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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Introduction
 Florida geological survey...
 U. S. geological survey - Florida...
 Publications
 Activities of the survey
 Oil exploration
 Topographic maps and mapping
 Numerical finding list of topographic...
 County finding list of topographic...
 Florida mineral industry during...
 Appropriations
 1953 statement of funds available,...
 Back Cover














Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000223/00009
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report of the Florida Geological Survey
Physical Description: 11 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1940-1961
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Geology -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation, Florida Geological Survey
Dates or Sequential Designation: 4th (1940)-14th (1959-1960).
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000376187
oclc - 01956611
notis - ACB5800
lccn - sn 87028635
System ID: UF00000223:00009
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    List of Illustrations
        Page 5
    Introduction
        Page 6
    Florida geological survey personnel
        Page 7
    U. S. geological survey - Florida personnel
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Publications
        Page 10
    Activities of the survey
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Oil exploration
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Topographic maps and mapping
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 18a
    Numerical finding list of topographic maps
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    County finding list of topographic maps
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Florida mineral industry during 1952 and 1953
        Page 39
        Value of production
            Page 39
        Phosphate rock
            Page 40
        Heavy mineral sands
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
        Selected mineral products
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
        Ground water
            Page 48
        Current and future expansion
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
        Rock and mineral producers
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
    Appropriations
        Page 56
    1953 statement of funds available, expenditures, and balances
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text
COLLECT ilN

ORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT
ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


FNeARY
i2.,

.. .








State of Florida

LEROY COLLINS, Governor


Florida State Board of Conservation
ERNEST MITTS, Director











ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT

of the

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
n' "


January 1,


Covering Period

1953, through December 31, 1954


HERMAN GUNTER

Director and State Geologist




Tallahassee, Florida

1955











FLORIDA STATE BOARD

OF

CONSERVATION


LEROY COLLINS
Governor


R. A. GRAY
Secretary of State

RAY E. GREEN
Comptroller

THOMAS D. BAILEY
Superintendent of
Public Instruction


64778


RICHARD ERVIN
Attorney General

J. EDWIN LARSON
Treasurer

NATHAN MAYO
Commissioner of
Agriculture


ERNEST MITTS, Director
Board of Conservation







ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL









Jaftla/iaee
April 11, 1955

MR. ERNEST MITTS, Director
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
SIR:
Herewith is the Eleventh Biennial Report of the Florida Geo-
logical Survey, a division of the Florida State Board of Conserva-
tion. This report contains a brief review of the work of the Survey
during the two-year period 1953-1954, an outline of some of the
proposed investigations for the future, summaries of the mineral
production for 1952-1953, and the financial statement. By means
of this report we wish to outline to you, the State Board of Con-
servation, and the citizens of the State, some of the work and
services of the Florida Geological Survey and to express our appre-
ciation to the State officials, the mineral producers, and the citizens
of Florida, whose cooperation has made our job interesting to do
and beneficial to our State.
Respectfully submitted,
HERMAN GUNTER, Director


6 7 8







4 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

Letter of Transmittal --------------- ------------____--___ 3

Introduction ----_______-------- -----------... .. -..... ___... 6

Florida Geological Survey Personnel ------ _____- 7

U. S. Geological Survey-Florida Personnel --- 8

Publications -------------..---------............__________ 10

Activities of the Survey ---------_ _~__ 10

Oil Exploration -____---.. .. ---------.- -..-.-.______..-.. 14

Topographic Maps and Mapping -- ______ _____ 16

Numerical Finding List of Topographic Maps __ 19

County Finding List of Topographic Maps --- 26

Florida Mineral Industry During 1952 and 1953 -- 39

Value of Production --------------------------- ..._-_ 39

Phosphate Rock ---------_ -------------......____. ._-. 40

Heavy Mineral Sands .--.------------ -----.. .________.. 41

Selected Mineral Products ----------------.............. 45

Ground Water _____--------------.-__________ .. .. 48

Current and Future Expansion -----------._____-___-...___.. 48

Rock and Mineral Producers -------------___._________.____._ 52

A appropriations ---------------------------_________ ---- ---- --- 56

Statement of Funds Available, Expenditures and Balances
1953 --------- -------- -- ---- ---------------------_-.-.--_-. 56

1954 ---_____-- ------.-.-- .. ...________ _______ 58








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


ILLUSTRATIONS

Page
Floating Spiral Concentrator, Highland Mine, Clay
County, Florida ----______________---__ Cover

Figure 1. Status of Topographic Mapping in Florida--- 17

2. Index to published Topographic Maps-Facing 18

3. Dry Mill of the Highland Plant ---- 42

4. Prospecting for heavy minerals in Walton
County .-- .--------. --....------ ___________ _-- ._. --. 44



Table 1. Summary of Oil Production ---.___ 15

2. Value of Florida Mineral Production, 1940
through 1953 -------_-- 40

3. Quantity of Production of Selected Florida
Minerals, 1940 through 1953 -----____ 49

4. Summary of Florida Mineral Production ...._- 51








6 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Eleventh Biennial Report

of the

Florida Geological Survey



INTRODUCTION

During the biennium, January 1, 1953, through December 31,
1954, the Florida Geological Survey had the greatest demand for
geological information in the history of the Survey. It is most
encouraging that requests for services of the Survey are increas-
ing phenomenally as is evidenced by the widespread manner in
which the public, industry and educational institutions seek basic
and highly technical data through personal calls, correspondence
and requests for literature.
The Geological Survey continues- to operate on a very modest
budget, but regardless of this, the staff is made up of thoroughly
trained and experienced personnel who do research and make in-
vestigations and prepare reports on geological subjects directly
related to their respective fields of specialization. The Survey
has, however, been financially unable to attract to its staff mem-
bers trained in paleontology. Florida is a state replete with both
vertebrate and invertebrate fossils and highly trained specialists
are needed to more thoroughly investigate and report upon such
deposits.
The unprecedented drought that began with 1954 still continues.
Fortunately, 1953 was the second wettest year of record and the
effects of the drought were therefore somewhat delayed; however,
certain sections of Florida were severely affected during the latter
part of 1954 and extending into 1955. Such conditions added very
materially to the duties of the Survey, for as the water table low-
ered and some springs and shallow wells went dry, requests for
data and help increased to an unprecedented high level. The Sur-
vey was fortunate to render the assistance necessary to solve the
problems, although at times facilities were taxed.









ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PERSONNEL

January 1, 1953, to December 31, 1954

FULL TIME STAFF


Herman Gunter
R. O. Vernon
James L. Calver
Charles W. Hendry, Jr.
James William Yon, Jr.
Harbans Puri
Andrew R. Janson
Herbert H. Winters
F. D. Miller, Jr.
E. Corinne Little
Mary Cathryn Novak
Mary W. Blount
Ruth A. Shuler
Martha Walker
Muriel M. Kirk
Roy W. Staton
Charlie Snelling
John McBride


Director and State Geologist
Asst. Director and Asst. State Geologist
Geologist
Assistant Geologist
Field Geologist
Paleontologist
Curator
(Resigned Sept. 8, 1954) Vertebrate Paleontologist


(Re-entered July 5, 1954)


(Deceased Feb. 7, 1954)
(Entered Dec. 1, 1953)
(Resigned Sept. 9, 1953)
(Entered Sept. 1, 1953)
(Resigned Feb. 28, 1955)
(Entered March 1, 1954)


Accountant
Secretary
Secretary
Secretary
Secretary
Librarian
Librarian
Field Assistant
Sample Washer
Janitor


PART TIME WORKERS


Charles L. Lester
Doryand P. Janson
Dorothy Harrell
Bobby L. Howe
Richard 0. Cutler
June Conyers
James S. Cullison, II
Lars Dohm
Frank N. Hall
Barbara L. Hendry
R. H. Herron
Bert McIntosh
Mary Louise Prine
Josephine P. Roehrig
Vann E. Street
Anna Sumner
F. Jeanette Tadlock
James E. Vause
Manuel Vega
Don A. Whitehead
William A. Wisner, Jr.


(Entered April, 1954)

(Entered July, 1954)
(Resigned May, 1954)
(June to July, 1954)
(Resigned June, 1953)
(Sept. to Dec., 1954)
(Feb. to Dec., 1953)
(Aug. to Sept., 1954)
(July, 1953, to Feb., 1954)
(March to June, 1954)
(Resigned Jan., 1953)
(Resigned June, 1954)
(June to Dec., 1954)
(November, 1953, to March,
(Oct., 1953, to May, 1954)
(Oct., 1953, to May, 1954)
(Resigned Jan., 1954)
(June to July, 1954)


Office Assistant
Museum Assistant
Typist
Laboratory Aide
Draftsman's Aide
Typist
Rodman
Draftsman's Aide
Rodman
Library Aide
Rodman
Draftsman's Aide
Draftsman
Typist
Laboratory Aide
Typist
1954) Typist
Laboratory Aide
Laboratory Aide
Laboratory Aide
Rodman


RESEARCH CONSULTANTS


Jules R. DuBar
Ernest H. Lund
E. C. Pirkle


(June to Sept., 1953)
(June to Sept., 1953)
(Began Aug., 1954)








8 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY-FLORIDA PERSONNEL
The Florida Geological Survey contributes a portion of the
funds used by the United States Geological Survey in cooperative
water-resource studies. The personnel, employed by the Federal
Survey in these studies, stationed in Florida in December, 1954,
is as follows:



GROUND WATER BRANCH
Office of Staff Engineer-Tallahassee
District Office-Tallahassee
P. O. Box 1233-New Dining Hall Bldg.
F.S.U. Campus, Phone 3-1693


Cooper, Hilton H., Jr.
Rorabaugh, Matthew I.
Heath, Ralph C.
Brown, Delbert W.
Derragon, Eugene
Leutze, Willard P.
Essig, Carl F., Jr.
Mills, Luther R. E.
Williamson, Alberta Glover
Dann, Marelle D.
Peek, Harry M.
Field Headquarters-Bradenton
Wyrick, Granville G.
Field Headquarters-Daytona Beach
Stewart, Herbert G., Jr.
Field Headquarters-Lakeland
Barraclough, Jack T.
Field Headquarters-Sanford


Staff Engineer
District Engineer
Geologist
Geologist
Physicist
Geologist
Engineer-Aide
Engineer-Aide
Clerk
Clerk-Stenographer
Geologist

Geologist

Geologist

Engineer


Area Office-Miami 33
P. O. Box 348, Coconut Grove Station
Dinner Key, South Bayshore Drive
Phone 48-4564


Hoy, Nevin D.
Klein, Howard
Kohout, Francis A.
Schroeder, Melvin C., WAE
Lichtler, William F.
Sherwood, Clarence B., Jr.
Jackson, Kenneth L.
Voegtle, Henry J.
Pollard, Laura G.


Geologist-in-Charge
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Engineer
Engineer-Aide
Engineer-Aide
Clerk









ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT

SURFACE WATER BRANCH

District Office-Ocala
P. O. Box 607, Building 211
Camp Roosevelt, Phone MArion 2-6513


Patterson, Archibald O.
Pride, Roland W.
Yonker, Carl C.
Kenner, William E.
Kidd, Wm. Richard, Jr.
Musgrove, Rufus H.
Taylor, Robert L.
Barrows, Robert C.
Murphy, Walter R., Jr.
Spooner, Charles M., Jr.
Gardner, Milton S.
Cunningham, Ray E.
Newbern, Ernest K.
Speir, Florence D.
McLain, Helen Jones, WAE
Baugh, Frances P.


District Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineering-Aide
Engineering-Aide
Engineering-Aide
Clerk
Clerk
Clerk


Area Office-Miami 33
P. O. Box 348, Coconut Grove Station
Dinner Key, South Bayshore Drive
Phone 48-4564


Hartwell, James H.
Carter, Albert G.
Galliher, Claiborne F.
Leach, Stanley D.
Charnley, Raymond S.
Arbogast, Mary N.


Engineer-in-Charge
Engineer
Engineer
Engineer
Engineering-Aide
Clerk


Area Office-Sebring
P. O. Box 553, Highlands County
Court House, Phone 5771


Heath, Richard C.
Anderson, Warren
Bird, Robert A.


Engineer-in-Charge
Engineer
Engineering-Aide


QUALITY OF WATER BRANCH

District Office-Ocala
P. O. Box 607, Building 211
Camp Roosevelt, Phone MArion 2-6513


Brown, Eugene
Crooks, James W.
Menke, Clarence G.
Gore, James B., WAE
Wesley, Merle Spears


District Chemist
Chemist
Chemist
Physical-Science-Aide
Clerk-Stenographer







10 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

PUBLICATIONS
During 1953 and 1954, ten resource studies covering water re-
sources, Miocene stratigraphy and fauna, Eocene faunas, Phos-
phorus in Florida waters, the geology and stratigraphy of five
counties and the petrology of Eocene rocks were published. These
papers were printed in the Bulletins, Reports of Investigation and
Information Circulars-three of the standard series of publica-
tions issued by this Department.
The editions of all Survey reports are limited to 3,000 copies;
consequently, the distribution is restricted. In order that the
greatest number can have access to the publications a copy of each
is deposited in hundreds of large reference libraries throughout the
United States and many foreign countries, and in a number of in-
stitutional and private libraries. In addition, a selected list of
seven publications, eagerly sought by the teachers in secondary
schools, are deposited in the high school libraries of the State upon
request for a reference file. The Survey has prepared a study set
of characteristic minerals and rocks found in Florida with de-
scriptive information concerning each as a further aid to public
school teachers. These are available for one dollar a set of 18
specimens, the approximate cost of assembling.

ACTIVITIES OF THE SURVEY
As a result of technical help and data that the Survey is able
to furnish Industry, Agriculture, and local and state agencies, the
Florida Geological Survey is one of the State departments that
brings more wealth into the State than it expends from funds
appropriated by the Legislature from general revenue. It is a
fact-finding, scientific, research department that operates under
the State Board of Conservation through the Director. The Survey
employs presently six geologists, two technicians, three clerks, a li-
brarian and two laboratory aides. With this small staff and a
modest budget, several hundred studies have been undertaken and
have resulted in as many papers covering the mineral wealth and
water resources of the State.
We are proud of the fact that the total output and value of
mineral wealth produced in the State has steadily climbed and that
the total value exceeded 90 million dollars in 1954. The pride that
the Survey takes in this growth of the industry is that much of the
advance was based on the research and on mineral discoveries made
by the Survey. During the past biennium the Survey has assisted,







10 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

PUBLICATIONS
During 1953 and 1954, ten resource studies covering water re-
sources, Miocene stratigraphy and fauna, Eocene faunas, Phos-
phorus in Florida waters, the geology and stratigraphy of five
counties and the petrology of Eocene rocks were published. These
papers were printed in the Bulletins, Reports of Investigation and
Information Circulars-three of the standard series of publica-
tions issued by this Department.
The editions of all Survey reports are limited to 3,000 copies;
consequently, the distribution is restricted. In order that the
greatest number can have access to the publications a copy of each
is deposited in hundreds of large reference libraries throughout the
United States and many foreign countries, and in a number of in-
stitutional and private libraries. In addition, a selected list of
seven publications, eagerly sought by the teachers in secondary
schools, are deposited in the high school libraries of the State upon
request for a reference file. The Survey has prepared a study set
of characteristic minerals and rocks found in Florida with de-
scriptive information concerning each as a further aid to public
school teachers. These are available for one dollar a set of 18
specimens, the approximate cost of assembling.

