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Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000223/00006
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report of the Florida Geological Survey
Physical Description: 11 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1940-1961
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Geology -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation, Florida Geological Survey
Dates or Sequential Designation: 4th (1940)-14th (1959-1960).
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000376187
oclc - 01956611
notis - ACB5800
lccn - sn 87028635
System ID: UF00000223:00006
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Introduction
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Staff, 1947-1948
        Page 8
    Activities of the geological survey
        Page 8
    Investigations completed and in progress
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Publications
        Page 11
    Publications in preparation
        Page 12
    Cooperation with other agencies
        Page 12
    Current appropriation: July 1 to June 30, 1949
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Budget requested
        Page 20
    Oil prospecting
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Data on producing wells of the Humble Oil & Refining Company in the Sunniland Field, Collier County
        Page 23
    Florida mineral industry during 1946 and 1947
        Page 24
    Producers reporting production in 1946 and 1947
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Summary of mineral production in 1946 and 1947
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Financial statement: January 1 to December 31, 1947 and January 1 to December 31, 1948
        Page 29
        Page 30
Full Text





State of Florida
Florida State Board of Conservation
GEORGE VATHIS, Supervisor


EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT
of the

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Covering Period
January 1, 1947 through December 31, 1948



HERMAN GUNTER
Director and State Geologist



TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
1949





















Published March 31, 1949


64771


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THE E. 0. PAINTER PRINTING CO., DELAND, FLA.-13455









LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Tallahassee, Florida
March 1, 1949

Mr. George Vathis, Supervisor
Florida State Board of Conservation
Tallahassee, Florida
Sir:
Transmitted herewith is the biennial report of the Florida
Geological Survey, a Division of the Florida State Board of
Conservation. This is the biennial report of the Survey since
it became a part of the Department of Conservation by Legis-
lative Act in 1933. You will find in this report a brief review
of the activities during the period covered, a statement of the
proposed program for the immediate future, summaries of
the mineral production for 1946-1947 and the financial state-
ment. The report covers the calendar years 1947-1948. The
progress of the Survey has been satisfactory on the whole but
we have been handicapped by our inability to secure trained
personnel largely because of economic conditions with which
the Survey was not prepared to cope. Should the budget for
the incoming biennium as approved by the Budget Commission
be approved and made available by the Legislature of 1949 the
Survey will find itself in much better position for adding to its
staff.
Let me add my expression of appreciation of the interest
you have shown in the work of this Division and the support
you have already given it.
Respectfully submitted,
HERMAN GUNTER, Director



771
64771









Eighth Biennial Report

of the

Florida Geological Survey


INTRODUCTION
SURVEY QUARTERS
During the biennium 1947-1948 the State made much
progress in providing more space for a number of its large,
crowded and fast growing departments. The Capitol Center
Program under consideration for some years was brought
closer to realization by the adoption of an official long-ranged
plan and the construction of the first three buildings-Cald-
well Building caring for the Industrial Commission; the Hol-
land Building providing much needed accommodations for the
State Road Department, and the Supreme Court Building, the
imposing, dignified gem of the three, in which the Supreme
Court of Florida will deliberate. The space vacated by each
of these State departments will be taken over by other official
agencies that have long been over-crowded. Although this
will provide at least immediate relief for certain departments
others will remain in as crowded quarters as ever. Among
those unaffected so far is the Florida Geological Survey al-
though the ultimate plan includes a building which will care
for the Geological Survey and related natural resource de-
partments. In the meantime, however, the Florida State Uni-
versity is continuing to provide convenient office accommoda-
tions on the University Campus in the East Lower Dining
Hall where the Survey has been located since December, 1939.
The Survey itself, however, is growing rot only in personnel
but also in expanded activities and acquisitions. This is es-
pecially noticeable in the significant additions to the already
imposing file of well samples, see figure 1. It has therefore
been necessary to remove this file of samples from almost
2,000 wells along with some other collections, to a storage
space made available through the completion of a quonset hut
on University property adjacent to the campus. Even with
this relief the Survey needs additional room. The Florida







6 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Geological Survey is not an official part of the University and
is housed on the campus only through the courtesy of the
Board of Control and the officials of the University. With the
phenominally rapid growth and expansion of the University
the Survey is fortunate to occupy its present quarters. It is
hoped that the Survey can continue to contribute to the Uni-
versity program by expanding its museum and research fa-
cilities. This would require adequate housing and in our
Seventh Biennial Report, page 6-7, general data on the nature
of the building needed by the Survey, are given.







EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-ADMINISTRATIVE



WELL SAMPLE LIBRARY


Number of Wells Acquired Annually


Total
Accumulated
Wells
Number Year
1856 --1948


1642


1446







973
886
819

708
624
578

462
392


oi 0 Gp Il t iGn to oI- co
Figure -Graph Illustrating Growth of ell Sample Library.
Figure 1-Graph Illustrating Growth of Well Sample Library.


1947


1946







1945
1944
1943

1942
1941
1940

1939
1938






1908







8 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

STAFF 1947-1948
FULL TIME STAFF:
Herman Gunter, D.Sc(Hon.), Director
Robert O. Vernon, Ph.D., Geologist
James L. Calver, Ph.D., Geologist
Hans G. Naegeli, Ph.D., Paleontologist
J. Clarence Simpson, Supervisor of Laboratory.
Harold T. Chittum, Jr., Assistant Geologist (Employed Nov. 1, 1948)
Corinne Little, Secretary
Mary W. Blount, Secretary
Jean Neel, Secretary
Lily Moore, Librarian
John McBride, Janitor
RESEARCH CONSULTANTS:
W. Storrs Cole, Ph.D., Micropaleontologist, Special Research
Alfred G. Fischer, Geologist, Special research in geology and inverte-
brate paleontology
Wayne E. Moore, Geologist, Research-Geology of Jackson County
Thomas Lins and L. Neal FitzSimons, Assistants to Moore in Jack-
son County Research
PART TIME STAFF:
Edwin Andrews, Draftsman's Assistant
William C. Henry, Preparator in Micropaleontology
Bernard Eaton, Assistant in Laboratory
Robert Hart, Assistant in Laboratory
Walton Jones, Assistant in Laboratory
DeWitt F. Miller, Jr., Assistant in Laboratory
Jack Wells, Assistant in Laboratory


ACTIVITIES OF THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

January 1. 1947-December 31, 1948

The biennium here considered has been one of constant
activity. There is a growing interest in the industrial possi-
bilities of Florida and the Survey is endeavoring in every
possible way to make known the potentialities of our mineral
resources. There seems to be a general consideration of re-
location and decentralization of industry from the highly in-
dustrialized centers to those areas offering inducements of
underdeveloped natural resources and related advantages of







8 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

STAFF 1947-1948
FULL TIME STAFF:
Herman Gunter, D.Sc(Hon.), Director
Robert O. Vernon, Ph.D., Geologist
James L. Calver, Ph.D., Geologist
Hans G. Naegeli, Ph.D., Paleontologist
J. Clarence Simpson, Supervisor of Laboratory.
Harold T. Chittum, Jr., Assistant Geologist (Employed Nov. 1, 1948)
Corinne Little, Secretary
Mary W. Blount, Secretary
Jean Neel, Secretary
Lily Moore, Librarian
John McBride, Janitor
RESEARCH CONSULTANTS:
W. Storrs Cole, Ph.D., Micropaleontologist, Special Research
Alfred G. Fischer, Geologist, Special research in geology and inverte-
brate paleontology
Wayne E. Moore, Geologist, Research-Geology of Jackson County
Thomas Lins and L. Neal FitzSimons, Assistants to Moore in Jack-
son County Research
PART TIME STAFF:
Edwin Andrews, Draftsman's Assistant
William C. Henry, Preparator in Micropaleontology
Bernard Eaton, Assistant in Laboratory
Robert Hart, Assistant in Laboratory
Walton Jones, Assistant in Laboratory
DeWitt F. Miller, Jr., Assistant in Laboratory
Jack Wells, Assistant in Laboratory


ACTIVITIES OF THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

January 1. 1947-December 31, 1948

The biennium here considered has been one of constant
activity. There is a growing interest in the industrial possi-
bilities of Florida and the Survey is endeavoring in every
possible way to make known the potentialities of our mineral
resources. There seems to be a general consideration of re-
location and decentralization of industry from the highly in-
dustrialized centers to those areas offering inducements of
underdeveloped natural resources and related advantages of







EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-ADMINISTRATIVE


climate, labor and transportation. This is judged from the
number of inquiries for information on Florida's mineral raw
materials, to such inquiries the Survey gives prompt and full
reply by letter, often supplemented by printed reports. Per-
sonal calls, too, are made and these take considerable atten-
tion and time of the Survey staff. Requests for examination
of mineral specimens sent in by citizens of the State receive
merited consideration and often the results of such tests
suggest that it is advisable to have the properties from which
the samples came further examined. In the progress of its
routine field work members of the Survey staff examine such
deposits and recommend either further prospecting or other-
wise advise the land owner on its possibilities of economic de-
velopment. This service of the Survey has proved advantage-
ous to the citizens.
The increased growth of the cities and towns and the de-
velopment of the rural areas has created a tremendous de-
mand for data on ground water. With the well organized and
increasing file of information obtained through samples from
wells in many portions of Florida, the Survey is finding itself
in a constantly better position to give helpful and dependable
service about this important resource.


INVESTIGATIONS COMPLETED AND IN PROGRESS
COUNTY REPORTS
In 1942 the Survey published Bulletin No. 21 dealing with
a detailed geological and structural study of Washington and
Holmes counties. It has proved to be a very acceptable and
satisfactory form of report and it has been decided to continue
the county series of bulletins.
Levy and Citrus Counties: The field work for a report on
these two counties has been completed by Dr. R. O. Vernon
and the manuscript and accompanying maps are in prepara-
tion. It is expected that the report will be ready for printing
during the summer of 1949.
As an indication of the completeness and thoroughness of
this report there will be included a number of special papers
dealing with particular phases of the geology and paleontology








10 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

of the area. Among these is a paper on the Ostracoda by Dr.
Henry V. Howe, Dean, Arts and Sciences, Louisiana State
University, Baton Rouge, and Mr. Alfred G. Fischer, now with
the Kansas Geological Survey, will contribute two papers
"The Echinoid Fauna of the Eocene Withlacoochee Limestone"
and the "Petrology of the Eocene Limestones in and around
the Citrus-Levy County Area, Florida."

Jackson County: There is in preparation a report on the
geology and mineral resources of Jackson County. The major
portion of the field work has been completed by Wayne E.
Moore, a graduate student of Cornell University. The manu-
script is in preparation and this together with the accompany-
ing maps should be completed this summer.

Dr. James L. Calver has completed very satisfactorily the
cumbersome task of abstracting factual data from two un-
published manuscripts which the Survey has had in file for
some time. One of these deals with Florida Kaolins and was
written by Frank Westendick; the other with Clays of North-
ern Florida was prepared by Dr. James H. C. Martens. Both
Mr. Westendick and Dr. Martens are former employees of the
Survey and these data were prepared while they were so em-
ployed some years ago. Mr. Westendick prepared his manu-
script while employed by the U. S. Bureau of Mines in a co-
operative agreement with the Florida Survey. The abstracted
factual data from these two manuscripts are being mimeo-
graphed and published as Information Circular No. 2. These
data should benefit all who may be interested in the locations
and characteristics of the high-grade, white-firing kaolins of
Florida and the common clays of northern Florida.

Progress is likewise being made on a report dealing with
the Mineral Resources of Florida which Dr. Calver will com-
plete in the near future. There is an ever increasing demand
for information about the mineral resources of Florida both
the developed and the potential and this report will fill the re-
quests for this character of information.

With the continually increasing number of samples that
the Survey receives from wells drilled in Florida we are ex-
periencing difficulty in keeping current with their study. It is








EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-ADMINISTRATIVE


hoped, however, that Dr. H. G. Naegeli can prepare some of
the results of his studies for publication. Even with progress
in geophysics and with the increased dependence placed on
electric logs the paleontological determinations are indispen-
sible in analyzing and correlating the rock strata of new fields
such as Florida. It is therefore of much practical help to have
such data available for distribution.


PUBLICATIONS

During the biennium the following publications have been
prepared by members of the department and by members of
the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Bureau of Mines in
cooperation with the Survey:
Seventh Biennial Report, calendar years 1945-1946, includ-
ing mineral production statistics for 1944-1945, 1947, 24 pp.
Bulletin 31, Springs of Florida, 1947, 196 pp., 1 pl., 38 figs.,
4 tables.
Bulletin 32, Elevations in Florida, 1948, 1158 pp., 2 figs.
$1.50.
Report of Investigations No. 6, Geology and Ground Waters
of the Fort Lauderdale Area, Florida, 1948, 42 pp., 12 pls.
Information Circular No. 1, Exploration for Oil and Gas in
Florida, 1948, 68 pp., 2 figs., 2 tables.
Information Circular No. 1-Revised, Exploration for Oil
and Gas in Florida, 1949, 106 pp., Frontispiece, 2 figs., 2 tablets.
$1.00.
Information Circular No. 2, Florida Kaolins and Clays, 1949,
59 pp., 2 figs. $.50.
Report of Investigation 4208 (U. S. Bureau of Mines) March
1948, Titanium Minerals in Trail Ridge, Fla. 1948, 21 pp., 19 figs.

