<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Introduction
 Staff, 1949-1950
 Well sample library
 Cooperation with other agencie...
 Well exploration and development...
 Oil prospecting
 Publications
 Florida mineral industry during...
 Producers reporting production...
 Mineral production statistics














Biennial report
http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/dl/UF00000223.jpg ( PALMM Version )
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000223/00007
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report of the Florida Geological Survey
Physical Description: 11 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1940-1961
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Geology -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation, Florida Geological Survey
Dates or Sequential Designation: 4th (1940)-14th (1959-1960).
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000376187
oclc - 01956611
notis - ACB5800
lccn - sn 87028635
System ID: UF00000223:00007
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Introduction
        Page 5
    Staff, 1949-1950
        Page 6
    Well sample library
        Page 7
    Cooperation with other agencies
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Well exploration and development data
        Page 15
    Oil prospecting
        Page 16
    Publications
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Florida mineral industry during 1948 and 1949
        Page 19
    Producers reporting production in 1948 and 1949
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Mineral production statistics
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
Full Text



State of Florida
FULLER WARREN, Governor

Florida State Board of Conservation
GEORGE VATHIS, Supervisor


NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT
of the

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Covering Period
January 1, 1949 through December 31, 1950






HERMAN GUNTER
Director and State Geologist


*


Tallahassee, Florida
1951




















Published 1951

-9-






64769
}












LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Tallahassee, Florida
March 8, 1951

MR. GEORGE VATHIS, Supervisor
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

SIR:

Herewith is the Ninth Biennial Report of the Florida Geological
Survey, a division of the Florida State Board of Conservation.
This report contains a brief review of the work of the Survey
during the two-year period, 1949-1950, an outline of some of the
proposed investigations for the future, summaries of the mineral
production for 1948-1949, and the financial statement.
Again let me express my appreciation of the support that you
have given to the work of this Division of the State Board of
Conservation.
Respectfully submitted,


HERMAN GUNTER, Director











LOCATION

OF
,

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

EAST CAMPUS

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA A


0 100 200 300 400
Sctal in Flat


II E
I-


Figure 1.


r,








Ninth Biennial Report
of the

Florida Geological Survey



INTRODUCTION
Survey Quarters: The Florida Geological Survey offices have
been on the campus of the Florida State University since Decem-
ber, 1939. This location has proven advantageous in a number of
respects. The Survey is primarily a research and fact finding
agency and therefore finds itself in a congenial atmosphere on
the campus of a State educational institution. Here the United
States Geological Survey, Ground Water Division, with which
close cooperation is maintained, is conveniently accessible, as is
also the Geological Department of the University. Figure 1 on
the opposite page gives the location of these three departments.
As convenient and commodious as the Survey offices are, the
Survey is experiencing difficulty in adequately caring for its
expanding activities. A department cannot remain static; to do
so is a certain sign of decadence and non-progressiveness. With
the constant expansion of the mineral industry in Florida and
the industrial growth of the State, the Survey is called upon for
more and more information on the possibilities that Florida
offers. Industries, too, utilize greater and greater quantities of
both surface and ground waters, and to give answers to some
of these increasing needs requires much study, careful planning
and at times detailed investigations. To meet these demands
more satisfactorily the Survey is compelled to increase its staff
of technicians, and to acquire appropriate equipment, all of which
intensifies the need of additional space. In earlier reports there
has been brief mention of these needs and the hope expressed
that space might be provided in a new building that should be
one of the Capitol Center group. This, however, has not yet
materialized. Plans for other accommodations, however, are
under consideration by Florida State University and if carried
to successful termination the Survey would be adequately and
conveniently housed.



64169








6 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

STAFF-1949-1950
FULL TIME:
Herman Gunter, D. Sc. (Hon.), Director
R. O. Vernon, Ph. D., Geologist
James L. Calver, Ph. D., Geologist
H. G. Naegeli, Ph. D., Paleontologist
J. Clarence Simpson, Supervisor of Laboratory
Harold T. Chittum, Jr., Assistant Geologist
Lily Moore, Librarian
Mary W. Blount, Secretary
Corinne Little, Secretary
Jean Neel, Secretary, (Resigned October 15, 1949)
Eva Merle Haynes, (Entered November 1, 1949, Resigned
June, 1950)
Evelee Cobb, (Temporary, June 1-September 8, 1950)
Mary Cathryn Novak, (Entered September 11, 1950)
John McBride, Janitor

RESEARCH CONSULTANTS:
Cole, W. Storrs, Ph. D., Micropaleontologist, Special Research
Moore, Wayne E., Ph. D., Geology of Jackson County, Special
Research
Oglesby, Woodson R., Jr., Geology of Gilchrist County, Special
Research
Richards, Horace G., Ph. D., Special Research

PART TIME: (Staff of five is maintained)
Andrews, Edwin V., Draftsman's Assistant (October 1, 1948-
August 31, 1949)
Ellis, Thomas J., III, Field Assistant-Rodman (July 5-31, 1950)
Eaton, Bernard, Assistant in Laboratory
Gillis, Ralph P., Assistant in Laboratory (September 1, 1949,
September 30, 1950)
Gray, Richard C., Micropaleontologic Assistant (January 1,
1949-)
Jones, Walton B., Assistant in Laboratory (Resigned October
7, 1950)
Hendry, Charles W. Jr., Draftsman's Assistant (September 11,
1949-)
Henry, William C., Micropaleontologic Assistant (Resigned
March 31, 1950)







NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Miller, F. DeWitt, Jr., Clerical Aide
Randall, Thomas E., Field Assistant (September 1, 1949-
February 28, 1950)
Withers, Robert B., Assistant in Laboratory (October 1, 1950-)
Yon, James William, Assistant in Laboratory (October 1, 1950-)

WELL SAMPLE LIBRARY
The efforts of the Survey to accumulate cuttings with complete
records of wells through the voluntary cooperation of water well
drillers and contractors continues with gratifying results. The
wells, including both the deep oil tests and water wells, now
number 2,325, and every county in the State is now represented.
With the accumulation of such data the Survey is in a pro-
gressively better position to supply dependable data regarding
the character and thickness 6f the several formations penetrated,
as well as the yield of water and other details. In addition, eleva-
tions are being determined for many of the wells and with such
complete information it is possible to prepare a structural map
of the State. The appreciation of the Survey is herewith expressed
to all the contractors and drillers who have so generously and
willingly supplied data to the Survey.

COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES
United States Geological Survey-Ground Water: Investiga-
tions of the ground-water resources of the State which are made
cooperatively by the Florida Geological Survey and the U. S.
Geological Survey were continued during the 1949-50 biennium
under the immediate supervision of H. H. Cooper, Jr., District
Engineer, Tallahassee, and Nevin D. Hoy, District Geologist,
Miami, who have prepared the following summary of their activ-
ities. The phase of these investigations which is probably of
greatest ultimate value to the State is the program of systemati-
cally observing the fluctuations of water level in selected wells.
Records of water level serve to indicate the extent to which the
ground-water reservoirs are being recharged by rainfall in
areas known as "recharge areas", and the extent to which they
are depleted by heavy pumping, or as in southern Florida, by
the operation of drainage canals. In coastal areas, where ground
water is subject to the encroachment of sea water, records of
water levels are especially valuable because they can often be







NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Miller, F. DeWitt, Jr., Clerical Aide
Randall, Thomas E., Field Assistant (September 1, 1949-
February 28, 1950)
Withers, Robert B., Assistant in Laboratory (October 1, 1950-)
Yon, James William, Assistant in Laboratory (October 1, 1950-)

WELL SAMPLE LIBRARY
The efforts of the Survey to accumulate cuttings with complete
records of wells through the voluntary cooperation of water well
drillers and contractors continues with gratifying results. The
wells, including both the deep oil tests and water wells, now
number 2,325, and every county in the State is now represented.
With the accumulation of such data the Survey is in a pro-
gressively better position to supply dependable data regarding
the character and thickness 6f the several formations penetrated,
as well as the yield of water and other details. In addition, eleva-
tions are being determined for many of the wells and with such
complete information it is possible to prepare a structural map
of the State. The appreciation of the Survey is herewith expressed
to all the contractors and drillers who have so generously and
willingly supplied data to the Survey.

COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES
United States Geological Survey-Ground Water: Investiga-
tions of the ground-water resources of the State which are made
cooperatively by the Florida Geological Survey and the U. S.
Geological Survey were continued during the 1949-50 biennium
under the immediate supervision of H. H. Cooper, Jr., District
Engineer, Tallahassee, and Nevin D. Hoy, District Geologist,
Miami, who have prepared the following summary of their activ-
ities. The phase of these investigations which is probably of
greatest ultimate value to the State is the program of systemati-
cally observing the fluctuations of water level in selected wells.
Records of water level serve to indicate the extent to which the
ground-water reservoirs are being recharged by rainfall in
areas known as "recharge areas", and the extent to which they
are depleted by heavy pumping, or as in southern Florida, by
the operation of drainage canals. In coastal areas, where ground
water is subject to the encroachment of sea water, records of
water levels are especially valuable because they can often be







8 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

used to determine the depth at which a well is likely to draw
salt water. Jn other areas, where the hydraulic head has been
lowered to such an extent that it is no longer sufficient to pre-
vent the movement of salt water into the aquifer, water-level
records can be used to estimate the extent to which salt water
will encroach.
Records of the altitude and fluctuations of the water levels in
wells are obtained by making measurements at regular inter-
vals that range from one a week to one every six weeks, or by
installing automatic water-stage recorders, which give a con-
tinuous record of the changes in the water level. At the end
of 1948, a total of 605 wells were under regular observation. By


Figure 2.
Map showing distribution of the wells equipped with automatic water-
stage recorders. Not shown are the approximately 660 wells on which
periodic water-level measurements are made.








NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


the end of 1950 the total had increased to approximately 775.
The number of these wells that are equipped with automatic
water-stage recorders was increased during the past biennium
from 78 to 114.
Salt-water encroachment-the movement of salt water into an
aquifer-occurs relatively slowly. Water-level measurements and
records of the continuous changes in water level are useful in
determining whether the conditions are such that salt-water
encroachment may continue. However, they do not indicate the
rate at which the salt water encroaches. One method for deter-
mining the rate of movement consists in making analyses of
the salt content of the water samples obtained periodically from
selected wells. In southern Florida, where the problem of salt-
water encroachment is critical in certain areas, water samples
from selected wells have been obtained regularly since about
1939. During the past biennium 4,300 such samples were
analyzed.
Areal investigations of the geology and ground-water re-
sources of various parts of the State were continued during the
past biennium. These investigations are usually restricted to
one or two counties and require several years to complete. The
results of each investigation are published in reports of the
Florida Geological Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey and
in papers in technical journals. The reports provide information
that enables a more profitable utilization of the ground-water
resources.
An intensive investigation of the ground water in Dade and
Broward Counties was begun in 1939, reports giving the results
of different phases of that investigation have been published
from time to time in publications of the Florida Geological Sur-
vey and as articles in technical journals. A comprehensive report
giving the results of the investigation has been prepared for
publication by the U. S. Geological Survey, and a manuscript
copy is on file with the Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee,
which is available for reference.
Investigations of the ground-water resources of Pinellas, Bre-
vard, Lee, and Charlotte Counties were essentially completed
during the past biennium and reports giving the results are to
be published during the next biennium. These investigations
were financed by funds provided by the Florida Geological Sur-








10 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

vey and the U. S. Geological Survey, except where local agen-
cies provided funds for detailed studies that were beyond the
scope of the State-Federal cooperative program. Thus, in con-
nection with the investigations in Pinellas and "Lee Counties
part of the expenses were paid by Pinellas County and the City
of Fort Myers, respectively.
Ground-water investigations begun during the past biennium
by the U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Florida
Geological Survey and various county and municipal agencies,
include investigations in Santa Rosa County, the Kissimmee
River Valley, and the area east and south of Lake Okeechobee,
Sarasota County, Hillsborough County, Manatee County, and
Highlands County.
In 1949 the Santa Rosa Island Authority, an agency of Escam-
bia County, requested the U. S. Geological Survey and the
Florida Geological Survey to evaluate the safe yield of the
ground-water resources of Fair Point Peninsula, which is located
four miles south of Pensacola in Santa Rosa County. An inves-
tigation was made in the summer and fall of 1950 to provide
information essential to the development of a perennial water
supply for Pensacola Beach. This investigation was made possible
through funds provided by the Santa Rosa Authority, the Flor-
ida Geological Survey, and the U. S. Geological Survey.
In connection with the Central and Southern Florida Flood
Control project, the U. S. Geological Survey is making an inves-
tigation of the ground water in the Kissimmee River Valley
and the area east and south of Lake Okeechobe in cooperation
with the Florida Geological Survey and the Central and Southern
Florida Flood Control District.
A report on the ground-water resources of Sarasota County
was published in 1933 by the Florida Geological Survey. In
order to determine whether there has been any significant
change in the artesian head and salt content of the water since
that time, a resurvey of key wells was made in the summer
and fall of 1950. The results of this resurvey indicate that the
artesian head has declined and that the salt content has increased
in some of the wells since 1933.
In recent years an increase in the acreage devoted to truck
crops in the Ruskin area of southern Hillsborough County and







NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


in Manatee County brought about a corresponding increase in
the consumption of water for irrigation. Investigations to deter-
mine whether the lowering of artesian head that has accompa-
nied the increase in withdrawal might be sufficient to cause salt
water encroachment were begun in the two counties during
the fall of 1950. The investigation of Manatee County is being
financed by funds provided by the Florida Geological Survey
and the U. S. Geological Survey, and by the Board of County
Commissioners and the Manatee River Soil Conservation Dis-
trict. The investigation in Hillsborough County is being financed
with funds provided by the Florida Geological Survey, and the
U. S. Geological Survey, and by the Board of County
Commissioners.
The investigation of the geology and ground-water resources of
Highlands County which was begun early in the past biennium
is approximately 75 percent complete. A large part of this inves-
tigation is concerned with the collection of data on the occur-
rence of artesian water in the limestone formations. Because
the limestone formations that yield water to wells in Highlands
County are also important sources of supply in other parts of
the State, the information obtained during the investigation will
be useful in studying the ground water in other areas in which
water is obtained from the limestone formations. This investi-
gation is being made with funds provided by the Florida Geo-
logical Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey.
United States Geological Survey-Surface Water: Investiga-
tions of the surface water resources of Florida, under the super-
vision of A. O. Patterson, District Engineer, Ocala, consisted of
the collecting of water stage data on the elevation of certain
important lakes. Continuing records of the fluctuations in water
level of lakes in various parts of the State are maintained to
aid in the assembling of more complete data for hydrologic
investigations. The value of such data increases with length of
record and the longer the period of continuity, the more accu-
rate the basis becomes for evaluating trends in the water
resources.
Certain specific investigations were undertaken during the
biennium. A staff gauge was installed on Panasoffkee Lake to
ascertain and aid in evaluating an abnormally low stage which
was reported by residents. The depth and the horizontal velocity










12 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


of water in Emerald Spring were determined for an investiga-
tion to utilize the spring for a potential additional water supply
for the City of Orlando. A similar measurement was made at
Green Cove Springs in connection with the possible use of the
spring as a municipal water supply for the City of Green Cove
Springs. Hydrographs were prepared of Lake Apopka and Lake
Dora to aid local authorities in the design and operation of a
control in the Apopka-Beauclair Canal, which control has been
installed and, if properly operated, should improve the water
level in Lake Apopka without detriment to Lake Dora. In re-
sponse to a request of the Lake Soil Conservation District, in-
spection and reconnaissance soundings were made of the fol-
lowing lakes in Lake and Orange counties: Tracy, Norris, Dal-

Y *** W, *Y* A f Nt f


7L16- G. --
/ % ^l *LBI ^^^ J_.-.4fltaE,7

^^i^JL^^ ^- j".u'1?^


E0 R G I A


T.- II .'l U
RRVLR" j i^Tl A- ~~~;~ .'^ z


-17R


vF


A-"'


I I--- l O- u H


A



i..-C o





A. RLA
4 (ISIR

DT1IR ORI






2o- Tj



-.-.


Figure 3.
Map showing locations of the regular gaging stations maintained
during the past two years and the locations of the special work.


MAP OF FLORIDA
S OF SURFACE WATER INVEST
U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
FLORIDA GSOLO OIAL SURVEY
IO .O.. i ,I949 1. O.S..,. 31, 195C


IS A I S -
- -


I I


I _I


vL


i,


Irli D ollsc .lc
1. 1., rr~l.I ., o.l cI.I
- ___ .I1 ... tcl.l *, *x. o1 l

I Iil ~I
10. *l*|ilt> Lit111 err *ill(t


tlCTL INVCtTltTIIOt










L0CA


"T


- IN


I


I I I


I


I


-*Y -~


_L


I Y---- --~___Q(


IY----~--~dl~-~m~T







NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT \


house, Lucy, Cherry, Minneola, Minnehaha, Louisa, Sawgrass,
Aldrich, Johns, Black, Crescent, Mable, Speer, Hancock and
Turkey.
The springs of Florida are among some of its most valuable
water resources which remain largely unused, except for recre-
ational purposes. The water discharging from these springs is
pure and often contains less mineral solids than some of the
deep well water, and such waters are at least a potential source
readily available for use.
United States Bureau of Mines: The agreement with the
Bureau of Mines for cooperation in compiling mineral production
statistics was continued during the biennium. The Bureau of
Mines collects and assembles the major portion of the mineral
production data from the owners or operators of all quarries,
pits and mines. A check list of active producers is maintained
and all companies on the list are requested annually by the
Bureau of Mines to furnish data. If any of the producers are
slow in reporting their activities, the Bureau of Mines furnishes
the Florida Geological Survey with a list of such delinquents
and contacts are made. Through this cooperation duplication of
effort is avoided and uniformity in statistical data is gained.
Water Survey and Research Division: The division of Water
Survey and Research of the State Board of Conservation was
established August 6, 1947, and with this division the Geological
Survey cooperates to avoid duplication of investigations. Since
the Geological Survey had for many years reported upon ground
water and water within surface formations, this phase of the
work has been continued. The Division of Water Survey and
Research has concerned itself primarily with problems of surface
water, drainage, and flood control.
Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station: Cooperation
has been continued with the University of Florida in studying the
properties of the State's mineral resources. At present some
clays are being investigated, particularly for the possibility of
light weight aggregate manufacture and suitability for pottery.
Plans are completed for testing dolomites and other materials
for use in the making of rock wool. And later, a survey of sand
deposits will be undertaken and tests made as to their suitability
for glass manufacture. It is indeed a satisfaction that materials
can be tested within our State and by a State institution. This