ACTIVITIES OF THE SURVEY
As a result of technical help and data that the Survey is able
to furnish Industry, Agriculture, and local and state agencies, the
Florida Geological Survey is one of the State departments that
brings more wealth into the State than it expends from funds
appropriated by the Legislature from general revenue. It is a
fact-finding, scientific, research department that operates under
the State Board of Conservation through the Director. The Survey
employs presently six geologists, two technicians, three clerks, a li-
brarian and two laboratory aides. With this small staff and a
modest budget, several hundred studies have been undertaken and
have resulted in as many papers covering the mineral wealth and
water resources of the State.
We are proud of the fact that the total output and value of
mineral wealth produced in the State has steadily climbed and that
the total value exceeded 90 million dollars in 1954. The pride that
the Survey takes in this growth of the industry is that much of the
advance was based on the research and on mineral discoveries made
by the Survey. During the past biennium the Survey has assisted,







ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


by studies already published and through field assistance, in locat-
ing two deposits of rutile, ilmenite and other heavy minerals, upon
which plants are being constructed and mining will soon begin.
Since the start of the Survey in 1907 a library of rock cuttings
from wells throughout Florida and adjacent States has been main-
tained. This library now includes samples from 3500 wells drilled
for water supply, drainage, or for oil. These samples are im-
portant leads to new mineral wealth, and to the expansion of our
knowledge of known resources. The well cuttings are keys to the
stratigraphy, geology, and structure of the State and have been
very useful to the oil geologists in the search for oil in Florida.
But by far the most important use of these samples, in total value
to the economy of the State, is the record of ground-water resources
and the conditions under which they occur. Water is the most
valuable of all of our mineral resources and probably the least
valued by the citizens of Florida.
Florida is fortunate to have what is reported to be the most
prolific and largest distribution system of artesian water in the
world. The formations making up this aquifer, as are many of
the formations that over lie it, are filled with sweet, potable water
of such high purity and quality, that little treatment other than for
public health precautions is necessary. This acquifer leaks natu-
rally through more than one hundred known and measured springs,
seven times more water than required for all the supplies for mu-
nicipal, domestic and industrial uses in the State. This leakage,
about 31/2 billion gallons of water per day, is not used for any
purpose other than for recreation.
The water facts covering this great resource have been gath-
ered and tabulated by Survey personnel since the initiation of the
Survey in 1907. Beginning in 1930 the State Survey has cooper-
ated with the Federal Survey in water resource studies and from
this association there has accumulated a long record of the water
levels, movements, quantity, quality, and the associated geology.
It is hoped that these continued records will lead ultimately to the
complete understanding of the hydrology and geology of Florida
and that this knowledge will be useful in preventing water short-
ages and troubles in the future.
In the attempt to offer a greater service in trouble shooting in
ground-water problems in Florida, the Survey has purchased sev-
eral technical machines that have proved their adaptability and
worth in locating the source of salt water and bacterial contamina-








12 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

tion, in reconditioning old wells where the casing is thought to be
defective, in determining the depth of wells and the length of casing
in old wells on which no records are available. In particular, the
Widco electric logging machine has saved the city, county and
State agencies, together with some industrial and private interests
where consulting services were not available, several times the
amount of money used to purchase the logging machine.
An improved Mobile auger has been very satisfactory in ob-
taining samples of the hard rock beneath the sand and detrital
cover that blankets most of Florida. Foundations for dam sites
have been tested and certain stratigraphic problems have been
solved by the use of this machine.
During the biennium a number of specific problems were solved
through the use of the Widco logging machine and the Mobile
auger. These are listed as follows:

Electric and geologic logging:
1) The wells at the abandoned Morris plant of Armour and Company,
Bartow, Florida, were found to be in shape to use at the new plant
now being constructed.
2) A permanent record was made of the new supply well for the Uni-
versity of Florida.
3) Salt-water contamination of the water supply in some wells along
a portion of the Panama City Beach was studied and recommenda-
tions made to combat the problem.
4) The Santa Rosa Island Authority was assisted in an attempt to
secure a deep water supply through a well drilled on the island.
5) A record was made of the new water supply well for the City of
Marianna, Florida, and recommendations for casing and develop-
ment were made.
6) Cooperated with the United States Geological Survey in ground-
water and geologic study for proposed site for the Chemstrand Cor-
poration plant in Escambia county.
7) Records were made of the Farmers State Market well near Quincy,
with recommendations for development in this area where water
supply is difficult to obtain.
8) Recommendations made for reconditioning an old well of the Clinton
Foods, Inc., in Highlands County.
9) An old well was reconditioned for the town of Webster, Florida.
10) Several water supply wells were logged and studied for the city of
Tallahassee, Florida.
The Mobile rig was used for:
1) An investigation of the soil, the subsurface formations and the
hydrology at the Chipola Experimental Forest in cooperation with
the United States Department of Agriculture.









ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 13

2) The foundation site for a proposed dam to control the waters in
Lake Miccosukee was surveyed for Leon and Jefferson county
authorities.
3) The stratigraphy of the Lake Bradford area was studied to deter-
mine the cause of the low water levels.

In the cooperative program of water resource studies several
investigations are being conducted by the personnel of the Federal
Survey, with some assistance being given by those of the State
Survey. On December 31, 1954, the following projects were being
undertaken:

1) The geology and ground-water resources of Lee and Charlotte
counties, Florida.
2) Investigation of the ground-water resources of Brevard County,
Florida.
3) Investigation of the ground-water resources in southwestern Hills-
borough County.
4) Investigation of the ground-water resources of Manatee County,
Florida.
5) Investigation of the ground-water resources of Indian River County,
Florida.
6) Investigation of the ground-water resources of Glades and Hendry
counties, Florida.
7) Investigation of the ground-water resources of the Foley area,
Taylor County, Florida.
8) Investigation of the ground-water resources of Volusia County,
Florida.
9) Investigation of the ground-water resources of Polk County, Florida.
10) Continuing studies of ground-water fluctuations.

Geologic studies being undertaken at end of biennium:
1) The Ocala group of Jackson age.
5) The geology of Jackson County.
3) The tabulation and description of Florida's mineral resources.
4) The geology of the Jim Woodruff dam site.
5) The geology of Jackson County.
6) The stratigraphy of Florida as determined by geologic studies of
rock cuttings taken from wells drilled in search of oil and water.

The results of these studies on geology and water resources will
eventually be published as a portion of the regular editions issued
by the Survey.








14 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY



OIL EXPLORATION

Exploration for oil and gas in Florida continued actively during
the biennium. The Pollard Field in Alabama stimulated activities
in the western portion of Florida and the discovery of oil in the
Forty-Mile Bend Field on the Tamiami Trail about 40 miles west
of Miami accelerated exploration in that area. In 1954 there were
29 wells completed and seven were drilling on January 1, 1955.
Two wells were completed as producers. The total footage drilled
in 1953 was 211,089; in 1954 the footage was 198,127.
The Forty-Mile Bend Field. This new field is about 40 miles
west of Miami on the Tamiami Trail. The Commonwealth Oil
Company, et al., No. 1 M. B. Wiseheart-State Board of Education
well was completed February 6, 1954, with an initial production
of 76 barrels of oil per day, gravity 21.2 API at 600. The total
depth of this well is 11,557 feet; the producing zone is the Sunni-
land at 11,322-11,339 feet. Total production during 1954 was
10,673 barrels of oil, or an average of about 32 barrels per day.
A second producer was brought in by the Gulf Oil Corporation,
the No. 1 State of Florida-Lease 340 well, about 3 miles east of the
discovery well. This well was completed April 5, 1954, at a total
depth of 11,352 feet. The initial production was 112 barrels of
oil per day, gravity 21.7 API at 60'. During 1954 this well pro-
duced 10,819 barrels of oil, or an average of about 40 barrels
per day.
Additional tests in that immediate area have not been successful
as commercial producers, although they have yielded encouraging
shows.
The production from Florida's two fields, the Sunniland and
the Forty-Mile Bend, is given in Table 1.










TABLE 1
SUMMARY OF OIL PRODUCTION (BARRELS)

A-Sunniland Field, Collier County, September 26, 1943 December 31, 1954


B-Forty-Mile Bend Field,
Dade County
January-December, 1954


Month 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1954
Jan. 2,108 3,899 7,464 25,149 37,695 32,095 47,845 52,331 45,375 46,067 54
Feb. 1,404 402 3,454 5,203 22,853 32,617 26,091 43,543 50,487 40,821 41,985 1,446
Mar. 1,100 581 2,982 18,795 25,688 38,880 31,963 48,613 51,708 46,609 47,930 1,296
Apr. 1,0541 403 4,151 16,362 23,597 42,859 31,136 49,990 52,385 43,673 38,357 3,289
May 1,1151 725 6,776 20,440 21,266 39,756 28,146 49,288 52,629 46,244 47,152 2,870
June 8221 4,110 7,676 31,065 24,092 39,956 47,649 49,823 49,520 43,260 42,695 2,421
July Discov. 1,123 5,700 6,450 31,395 25,543 44,070 46,740 54,499 47,352 46,912 45,740 2,297
Aug. Date 957 4,455 4,160 31,021 24,011 44,764, 50,578 50,294 49,863 48,020 t 46,403 1,169
Sept. 9/26/43 516 2,775 6,544 28,431 22,475 31,437 48,130 49,609 45,908 45,093 42,654 1,319
Oct. 648 609 2,976 ---.- 22,445 27,003 28,634 45,715 51,725 46,350 45,529 42,941 2,144
Nov. 643 581 2,666 2,408 23,948 20,331 31,054 52,813 48,008 45,357 44,694 41,453 1,287
Dec. 2,741 4491 2,717 8,3841 22,776 29,213 29,998 44,965 52,806 47,965 45,054 42,845 2,009

Total 4,032111,838127,5101 56,8841259,3451291,221 441,7201 486,021 596,043 591,855 541,284 526,22211 21,559
Cumu-
lative 4,032115,870 43,3801100,2641359,619 650,830 1,092,550 1,578,571 2,174,614 2,766,469 3,307,753 3,833,975 21,559


* Last remaining flowing well placed on pump, twelve producing wells in the field-all on pump.
t Well No. 4, GCRC, depleted and plugged-11 wells in field, all on pump.


Two wells pumping.







16 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY



TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS AND MAPPING
From the very beginning of the United States Geological Survey
in 1879, it was evident that neither land classification nor conclu-
sive geologic determinations could be made without accurate base
maps. In order to make a systematic study of the geology and
natural resources of the United States it was first necessary to
make the maps and in 1882 the Topographic Division of the U. S.
Geological Survey was organized. Since that time that division
has been engaged in making a series of standard topographic maps
to cover the entire United States. This monumental undertaking
has received the support of many private organizations as well as
other Federal and State agencies. The State of Florida is the only
State in the United States that has not had a cooperative mapping
program with the U. S. Geological Survey. A number of Federal
agencies in addition to the U. S. Geological Survey are or have
been engaged in the preparation of topographic maps, the most
outstanding of these are the Coast and Geodetic Survey, The Gen-
eral Land Office, the Department of the Army, the Forest Service
and the Tennessee Valley Authority. All of the topographic maps
that have been prepared and published are now distributed by the
United States Geological Survey.

The topographic maps so far completed of Florida cover an
area equal to approximately 40 per cent of the State. Some of
these were published before 1900, consequently they are far out-
of-date in regard to present day culture. These older maps were
prepared under standards of accuracy that are far below those
required by present day map users and makers. The portion of
Florida that is either mapped or in progress of being mapped is
illustrated in Figure 1. This illustration was prepared by the
Topographic Division, U. S. Geological Survey, to show the status
of topographic mapping in Florida as of April 1, 1955.









ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


* 6 65s 84 83* B3P BI
_____________+ M31*


FLORI DA


W.ii
-Lf



I'B.


I-I r a-- ^ TI "


rij"- l'N
f B ; 1'


ComUN SIT


Figure 1. Status of topographic mapping in Florida as of April 1, 1955.
Prepared by the Topographic Division, U. S. Geological Survey.


TT'
!I L~ "L-^^ rB
:<- ^- I--.,^ ^

!-'- S^ i I ^U^^Mf


sc
c



Lr


'"'''~ "'"







18 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Standard topographic maps are issued for areas that are bound-
ed by parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude. Such areas
are called quadrangles and the quadrangle may be one degree; 30
minutes; 15 minutes; or 712 minutes of latitude and longitude.
Some of the quadrangle maps of Florida are issued in the 15 minute
series and others in the 71/ minute series. Each of the individual
quadrangles has been named and Figure 2 is an index to these
quadrangle names. The numbers have no significance and are
useful only in locating the quadrangle or map name in the accom-
panying lists. Topographic maps are for sale by the U. S. Geo-
logical Survey and must be ordered by quadrangle name. Orders
should be addressed to the Chief of Distribution, Geological Sur-
vey, Washington 25, D. C. The price is 20 cents per copy and
payment by money order or check, payable to the Geological Sur-
vey, should accompany all orders.

Topographic maps may also be purchased from the following
companies:

Fort Pierce:
Horton's, 122 North Second Street.
Gainesville:
Campus Shop & Book Store, University of Florida.
Jacksonville:
The H. & W. B. Drew Company.
The Nautical Supply Company, 15 North Newnan Street.
Tampa:
Poston Marine Supply Company, P. O. Box 425.

Many libraries maintain map reference facilities where the
published maps of the Geological Survey may be consulted. In
Florida, maps are deposited in the libraries listed below:
Gainesville:
The University Libraries, University of Florida.
Tallahassee:
The Library, Florida State University.
Florida Geological Survey.
Winter Park:
Mills Memorial Library, Rollins College.








16







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87"
86


I N D E


TOPOGRAPHIC


MAPS

MAPS


TOPOGR





MA



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INDEX NUM

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C DD


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SERIES


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e~y(


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25 50


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15'


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Approx
---- ------ ------------


Approximate Scale


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242


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ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


NUMERICAL FINDING LIST OF TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS
Numerical finding list to the names of quadrangles for which
topographic maps have been published. The index numbers corre-
spond to the 15 minute quadrangles that are shown on the map
of Florida, Figure 2-facing page 18.


Name

Dyas ---
Century ---
Jay -. ----
Munson
Crestview --
Laurel Hill -----
Glendale -----

A Hobbs Cross
Roads
B Izagora ..
C Prosperity .
D Caryville -


Esto --
Graceville -----
Bonifay ---------
Chipley ----

Campbellton
Sills ----- .-
Cottondale West
Cottondale East


A Malone --_.---- 71/2'
B Bascom .---.-- 71/2'
C Marianna 71/2'
D Dellwood 71/2'
Folkston 15'
Boulogne 15'
Kingsland ..--------- 15'
Robertsdale .------- 15'
Muscogee ---------- 15'
Milton ------ 15'
Harold 15'
Holt 15'
Niceville --- 15'
DeFuniak Springs-_ 15'

A Ponce de Leon- 71/2'
B Hinsons Cross
Roads --- 71/2'


Series Date

15' 1942
15' 1941
15' 1942
15' 1948
S15' 1949
15' 1949
15' 1949


1949
1949
1949
1949

1950
1950
1950
1950

1952
1952
1952
1952

1952
1952
1952
1952
1917
1917
1917
1941
1941
1941
1934
1934
1934
1935

1948

1949


Name Series Date

C Redbay .----....-- 71/2' 1949
D Millers Ferry... 71/2' 1949


A Poplar Head --
B Wausau
C Vernon
D Gap Pond --

A Alford
B Kynesville -
C Compass Lake-
D Alford SE -----

A Oakdale -
B Cypress -
C Altha West -..
D Altha East -
Moniac ---
Hilliard -------
St. Marys ---
Fernandina --
Foley
Ft. Barrancas -
Pensacola
Holley ------- --
Mary Esther -.
Villa Tasso ...-....-..
Point Washington-

A Bruce
B Red Head -----.
C Seminole Hills
D West Bay ..---

A Crystal Lake
B Bennett
C Southport --
D Bayhead ------


S71/2'

7 M/2'
71/2'

71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
7%'


71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
15'


15'
15'
S15'

15'
15'
715'
15'
15'

15'
15'


71/2'
71/2'
152'
71/2'


71/2'
71/2'

7'
-71/'


A Fountain 7'---
B Juniper Creek- 71/2'
C Youngstown ... 71/2'


1950
1950
1950
1950

1952
1952
1952
1952

1952
1952
1952
1952
1917
1917
1917
1917
1941
1941
1941
1936
1935
1935
1936

1944
1944
1943
1943

1944
1944
1943
1944

1944
1944
1944








20 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Name


D Broad Branch


A Clarksville --..
B Blountstown
C Frink
D Estiffanulga -.
53.
A Bristol
B Hosford
C Woods
D Telogia ---------
54. Lake Talquin --....
55. Tallahassee ---
64. Macclenny ---
65. Cambon --..-
66. Jacksonville --
A Trout River --
B Eastport ....-
C Jacksonville
D Arlington -
67. Mayport ----
A Mayport -
C Jacksonville
Beach ---
68.
A Laguna Beach-
B Panama City
Beach --
69.
A Panama City _
B Parker --
C Beacon Beach -_
D Long Point --..
70.
A North of Allan-
ton -
B Tenmile Swamp
C Allanton
D Wetappo Creek
71.
A Dead Lake -----
B Orange ..__.----
C Wewahitchka -
D Kennedy Creek
72.
A Wilma ...---
B Queens Bay -.-
C Sumatra ---.......
D Owens Bridge--


Series Date

__ 72' 1944


72'
7Y'
72'
71/2'
7'

7'
7'
7'
71/2'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
7'
7%'
7'

15'
71/2'


1944
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944
1943
1940
1917
1917
1917
1948
1948
1948
1948
1917
1948


72' 1948 89.

