives
(garnet), cement
(masonry and portland),
lime, stone (dimension),
titanium (ilmenite and
rutile concentrates), and
minerals whose value
must be concealed ---...


Short tons
unless otherwise
stated)
412,000
40,000
1,117,000
65,000
487,000
10,500,000
5,000,000
17,303,000
(1)


Value
$ 5,135,000
(1)
2,496,000
260,000
(1)
65,920,000
4,155,000
24,123,000
(1)


33,547,000


Total Florida .......................... (2) $132,955,000

(1) Included with "Undistributed."
(2) Total adjusted to eliminate duplications.
U. S. Bureau of Mines data.







86 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
two plants under construction in Dade County that will have a
combined annual capacity of 4,500,000 barrels of cement.
The heavy mineral industry in the State recovers and separates
grains of ilmenite, rutile, zircon, garnet, staurolite, and monazite,
from sand deposits that are associated with either the present
beaches of the State or the raised or ancient beach lines. Although
production data are not available for publication, it is estimated
that the total value of these minerals at the separation plants,
increased from $4,500,000 in 1954 to $8,000,000 in 1956. Florida
ranks first among the states in production of rutile, zircon, and
staurolite, and second in ilmenite. The value at the mine or plant
for the rock and mineral products in 1956 was greater than the
total value reported for the six-year period 1940-1945 inclusive.










pical mining scene in tlie land-pebble phosphate
Sdisrict with dragline in foreground removing phos-
pha.e ore and dragline in 'background removing
fir burden. .-

--f--' Ph ograph courtesy of the American Agricultural Chemical Company.









-;-.-- .** : \
'.t \
., *-,. ..

*,.. .. o .-.. ..- a'














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