14 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

means that we shall in time have much more information about
the potential possibilities of the mineral resources than has
heretofore been available to us.
Florida State Board of Health: Cooperation with the State
Board of Health has been continued on an increased scale and
the Survey has benefited very materially. As a result accurate
records of many municipal wells and of wells drilled for public
supplies, are now obtained. In problems of ground-water con-
tamination this cooperation too, has proved to be mutually
advantageous.
State Chemist: The Act, Chapter 5681, establishing the Geo-
logical Survey was passed by the Legislature of 1907 and Sec-
tion 6 of this Act provides that "All chemical, analytical or
assay work shall be performed by the State Chemist and his
assistants,...". Through the years the State Chemist has always
performed this function and this cooperation has been most
helpful. In many instances chemical analyses are absolutely
essential in determining mineral specimens and evaluating ma-
terials for possible commercial use.
Department of Education and Florida Resource-Use Education
Committee: The Geological Survey receives numerous requests
from elementary and high schools throughout the State for
publications and for exhibits of Florida rocks and minerals.
Through arrangement with school libraries many of the high
schools receive and have on file current bulletins and other
publications of the Survey. The need for an understanding by
all citizens of the basic role that mineral resources and their
proper utilization play in the social and economic well being of
our State and Nation is recognized. Soon after the creation of
the Survey a museum of geology and natural history was estab-
lished, and, since that time, the museum has been maintained as
one of its educational functions. This museum is open daily and
incomplete records show that 4,870 people, including whole
classes of students from grade and high schools located in the
vicinity of Tallahassee, visited the museum during the biennium.
It is the objective of the Florida Geological Survey to arouse,
foster and stimulate interest in Florida's mineral resources,
their use and development. To that end, and, to satisfy the
increasing demand for collections of rocks and minerals received
from schools and other organizations, 1,000 sets of 18 typical







NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


rocks and minerals, together with descriptive literature were
prepared. With the cooperation of the Department of Education
and the Florida Resource-Use Committee approximately 700 sets
of this collection were mailed to schools in Florida during the
period from September, 1949, through December, 1950. The
results of this educational program have been most gratifying
and plans have been formulated to continue and expand this
activity of the Survey.
Other State Departments: Cooperation is maintained also
with the Florida State Road Department, the Florida Forest
Service, the Park Service, the Advertising Commission and the
Improvement Commission. The Governor, during November,
1949, created the Florida Industrial Development Council, com-
posed of nine members from Florida's representative industries.
In addition, the Florida State Chamber of Commerce and the
administrative heads of several official State Agencies were in-
vited to serve as ex-officio members to assist in bringing more
industries to Florida. The Director of the Florida Geological
Survey is an ex-officio member of this Industrial Council and it
has been a pleasure and privilege to serve. Results of this Com-
mission's activities are already felt in the State.

WELL EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT DATA
The Florida Geological Survey has made substantial progress
in its studies of water supplies throughout the State. For years
through the courteous cooperation of many well contractors
and drillers complete data on new wells, including cuttings for
the well sample library, have been submitted to the Geological
Survey for permanent reference. These data have on numerous
occasions proved most helpful in not only giving direct and im-
mediate information on the character, thickness, age and other
details on the sub-surface formations, but they have time and
again proved invaluable in solving difficulties that have devel-
oped in particular wells after the well had been in use for years.
As an additional aid in these water resource studies the Geo-
logical Survey, purchased May, 1949, a Widco electric logging
unit. This equipment is especially designed for the logging of
shallow holes such as water wells, seismograph shot holes and
exploratory core holes. The Survey has already been of very
material assistance to the following Florida cities and official







16 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

agencies in the exploration and development of water supplies
and the condition of wells that were giving trouble: Bonifay,
Holmes County; Blountstown, Calhoun County; Cocoa, U. S.
Army Training Missile Range, Brevard County; Lake City,
Columbia County; Orlando, Orange County; Port St. Joe, Gulf
County; Santa Rosa Island Authority, Fair Point Peninsula, four
miles south of Pensacola, Santa Rosa County; Tallahassee, Leon
County; Wildwood, Sumter County.

OIL PROSPECTING
Oil exploratory drilling in Florida during 1949 kept pace with
that for 1948, although there was a definite curtailment during
the latter part of the year. This slackening of activity was more
pronounced for 1950. During 1949, twenty-four permits to drill
were issued, whereas in 1950, there were only nine. Of the
twenty-four 1949 permits, four wells were brought in as pro-
ducers-all in the Sunniland Field-fifteen proved dry holes and
were abandoned, three wells were drilling on December 31,
1949, and two were locations. One of these locations, in Levy
County, approved August 16, 1949, has as yet not been drilled.
Prospecting during 1950 declined to the lowest level since
1943. Three wells begun late in 1949 were completed early in
1950 and abandoned as dry holes. One well begun in 1945, on
which progress has been intermittent and slow, was active
throughout the year. Only nine permits for the drilling of new
wells were issued in 1950. Of these, eight were completed as
dry holes and abandoned, and one R. E. Skinner's J. A. Boyd,
Block 10, No. 1, Pinellas County, was drilling at the end of the
year. The total activity for 1950 was three completions, the per-
mits for which were issued in 1949, and eight completions, the
permits for which were issued in 1950, and two wells drilling,
one permit in 1945, the other in 1950. Further details are re-
corded in the 1950 Supplement to Information Circular No. 1
(Revised).

PUBLICATIONS

Manuscripts: A bulletin detailing the geology, structure, strati-
graphy and mineral resources of Levy and Citrus Counties has
been in preparation for some time by Dr. R. O. Vernon. With the
progress of the study has come the necessity of broadening the







16 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

agencies in the exploration and development of water supplies
and the condition of wells that were giving trouble: Bonifay,
Holmes County; Blountstown, Calhoun County; Cocoa, U. S.
Army Training Missile Range, Brevard County; Lake City,
Columbia County; Orlando, Orange County; Port St. Joe, Gulf
County; Santa Rosa Island Authority, Fair Point Peninsula, four
miles south of Pensacola, Santa Rosa County; Tallahassee, Leon
County; Wildwood, Sumter County.