72' 1943


7' 1943


1943
1944
1943
1943


1944
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944


Name


Series Date


A Smith Creek --. 72' 1944
B Bradwell Bay- 71/2' 1944
C Thousand Yard
Bay -------__ 7/2' 1944
D Sanborn ----_._ 71' 1944
74. Arran --- 15' 1940
83. Lawtey -- 15' 1917
84. Middleburg ------- 15' 1917
A Fiftone ----.---- 71/' 1948
B Jacksonville
Hts. 7' 1948
C Middleburg SW 7' 1948
D Middleburg ---- 7%' 1948
85. Orange Park ..---- 15' 1917
86. Palm Valley ..----- 15' 1917
87.


B Crooked Island 72' 1943

A Beacon Hill ...-- 71/2' 1943
B Overstreet 7' 1943
C St. Joseph Point 7' 1943
D Port St. Joe -- 72' 1943

A White City -- 71/2' 1943
B Forbes Island 72' 1944
C Lake Wimico..- 72' 1944
D Jackson River- 72' 1943


A Fort Gadsden
B Tates Hell
Swamp ..-...
C Beverly ---
D Green Point

A Pickett Bay --.
B McIntyre
C Carrabelle
D Dog Island


A St. Teresa
B Lighthouse
Point
100. Starke ----
A Sampson
B Starke
C Waldo --_..
D Keystone
Heights


7' 1943

71/2' 1943
72' 1943
72' 1943


72' 1943


7'
15'
--- 71/2'
--- 71/2'
71/2'
.... 7'


1943
1941
1943
1948
1948


7/2' 1948








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Name


Series Date


101. Ates Creek --------- 15'
A Kingsley 7%'
B Penney Farms- 7%'
C Gold Head
Branch --------- 7%'
D Rice Creek -..--- 71/2'


Name


Series Date


C Maytown ----_-
D Oak Hill


1941
1948
1948

1948
1948


102. Bostwick ---- 15' 1941
A Green Cove
Springs -- 7' 1948
B Picolata 7' 1948
C Bostwick 71/2' 1948
D Riverdale 71/' 1948
103. St. Augustine ----- 15' 1937
104. (Included on margin of 103)
105.
A St. Joseph Spit 7' 1943
B Cape San Blas- 72' 1943


A Indian Pass --.
B West Pass -----
D Cape St. George
107.
A Apalachicola
B Goose Island -
C New Inlet -
108.
A Sugar Hill ---
114. Arredondo ----
115. Hawthorn
116. Interlachen --
A Putnam Hall --
B Baywood -
C Keuka
D Rodman ---
117. Palatka
118. Dinner Island --..
119. Matanzas ---
124. Williston
125. Citra ---
129. Ormond
133. Dunnellon .----..---
134. Ocala -------
139. Port Orange ------
142. Tsala Apopka -----
143. Panasoffkee ---


72' 1943
7/2' 1943
7' 1943

72' 1943
7/2' 1949
7' 1949


7'
15'
15'
15'
71/2'
7'
71/2'
71/2'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
71'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'


1944
1890
1944
1942
1948
1948
1948
1948
1912
1943
1943
1893
1893
1943
1890
1892
1943
1893
1893


C Pardon Island-

B Geneva -- ....
C Oviedo SW --..--
D Bithlo ---

A Aurantia .-
B Mims --
C Titusville SW --
D Titusville ---


72' 1950
7%' 1949


72' 1949

7' 1953
72' 1953
72' 1953


7%'
7Y2'
7'
7%'


1950
1949
1953
1949


Wilson .-....-- 7' 1949
(Included on margin of A)
Orsino --... 7' 1949
False Cape ---- 7%' 1949


B Windermere --
D Intercession
City --..--

A Lake Jessamine
B Pine Castle -.-
C Kissimmee
D St. Cloud North

A Narcoossee NW
B Narcoossee NE
C Narcoossee ----
D Narcoossee SE

A Lake Poinsett
NW ----_ --
B Sharpes --
C Lake Poinsett
SW ..-
D Lake Poinsett -

A Courtenay --.
B Cape Canaveral
C Cocoa -...
D Cocoa Beach....


72' 1953

7/2' 1953


1953
1953
1953
1953


7/2' 1953
7' 1949

7Y' 1953
72' 1953


1949
1949
1949
1949


A Edgewater
B Ariel --...


_ 7Y' 1950
-- 72' 1950


B Tarpon Springs 7' 1943
D Dunedin _--...-. 7Y' 1943









22 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Name


A Elfers ...----
B Odessa ..
C Oldsmar -
D Citrus Park

A Lutz ---
B Wesley Chapel.-
C Sulphur Springs
D Thonotosassa -

A Zephyrhills -
B Socrum
C Antioch ----.. -
D Plant City --.--

A Providence -
B Polk City -----
C Lakeland .-
D Auburndale --.

B Davenport -
D Dundee --

A Lake Tohopeka-
liga -. -----
B St. Cloud South
C Lake Hatchi-
neha .........
D Cypress Lake -

A Ashton ---
B Holopaw _--
C Holopaw SW ---
D Holopaw SE -..

A Deer Park NW
B Deer Park NE_
C Deer Park --.--
D Deer Park SE__

A Eau Gallie -----
B Tropic -----__-__
C Melbourne West
D Melbourne East

B Clearwater --
D Bay Pines ..----


Series Date


1943
1943
1943
1943

1942
1944
1944
1943

1947
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944


7/2' 1953
71/2' 1953


71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953

7/2' 1953
71/2' 1953

71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953

71/2' 1953
7/2' 1953
71/' 1953
7/2' 1953

7/' 1949
71/2' 1949
7/2' 1949
71/2' 1949

7/2' 1943
7/2' 1943


Name


Series Date


A Safety Harbor-
B Gandy Bridge
C St. Petersburg
D Port Tampa --

A Tampa
B Mango
C Gadsden Point
D Balm

A Mulberry -
B Bartow
C Bradley Junc-
tion
D Homeland -

B Lake Wales -
D Babson Park -

A Hesperides ..
B Lake Weohya-
kapka NE -----
C Lake Weohya-
kapka -_-.--
D Lake Weohya-
kapka SE -

A Lake Marian
NW -
B Lake Marian
NE
C Lake Marian
SW
D Lake Marian
SE ..----

A Kenansville ---
B Kenansville NE
C Kenansville SW
D Kenansville SE

A Fellsmere NW
B Grant -
C Fellsmere SW__
D Fellsmere


A Sebastian NW__ 71/2' 1949


7/2' 1943
7/2' 1943
71/2' 1943
71/2' 1943

71/2' 1943
71/2' 1943
71/2' 1943
71/2' 1943

7%' 1949
71/2' 1949

71/2' 1949
72' 1952

71/2' 1952
7'/2' 1952

7Y2' 1952

7Y2' 1952

712' 1952

71/2' 1952


71/2' 1953

71/2' 1953

71/2' 1953

71/2' 1953


1953
1953
1953
1953

1953
1949
1953
1949








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Name


Series Date


C Sebastian -..-
189.
D Egmont Key --
190.
A Pass-A-Grille
B Cockroach Bay
C Anna Maria --
D Ellenton
191.
A Ruskin --
B Wimauma --
C Parish
D Rye
194.
B Frostproof ----
D Avon Park ---
195.
A Lake Arbuckle
B Lake Arbuckle
NE
C Lake Arbuckle
SW
D Lake Arbuckle
SE ---
196.
A Fort Kissimmee
NW
B Fort Kissimmee
NE --
C Fort Kissimmee
D Fort Kissimmee
SE---
197.
A Fort Drum NW
B Fort Drum NE
C Fort Drum SW
D Fort Drum ----
198.
A Fellsmere 4
NW -
B Fellsmere 4
NE
C Fellsmere 4
SW ------
D Fellsmere 4
SE .--
199.
A Vero Beach ..


7Y' 1949

7/2' 1944

7' 1943
7/2' 1944
7/2' 1944
7/2' 1944

7/2' 1944
7Y2' 1944
7/2' 1944
7/2' 1944

7Y' 1953
7/2' 1953

7/2' 1952

71/2' 1952

7/2' 1952

71/2' 1952


7' 1952

7' 1953
7' 1952

7Y2' 1953

7/2' 1953
71/2' 1953
7/2' 1953
7' 1953


71' 1953

7' 1953

7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953

7' 1949


Name


Series Date


B Riomar --
C Oslo
D Indrio ----
200.
A Bradenton
Beach _----
B Bradenton -
D Sarasota
201.
A Lorraine -
B Verna
C Bee Ridge -----
D Miakka
204.
B Crewsville
D Crewsville SE--
205.
A Sebring --
B Lorida
C Lake June in
Winter -----.
D Lake Placid -
206.
A Basinger NW_
B Basinger ----___
C Basinger SW --
D Fort Basinger
207.
A Taylor Creek
NW
B Taylor Creek
NE --
C Taylor Creek
SW -
D Taylor Creek
SE
208.
A Okeechobee 1
NW
B Okeechobee 1
NE -
C Okeechobee 1
SW --
D Okeechobee 1
SE-- -.
209.
A Fort Pierce NW
B Fort Pierce -...


7%' 1948
7Y' 1949
7Y' 1948


7Y' 1944
71/2' 1944
71/2' 1944

71/2' 1944
7' 1944
7/2' 1944
71/2' 1944

71/2' 1953
7' 1953

71/2' 1952
7' 1952

71/2' 1953
71/2' 1952

7' 1953
7' 1953
71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953


71/2' 1953

7Y' 1953

71/2' 1953

7Y' 1953


7Y' 1953

7' 1953

7' 1953

7Y' 1953

71/' 1949
72' 1949








24 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


210.

211.

212.






216.


217.





218.




219.









220.







221.




231.


Series Date


7/2' 1953
7%' 1948

7/2' 1948

71/2' 1944

71/2' 1942

7/2' 1944
7Y2' 1944
71/2' 1944

71/2' 1953
7/2' 1953


C Fort Pierce SW
D Ankona -

C Eden -----

B Bird Keys ..---

A Laurel
B Lower Myakka
Lake ------...
C Venice .--
D Myakka River-

A Venus NW .--
B Childs

A Brighton NW_
B Brighton
C Brighton SW ---
D Brighton SE --

A Okeechobee NW
B Okeechobee --_-
C Okeechobee SW

A Okeechobee 4
NW---
B Okeechobee 4
NE ---
C Okeechobee 4
SW --
D Okeechobee 4
SE

A Indian Town
NW --
B Palm City -----
C Indian Town _
D Indian Town
SE ------

A St. Lucie Inlet.-
C Gomez --
D Hobe Sound --

A Rood -
B Jupiter .--


7/2' 1952
7/2' 1952
7/2' 1953


72' 1953

7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953


7' 1953
7/2' 1948
7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953

7/' 1948
7%' 1948
7/2' 1948

7/2' 1948
7%' 1948


Name


Series Date


C Delta -- 71/2' 1945
D Riviera Beach. 7' 1946
241.
A Palm Beach
Farms --. 7' 1946
B Palm Beach 7/2' 1945
C Greenacres
City ----- 71' 1945
D Lake Worth .- 71/2' 1945
250.
A Delmar Farms 7' 1946
B Delray Beach. 72' 1946
C West Dixie
Bend -- 7Y' 1946
D Boca Raton --. 71/2' 1946
258.
A Ft. Lauderdale
North -- 71/2' 1945
B Pompano Beach 7%' 1945
C Ft. Lauderdale
South _-- 7' 1947
D Port Everglades 7' 1945
265.
B Opalocka --.-- 7/2' 1947
D Hialeah 72' 1947
266.
A North Miami__ 7%' 1947
B (Included on margin of A)
C Miami 71/2' 1947
D (Included on margin of C)
271.
A South Miami
NW -.-------- 71' 1946
B South Miami -_ 7' 1946
C Goulds -- 7' 1946
D Perrine -- 7' 1946
272.
A Key Biscayne- 7' 1947
C Soldier Key 71/2' 1947
276.
A Homestead ---- 7%' 1947
B Arsenicker
Keys ---- 71/' 1947
C Glades 7' 1947
D Card Sound -- 7' 1947
277.
A Elliott Key --- 71/2' 1947
C Pacific Reef.-.- 7' 1947


1953
1953
1953
1953


Name








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Name


A Blackwater
Sound
B Garden Cove
C Rock Harbor

B Bay Keys _..
C Cottrell Key


Series Date



S71/2' 1947
7/2' 1947
S7/2' 1947

--. 7/2' 1943
7/2' 1943


Name

D Key West


Series Date

. 7%' 1943


A Snipe Keys -.- 71/2' 1943
B Sugarloaf Key 7Y2' 1943
C Boca Chica --- 71/2' 1943
D Saddlebunch
Keys --...-... .---- 71/2' 1943








26 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

COUNTY FINDING LIST OF TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS
County listing of the names of quadrangles for which topo-
graphic maps have been published.


ALACHUA COUNTY
100. Starke
A Sampson --.
B Starke --
C Waldo -
D Keystone
Heights -
114. Arredondo -
115. Hawthorn -----
124. Williston
125. Citra ---

BAKER COUNTY
38. Moniac ....--
64. Macclenny ---.---
83. Lawtey
BAY COUNTY
25.


A Alford
B Kynesville -----
C Compass Lake
D Alford SE -

A Bruce -----
B Red Head -
C Seminole Hills_
D West Bay .----

A Crystal Lake -
B Bennett --------
C Southport -
D Bayhead --

A Fountain
B Juniper Creek-
C Youngstown --
D Broad Branch.