A new policy relating to the distribution of the publica-
tions of the Survey has been established. For many years
there was no charge for any reports issued. Then a small
postage and handling charge was instituted. In recent years,
however, there has been a constant rise in printing costs and
this together with the generally decreasing value of the dollar
impelled the Survey to ask the opinion of the Attorney
General as to the advisability of making a charge that would
partially cover the cost of printing. This proposed policy was
approved and a charge is now attached to each new publication
based upon the actual cost of printing. The Survey has not
applied this ruling retroactively.







12 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

PUBLICATIONS IN PREPARATION
A bulletin relating to the geology, structure, stratigraphy
and mineral resources of Levy and Citrus counties is ap-
proaching completion. The broadening of the scope of the
study to areas surrounding these counties, which as the study
progressed indicated was essential to a more complete interpre-
tation of problems within the two counties, delayed the com-
pletion of the report but it is certain that the final report will
be the more satisfactory. It is planned that the publication
will appear during the summer.
Progress is also being made on a bulletin dealing with the
mineral resources and industries of Florida. There is a
general and increasing interest in the mineral resources of
Florida and the opportunities that these offer for development
and this report should therefore be in demand.
Also in preparation is a detailed county report dealing
with Jackson County. This will contain data on the geology,
structure and stratigraphy of the county as well as data on
the mineral resources and recommendations for their develop-
ment.
In cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey there will
be issued bulletins on the water resources of the various lo-
calities which have been investigated. This work will include
a general report on the lakes of Florida, their areal extent,
depths, biologic character and the recreational possibilities
they offer, as well as general reports covering ground water in-
vestigations.

COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES
The Geological Survey continued its cooperation with
federal bureaus, various state departments, municipalities, in-
dustries and individuals. In many instances this cooperative
program was expanded and extended during the biennium.
This mutual exchange of information has added much data to
the Survey files, which make it possible for the Survey to ren-
der more widespread service and to further the utilization of
the State's mineral resources.
United States Geological Survey: Cooperation with the U.
S. Geological Survey began early after the Florida Survey was







12 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

PUBLICATIONS IN PREPARATION
A bulletin relating to the geology, structure, stratigraphy
and mineral resources of Levy and Citrus counties is ap-
proaching completion. The broadening of the scope of the
study to areas surrounding these counties, which as the study
progressed indicated was essential to a more complete interpre-
tation of problems within the two counties, delayed the com-
pletion of the report but it is certain that the final report will
be the more satisfactory. It is planned that the publication
will appear during the summer.
Progress is also being made on a bulletin dealing with the
mineral resources and industries of Florida. There is a
general and increasing interest in the mineral resources of
Florida and the opportunities that these offer for development
and this report should therefore be in demand.
Also in preparation is a detailed county report dealing
with Jackson County. This will contain data on the geology,
structure and stratigraphy of the county as well as data on
the mineral resources and recommendations for their develop-
ment.
In cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey there will
be issued bulletins on the water resources of the various lo-
calities which have been investigated. This work will include
a general report on the lakes of Florida, their areal extent,
depths, biologic character and the recreational possibilities
they offer, as well as general reports covering ground water in-
vestigations.

COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES
The Geological Survey continued its cooperation with
federal bureaus, various state departments, municipalities, in-
dustries and individuals. In many instances this cooperative
program was expanded and extended during the biennium.
This mutual exchange of information has added much data to
the Survey files, which make it possible for the Survey to ren-
der more widespread service and to further the utilization of
the State's mineral resources.
United States Geological Survey: Cooperation with the U.
S. Geological Survey began early after the Florida Survey was







EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-ADMINISTRATIVE


created but since 1930 it has continued on a more substantial
scale without interruption, although at times contributions
from the State were much reduced. This cooperation has been
mainly in the field of water resources although two volumes
on the geology of Florida have been published by the Florida
Survey, the texts of which were prepared by members of the
U. S. Geological Survey staff. This cooperation has proved
most helpful since it furnishes scientifically trained personnel
and the equipment needed for the particular investigation,
thus saving the State the expense of a large staff and special
equipment.