OIL PROSPECTING
Oil exploratory drilling in Florida during 1949 kept pace with
that for 1948, although there was a definite curtailment during
the latter part of the year. This slackening of activity was more
pronounced for 1950. During 1949, twenty-four permits to drill
were issued, whereas in 1950, there were only nine. Of the
twenty-four 1949 permits, four wells were brought in as pro-
ducers-all in the Sunniland Field-fifteen proved dry holes and
were abandoned, three wells were drilling on December 31,
1949, and two were locations. One of these locations, in Levy
County, approved August 16, 1949, has as yet not been drilled.
Prospecting during 1950 declined to the lowest level since
1943. Three wells begun late in 1949 were completed early in
1950 and abandoned as dry holes. One well begun in 1945, on
which progress has been intermittent and slow, was active
throughout the year. Only nine permits for the drilling of new
wells were issued in 1950. Of these, eight were completed as
dry holes and abandoned, and one R. E. Skinner's J. A. Boyd,
Block 10, No. 1, Pinellas County, was drilling at the end of the
year. The total activity for 1950 was three completions, the per-
mits for which were issued in 1949, and eight completions, the
permits for which were issued in 1950, and two wells drilling,
one permit in 1945, the other in 1950. Further details are re-
corded in the 1950 Supplement to Information Circular No. 1
(Revised).

PUBLICATIONS

Manuscripts: A bulletin detailing the geology, structure, strati-
graphy and mineral resources of Levy and Citrus Counties has
been in preparation for some time by Dr. R. O. Vernon. With the
progress of the study has come the necessity of broadening the








NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


area to be considered in order to more satisfactorily solve and
interpret some of the problems involved. This has delayed the
completion of the report, but it is certain that it has added to the
completeness. The report is in manuscript form and the several
cross-sections, graphs, maps and illustrations have been com-
pleted. Very shortly bids will be asked for printing.
Also in manuscript form is a report on the geology and min-
eral resources of Jackson County, by Dr. Wayne E. Morse. This
will soon go to press and appear as one of the Survey bulletins.
A revision of a report on the Mineral Resources and Indus-
tries of Florida is in progress by Dr. James L. Calver. It is
planned to have this in readiness for printing and distribution
before the expiration of the current fiscal year.
Several short papers have been prepared dealing with various
subjects, such as the Kissengen Spring, Polk County, the sub-
marine spring off the coast, near St. Augustine, and subjects of
equal interest. It is planned to include these in one bulletin
under a new series of miscellaneous papers.
Published Reports: During the biennium the following publica-
tions have been prepared by members of the Department, and by
members of the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Bureau of
Mines in cooperation with the Florida Survey:
Eighth Biennial Report, calendar years 1947-1948, including min-
eral production statistics for 1946-1947, 1949, 30 pp.

Mimeographed Reports
Information Circular No. 2, Florida Kaolins and Clays, 1949,
59 pp., 2 figs. $ .50
1949 Supplement to Information Circular No. 1-Revised, Ex-
ploration for Oil and Gas in Florida, 1950, 39 pp., frontis-
piece, 1 fig., 2 tables. $ .50
Information Circular No. 3, Ground Water in Florida, 1950, 6 pp.,
frontispiece, 4 figs. $ .25
Report of Investigations 4515, U. S. Bureau of Mines, September
1941, Titanium Minerals in Central and Northeastern Flor-
ida, 1949, 62 pp., 26 figs.

Special Publications
A collection of some Florida Rocks and Minerals, 1949, 8 pp.,
18 specimens. $ .50. Primarily for the schools of Florida








18 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

MINE VALUE

FLORIDA MINERAL PRODUCTS


5$ 54,998,000
55


50

$ 45,992,000
45


40


35

$ 31,093.000
30

0i $ 25,070,000


ALL OTHERS


SAND a GRAVEL

LIMESTONE

PHOSPHATE


Figure 4-Graph of Total Value of Mineral Production of Florida for
the Period 1938 to 1949 Inclusive.


10Z


$ 20.304,000








NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


FLORIDA MINERAL INDUSTRY DURING
1948 AND 1949
Statistics Collected in Cooperation with the United States Bureau
of Mines
During the past few years the mineral industry of Florida has
undergone a tremendous expansion. For the year 1940 the total
value of Florida's mineral production as reported to the U. S.
Bureau of Mines amounted to $14,854,000 and the State ranked
thirty-fifth among the states in the value of minerals produced.
By 1948, the last year for which complete data are available,
the total value had increased to $53,654,000 and Florida's rank
among the states in value of mineral products had increased to
twenty-eight. For comparison with the rank of other states
in the southeastern United States for the year 1948, North Caro-
lina ranked thirty-sixth; South Carolina, forty-second; Georgia,
thirty-third; Tennessee, twenty-sixth; and Alabama, fifteenth.
The growth of the mineral industry is shown graphically in
Figure 4 which illustrates the value of Florida mineral products
during the 12-year period of 1938-1949 inclusive. Florida led
all states in the quantity of peat, phosphate rock, rutile, and zir-
con produced in 1948; placed second in ilmenite production and
third in fuller's earth. The principal mineral products of Florida
listed in order of their value are: phosphate rock, limestone,
cement, sand and gravel. Complete statistical data for the year
1949 are not yet available, nevertheless the portion of the 1949
data that have been released by the U. S. Bureau of Mines shows
the total value of Florida's mineral products, as reported by the
producers, to be $54,998,000. This is an increase of $1,344,000
over the previous year. The quantity and value of rock and
mineral products for the years 1948 and 1949 are shown in the
tables on pages 24 to 27.
Early in 1949 the Humphreys Gold Corporation began opera-
tion of the E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company's mine and
mineral separation plant to recover titanium minerals and zircon
from a sand deposit located about six miles east of Starke. The
site is a part of Camp Blanding on land leased by the du Pont
Company from the Florida State Armory Board in December,
1947. The mine and plant capacity is designed for an output of
100,000 tons of ilmenite a year from sands analyzing about 4 to
4.5 percent heavy mineral of which less than half is composed of








20 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

titanium minerals. For every ton of ilmenite recovered it is
necessary to mine 50 tons of sand. This million dollar enterprise
employing approximately 200 men was established on an ore
deposit originally outlined by the Florida Geological Survey and
proved commercial during a cooperative study completed April,
1947, with the U. S. Bureau of Mines.