A Laguna Beach
B Panama City
Beach --

A Panama City -
B Parker --
C Beacon Beach _
D Long Point --


15'
71/2'
71/2'
7%'

7Y2'
15'
15'
15'
15'


15'
15'
15'



71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
72'

7%'
71/2'
7'
71/2'
7'
7'


71/2'
7'
7'
7'


7'
71/2'
71/2'
7%'


7/2' 1943

7/2' 1943


1943
1944
1943
1943


A North of Allan-
ton ........._---
B Tenmile Swamp
C Allanton -
D Wetappo Creek


1944
1944
1944
1944


B Crooked Island 72' 1943


1941
1948
1948
1948

1948
1890
1944
1893
1893


1917
1917
1917



1952
1952
1952
1952

1944
1944
1943
1943

1944
1944
1943
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944


7/2' 1943
7/2' 1943

7/2' 1943
7/2' 1943


15'
.15'
71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
7'
7'
7'


1917
1941
1948
1948
1948


72' 1948
15' 1944


C Pardon Island_ 7%'


B Geneva ------..
C Oviedo SW ---
D Bithlo

A Aurantia
B Mims -
C Titusville SW_
D Titusville


A Beacon Hill
B Overstreet ---
C St. Joseph
Point -
D Port St. Joe -

BRADFORD COUNTY
83. Lawtey -
100. Starke -..... -
A Sampson -.
B Starke
C Waldo
D Keystone
Heights -
115. Hawthorn --

BREVARD COUNTY
148.
A Edgewater --
B Ariel
C Maytown --_
D Oak Hill


7/2' 1953
7' 1953
7/2' 1953


1950
1949
1953
1949


A Wilson 71/2' 1949
B (Included on margin of A)
C Orsino ---- 71/2' 1949
D False Cape --_ 71/2' 1949


1950
1950
1950
1949

1949








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


166.
A Lake Poinsett
NW -
B Sharpes ----...
C Lake Poinsett
SW -----
D Lake Poinsett
167.
A Courtenay
B Cape Canaveral
C Cocoa
D Cocoa Beach --.
176.
A Deer Park NW
B Deer Park NE
C Deer Park -
D Deer Park SE
177.
A Eau Gallie
B Tropic --
C Melbourne
West
D Melbourne
East
186.
A Kenansville ..
B Kenansville NE
C Kenansville SW
D Kenansville SE
187.
A Fellsmere NW
B Grant --
C Fellsmere SW -
D Fellsmere -
188.
A Sebastian NW
C Sebastian

BROWARD COUNTY
250.


7/2' 1953
7/2' 1949

71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953

71/2' 1949
7/2' 1949
7/2' 1949
7%2' 1949

71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953
7/2' 1953
71/2' 1953

71/2' 1949
71/2' 1949

7/2' 1949

71/2' 1949

71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953
7' 1953
7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953
7/2' 1949
7/2' 1953
7%' 1949

7/2' 1949
7/2' 1949


A Delmar Farms 7%'
B Delray Beach 71/2'
C West Dixie Bend 7'
D Boca Raton -. 71/2'

A Ft. Lauderdale
N. ------....... 71'
B Pompano Beach 7'
C Ft. Lauderdale
S. _-_-__-------___-... 7/2'
D Port Everglades 7%'


1946
1946
1946
1946


B Opalocka
D Hialeah


7/2' 1947
7/2' 1947


A North Miami 7%' 1947
B (Included on margin of A)
C Miami --.. 7' 1947
D (Included on margin of C)
CALHOUN COUNTY
25.


A Alford ..
B Kynesville ......
C Compass Lake
D Alford SE -

A Oakdale --._....
B Cypress -...
C Altha West --
D Altha East ----

A Fountain ...
B Juniper Creek.
C Youngstown ---
D Broad Branch

A Clarksville ..
B Blountstown .-
C Frink ---........
D Estiffanulga -

A Bristol
B Hosford
C Woods
D Telogia ---

A North of Allan-
ton -
B Tenmile Swamp
C Allanton -
D Wetappo Creek

A Dead Lake -
B Orange -
C Wewahitchka
D Kennedy Creek


71/2'
71/2'
7%'
7'
71/2'
7Y2'

7'
71/2'
71/2'
7'



71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
7'
7'
7%'

7'
7'
7'
7'

7'
7'
7'
7'

7'
7'
7'
7'


7'
7'
7'
7'

7'
7'
7'
7%'
71/2'
71/2'


71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
71/2'

7 Y2'
7 Y2'
71/2'
7 112


1952
1952
1952
1952

1952
1952
1952
1952

1944
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944


1944
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944


1945 CHARLOTTE COUNTY
1945 212.


1947
1945


A Laurel -....
B Lower Myakka
Lake


7/2' 1942

7' 1944








28 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


C Venice .-.---..-- 7/2'
D Myakka River- 7/2'


CITRUS COUNTY
133. Dunnellon ---
142. Tsala Apopka ----
143. Panasoffkee ------

CLAY COUNTY
83. Lawtey -----
84. Middleburg -------
A Fiftone -------
B Jacksonville
Hts.
C Middleburg
SW -------
D Middleburg --
85. Orange Park ----
100. Starke ----
A Sampson -
B Starke ...-
C Waldo --
D Keystone
Heights _-------
101. Ates Creek --
A Kingsley -
B Penney Farms-
C Gold Head
Branch ---
D Rice Creek ---
102. Bostwick __...-------
A Green Cove
Springs
B Picolata -
C Bostwick
D Riverdale .
115. Hawthorn -
116. Interlachen -------
A Putnam Hall _
B Baywood
C Keuka
D Rodman -..----

DADE COUNTY
265.


1944
1944


15' 1890
15' 1893
15' 1893


15'
15'
7%'


1917
1917
1948


712' 1948


71/2'
7%'

15'
S15'
7%'
71/2'
7'

S7%'
15'
7%'



S7%'
S71/2'


15'

71/2'
7-1/2'
71/2'
71/2'
15'
15'
7'
7'
7'
7'


B Opalocka
D Hialeah --

A North Miami -.
B (Included on mar
C Miami --
D (Included on mar


1948
1948
1917
1941
1948
1948
1948

1948
1941
1948
1948

1948
1948
1941

1948
1948
1948
1948
1944
1942
1948
1948
1948
1948


A South Miami
NW .....
B South Miami
C Goulds
D Perrine
272.
A Key Biscayne-
C Soldier Key ----
276.
A Homestead ----
B Arsenicker
Keys ----
C Glades
D Card Sound --
277.
A Elliott Key ---
C Pacific Reef --
281.
A Blackwater
Sound
B Garden Cove .
C Rock Harbor -

DESOTO COUNTY


1946
1946
1946
1946


7/2' 1947
71/2' 1947

7Y2' 1947

7/2' 1947
71/2' 1947
71/2' 1947

71/2' 1947
71/2' 1947


7Y2' 1947
7/2' 1947
71/2' 1947


B Crewsville 7/' 1953
D Crewsville SE._ 71/2' 1953


DUVAL COUNTY
39. Hilliard
40. St. Marys ------
41. Fernandina ----
64. Macclenny --.--
65. Cambon -
66. Jacksonville
A Trout River
B Eastport
C Jacksonville
D Arlington _
67. Mayport ..-----.-
A Mayport -
C Jacksonville
Beach -


7%' 1947 83. Lawtey --
71/2' 1947 84. Middleburg --
A Fiftone
7%' 1947 B Jacksonville
gin of A) Hts. -
71/2' 1947 C Middleburg SW
rgin of C) D Middleburg --


15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
15'
7'
7'

15'
7'
71/2'

72'
15'
15'
71/2'

71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
7'

7'
7'
7'


1917
1917
1917
1917
1917
1917
1948
1948
1948
1948
1917
1948

1948
1917
1917
1948

1948
1948
1948








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


85. Orange Park
86. Palm Valley


ESCAMBIA COUNTY
1. Dyas .--...........
2. Century ....---.-..
3. Jay ---- -.. .
16. Robertsdale ...
17. Muscogee ---------
18. Milton
42. Foley ----
43. Ft. Barrancas
44. Pensacola --.
45. Holley ......----
FLAGLER COUNTY
117. Palatka -----__
118. Dinner Island ----
119. Matanzas
129. Ormond -

FRANKLIN COUNTY
71.


A Dead Lake ----
B Orange ..-------
C Wewahitchka
D Kennedy Creek
72.
A Wilma -
B Queens Bay ---
C Sumatra -
D Owens Bridge-
73.
A Smith Creek ---
B Bradwell Bay..
C Thousand Yard
Bay ------
D Sanborn --
74. Arran ---
89.
A White City ----
B Forbes Island
C Lake Wimico --
D Jackson River-
90.
A Fort Gadsden -
B Tates Hell
Swamp
C Beverly -
D Green Point -.
91.
A Pickett Bay --


15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'

15'
15'
15'
15'



7'
7 1/2'
71/2'
71/2'
71/2'
7%'

7/2'
71/2'-
71/2'
7Y2'
7'


71/2' 1944
7/2' 1944

71/2' 1944
7/2' 1944
15' 1940


1943
1944
1944
1943


71/' 1943

7/2' 1943
7' 1943
7/2' 1943

7' 1943


B McIntyre
C Carrabelle
D Dog Island


A St. Teresa ---.... 7Y2' 1943
B Lighthouse Point 7' 1943


1917
1917


1942
1941
1942
1941
1941
1941
1941
1941
1941
1936

1912
1943
1943
1943



1944
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944


A Bristol -
B Hosford
C Woods --
D Telogia .
54. Lake Talquin
55. Tallahassee _

GLADES COUNTY


7Y'
--- 71/2'
7'
7%'

S15'
.-..- 15'


A Venus NW
B Childs -


A Brighton NW --
B Brighton --------
C Brighton SW --
D Brighton SE ---

A Okeechobee NW
B Okeechobee --
C Okeechobee SW


1944
1944
1944
1944
1943
1940


S7Y' 1953
- 72' 1953


1953
1953
1953
1953


7/2' 1952
72' 1952
7' 1953


GULF COUNTY
70.
A North of Allan-
ton --._.-.--.----..- 7%'
B Tenmile Swamp 7Y%'
C Allanton ----_. 7%'
D Wetappo Creek. 7%'
71.
A Dead Lake ---____ 7'
B Orange -.-- 7%'
C Wewahitchka 7%'
D Kennedy Creek-- 71'


1944
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944


7/2' 1943
7Yz' 1943
71/2' 1944


71/2' 1943
7%' 1943
72' 1943

7' 1943
71/2' 1949
7' 1949

7/2' 1944


A Indian Pass ..----
B West Pass--.......-
D Cape St. George
107.
A Apalachicola ..
B Goose Island __
C New Inlet ...---.
108.
A Sugar Hill-- .--

GADSDEN COUNTY








30 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


88. A Beacon Hill --
B Overstreet .
C St. Joseph
Point -----
D Port St. Joe ..
89.
A White City ...
B Forbes Island.
C Lake Wimico-..
D Jackson River.


71/2' 1943
71' 1943

7%' 1943
7/2' 1943


1943
1944
1944
1943


A St. Joseph Spit 7' 1943
B Cape San Bias. 7Y2' 1943


A Indian Pass ---
B West Pass -----
D Cape St. George

HARDEE COUNTY
194.
B Frostproof --
D Avon Park -----
204.
B Crewsville -
D Crewsville SE.

HIGHLANDS COUNTY
194.
B Frostproof --.-
D Avon Park -----
195.
A Lake Arbuckle-
B Lake Arbuckle
NE .------
C Lake Arbuckle
SW ---
D Lake Arbuckle
SE ---
196.
A Fort Kissimmee
NW --...---
B Fort Kissimmee
NE _...-- _----_.
C Fort Kissimmee
D Fort Kissimmee
SE ------__


7' 1943
7%' 1943
7%' 1943



72' 1953
7' 1953

7' 1953
7%' 1953



7%' 1953
71' 1953


B Lorida .-.--------
C Lake June in
Winter --
D Lake Placid ---

A Basinger NW .
B Basinger .-
C Basinger SW ---
D Fort Basinger -

A Taylor Creek
NW -------------
B Taylor Creek
NE ..----
C Taylor Creek
SW
D Taylor Creek
SE ------

A Venus NW ----
B Childs --

A Brighton NW .
B Brighton ...---
C Brighton SW .-
D Brighton SE ---

A Okeechobee NW
B Okeechobee ..
C Okeechobee SW


7Y2' 1952 HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
169.


7Y' 1952

7/2' 1952

71/2' 1952 170.


7/2' 1952


7/2' 1953
7' 1952

7/2' 1953


B Crewsville 7' 1953
D Crewsville SE.-- 7' 1953


A Sebring


A Elfers ---
B Odessa --
C Oldsmar
D Citrus Park


7/2' 1952

71/2' 1953
71/2' 1952


1953
1953
1953
1953


7' 1953

71/2' 1953

71/2' 1953

7' 1953

7' 1953
7%' 1953


1953
1953
1953
1953


7' 1952
71/2' 1952
7' 1953


--- 71/2'
--- 71/2'
7'
7'
7'
7 1/2'
--- 71/2'


A Lutz --
B Wesley Chapel-
C Sulphur Springs
D Thonotosassa __


A Zephyrhills
B Socrum --
C Antioch -..
D Plant City_.


A Safety Harbor-
B Gandy Bridge- -
C St. Petersburg -.


-- 71'
--- 71'
-- 71'
--- 71'


1943
1943
1943
1943

1942
1944
1944
1943

1947
1944
1944
1944


7/2' 1943
7/2' 1943
7%' 1943


71/2' 1952








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


D Port Tampa --.

A Tampa --
B Mango ----------
C Gadsden Point.
D Balm

A Pass-A-Grille
B Cockroach Bay
C Anna Maria --
D Ellenton


A Ruskin
B Wimauma
C Parish ..-
D Rye -

HOLMES COUNT'
7. Glendale -
8.


72' 1943


7'
71/2'
S------- 71/2'
--- 71/2'
7%'


1943
1943
1943
1943

1943
1944
1944
1944

1944
1944
1944
1944


-- 15' 1949


A Hobbs Cross
Roads --
B Izagora ....--
C Prosperity
D Caryville


A Esto ----- 7%'
B Graceville 7%'
C Bonifay .------- 7z'
D Chipley ----..... 71/2'
22. DeFuniak Springs- 15'
23.
A Ponce de Leon-- 7'
B Hinsons Cross
Roads __--- 7%'
C Red Bay .....--- 71/2'
D Millers Ferry ... 7%'


A Poplar Head-
B Wausau -....
C Vernon
D Gap Pond ---


INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
186.
A Kenansville -- 7'
B Kenansville NE 71/2'
C Kenansville SW 71/2'
D Kenansville SE-- 7%'


1949
1949
1949
1949

1950
1950
1950
1950
1935

1948

1949
1949
1949

1950
1950
1950
1950



1953
1953
1953
1953


A. Fellsmere NW-_ 7' 195M


B Grant ---
C Fellsmere SW .
D Fellsmere __-


7' 1949
7' 1953
71/' 1949


A Sebastian NW 7%' 1949
C Sebastian .----- 7%' 1949


A Fort Drum NW
B Fort Drum NE
C Fort Drum SW
D Fort Drum .___

A Fellsmere 4 NW
B Fellsmere 4 NE
C Fellsmere 4 SW
D Fellsmere 4 SE


A Vero Beach ----
B Riomar
C Oslo ---
D Indrio ---

JACKSON COUNTY
9.


A Esto -
B Graceville
C Bonifay
D Chipley


7'
.-- 7Y2'
7'
7'


A Campbellton --- 7%'
B Sills --_---- 7'
C Cottondale West 7'
D CottondaleEast 7%'


A Malone .
B Bascom --
C Marianna --
D Dellwood ----.---

A Alford -
B Kynesville -
C Compass Lake .-
D Alford SE ...-...