PRODUCERS REPORTING PRODUCTION IN
1948 AND 1949
Product Company Location
CALCAREOUS MARL
Maule Industries, Inc ......................... Miami Beach
CEMENT
Florida Portland Cement Division,
General Portland Cement Company .................. Tampa
CLAY
Used by Producer:
Florida Portland Cement Division .................... Tampa
Taylor Brick & Tile Company .................... Pensacola
Non-Commercial:
Florida State Hospital ....................... Chattahoochee
FLINT ROCK
Crushed:
Coy Thomas Industries ........................ Gainesville
FULLER'S EARTH
The Floridin Company, Inc. ........................ Quincy
ILMENITE, RUTILE AND ZIRCON
E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company ................ Starke
Florida Ore Processing Company ................. Melbourne
Rutile Mining Company of Florida .............. Jacksonville
KAOLIN
Edgar Plastic Kaolin Company ....................... Edgar
United Clay Mines, Inc. ........................ Hawthorn
LIME
City of Miami Department of Water and Sewers ....... Miami
Dixie Lime Products Company ........................ Ocala
LIMESTONE
Concrete, Road Metal and Screenings:
Camp Concrete Rock Company ....................... Ocala
Central Quarries Company, Inc. ................... Lakeland
C. M eekins ............................... ...... Hollywood
Crystal River Rock Company ...................... Leesburg
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing
Company ......................... Ocala and Jacksonville
rnixie Lime Products Company ........................ Ocala
Florida Lime Products Company ....................... Ocala
Levy County Lime Rock Corporation ............... Williston
Maule Industries, Inc. ....................... Miami Beach
Miami Crushed Stone Company .................... Miami









NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Miami Lime and Chemical Company, Inc ............. Miami
Mills Rock Company of Miami, Inc ................. Miami
Naranja Rock Company, Inc ............. Naranja and Miami
Newberry Corporation .......................... Jacksonville
Oolite Rock Company ............................. Miami
Ralph Fuzzard ....................... ............. M iam i
S. P. Snyder and Son, Inc .................. Fort Lauderdale
Troup Quarries, Inc ............................... Miami
Williston Shell Rock Company ........................ Ocala
Wm. P. MacDonald Corporation ................. Auburndale
Railroad Ballast and Aggregate:
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Co... Ocala and Jacksonville
Miami Crushed Stone Company ..................... Miami
Murphy and Mills Corporation ....................... Miami
Naranja Rock Company, Inc ............ Naranja and Miami
Agricultural:
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Co... Ocala and Jacksonville
Dixie Lime Products Company ........................ Ocala
Florida Dolomite Company ....................... Pembroke
Florida Lime Products Company ...................... Ocala
Other Limestone Uses:
C. Meekins .................................... Hollywood
Connell and Schultz ............................ Inverness
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Co... Ocala and Jacksonville
Ocala Lime Rock Corporation ......................
T. J. James Construction Company, Inc. .............. Miami
Thompson-Williston Mine ...................... Jacksonville
United Lime Rock Corporation .................. Jacksonville
Non-Commercial:
Broward County Highway Department ....... Fort Lauderdale
Dade County Highway Department .................. Miami
Marion County Highway Department ................. Ocala
Martin County Highway Department ................ Stewart
Palm Beach County Highway Department .. West Palm Beach
PEAT
Deatwyler Nurseries ............................... Orlando
Florahome Peat Humus Company ................... Palatka
Florida Nursery Landscape Company ............... Leesburg
Glen St. Mary Nurseries Company ............. Glen St. Mary
Southern States Nursery ......................... Macclenny
West Florida Humus Company ................. Panama City
PETROLEUM
Humble Oil and Refining Company ............... Sunniland
PHOSPHATE
Hard Rock:
C. & J. Camp, Inc. .................................. Ocala
J. Buttgenbach and Company ..................... Lakeland
Kibler-Camp Phosphate Enterprise ................... Ocala
Soft:
Colloidal Phosphate Sales Company ............... Dunnellon
Kellogg Company ................................... Ocala
Lakeland Phosphate and Fertilizer Company ......... Bartow
Loncala Phosphate Company .................. High Springs
Seaboard Phosphate Company ................... Dunnellon
Soil Builders, Inc. .................. ............. Dunnellon
Superior Phosphate Company .................... Dunnellon








22 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Land Pebble:
American Agricultural Chemical Corporation .......... Pierce
American Cyanamid Company ..................... Brewster
Coronet Phosphate Company ..................... Plant City
International Minerals and Chemical Company ..... Mulberry
Pembroke Chemical Corporation .................. Pembroke
Swift and Company Fertilizer Works ................ Bartow
The Davison Chemical Company .................... Bartow
The Phosphate Mining Company Division,
Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation ............. Nichols
SAND AND GRAVEL
Structural Sand:
Alfred Destin Company ........................ Miami Beach
Brewton Engineering Company ................ Panama City
Campbell and Johnson .................. Flomaton, Alabama
Central Sand Company ........................... Tavares
Coleman and Maige ........................... Tallahassee
Diamond Inteilachen Corporation ............... Jacksonville
Florida Gravel Company .................... Chattahoochee
Hauser Concrete Company .......................... Deland
Howard Backus .................................. Miami
Keuka Sand Company ........................... Keuka
Lake Wales Concrete Sand Company ............. Lake Wales
Lake Wales Independent Sand Company ......... Lake Wales
Largo Washed Sand Company ............................. Largo
Maule Industries .................................. Miami
Middle Florida Sand Company ............... Chattahoochee
United Clay Mines Corporation ................... Hawthorn
Ward Gravel Company ......................... Pensacola
Paving Sand:
Brewton Engineering Company ............... Panama City
Coleman and Maige ................ .......... Tallahassee
Diamond Interlachen Corporation ............... Jacksonville
Florida Gravel Company .................... Chattahoochee
Keuka Sand Company .............................. Keuka
Lake Wales Concrete Sand Company ............. Lake Wales
Ward Gravel Company ......................... Pensacola
Other Sand Uses:
Brewton Engineering Company ................ Panama City
Diamond Interlachen Corporation ............... Jacksonville
Florida Gravel Company .................... Chattahoochee
Lake Wales Independent Sand Company ......... Lake Wales
Non-Commercial Sand:
Highlands County Highway Department ............. Sebring
Stii~tural Gravel:
Campbell and Johnson .................. Flomaton, Alabama
Male Industries ..................................... Miami
Paving Gravel:
Florida Gravel Company .................... Chattahoochee
Ward Gravel Company .......................... Pensacola
