A Oakdale --- 72'
B Cypress .------- 7%'
C Altha West---- 71/2'
D Altha East... 7%'

LEON COUNTY
54. Lake Talquin -....--- 15'


1953
1953
1953
1953

1953
1953
1953
1953

1949
1948
1949
1948



1950
1950
1950
1950

1952
1952
1952
1952

1952
1952
1952
1952

1952
1952
1952
1952

1952
1952
1952
1952


1943









32 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


55. Tallahassee ---.--

LEVY COUNTY
124. Williston .....---

LIBERTY COUNTY


A Clarksville
B Blountstown -.
C Frink ---.-.
D Estiffanulga
53.
A Bristol -
B Hosford -
C Woods --.-..--
D Telogia ------
54. Lake Talquin --...
71.
A Dead Lake --
B Orange -
C Wewahitchka
D Kennedy Creel
72.
A Wilma -.----
B Queens Bay -
C Sumatra --.-
D Owens Bridge.
73.
A Smith Creek...
B Bradwell Bay-
C Thousand Yar
Bay --.......-----
D Sanborn ---
89.
A White City --
B Forbes Island-
C Lake Wimico-
D Jackson River_

MANATEE COUNTY


A Pass-A-Grille -
B Cockroach Bay-
C Anna Maria --.-
D Ellenton .---

A Ruskin -
B Wimauma ------
C Parish -----
D Rye -----.....


-- 15' 1940 200.


-.-- 15' 1893


-- 7'/2 1944
.- 7/2' 1944
.. 7/2' 1944
.- 7/' 1944

S72' 1944
S7%' 1944
-- 7/2' 1944
-- 7' 1944
.. 15' 1943

.- 7' 1944
S72' 1944
.. 7' 1944
ck 72' 1944

.- 72' 1944
7' 1944
7Y2' 1944
7%' 1944

72' 1944
.- 72' 1944
d
- 7' 1944
7 1944

S7' 1943
-- 7/2' 1944
-- 7/2' 1944
- 7' 1943


7Y' 1943
7%' 1944
7/2' 1944
7' 1944

7%' 1944
7Y' 1944
7%' 1944
7%' 1944


A Bradenton
Beach -
B Bradenton .-
D Sarasota ...----.

A Lorraine ---_---
B Verna
C Bee Ridge -.---
D Miakka -

A Laurel --
B Lower Myakka


Lake -.----
C Venice ---- -.-------
D Myakka River

MARION COUNTY
116. Interlachen --.--.
A Putnam Hall -..
B Baywood ---..--
C Keuka ---
D Rodman -
124. Williston ..---..
125. Citra -------
133. Dunnellon --
134. Ocala -..----
142. Tsala Apopka ..----
143. Panasoffkee ---


MARTIN COUNTY
209.
A Fort Pierce NW
B Fort Pierce ...--
C Fort Pierce SW
D Ankona .----_....


C Eden --.

A Okeechobee 4
NW --
B Okeechobee 4
NE .--- .
C Okeechobee 4
SW --.-
D Okeechobee 4
SE ---


7' 1944
71/2' 1944
72' 1944


1944
1944
1944
1944


72' 1942

7' 1944
7%' 1944
7%' 1944


15'
71/2'
71/2'
7'
7'
15'
15'/2'
71/2'

15'
15'
15'
15'
15'
15'


1942
1948
1948
1948
1948
1893
1893
1890
1892
1893
1893



1949
1949
1953
1948


- 7/2' 1948


- 7/2' 1953

-. 7/2' 1953

S7' 1953

- 7%' 1953


A Indian Town NW 71/2' 1953
B Palm City -....- 7' 1948
C Indian Town -... 7' 1953









ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


D Indian Town SE 71/' 1953


A St. Lucie Inlet.
C Gomez --..
D Hobe Sound ---.
231.
A Rood ----
B Jupiter
C Delta ---
D Riviera Beach

MONROE COUNTY
276.
A Homestead ----
B Arsenicker Keys
C Glades ..----.
D Card Sound --.-
281.
A Blackwater
Sound ----_
B Garden Cove ---
C Rock Harbor ..-
288.
B Bay Keys ..--.
C Cottrell Key --
D Key West ----
289.
A Snipe Keys --.-
B Sugarloaf Key_
C Boca Chica ----
D Saddlebunch
Keys -----


NASSAU COUNTY
13. Folkston ----------- 15'
14. Boulogne --- 15'
15. Kingsland ----- 15'
38. Moniac ------- 15'
39. Hilliard ------ 15'
40. St. Marys-----. 15'
41. Fernandina --------- 15'
64. Macclenny .-------- 15'
65. Cambon 15'

OKALOOSA COUNTY
4. Munson 15'
5. Crestview --...----- 15'
6. Laurel Hill----... --- 15'
19. Harold ----- 15'
20. Holt -------- 15'
21. Niceville ---- 15'


71/' 1948
71/2' 1948
71/2' 1948


1948
1948
1945
1946



1947
1947
1947
1947


7' 1947
7/2' 1947
71/2' 1947

71/2' 1943
7' 1943
71/2' 1943

7/2' 1943
71/2' 1943
7/2' 1943

7/2' 1943


1917
1917
1917
1917
1917
1917
1917
1917
1917


1948
1949
1949
1934
1934
1934


45. Holley -- ..----- 15'
46. Mary Esther ------.. 15'
47. Villa Tasso ........-- 15'

OKEECHOBEE COUNTY


A Fort Kissimmee
NW
B Fort Kissimmee
NE -- -
C Fort Kissimmee
D Fort Kissimmee
SE -----

A Fort Drum NW
B Fort Drum NE
C Fort Drum SW
D Fort Drum --

A Fellsmere 4 NW
B Fellsmere 4 NE
C Fellsmere 4 SW
D Fellsmere 4 SE

A Basinger NW -
B Basinger .-
C Basinger SW -
D Fort Basinger -

A Taylor Creek
NW --
B Taylor Creek
NE ---
C Taylor Creek
SW -- .-
D Taylor Creek
SE ....------

A Okeechobee 1
NW
B Okeechobee 1
NE ------
C Okeechobee 1
SW --
D Okeechobee 1
SE .--........


1936
1935
1935


72' 1952

7/2' 1953
71/' 1952

72' 1953

71/2' 1953
7/2' 1953
71/2' 1953
72' 1953

7' 1953
72' 1953
7/2' 1953
7/2' 1953

7' 1953
72' 1953
72' 1953
71/2' 1953


7' 1953

7' 1953

71/2' 1953

7/2' 1953


7Y' 1953

72' 1953

7Y' 1953

712' 1953


C Fort Pierce SW 7' 1953

A Okeechobee NW 7/2' 1952
B Okeechobee .-- 71/2' 1952









34 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


C Okeechobee SW 7/2' 1953


A Okeechobee 4
NW -
B Okeechobee 4
NE
C Okeechobee 4
SW
D Okeechobee 4
SE

ORANGE COUNTY
156.
B Geneva -
C Oviedo SW --.-
D Bithlo
157.
A Aurantia --
B Mims
C Titusville SW-
D Titusville -
163.
B Windermere --
D Intercession
City ...---
164.
A Lake Jessamine
B Pine Castle -...
C Kissimmee -
D St. Cloud North
165.
A Narcoossee NW
B Narcoossee NE
C Narcoossee --
D Narcoossee SE.
166.
A Lake Poinsett
NW ----
B Sharpes ......----
C Lake Poinsett
SW -
D Lake Poinsett -

OSCEOLA COUNTY


7' 1953

71/2' 1953

72' 1953

71/2' 1953



7Y2' 1953
71/2' 1953
7/2' 1953


1950
1949
1953
1949


7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953


1953
1953
1953
1953

1953
1953
1953
1953


7/2' 1953
7/2' 1949

7/2' 1953
7/2' 1953


B Windermere 7' 1953
D Intercession City 7' 1953

A Lake Jessamine 7' 1953
B Pine Castle -... 7' 1953


C Kissimmee ...--- 7' 1958
D St. Cloud North 71/' 1953


A Narcoossee NW
B Narcoossee NE
C Narcoossee
D Narcoossee SE

A Lake Poinsett
NW --
B Sharpes ---
C Lake Poinsett
SW --
D Lake Poinsett _

B Davenport -.
D Dundee -

A Lake Tohopeka-
liga --------
B St. Cloud South
C Lake Hatchi-
neha --
D Cypress Lake _

A Ashton -----....
B Holopaw -
C Holopaw SW -
D Holopaw SE --

A Deer Park NW
B Deer Park NE
C Deer Park ...--.
D Deer Park SE_

A Hesperides -
B Lake Weohya-
kapka NE ----
C Lake Weohya-
kapka -------
D Lake Weohya-
kapka SE

A Lake Marian
NW --
B Lake Marian
NE---
C Lake Marian
SW ---


7/2' 1953
71/' 1949

7/2' 1953
7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953
7/2' 1953



7/2' 1953
7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953
7/2' 1953


1953
1953
1953
1953

1953
1953
1953
1953


7/2' 1952

7Y' 1952

7/2' 1952

7/2' 1952


7/2' 1953

7/2' 1953

7' 1953








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


D Lake Marian
SE --


7' 1953


A Kenansville _.- 7 71/2 1953
B Kenansville NE 71/2' 1953
C Kenansville SW 71/2' 1953
D Kenansville SE_ 7' 1953

A Fort Kissimmee
NW ----- 71' 1952
B Fort Kissimmee
NE -- 7Y2' 1953
C Fort Kissimmee 7%' 1952
D Fort Kissimmee
SE _.__.__----_ 71/2' 1953

A Fort Drum NW 71/2' 1953
B Fort DrumNE 72' 1953
C Fort Drum SW 71/2' 1953
D Fort Drum .-- 71/2' 1953


PALM BEACH COUNTY
231.
A Rood --
B Jupiter --
C Delta .---------
D Riviera Beach
241.
A Palm Beach
Farms -
B Palm Beach --
C Greenacres City
D Lake Worth
250.
A Delmar Farms
B Delray Beach -
C West Dixie Bend
D Boca Raton


7%' 1948
7' 1948
7/2' 1945
7' 1946


7Y' 1946
7/2' 1945
7/2' 1945
7Y2' 1945

7' 1946
7' 1946
7' 1946
7' 1946


PASCO COUNTY
158.
A Wilson 71/2' 1949
B (Included on margin of A)
C Orsino --- 7' 1949
D False Cape --.. 71/' 1949
168.
B Tarpon Springs 71/2' 1943
D Dunedin .- 71/2' 1943


A Elfers
B Odessa


7' 1943
7' 1943


C Oldsmar
D Citrus Park
170.
A Lutz
B Wesley Cha
C Sulphur
Springs -
D Thonotosass
171.
A Zephyrhills
B Socrum ----
C Antioch
D Plant City

PINELLAS COUNT'
168.
B Tarpon Spri
D Dunedin
169.
A Elfers
B Odessa -...-
C Oldsmar --
D Citrus Park
178.
B Clearwater
D Bay Pines
179.
A Safety Har
B Gandy Bri(
C St. Petersbi
D Port Tamps
189.
D Egmont Ke;
190.
A Pass-A-Grill
B Cockroach
C Anna Maria
D Ellenton

POLK COUNTY


71/2' 1943
-- 7/2' 1943

7/2' 1942
ipel 71/2' 1944

-- 7' 1944.
a -- 71/2' 1943

72' 1947
71' 1944
7' 1944
--- 71/2' 1944

Y

ngs 71/2' 1943
S7/' 1943

S7/2' 1943
----- 7/2' 1943
.--- 7/2' 1943
- 7' 1943

--- 71/2' 1943
.---- 72' 1943

bor 7' 1943
dge_ 71/2' 1943
irg- 71' 1943
S7' 1943

y -- 7' 1944

e -- 7' 1943
3ay- 7' 1944
--.. 7/2' 1944
7%' 1944


B Windermere .... 7/' 1953
D Intercession City 7%' 1953


A Zephyrhills
B Socrum
C Antioch
D Plant City


7/2' 1947
7/2' 1944
7/2' 1944
7/2' 1944


A Providence ..... 7' 1944
B Polk City-..-.-_ 71/2' 1944








36 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


C Lakeland ----- 71/2' 1944
D Auburndale 71/2' 1944


B Davenport
D Dundee


A Lake Tohopeka-
liga -----
B St. Cloud South
C Lake Hatchi-
neha --
D Cypress Lake _

A Mulberry ---
B Bartow
C Bradley Junction
D Homeland


B Lake Wales
D Babson Park

A Hesperides
B Lake Weohya-
kapka NE --.--
C Lake Weohya-
kapka --
D Lake Weohya-
kapka SE

A Lake Marian
NW
B Lake Marian
NE -
C Lake Marian
SW
D Lake Marian
SE

B Frostproof ----
D Avon Park ----

A Lake Arbuckle
B Lake Arbuckle
NE ---
C Lake Arbuckle
SW -------
D Lake Arbuckle
SE ,---

A Fort Kissimmee


7/2' 1953
7/2' 1953


NW ------ 71/2' 1952
B Fort Kissimmee
NE --- 71/2' 1953
C Fort Kissimmee 7/' 1952
D Fort Kissimmee
SE ------ 71' 1953


7/' 1953 PUTNAM COUNTY
7' 1953 101. Ates Creek ---.....
A Kingsley -
7' 1953 B Penney Farms-
7/2' 1953 C Gold Head
Branch
7' 1949 D Rice Creek ---
7' 1949 102. Bostwick --
7' 1949 A Green Cove
71/' 1952 Springs
B Picolata
7' 1952 C Bostwick -.....
7%' 1952 D Riverdale --
115. Hawthorn --
7' 1952 116. Interlachen ----.....
A Putnam Hall. ...
71/2' 1952 B Baywood ---.---
C Keuka ---
7' 1952 D Rodman
117. Palatka
7%' 1952 125. Citra---


. 15'
S 71/2'
S71/2'

71/2'
S71/2'
15'

71/2'
7'
7'
71/2'
71/2'
S7Y2'
15'
15'
71/2'
S72'
7%'
71/2'
71/2'
15'
15'


ST. JOHNS COUNTY

7' 1953 67. Mayport -------- 15'
A Mayport --- 7%'
7' 1953 C Jacksonville Bch. 7%'
85. Orange Park ---.-. 15'
7' 1953 86. Palm Valley ----.. 15'
102. Bostwick .. 15'
7' 1953 A Green Cove
Springs -- 71'
B Picolata --- 7'
7' 1953 C Bostwick ..- 7'
7' 1953 D Riverdale --- 71/2'
103. St. Augustine ----- 15'
7/2' 1952 117. Palatka -. 15'
118. Dinner Island ----. 15'
7/2' 1952 119. Matanzas _-- 15'


71/2' 1952 ST. LUCIE COUNTY


7/2' 1952


A Fellsmere4NW 7%'
B Fellsmere 4 NE 71/2'
C Fellsmere 4 SW 71/2'


1941
1948
1948

1948
1948
1941

1948
1948
1948
1948
1944
1942
1948
1948
1948
1948
1912
1893


1917
1948
1948
1917
1917
1941

1948
1948
1948
1948
1937
1912
1943
1943



1953
1953
1953








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


D Fellsmere 4 SE 71/2' 1953


Vero Beach
Riomar --
Oslo -
Indrio -


208.


A Okeechobee 1
NW
B Okeechobee 1
NE --
C Okeechobee 1
SW -
D Okeechobee 1
SE


A Fort Pierce NW
B Fort Pierce ----
C Fort Pierce SW
D Ankona

C Eden --

A Okeechobee 4
NW -------
B Okeechobee 4
NE --
C Okeechobee 4
SW
D Okeechobee 4
SE ----


- 71/2' 1949
... 7' 1948
S71/2' 1949
S7Y' 1948
211.

S71/2' 1953 212.

S71/2' 1953

S7/2' 1953

S71/2' 1953
SEIM


71/2' 1948


7' 1953


D Sarasota ------

A Lorraine ----.
B Verna
C Bee Ridge ----
D Miakka --

B Bird Keys -----

A Laurel ....-----
B Lower Myakka
Lake -----.
C Venice --
D Myakka River

[INOLE COUNTY

B Geneva ....---
C Oviedo SW ..
D Bithlo --------.


A Aurantia ---.
B Mims --
C Titusville SW_
D Titusville


71/2' 1953 SUMTER COUNTY
142. Tsala Apopka --..
7' 1953 143. Panasoffkee


7/2' 1953


A Indian TownNW 7'
B Palm City------ 7%'
C Indian Town --- 71/2'
D Indian Town SE 71/2'
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
2. Century ----- 15'
3. Jay -------- 15'
4. Munson -- ... 15'
17. Muscogee --- 15'
18. Milton ------ 15'
19. Harold _--_ 15'
44. Pensacola 15'
45. Holley .-------.....- 15'
SARASOTA COUNTY
200.


A Bradenton
Beach -
B Bradenton -


1953
1948
1953
1953


1941
1942
1948
1941
1941
1934
1941
1936


7/2' 1944
7Y' 1944


UNION COUNTY
83. Lawtey --..


WAKULLA COUNTY
54. Lake Talquin_------- 15'
55. Tallahassee --..... 15'
73.
A Smith Creek... 7%'
B Bradwell Bay-- 71/2'
C Thousand Yard
Bay -------_ 71/2'
D Sanborn 71/2'


74. Arran


A Pickett Bay
B McIntyre -.-
C Carrabelle
D Dog Island


-- 15'

S71/2'
71/2'
--- 71/2'
71/2'
7'


A St. Teresa --...- 71/2' 1943
B Lighthouse Point 71/2' 1943


71 1944


71/2' 1944

71/2' 1942

71/2' 1944
71/2' 1944
71/2' 1944



71/2' 1953
71/2' 1953
71/' 1953


1950
1949
1953
1949


15' 1893
15' 1893


15' 1917


1943
1940

1944
1944

1944
1944
1940

1943
1943
1943
1944









38 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


VOLUSIA COUNTY
129. Ormond .-----.--
139. Port Orange _-
148.


15' 1943
15' 1943


A Edgewater --- 7Y'
B Ariel ----- 7'
C Maytown 7-- '
D Oak Hill ---.- 71'
156.
B Geneva --------- 71/'
C Oviedo SW --- 712'
D Bithlo _-- 7s'
157.
A Aurantia --.- 71'
B Mims --- 7%'
C Titusville SW_ 7/2'
D Titusville _----- 7'

WALTON COUNTY
6. Laurel Hill ..---- 15'
7. Glendale 15'
21. Niceville ------ 15'
22. DeFuniak Springs- 15'
23.
A Ponce de Leon- 71'
B Hinsons Cross
Roads ---._- 7 '
C Red Bay .----.-.. 7'
D Millers Ferry-- 7T'
47. Villa Tasso -__----- 15'
48. Point Washington- 15'
49.
A Bruce __-- 7 '
B Red Head -7'
C Seminole Hills_ 7'
D West Bay 71'

WASHINGTON COUNTY
8.
A Hobbs Cross
Roads ------ 71/'
B Izagora ----. 71'
C Prosperity ----- 7 '
D Caryville --- 71'


1950
1950
1950
1949

1953
1953
1953

1950
1949
1953
1949


1949
1949
1934
1935

1948

1949
1949
1949
1935
1936

1944
1944
1943
1943


1949
1949
1949
1949


A Esto
B Graceville
C Bonifay ----..---
D Chipley ----.---

A Campbellton ---
B Sills ---
C Cottondale West
D Cottondale East

A Ponce de Leon
B Hinsons Cross
Roads -----
C Red Bay -
D Millers Ferry -

A Poplar Head --.
B Wausau ----._-_.
C Vernon-- --
D Gap Pond -- -

A Alford ------
B Kynesville -
C Compass Lake -
D Alford SE -----

A Bruce ----
B Red Head --_--
C Seminole Hills._
D West Bay -__

A Crystal Lake ._
B Bennett
C Southport -
D Bayhead --


A Fountain ---_--
B Juniper Creek._
C Youngstown ---
D Broad Branch


1950
1950
1950
1950

1952
1952
1952
1952


7' 1948

7' 1949
72' 1949
7' 1949


1950
1950
1950
1950

1952
1952
1952
1952


1944
1944
1943
1943

1944
1944
1943
1944


1944
1944
1944
1944







ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


FLORIDA MINERAL INDUSTRY DURING 1952 and 1953
Statistics Collected in Cooperation with the U. S. Bureau of Mines


The development and diversification of the mineral industry
in Florida are dependent upon the utilization of materials ordi-
narily classified as nonmetallic minerals. The foremost mineral
products of the State are phosphate, limestone, sand and gravel,
fuller's earth, kaolin, cement, heavy minerals including ilmenite,
rutile, zircon and monazite, petroleum, peat, and abundant supplies
of ground water.

Value of Production
The value of Florida production of minerals and rock materials
increased between the year 1940 and 1953, from less than $15
million to over $91 million, a rise of 516 per cent. The rate of
increase in Florida value was well above that of the national
average. From 1932 through 1945, the average annual increase
in value amounted to $1,400,000; from 1945 through 1953, there
has been an annual increase of $8,400,000.
The remarkable expansion shown in Table 2 was made possible
through an increase in the quantity and value of all mineral and
rock products produced. For the year 1940, Florida ranked thirty-
fifth among the states in the value of minerals produced. By 1947,
Florida's rank among the states in value of mineral products had
increased to twenty-eight, and this position has been maintained
through 1951. For comparison with the rank of other states in
the southeastern United States for the year 1951, North Carolina
ranked 36; South Carolina, 42; Georgia, 32; Tennessee, 26; and
Alabama, 20. Florida led all states in the quantity of phosphate
rock, rutile, and zircon produced in 1951; placed second in ilmenite,
and third in peat and garnet production. The principal mineral
products of Florida listed in order of their value are phosphate
rock, limestone, cement, sand and gravel.







ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


FLORIDA MINERAL INDUSTRY DURING 1952 and 1953
Statistics Collected in Cooperation with the U. S. Bureau of Mines


The development and diversification of the mineral industry
in Florida are dependent upon the utilization of materials ordi-
narily classified as nonmetallic minerals. The foremost mineral
products of the State are phosphate, limestone, sand and gravel,
fuller's earth, kaolin, cement, heavy minerals including ilmenite,
rutile, zircon and monazite, petroleum, peat, and abundant supplies
of ground water.

Value of Production
The value of Florida production of minerals and rock materials
increased between the year 1940 and 1953, from less than $15
million to over $91 million, a rise of 516 per cent. The rate of
increase in Florida value was well above that of the national
average. From 1932 through 1945, the average annual increase
in value amounted to $1,400,000; from 1945 through 1953, there
has been an annual increase of $8,400,000.
The remarkable expansion shown in Table 2 was made possible
through an increase in the quantity and value of all mineral and
rock products produced. For the year 1940, Florida ranked thirty-
fifth among the states in the value of minerals produced. By 1947,
Florida's rank among the states in value of mineral products had
increased to twenty-eight, and this position has been maintained
through 1951. For comparison with the rank of other states in
the southeastern United States for the year 1951, North Carolina
ranked 36; South Carolina, 42; Georgia, 32; Tennessee, 26; and
Alabama, 20. Florida led all states in the quantity of phosphate
rock, rutile, and zircon produced in 1951; placed second in ilmenite,
and third in peat and garnet production. The principal mineral
products of Florida listed in order of their value are phosphate
rock, limestone, cement, sand and gravel.








40 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY



TABLE 2.-VALUE OF FLORIDA MINERAL PRODUCTION:

1940 THROUGH 1953


Year
1940 --
1941 --

1942 ---
1943 -_-
1944 -.
1945 --
1946 --
1947 -__

1948 ---
1949 --
1950 ---
1951
1952 ----
1953 -._-
Source:


Value
$.14,854,000
19,269,000
20,304,000
25,070,000
21,852,000
24,995,000
31,093,000
S45,992,000

S53,645,000
S54,998,000

S67,717,000
S78,548,000
80,017,000
91,913,000


U. S. Bureau of Mines reports.


Phosphate Rock

Production of Phosphate. Of the mineral products mined in
Florida, phosphate easily takes first place both in value and in
quantity. Production began in 1888. Since 1894, when it replaced
South Carolina, Florida has consistently produced more phosphate
rock than any other state. During the interval from 1888 to 1953,
inclusive, 167,295,284 long tons of phosphate have been mined at
a total recorded value at the mines of $1,185,051,944. During 1952
and 1953, the production record of the phosphate industry reached
new highs, and continued to overshadow the records of the other
mineral industries of the state. The total quantity of land-pebble,







ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


hard-rock, and soft-rock or colloidal phosphate that was sold or
used by producers reached 8,781,125 long tons in 1952, and
9,166,855 long tons in 1953. The value at the mines as reported
by the producing companies for these quantities of raw phosphate
rock amounted to $51,541,799 in 1952 and $55,612,272 in 1953.
The major portion of the production comes from the land-pebble
district in Polk and Hillsborough counties, but small quantities
of hard-rock phosphate were mined in Citrus County and colloidal
phosphates were produced in Citrus, Columbia, Gilchrist and
Marion counties.
Uranium. The most important development in the phosphate'
industry during the past few years was the research that led to
the commercial production of uranium from phosphate rock. Rec-
ords indicate that uranium has been known since 1908 as a very
minor component of the extensive Florida phosphate deposits.
Only recently, however, methods of recovery of these small quan-
tities of uranium, amounting approximately from 3 to 6 ounces
per ton, have been developed and demonstrated to be commer-
cially feasible. The U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with
the Atomic Energy Commission, has been making detailed in-
vestigations of the land-pebble phosphate deposits since 1947. Five
companies have plants in which uranium is recovered from phos-
phoric acid as a by-product in the process of manufacturing phos-
phate chemicals and concentrated commercial fertilizers., The
International Minerals and Chemical Corporation (Bartow) and
the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation (Nichols) have each
had uranium extraction units in production for some time. The
U. S. Phosphoric Products Division, Tennessee Corporation
(Tampa), is constructing facilities for the recovery of by-product
uranium. Two plants located outside of Florida are recovering
uranium from Florida material. These are the Blockson Chemical
Company, Joliet, Illinois, and the Texas City Chemicals, Inc.,
Texas City, Texas.

Heavy Mineral Sands
Mines and ore-producing plants. The only metallic ores mined
in Florida are recovered from sand deposits that contain grains
of a number of heavy minerals. The ore minerals-rutile, ilmen-
ite, zircon, monazite, garnet, and staurolite-are mined and con-
centrated through the removal of the quartz sand. The concentrate
of heavy mineral grains is then separated into the rather pure
mineral components. This separation is accomplished by magnetic









42 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Figure 3. Dry mill of the Highland Plant where the heavy mineral sand
concentrate is separated into its ore components by electro-static and electro-
magnetic methods. Photograph courtesy of the Humphreys Gold Corporation.








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


and electrostatic methods. Beach and other coastal deposits of
sand, including inland deposits of ancient shore lines that are com-
posed of from three to seven or more per cent heavy minerals,
are processed commercially, Four plants that produce these ores
are located in the State:'one, approximately eight miles east of
Jacksonville, Duval county; two, near Starke in the Camp Bland-
ing area, Clay county; and the fourth in the vicinity of Melbourne,
Brevard county. (See photograph on cover and Figure 3.)
The Highland Plant operated by the Humphreys Gold Corpo-
ration for the E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company is the sec-
ond mine and heavy mineral separation plant on Trail Ridge, Clay
County. This plant located nine miles north of the installation in
the Camp Blanding area was scheduled to begin production in
March, 1955. In size, the new mine and plant is similar to the
Trail Ridge plant where about 20,000 long tons of ore per day are
processed to produce 100,000 long tons of titanium mineral a year.
The exploration divisions of several major mining companies, as
well as a number of smaller companies and individuals, are active
in conducting a search for additional deposits from which the
heavy minerals may be recovered. (See Figure 4.) This search
has extended over the entire state, along modern, as well as ancient,
coast lines and in the off-shore area popularly called the tidelands.
Titanium minerals: rutile and ilmenite. Rutile is used chiefly
in welding-rod coatings, alloys, carbide and in ceramics. Titanium
enamels are reported to be superior to zirconium enamels. Ilmen-
ite, while used in making alloys and carbide, finds its greatest
use in the manufacture of titanium dioxide paint pigment, which
is produced in greater quantities than any other white pigment.
Public interest in titanium has increased during the past few years
by recent technical developments that foreshadow the use of titani-
um metal as a structural material. Limited quantities of com-
mercially pure titanium metal have been made in the United States
since 1945, and the quantity has increased yearly. The use of
titanium metal is limited, at the present time, to such items as jet-
engine parts and aircraft structure, where the combination of
lightness, strength, and corrosion resistance are important enough
to justify the cost of $5.00 per pound.
Zircon. The major uses of zircon are in the ceramic industries
to produce enamels, porcelains and glazes, and in alloy production
not only of steel but also of magnesium, copper, titanium, and
nickel. The addition of zirconium imparts strength, toughness,









44 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


4R ..



P.

, _



.P ': ', 2 ,
-. .,
"".-7- -. =


fE 7-'t


7..~4
*


-b

IL


- A


Figure 4. Prospecting for heavy mineral deposits in Walton county.
Photograph courtesy of the Florida State News Bureau.


L~L~Cr~L*L~iSd~Sj61~







ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


corrosion resistance, and creep resistance at high temperatures.
Some of these alloys are suitable for jet and gas turbine engine
parts. Some zirconium metal finds use in vacuum-tube parts
while the powdered metal is used for flashlight powders, flares,
fireworks and detonators. Ground zircon, either in loose grains
or in bricks or cements, is an acid type refractory material that
can withstand very high temperatures.
Monazite. Monazite makes up only a small portion of the
heavy mineral concentrates found in Florida. 'This mineral con-
tains the group of elements known as the rare-earths, and the
compounds and alloys of these elements have important commer-
cial applications. Misch-metal, a mixture of rare-earth elements
with cerium predominating, is combined with iron to form the
"flints" used in cigarette lighters, miners' lamps, and other prod-
ucts. Alloys of magnesium and aluminum with cerium have appli-
cation in the construction of gas turbines, aircraft super-charger
parts, jet planes, and other equipment that demands high tensile
strength at high temperatures.; In the complicated chemical struc-
ture of monazite, varying amounts of thorium, a potential source
of fissionable material, are found. The whole group of rare-earth
elements has been subjected to intensive scientific study by the
Atomic Energy Commission.
Garnet. The grains of garnet sands, a product of the Florida
Ore Processing Company's mineral separation plant, are sold to
monument works to be used as blast sand, and to filling stations
and garages throughout the country to clean spark plugs.

Staurolite. The first industrial use of the mineral staurolite
was made possible when that mineral became available in quan-
tity at the heavy mineral separation plant located on Trail Ridge,
Clay County. This product contains more than 45 per cent A120O
and is used by the Lehigh Portland Cement Company at their
Bunnell plant as a source of alumina in the mix for Portland
cement manufacture instead of the customary clay.