Mineral Production Statistics










24 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

MINERAL PRODUCTS

PRODUCT
CLAY, used in cement (not included in Total Value) ......
NATURAL GAS .....................................
PEAT .. .............................................
PETROLEUM .......................................
PHOSPHATE
Land
Uses: pebble
Superphosphates ............................ 5,117,520
Phosphorus and phosphate chemicals ........ 316,658
Direct application to the soil ................. 467,231
Stock and poultry feed ...................... 21,973
Fertilizer filler ........... ........... ... 14,789
Other purposes ............................. 99
Exports ................................... 483,455

Total in long tons ........................... 6,421,725
Value at mine .............................. $37,070,381
SAND AND GRAVEL
Uses:
Structural ... ......................................
Paving--commercial ................................
non-comm ercial ............................
Blast sand & engine sand ..............................
R railroad ballast .....................................

Total in short tons ..................................
V alue at m ine .....................................
STONE
Uses:
Concrete, road metal and screenings ....................
Agricultural .......................................
Road base .........................................
Riprap, railroad ballast and others .....................
Total in short tons ..................................
Value at quarries .....................................
MISCELLANEOUS* ............................... ...

TOTAL VALUE OF MINERAL PRODUCTS .............
Miscellaneous includes value of cement, clay products, kaolin, fuller's
earth, petroleum, lime, flint, dimensional stone, ilmenite, rutile, and
zircon.
Data from U. S. Bureau of Mines.









NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT

STATE OF FLORIDA

QUANTITY VALUE
... Short tons ................. 49,386 $ 37,040
.....M Cubic feet ................ 27,000 1,000
... Short tons .................. 24,750 56,171
... Barrels ..................... 290,000 *


Long tons
Phosphatic
clay


46,264
18,537
4,534



69,335
$ 293,927
Short tons
Sand
1,185,399
98,266
136,350
7,330


1,427,345
$1,189,734


Hard
rock


-



48,198

48,198
$ 368,586


Gravel
541,506
22,000


321,280

884,786
$1,242,841


6,539,258


2,312,131


$37,732,894


$ 2,432,575


Short tons
Crushed limestone
3,754,130
99,300
259,411
42,079
................................. 4,154,920
............................................. $ 5,115,974
............................................. $ 8,315,229

...... ........ ......................... .. $53,654,000








26 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

MINERAL PRODUCTS

PRODUCT
CLAYS, sold or used* ...................................
Clay, used in cement (not included in Total Value) ........
NATURAL GAS .....................................
PEAT ..................................................
PETROLEUM. .......................................
PHOSPHATE ROCK
Land
Uses: pebble
Superphosphates ............................ 4,961,915
Phosphorus and phosphate chemicals ......... 342,282
Direct application to the soil ................. 474,528
Stock and poultry feed ...................... 28,400
Fertilizer filler .............................. 5,266
Exports .................................... 902,706

Total in long tons ........................... 6,715,097
Value at mine ........................... $37,339,985
SAND AND GRAVEL
Uses:
Structural ............................................
Paving- commercial ...............................
non-comm ercial ............................
Blast sand, railroad ballast, filter sand and other ........

Total in short tons ..................................
Value at m ine ........................................
STONE
Uses:
Concrete, road metal and screenings .................
Railroad ballast .......................................
Road base ........................................
Riprap, agricultural and other ........................
Total in short tons ....................................
Value at quarries ......... .........................
MISCELLANEOUS* ................................

TOTAL VALUE OF MINERAL PRODUCTS ..............
SIncludes clay used in brick manufacture, kaolin, and fuller's earth.
** Miscellaneous includes value of calcareous marl, cement, petroleum,
lime, flint, dimensional stone, ilmenlte, rutile and zircon.
Data from U. S. Bureau of Mines.









NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


STATE OF FLORIDA

QUANTITY VALUE
.....Short tons .................. 95,516 $ 1,446,544
.....Short tons ................. 80,078 40,039
.....M cubic feet ................ 40,000 2,000
.....Short tons .................. 11,800 69,000
.....Barrels ..................... 441,000 **
Long tons
Phosphatic Hard
clay rock
3,145
47,782
28,303
1,003
20,659

77,088 23,804 6,815,989
$ 344,787 $ 173,211 $37,857,983
Short tons
Sand Gravel
1,165,458 620,000
156,079 90,967
141,850
69,544
1,532,931 710,967 2,243,898
$1,190,753 $ 688,980 $ 1,879,733
Short tons
Crushed limestone
3,067,440
407,300
584,390
155,960
.................................. 4,215,090
............................................. $ 4,748,253
............................................. $ 8,994,380

........................ .................... $54,998,000








28 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

APPROPRIATIONS
July 1, 1949- June 30, 1951

Current:

The appropriation under which the Florida Survey is cur-
rently operating for the biennium July 1, 1949, to June 30, 1951,
follows:


July 1, 1949 to
June 30, 1950
Salaries .....$ 65,500.00
Expenses .... 72,000.00

TOTAL ......$137,500.00


July 1, 1950 to
June 30, 1951
$ 65,500.00
72,000.00

$137,500.00


Held in reserve the first year was $8,037.50 for salaries and
$10,868.75 for expenses. Held in reserve the second year was
$3,275.00 for salaries and $3,600.00 for expenses to December
31, 1950.