Selected Mineral Products
Cement. Portland cement has been produced in Florida for
25 years by the Florida Portland Cement Division, Tampa, of the
General Portland Cement Company, Chicago, Illinois. This plant
began operation in 1927, producing cement from limestone ob-
tained north of Brooksville, Hernando county; and clay from a







46 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

few miles distant in Citrus county. In an effort to meet more
nearly the increasing demands, the capacity of the Tampa plant
has been enlarged to its present size of four million barrels an-
nually.
In 1951, the Lehigh Portland Cement Company began the con-
struction of a cement mill on the east coast of Florida near Bun-
nell. This plant had an initial capacity of 1,400,000 barrels an-
nually and production began during December, 1952. During the
summer of 1954, an expansion program was announced which
when completed in the summer of 1955 will increase the plant
capacity to about 2,500,000 barrels. Coquina shell is quarried
adjacent to the mill to supply the calcium carbonate content; this
is the first extensive use of coquina. Another unique feature in
the use of raw products is that, in place of the usual argillaceous
material furnished in the form of clay, the mineral staurolite sup-
plies the alumina and a portion of the iron necessary in the manu-
facturing process. The staurolite residue is obtained from the
E. I. du Pont de Nemours Company's heavy minerals separation
plant near Starke. Although small quantities of staurolite have
been used as an abrasive in sand blasting, its use in manufacturing
of Portland cement marks the first important commercial utiliza-
tion of the mineral.
Petroleum. The discovery well of the Sunniland Oil Field,
Collier County-the first successful oil well drilled in Florida-
was brought in September 26, 1943, and produced 20,550 barrels
of asphaltic base, 20.80 API gravity oil before being converted to
a salt-water disposal well on May 10, 1946. The discovery well
was drilled by the Humble Oil and Refining Company, and this
company has further explored the region in the vicinity of Sunni-
land and has developed a small oil field of twelve wells that produce
from a horizon about 11,500 feet below the ground surface. Dur-
ing 1953, this field produced 541,284 barrels of oil and the total
cumulative production of the field up to January 1, 1954, was
3,307,753 barrels.
During the 14-year period from January 1, 1940, to January 1,
1954, 196 wells were drilled for oil and gas in Florida. Only 14
of these were completed as producing wells, 13 in the Sunniland
Field, and the other was the discovery well of the Forty-Mile Bend
Field, Dade County. This new field was discovered in December,
1953, and the second field well was brought in April, 1954. The
entire State of Florida remains a potential area for possible future







ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


discovery of additional petroleum fields. The drilling to date
has been exploratory and a sufficient number of wells have not
been drilled to eliminate any portion of Florida from the classifi-
cation of a potential producing area.
Limestone. Crushed limestone enters into road and highway
construction not only as road metal and aggregate for concrete
but also as the base material on which the highway is constructed.
These uses, together with concrete products and structural uses
for limestone aggregate, consume by far the greatest proportion of
limestone produced in the state. The lime and cement manufac-
turing industries also consume important quantities of limestone
annually. Smaller quantities are used for rip rap and railroad
ballast. Some types of limestone, particularly dolomitic limestone
and dolomite, are crushed to a fine powder and applied to soils
to sweeten them or to make them less acid.
Formerly the production of dimensional stone was an active
industry in the state but fashioning of stone into building blocks
currently utilizes only a minor portion of the rock produced. Con-
crete blocks and bricks, together with clay brick and tile have all
but replaced the native dimensional stone in the construction of
buildings and houses.
Clay. The clay industry of the state may be considered under
two groups: (1) common clay production and products and (2)
special purpose clays. Common clays are used in the manufacture
of structural products such as clay brick and tile and in the manu-
facturing of cement. The clay brick and tile industry in the state
has declined in recent years because of economic factors. Never-
theless, changing conditions now favor the reestablishment of the
industry. The quantity of common clay consumed by cement manu-
facturing has increased and in 1952 this industry consumed 85,598
tons. The quantity of common clay mined in the state is antici-
pated to increase steadily in the future to keep pace with expanding
demands created by the cement and brick-making industries.
Kaolin and fuller's earth. Two special purpose clays are pro-
duced in the state-kaolin from mines located in Putnam County,
and fuller's earth from mines in Gadsden County. The Florida
plastic kaolin enters into the ceramic industry where it is a stand-
ard ingredient in many types of white ware, tile, and porcelain.
Fuller's earth production has increased during the past 10 years
and the development of markets for absorbents for oily floors and
for carriers of insecticides and fungicides have resulted in larger







48 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

shipments. Consumption of fuller's earth in mineral-oil refining
constitutes the chief use for the material. Other important uses
are for vegetable oil clarification and rotary drilling mud.
Ground Water
Ground water is the principal source of supply for industrial,
municipal, agricultural, and domestic uses in Florida. The daily
consumption of ground water by these four major uses is estimated
by the U. S. Geological Survey to average about 500 million gal-
lons. Although some critical problems of supply have arisen in
certain areas, vast quantities of ground water are available for
development over the major portion of Florida.
The daily draft of 500 million gallons from the ground-water
resources should not be a cause for concern in regard to the State
as a whole. Ground waters are naturally discharging many hun-
dred million gallons a day, much of which can be salvaged and
used whenever it is needed. The tremendous discharges of
Florida's large limestone springs forcibly demonstrate the large
capacity of the ground-water reservoirs. The combined average
daily flow from the 66 large springs located in the state is about
3,600,000,000 gallons, or more than five times greater than the
estimated total consumption of ground water in Florida. The flow
from the springs represents water in excess of the storage capa-
city of the underground reservoirs. The availability of large
water resources in Florida, in contrast with the shortages of sup-
ply in many other parts of the nation, may conceivably play a
dominant role in the agricultural and industrial growth of the
State. Even though plentiful reserves of ground water exist in
Florida as a whole, the increasing need for wise development of
future supplies should not be minimized. To protect these ground-
water reserves from waste and contamination will insure the con-
tinued growth of our state.
Current and Future Expansion
The abundant reserves of the mineral and rock resources that
are now mined in Florida assure existing industries that ample
quantities are available to meet the increased demands brought
about by continued growth of present markets and the demands
created by the development of new uses for these materials. The
increase in the quantity of production from 1940 to 1953 was over
three-fold for each of the three minerals shown in Table 3, or 223
per cent for phosphate, 235 per cent for limestone, and 222 per
cent for sand and gravel.







48 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

shipments. Consumption of fuller's earth in mineral-oil refining
constitutes the chief use for the material. Other important uses
are for vegetable oil clarification and rotary drilling mud.
Ground Water
Ground water is the principal source of supply for industrial,
municipal, agricultural, and domestic uses in Florida. The daily
consumption of ground water by these four major uses is estimated
by the U. S. Geological Survey to average about 500 million gal-
lons. Although some critical problems of supply have arisen in
certain areas, vast quantities of ground water are available for
development over the major portion of Florida.
The daily draft of 500 million gallons from the ground-water
resources should not be a cause for concern in regard to the State
as a whole. Ground waters are naturally discharging many hun-
dred million gallons a day, much of which can be salvaged and
used whenever it is needed. The tremendous discharges of
Florida's large limestone springs forcibly demonstrate the large
capacity of the ground-water reservoirs. The combined average
daily flow from the 66 large springs located in the state is about
3,600,000,000 gallons, or more than five times greater than the
estimated total consumption of ground water in Florida. The flow
from the springs represents water in excess of the storage capa-
city of the underground reservoirs. The availability of large
water resources in Florida, in contrast with the shortages of sup-
ply in many other parts of the nation, may conceivably play a
dominant role in the agricultural and industrial growth of the
State. Even though plentiful reserves of ground water exist in
Florida as a whole, the increasing need for wise development of
future supplies should not be minimized. To protect these ground-
water reserves from waste and contamination will insure the con-
tinued growth of our state.
Current and Future Expansion
The abundant reserves of the mineral and rock resources that
are now mined in Florida assure existing industries that ample
quantities are available to meet the increased demands brought
about by continued growth of present markets and the demands
created by the development of new uses for these materials. The
increase in the quantity of production from 1940 to 1953 was over
three-fold for each of the three minerals shown in Table 3, or 223
per cent for phosphate, 235 per cent for limestone, and 222 per
cent for sand and gravel.








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


The rate of increase in the production of these rock materials
may be anticipated to become even greater in the future because
new uses will develop to create new markets, and the increased
population of the state and nation will require expansion of pres-
ent markets. Separate from population growth is the unpredict-
able rate at which new mineral resources will be discovered and
brought into production.

TABLE 3.-QUANTITY OF PRODUCTION OF SELECTED FLORIDA
MINERALS: 1940 THROUGH 1953


Phosphate Rock
Year (Long tons)
1940 2,845,012
1941 3,365,572
1942 3,012,240
1943 3,588,493
1944 3,752,795
1945 4,238,228
1946 5,005,511
1947 6,482,027
1948 6,539,258
1949 6,815,989
1950 8,085,870
1951 8,496,831
1952 8,781,125
1953 9,166,855
Source: U. S. Bureau of


Limestone
(Short tons)
2,815,713
4,063,840
6,563,420
8,741,200
2,730,020
2,615,950
2,863,070
3,504,010
4,154,920
4,215,090
5,313,400
8,032,966
7,836,634
9,430,238
Mines reports.


Sand and Gravel
(Short tons)
1,162,075
1,462,276
1,834,863
1,833,453
1,335,569
1,312,511
1,534,667
2,067,401
2,312,131
2,243,898
2,793,865
4,419,000
4,154,613
3,731,432


Mineral resources of the state that were latent in 1940 but have
since become materials of commerce include ilmenite, rutile, zircon,
garnet, staurolite, and monazite, all of which are recovered from
the heavy mineral sand deposits; petroleum and natural gas, dis-
covered in Florida in September, 1943; and by-product uranium
from processing phosphoric acid. The utilization of natural brine
or salt water to recharge municipal water softener units is rela-
tively new and may develop into widespread use. New products
and new uses create an expanding demand for materials. For
example, the use of fuller's earth as an absorbent for oily floors
began in 1943 and for a carrier of insecticide in 1945. These new
markets consume nearly one-half of the fuller's earth that is pro-
duced currently. New or expanded markets for common materi-
als, such as utilization of clay in the manufacture of light weight
aggregate and dolomite in the manufacture of mineral wool, await
development. The discovery and production of petroleum and
natural gas in quantity will make possible the establishment of








50 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

many industries, including glass manufacture; chemical industries
based on brines and abundant reserves of pure limestone; and the
utilization of aluminum phosphate portion of the overburden that
is now discarded in the mining of phosphate pebble. Other ma-
terials that are high in alumina-the kyanite and sillimanite found
in the heavy mineral sands-may be expected to become items of
commerce.










SUMMARY OF


TABLE 4
FLORIDA MINERAL PRODUCTION


1950 1951 1952 1 1953
PRODUCT Vl I Value Quantiy Valu Q y
Quantity Value Quantity Value Quantity Value Quantity Value


Clay, ihc. Kaolin and Ful-|
ler's earth (short tons)
Materials used in cement
Clay--...... (short tons)
Staurolite (short tons) --
Natural gas (M cubic ft.)
Peat _--._--._-- (short tons)
Petroleum -..-... (barrels)
Phosphate
Land pebble (long tons)
Soft rock. --(long tons)
Hard rock ._ (long tons)
Total phosphate,
(long tons)
Rutile ..--- .... (short tons) --
Sand and gravel,
(short tons)
Crushed limestone, inc.
dolomite. (short tons)
Miscellaneous** ------
Total value, eliminating
duplication -------------
t Estimated in part.
Value included in Miscellaneous.
** Includes value of: Cement
Lime


127,000

84,000

8,000
23,022
486,021

7,933,009
81,542
71,319

8,085,870
----------------

2,793,865

5,313,400
- -- - -


$ 1,955,000

63,000

*
151,270
*

44,430,646
408,595
538,601

45,377,842
----------- --- ---

2,806,431

6,885,394
10,541,000

$67,717,000


Dimensional stone
Flint


132,563

70,000

10,000
25,748
596,043

8,329,033
92,183
75,615

8,496,831


4,419,0001

8,032,9661


$ 2,288,855

70,000

1,000
161,417


49,185,072
495,243
582,247

50,262,562


4,300,682

9,419,682
12,113,358

$78,548,000


Ilmenite
Rutile (except 1953)


112,113

86,000

15,000
23,729
591,855

8,624,186
75,853
81,068

8,781,125


4,154,613

7,836,634


$ 1,985,587

86,000

1,000
154,164
*

50,483,421
433,203
625,175

51,541,799


3,848,077

9,577,541
13,229,587

$80,335,000


148,000

109,911
19,078
34,000
27,678
541,284

9,009,220
75,910
81,725

9,166,855
6,043

3,731,432

9,430,238
- - -


$ 2,842,448

109,911
*
3,000
185,524


54,498,217
470,062
643,993

55,612,272
702,791

3,199,368

11,320,949
t18,047,345

t$91,913,697


t$91,913,697


Garnet Monazite
Zircon Petroleum








52 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

ROCK AND MINERAL PRODUCERS
1952 and 1953
The names of the companies and individuals that cooperated
with the U. S. Bureau of Mines and the Florida Geological Survey
in supplying statistical data on their production of rock and min-
eral materials during the years 1952 and 1953, are included in
this list. All individuals and companies that mine, process and
sell limestone, sand, phosphate or other rock or mineral products
are urged to cooperate with this program in order that these annual
production records of the State may be more complete.

Product Company Location
Cement
Florida Portland Cement Division,
General Portland Cement Company --------- Tampa
Lehigh Portland Cement Company ----- Bunnell
Clay (Common)
Used by Producer:
Florida Portland Cement Division ....-.....---- Tampa
Non-Commercial:
Apalachee Correctional Institute --... Chattahoochee
Dolomite
Florida Dolomite Company -......-- Pembroke-Oneco
Golden Dolomite Company -------- ----._._- Orlando
Manatee Dolomite Company.....-- --------. Samoset
Southern Dolomite Company -...--------..---. Palmetto
Dixie Lime Products Company -------------_. .. Ocala
Fuller's Earth
The Floridin Company, Inc. .- _----------.__. Quincy
Minerals and Chemicals Corp. of
America -.._---------------_ Attapulgus, Ga.
Garnet
Florida Ore Processing Company, Inc. Melbourne
Ilmenite and Rutile
(Titanium concentrate)
E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company........ Starke
Florida Ore Processing Company, Inc. Melbourne
Rutile Mining Company of Florida... Jacksonville
National Lead Company, Titanium Div. .Jacksonville
Kaolin
Edgar Plastic Kaolin Company -- -__..---------. Edgar
United Clay Mines, Inc.-------- -----.. .Hawthorn
Lime
City of Miami, Department of
Water and Sewers .. -------------_ ......Miami
Dixie Lime Products Company --------------_- Ocala











Limestone
Crushed:


Non-Commercial:


Broward County Highway
Department ---


ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT



Belle Glade Rock Company-------
Brooksville Rock Company, Inc. -
Broward Quarries, Inc._..---------__
Camp Concrete Rock Company --
Central Quarries, Inc......-------
Connell and Shultz ....... --.---- -
Alonzo Cothron------------- -----
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing
Company ---------- Ocala
Curcie Brothers... -----
Deerfield Rock Corporation.. ------_
Dixie Lime Products Company-
Hallandale Rock Corporation ------
T. J. James Construction Co., Inc.-
L. and L. Quarries ---- ---..
Marianna Limestone Company
Marjax Company ---------
Maule Industries, Inc. .-----
Wm. P. McDonald Corporation .--.--
C. Meekins..... ------
Miami Crushed Stone Company --.-
Murphy and Mills Corporation-
Naranja Rock Company ---
Newberry Corporation............ ---
Ocala Lime Rock Corporation ..----
Oolite Rock Company----
Peffer Construction Company -------
Pruitt and Boyd -------
E. A. Pynchon ..--------..---
S. M. Wall -..--- --
Snyder Paving Company, Inc.. -----
Suwannee Lime Products Company
Troup Quarries, Inc ...-....----
United Limerock Company ...------
V. E. Whitehurst & Sons ----
Williston Shell Rock Company--


Palm Beach County Highway
Department -- West Palm Beach
Volusia County Highway Department --.... DeLand


Dimension Stone:


Alclaries Travertine Company -
Cutler Cut Rock Company--
Deerfield Rock Corporation .-------
C. Meekins __....... .
Williston Shell Rock Company -..-


---Sarasota
Miami
Deerfield Beach
----.._ Hollywood
---------.-..... -- Ocala


-------Miami
.-----_- Brooksville
-Fort Lauderdale
.....--------.. Ocala
-....----- Leesburg
-...--.... Inverness
..----.- Islamorada

and Jacksonville
... Hallandale
Deerfield Beach
Ocala
-----.. Hallandale
. -.......---- Miami
-Fort Lauderdale
-- Marianna
-....----.Marianna
---..Miami Beach
----. Brooksville
.------ Hollywood
Coral Gables
.-- Miami
Naranja
Jacksonville
.......--------. Ocala
Miami
------ Miami
Deerfield Beach
..-- North Miami
-.Gainesville
Fort Lauderdale
....------ Branford
------ Miami
--.-- Jacksonville
-- Williston
.- ----- Ocala



Fort Lauderdale







54 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Florida Ore Processing Company, Inc..
Humphreys Gold Corporation.--...---.......

Humble Oil and Refining Company


-- Melbourne
Jacksonville

--. Sunniland


Agricultural Organics Corporation -----_....... Seffner
Daetwyler Peat Mine ------.........---- Orlando
Fernwood Humus Company ---------.-----. Zellwood
Florida Nursery and Landscape Company .Leesburg
Glen Saint Mary Nurseries Company -Glen St. Mary
Jack 0. Holmes, Inc.. .. ..- ----_..-.- ---- ...-- Tampa
Mulford-Hickerson Peat Humus
Corporation --.---- ....-- --..-- Apopka
Southern States Nurseries, Inc.----- ------ Macclenny
West Florida Humus Company --........ Panama City


Petroleum

Phosphate Rock
Hard Rock:

Soft Rock or Colloidal








Land Pebble:









Sand and Gravel


Humble Oil and Refining Company


Kibler-Camp Phosphate Enterprise
Clay:
Kellogg Company, The.. ------_
Knight and Bevis -...---........- ----
Loncala Phosphate Company ----
Pedrick and Bernard ....-----
Seaboard Phosphate Company--
Soil Builders, Inc..... .....--------- .
Superior Phosphate Company.--


.-- Sunniland


. .----..... Ocala

Hernando
S-Dunnellon
High Springs
--Morriston
--Dunnellon
---.. Dunnellon
Dunnellon


American Agricultural Chemical Corporation --Pierce
American Cyanamid Company .-..--...._---- Brewster
Coronet Division, Smith-Douglas Company, Plant City
Davison Chemical Corporation, The -------Bartow
International Minerals and Chemical
Corporation Bartow
Swift and Company ....------- Bartow
Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation .-- Nichols


All-Florida Sand Company Unincorpo-
rated ------------------ Interlachen
Apalachicola Northern R.R. Port St. Joe
Brewton Engineering Company -----. Panama City
Burnup and Sims, Inc..------------- West Palm Beach
Rufus Campbell .....-. __.---------- Flomaton, Alabama
Central Sand Company ------------.------------ Tavares
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing
Company ------------------------- ----....---- Jacksonville
Davenport Sand Company, Inc.--- ...------- Davenport
DesRochers Sand Company ------------....- ---...... Miami


Monazite


Natural Gas


Peat







ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Alfred Destin Corporation .-----.-.--.... Miami Beach
Diamond-Interlachen Sand Company ..--Jacksonville
F. A. Edwards ----------------Bradenton
Florida East Coast Railway --- St. Augustine
Florida Gravel Company ..--- Chattahoochee
Florida Sand Company -.--- St. Petersburg
Florida Silica Sand Company, Inc. --..-- Opalocka
Hauser Concrete Company. --...- DeLand
Hialeah Crushed Stone Company ------------- Hialeah
Keuka Sand Company.. ------. --.-.Edgar
Keystone Sand Company ..........----------- Grandin
Lake Wales Concrete Sand Company ... Lake Wales
Lake Wales Independent Sand Company,
Inc. -.. -- ---------. Lake Wales
Largo Washed Sand Company. ----- Largo
Maule Industries, Inc. -------- Miami Beach
Murphy and Mills Corporation ----- Miami
Oak Ridge Sand Company, Inc. ---------- Mulberry
Owens Brothers Concrete, Inc... New Smyrna Beach
Seminole Rock Products, Inc..- -.. ....---------- Miami
Shands and Baker --------- Jacksonville
Standard Sand and Silica Company --..-- Davenport
United Clay Mines Corporation Hawthorn
Ward Gravel Company _---- Bluff Springs
Non-Commercial:
Bureau of Forestry,
Department of Agriculture. -Washington 25, D. C.
Staurolite
E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company ..--. Starke
Zircon
Humphreys Gold Corporation --.------....--- Starke
Florida Ore Processing Company, Inc. .-Melbourne
National Lead Company ------ Jacksonville
Rutile Mining Company of Florida. Jacksonville








56 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

APPROPRIATIONS
July 1, 1953-June 30, 1955
Current:

The appropriation under which the Florida Geological Survey is cur-
rently operating for the biennium July 1, 1953, to June 30, 1955, follows:
7/1/53 to 7/1/54 to
6/30/54 6/30/55 Total
Salary --------------- --...... .. ...... $ 77,050.00 $ 77,050.00 $154,100.00
Expense ---- ------ -... 74,800.00 72,400.00 147,200.00
Operating Capital Outlay --....... 7,200.00* 9,600.00** 16,800.00


Encumbrances ---

TOTAL -------


8,823.94***


8,823.94


$167,873.94 $159,050.00 $326,923.94


During the fiscal year 1953-54, $2,000.00 was transferred from expenses
to operating capital outlay.
** During the fiscal year 1954-55, $4,400.00 was transferred from expenses
to operating capital outlay.
*** Held over into the biennium July 1, 1953, to June 30, 1955, from the pre-
vious biennium was the sum of $8,823.94 to make payment of bills en-
cumbered in the previous biennium.
Requested:
For the biennium July 1, 1955, to June 30, 1957, the following funds have
been requested:


Salary ----------- -- .. ...-- ..... ....
Expense --- ------........ -
Operating Capital Outlay


7/1/55 to
6/30/56
.$ 98,340.00
S94,900.00
8,300.00


7/1/56 to
6/30/57
$100,340.00
94,900.00
8,300.00


Total
$198,680.00
189,800.00
16,600.00


TOTAL ---......--...... ........ $201,540.00 $203,540.00 $405,080.00
In addition, an appropriation of $585,000 is being sought with which to
construct adequate office, laboratory, and museum space.


1953
STATEMENT OF FUNDS AVAILABLE, EXPENDITURES,
AND BALANCES
January 1 to December 31


SALARY
Funds Available:
Balance, January 1 .... .---..-......
General Revenue Release, Jan. 1-
General Revenue Release, Apr. 1
General Revenue Release, July 1-
General Revenue Release, Oct. 1.


---- $ 7,743.22
--.--. 16,375.00
.-.--- 16,375.00
19,262.50
.-- 19,262.50


Total Available-


$ 79,018.22








56 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

APPROPRIATIONS
July 1, 1953-June 30, 1955
Current:

The appropriation under which the Florida Geological Survey is cur-
rently operating for the biennium July 1, 1953, to June 30, 1955, follows:
7/1/53 to 7/1/54 to
6/30/54 6/30/55 Total
Salary --------------- --...... .. ...... $ 77,050.00 $ 77,050.00 $154,100.00
Expense ---- ------ -... 74,800.00 72,400.00 147,200.00
Operating Capital Outlay --....... 7,200.00* 9,600.00** 16,800.00


Encumbrances ---

TOTAL -------


8,823.94***


8,823.94


$167,873.94 $159,050.00 $326,923.94


During the fiscal year 1953-54, $2,000.00 was transferred from expenses
to operating capital outlay.
** During the fiscal year 1954-55, $4,400.00 was transferred from expenses
to operating capital outlay.
*** Held over into the biennium July 1, 1953, to June 30, 1955, from the pre-
vious biennium was the sum of $8,823.94 to make payment of bills en-
cumbered in the previous biennium.
Requested:
For the biennium July 1, 1955, to June 30, 1957, the following funds have
been requested:


Salary ----------- -- .. ...-- ..... ....
Expense --- ------........ -
Operating Capital Outlay


7/1/55 to
6/30/56
.$ 98,340.00
S94,900.00
8,300.00


7/1/56 to
6/30/57
$100,340.00
94,900.00
8,300.00


Total
$198,680.00
189,800.00
16,600.00


TOTAL ---......--...... ........ $201,540.00 $203,540.00 $405,080.00
In addition, an appropriation of $585,000 is being sought with which to
construct adequate office, laboratory, and museum space.


1953
STATEMENT OF FUNDS AVAILABLE, EXPENDITURES,
AND BALANCES
January 1 to December 31


SALARY
Funds Available:
Balance, January 1 .... .---..-......
General Revenue Release, Jan. 1-
General Revenue Release, Apr. 1
General Revenue Release, July 1-
General Revenue Release, Oct. 1.


---- $ 7,743.22
--.--. 16,375.00
.-.--- 16,375.00
19,262.50
.-- 19,262.50


Total Available-


$ 79,018.22








ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Expenditures:
Salaries and Wages ----... .....--- --...-- 68,274.83


Balances:
General Revenue Balance, June 30 -... ---_ $ 8,004.84
General Revenue Balance, Dec. 31 ....-..- -- 2,738.55

Total Balances.... ------------------.---... ...... $ 10,743.39

EXPENSES OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY*

Funds Available: Expenses
Balance, January 1 --..-.- -.-... --------. $26,324.44
General Revenue Release, Jan. 1 ---- 18,000.00
General Revenue Release, Apr. 1 -----..... 18,000.00
General Revenue Release, July 1 -- 19,200.00
General Revenue Release, Oct. 1 --..--.----- 19,200.00

Total Available-Expenses ..- ----- $100,724.44

Funds Available: Operating Capital Outlay
General Revenue Release, July 1 ---------- 5,200.00

Total Funds Available-Expenses and Operating
Capital Outlay --- _~---.....-.---------------- $105,924.44

Expenditures: Expenses
Professional Fees and Consultant Services $ 744.67
Communication and Transportation of
Things .......------- ... ....... __---------------._-- 1,989.84
General Printing and Reproduction Service 9,091.80
Repairs and Maintenance..----------.--..-- 1,495.63
Travel ---- ---__-........-..---- --- 3,238.57
Utilities ------- 38.40
Other Contractual Services ----- 39,999.96
Building and Construction Materials and
Supplies -----.....---....----------....----- 306.37
Educational, Scientific, Medical, and Agri-
cultural Materials and Supplies .----. 2,037.51
Maintenance Materials and Supplies ......- 503.08
Motor Fuels and Lubricants ---- 1,218.29
Office Materials and Supplies .-..-..--- 1,744.32
Other Materials and Supplies ---- 273.54
Insurance and Surety Bonds ..... .... 549.10
Pensions and Benefits --------- 60.93
Rental of Buildings and Equipment -.--- 7,250.00
Other Current Charges and Obligations__ 12.75


...........-- -- $70,554.76


TOTAL








58 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Expenditures: Operating Capital Outlay
Books ------------------------ -------- -... .......-- .... $ 472.46
Educational, Medical, Scientific, and Agri-
cultural Equipment .....------ -- .- 3,551.87
Motor Vehicle-Passenger -- ---- 849.85
Motor Vehicle-Other-- ---- -- ... 122.51
Office Furniture and Equipment 5...---.-- 5,967.22
Other Capital Outlay -- --------- 1.47


TOTAL ... ------- ..
Total Expenditures-Expenses and
Capital Outlay ----.----.. -- -.... .

Balances: Expenses
General Revenue Balance, June 30 --.-
General Revenue Balance, Dec. 31--.

TOTAL ---------...-..-

Balance: Operating Capital Outlay
General Revenue Balance, Dec. 31 ----


-- $10,965.38
Operating


81,520.14


.- $ 7,285.25
S13,136.86

--. $20,422.11



-. $ 3,982.19


Total Balances-Expenses and Operating Cap-
ital Outlay --------- --..----- --- $ 24,404.30

* These two funds were not separated until the beginning of the 1953-54
fiscal year. Up until July 1, 1953, expenditures for regular expense and
operating capital outlay items were charged to the same appropriation fund.


1954
STATEMENT OF FUNDS AVAILABLE, EXPENDITURES,
AND BALANCES
January 1 to December 31


SALARY
Funds Available:
Balance, January 1....-----_-----...._
General Revenue Release, Jan. 1
General Revenue Release, Apr. 1-
General Revenue Release, July 1-
Reserve Release, August 15.--..
General Revenue Release, Oct. 1-
On Reserve, December 31 ....----.


S$ 2,738.55
-19,262.50
S19,262.50
S19,262.50
S5,600.00
S19,262.50
740.97


Total Available.


Expenditures: U,
Salaries and Wages


$ 86,129.52



$ 72,979.72









ELEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Balances:
General Revenue Balance, June 30 ..----... $ 6,340.97
General Revenue Balance, Dec. 31 -----.--- 6,067.86
Reserve Balance, December 31 --.......----- 740.97

Total Balances ..-.--. ......--...----------------------. $ 13,149.80

EXPENSE
Funds Available:
Balance, January 1 ...--------......---... $13,136.86
General Revenue-Release, Jan. 1 -- 19,200.00
General Revenue Release, Apr. 1--..-- 19,200.00
General Revenue Release, July 1 ...-. ...- 19,200.00
General Revenue Release, Oct. 1 19,200.00
On Reserve, December 31 --... 8,909.34

Less: $98,846.20
Transfers to Operating Capital Outlay..-. 6,400.00
Expenditure erroneously charged -- 1.10

Total Available-_ ------.--..... ... ---------- -..-__ $ 92,445.10
Expenditures:
Professional Fees and Consultant Services $ 1,556.78
Communication and Transportation of
Things ---------- -- 2,338.63
General Printing and Reproduction Service 10,582.72
Repairs and Maintenance .------------------- 2,399.42
Travel 5- 5,301.02
Other Contractual Services ---- 36,642.73
Building and Construction Materials and
Supplies .-.. .. ..........---------------. 524.37
Educational, Medical, Scientific, and Agri-
cultural Materials and Supplies .------- 723.38
Maintenance Materials and Supplies 366.16
Motor Fuels and Lubricants .------ 1,454.74
Office Materials and Supplies .. --------- 2,235.39
Other Materials and Supplies ..-- 73.48
Insurance and Surety Bonds 5-- 511.61
Pensions and Benefits --------------- ---.---- 402.63
Rental of Buildings and Equipment .. 7,000.00
Other Current Charges and Obligations --- 53.00

Total Expenditures --$ 72,166.06

Balances:
General Revenue, June 30 --- -- $ 8,909.34
General Revenue, December 31 --- 2,460.36
Reserve Balance, December 31 ---... ---- 8,909.34


Total Balances


$ 20,279.04









60 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY

Funds Available:
Balance, January 1..--..- ----
Transfer from Expense, Mar. 31


Transfer from Expense, June 1 -...-
General Revenue Release, July 1--
Transfer from Expense, Dec. 21. --
On Reserve, December 31.-------
Expenditure Erroneously Credited --


Total Available


Expenditures:
Books .---


Educational, Medical, Scientific, and Agri-
cultural Equipment ----------..
Motor Vehicle-Other (than Passenger) -
Office Furniture and Equipment --.------
Other Capital Outlay .. -----


--- $ 3,982.19
1,000.00
-.-- 1,000.00
5,200.00
4,400.00
33.34
-- 1.10


$ 15,616.63


--- $ 1,533.25


1,633.89
2,449.91
2,620.47
27.90


Total Expenditures.


Balances:
General Revenue, June 30-
General Revenue, Dec. 31 ..
Reserve Balance, Dec. 31 --


8,265.42


$ 33.34
--- 7,284.53
--- 33.34


Total Balances


$ 7,351.21


....















Florida's newest heavy. mineral mine located in the western
portion of Clay County. Heavy mineral sand dredged from
an artificial lake is concentrated in this floating spiral con-
centrator at the Highland Mine and Plant.
Phot:figrapih 'cor'rt y ,f H h Ia ni ph,. Guld Co'rp.rntion.
*, Ba. "'..!


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