Requested:
For the biennium beginning July 1, 1951 and ending June 30,
1953, the following Budget has been requested:


July 1, 1951 to
June 30, 1952
Salaries .....$ 68,900.00
Expenses .... 83,550.00

TOTAL ......$152,450.00


July 1, 1952 to
June 30, 1953
$ 68,900.00
83,550.00

$152,450.00









NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


FINANCIAL STATEMENT
1949
January 1 to December 31

Funds Released:
Salaries:
Balance January 1, 1949 ....... $30,925.12
General Revenue July 1, 1949..$16,375.00
Less Reserve ................ 3,125.00 13,250.00

General Revenue October 1, 1949 16,375.00
Less Reserve ................ 1,637.50 14,737.50

Total Funds Released for
Salaries for Year ......... $ 58,912.62

Expenses:
Balance January 1, 1949........ 23,712.65
General Revenue, July 1, 1949... 18,000.00
Less Reserve ................ 5,468.75 12,531.25

General Revenue October 1, 1949 18,000.00
Less Reserve ............... 1,800.00 16,200.00

Publications Sold .............. 441.80

Total Funds Released for
Expenses for Year ........ 52,885.70

Total Funds Released for
Salaries and Expenses for
Year ...................... .. $111,798.32







30 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

FINANCIAL STATEMENT
1949
January 1 to December 31
Disbursements:
Salaries ................. .............. $ 48,167.42
Expenses:
Repairs to Equipment ........$ 143.23
Printing and Binding ........ 1,020.82
Photographing and Blue Printing 45.00
Heat, Gas, Light, Power,
Water and Sewage ....... 288.23
Telephone, Telegraph and
Messenger Charges ....... 809.18
Freight, Express and Cartage.. 69.13
Travel Employees ......... 3,250.24
Information and Credit
Services .................... 25.00
Other Contractual Services:
U.S.G.S. Cooperative-
Ground Water ............. 14,038.51
U.S.G.S. Cooperative-
Surface Water .......... 2,320.41
U.S.G.S. Cooperative-
Quality Water ............. 500.00
Cooperative Research-
Other ........................ 1,451.74
Parts and Fittings .......... 78.11
Stationery and Office Supplies 11,171.86
Chemicals and Laboratory
Supplies .......... ........... 389.12
Gasoline, Oil and Lubricants.. 1,669.84
Hand Tools and Minor Equip-
ment ..... .................... 22.63
Cleaning and Laundry Supplies 12.50
Insurance-
Buildings and Equipment... 36.65
Insurance-
Liability & W'kmen's Comp. 111.20
Registrations, Dues, Fees,
Commissions, etc. ........... 9.00
Office Furniture and Equip-
ment ........... .............. 206.40
Automotive Equipment ...... 7.77
Books ............................ 507.38
Miscellaneous Expenses ...... 93.73

Total Expenses ........... $38,277.68

Total Disbursements ..... $ 86,445.10
Balances:
Salary Fund June 30, 1949.... 6,168.44
Salary Fund December 31, 1949 4,576.76

Total Salary Fund Balances 10,745.20
Expense Fund June 30, 1949.. 304.99
Expense Fund Dec. 31, 1949.. 14,303.03

Total Expense Fund Balances 14,608.02

Total Balances ............ $ 25,353.22
Total Disbursements and
Balances ................. $111,798.32








NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


FINANCIAL STATEMENT
1950
January 1 to December 31
Funds Released:
Salaries:
Balance January 1, 1950..... .... $ 4,576.76
General Revenue Jan. 1, 1950..$16,375.00
Less Reserve .............. 1,637.50 14,737.50

General Revenue April 1, 1950. 16,375.00
Less Reserve ................. 1,637.50 14,737.50

General Revenue July 1, 1950.. 16,375.00
Less Reserve ............ 1,637.50 14,737.50

General Revenue Oct. 1, 1950. 16,375.00
Less Reserve .............. 1,637.50 14,737.50

Total Funds Released for
Salaries for Year ....... $ 63,526.76

Expenses:
Balance January 1, 1950...... 14,303.03
General Revenue Jan. 1, 1950. 18,000.00
Less Reserve .............. 1,800.00 16,200.00

General Revenue April 1, 1950. 18,000.00
Less Reserve ............... 1,800.00 16,200.00

General Revenue July 1, 1950. 18,000.00
Less Reserve ...................... 1,800.00 16,200.00

General Revenue Oct. 1, 1950. 18,000.00
Less Reserve .............. 1,800.00 16,200.00
Publications Sold ................ 317.77

Total Funds Released for
Expenses for year ......... 79,420.80
Total Funds Released for
Salaries and Expenses for
Year .......................... $142,947.56





32 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


FINANCIAL STATEMENT
January 1 to December 31
1950


Disbursements:
Salaries .................... .
Expenses:
Repairs to Equipment ............$
Repairs to Buildings .........
Printing and Binding ........
Photographing and Blue
Printing ....... ............
Heat, Gas, Light, Power, Water
and Sewage .............
Postage ........ ... ....... .....
Telephone, Telegraph, and
Messenger Charges .........
Freight, Express and Cartage.
Travel Employees .........
Storage ........... ...........
Information and Credit Serv-
ices .... ..... ............
Other Contractual Services:
U.S.G.S. Cooperative-
Ground Water............ 2
U.S.G.S. Cooperative-
Surface Water ............
U.S.G.S. Cooperative-
Quality Water .............
Cooperative Research-
Other .....................
Parts and Fittings ..........
Other Building Materials.....
Other Materials ...........
Stationery and Office Sup-
plies .... ........- ........ ....
Chemicals and Laboratory
Supplies .................
Gasoline, Oil, and Lubricants.
Hand Tools and Minor Equip-
ment ................ ....
Cleaning and Laundry Supplies
Rental of Buildings, Offices and
Land ...... ...............
Rental of Equipment .......
Insurance-
Liability, Workmen's Com-
pensation .................
Registrations, Dues, Fees, Com-
missions, etc .................
Office Furniture and Equip-
ment ...... ............
Engineering and Scientific
Equipment ....................
Automotive Equipment ..... ....
Books ...... ............

Total Expenses .............

Total Disbursements .......
Balances:
Salary Fund Dec. 31, 1950....
Expense Fund Dec. 31, 1950...

Total Disbursements and
Balances ................ .


581.56
9.00
722.27

67.79

135.50
165.91

148.18
152.84
3,235.79
3.25

53.00


2,743.69

3,015.04

500.00

1,922.54
226.59
2.05
5.18

580.57

517.35
1,046.74

84.45
42.11

6,090.97
2.00


476.40

6.25

582.24

1,151.38
1,096.48
311.75


45,678.87


$ 99,942.91

9,262.72
33,741.93


$142,947.56


$54,264.04