Cooperation is maintained on the basis of equal expendi-
ture of funds, the amount allotted by the Florida Geological
Survey being matched by the U. S. Geological Survey. The
investigations made are under the supervision of the State
Geologist and the Director of the U. S. Geological Survey.
During the years 1947-1948 the funds apportioned by Florida
to the U. S. Geological Survey for Water Resources Investiga-
tions were as follows:
January 1, 1947 to June 30, 1947
Ground W ater .................. ...................... 12,500.00
Surface Water .................... ......... ...................... 1,500.00
Quality of W ater ..................... ........... ............. 250.00
July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1948
Ground Water ....................................... ....... $25,00000
Allocated by Budget Commission from Chap-
ter 24283, Laws of Florida, 1947
Surface W ater ........................................................... 2,500.00
Quality of W ater ............................ ............ .......... ... 500.00
July 1, 1948 to December 31, 1948
Ground W ater ............................................................... 7,750.00
From Chapter 24283, Laws of Florida, 1947
Ground W ater .................................... .................... 4,000.00
From Florida Geological Survey appropria-
tion
Surface W ater .................................. .................... 1,250.00
Quality of Water ........................................... 250.00

CURRENT APPROPRIATION
July 1, 1947-June 30, 1949
The appropriation under which the Survey is currently
operating for the biennium July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1949 is:
July 1, 1947 to July 1,1948 to
June 30, 1948 June 30 1949
Salaries ......................... .................. ... $50,200.00 $50,200.00
Expenses .................. -..... .................. 29,800.00 29,800.00

$80,000.00 $80.000.00






14 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

The previous biennium appropriation was $60,825.00 an-
nually, the current appropriation therefore represented an in-
crease of about 30 per cent. This increase was helpful in pro-
moting the work of the Survey but did not include money
budgeted to permit undertaking the contemplated expanded
ground water investigations. Unless some other financial
means were found this important work which had been in
progress for numbers of years would have been either sus-
pended or seriously hampered. Consequently, a direct appeal
was made to the Budget Commission with the result that
$25,000.00 was allocated from an appropriation under Chap-
ter 24283, Laws of Florida, 1947, creating a Division of Water
Survey and Research under the supervision of the State Board
of Conservation. This gave needed impetus to the ground
water investigation program for the fiscal year July 1, 1947-
June 30, 1948 and allowed not only the continuation of the
work but also furnished funds to add needed equipment.
The Division of Water Survey and Research was estab-
lished on August 6, 1947, by the State Board of Conservation.
In activating this Division the appropriation for its mainten-
ance was utilized. As a consequence, during the fiscal year
beginning July 1, 1948, the full allotment of $25,000 could not
be continued. Recognizing the close relation of the two di-
visions-Water Survey and Research and Geological Survey-
and the desire not to overlap in its functions, it was agreed
that the Water Survey and Research would furnish $15,500
and the Geological Survey $8,000 from its operating fund,
thus making a total of $23,500 for the fiscal year 1948-1949, a
reduction of $1,500 from the previous year's allotment. It is
planned to restore that reduction in another biennium through
an appropriation for the Geological Survey.
Probably no phase of the ground-water investigations in
cooperation with the Ground Water Branch of U. S. Geological
Survey is more important than the program of observation of
water levels in wells. Water-level records serve to indicate
the extent to which the ground-water reservoirs are being re-
charged by rainfall in areas known as "recharge areas," and
the extent to which they are depleted by heavy pumping, or,
as in southern Florida, by the operation of drainage canals.
In coastal areas, where ground water is subject to the en-






EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-ADMINISTRATIVE


croachment of sea water, records of water levels are especially
needed to indicate whether the hydraulic head of fresh water
is sufficient to balance the salt water and thus block the en-
trance of salt water into the aquifers.
In view of the value of water-level records, a systematic
program of observations was begun in 1939 and has gradually
expanded as funds have permitted. At the end of 1948, a total
of 605 wells were under regular observation. Of this total,
527 wells were being visited at intervals ranging from one
each week to once in 6 weeks from direct observation of the
water levels. Seventy-eight of the total were equipped with
automatic water-stage recorders which gave a continuous
record of the water level. The distribution of these recorders
over the State is shown on the map, Figure 2 on page 16. Also
shown are the proposed locations of 26 additional recorders
which were ordered on June 3, 1948, and which will be de-
livered in March, 1949. Not shown are the 527 wells that are
observed directly.
In southern Florida, where the problem of salt-water en-
croachment is in some places very critical, analyses of ground
water for salt content are necessary. In conjunction with
water-level observations, periodic water sampling from 336
selected wells is done. Where the rate of movement of sea
water into the aquifers is known to be comparatively slow, the
sampling interval is semi-annual or annual; where the rate of
movement is more rapid the sampling is done monthly. At
times, in some areas, when the rate of movement is especially
rapid, bi-weekly sampling is done. A total of 12,113 analyses of
ground water for salt content were made during the biennium.
The ground-water program includes also investigations of
the geology and ground water of the State progressively by
counties. These investigations range in duration from a few
months to several years, depending on the nature of the
problems. Where cities and counties have special problems
requiring work that is too detailed or too extensive to be in-
cluded in the program, the interested cities and counties bear
part of the cost of the work. As the investigations are com-
pleted, reports giving the results are published by the Florida
Geological Survey as part of the planned series of geological
bulletins which will ultimately cover the entire State.







16 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


I I EXPLANATION I
Contour Lines Represent Approximately the Height. in Feet
to Which Water Will Rise With Reference to Mean Sea Level in
Tightly Cased Wells That Penetrate the Principal Artesian Aquifer.
Contour Intervals 20 Feet
* Well Equipped With Automatic Wlter-Stage Recorder
O Proposed Location of Well With Water-Stoge Recorder
S25 0 25 50 75 c100
I ; Apploemate tSctan Milaes


87. 86' 85 64 83 82 81 80

Figure 2-Map Representing The Piezometric Surface in Florida Showing Loca-
tions of Wells Equipped with Automatic Water-Stage Recorders.






EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-ADMINISTRATIVE


The surface water program has consisted largely of a con-
tinuation of the collection of flow and stage data on Florida
springs with emphasis on those where previously obtained
records indicated possible changing trends. Florida Geologi-
cal Survey Bulletin 31 has been used as a basis for this further
study. A start has been made on a collection of depth data for
the lakes of Florida which will supplement the lake stage in-
formation already obtained. At the end of 1948 122 gaging
stations were being maintained on 86 rivers, canals, creeks and
springs. In addition 74 stations for recording stage, only,
were being operated in 46 additional surface water bodies.

Records of water levels in wells and stream-gaging data
are published annually in a series of U. S. Geological Survey
Water-Supply Papers. These papers may be purchased for a
nominal price from the Superintendent of Documents, Wash-
ington, D. C.

Division of Water Survey and Research: The Division of
Water Survey and Research was created by Chapter 24283,
Laws of Florida, 1947, as a division of the State Board of
Conservation. On August 6, 1947, Colonel A. G. Matthews
was appointed Chief Engineer and cooperation with the Geo-
logical Survey was promptly established. Data in the files of
the Geological Survey were made available to the Chief Engi-
neer and these have proved most helpful in assisting him to
assemble vital information on water resources. The Division
has been very active and has published its first annual report
for the year ending June 30, 1948, and there has also appeared
a comprehensive compilation of rainfall data-Water Survey
and Research Paper No. 1-"Observed Rainfall in Florida,
Monthly Totals from Beginning of Records to 31 Dec. 1947."
Accompanying this large volume is a series of 31 index maps
showing the geographic locations of the various rainfall sta-
tions. This represents a tremendous amount of very ex-
haustive search and care in assembling and preparation. The
volume wil prove a most satisfactory, useful and convenient
reference for Florida rainfall information.

It was from the appropriation for the Division of Water
Survey and Research that the Geological Survey received
$25,000 during the fiscal year 1947-1948 and $15,500 during







18 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

the fiscal year 1948-1949. This financial assistance made it
possible for the Survey to continue and to expand its ground
water investigations in cooperation with the U. S. Geological
Survey for otherwise this work would have been seriously
curtailed or suspended. Throughout its history the Florida
Survey has given much attention to the ground waters of the
State and has accumulated facts and data upon which our
knowledge of the occurrence of this great natural resource
is based. Little data relating to the surface water supplies
have been assembled, and the Water Survey is currently un-
dertaking this study. There will be no duplication of effort by
the two divisions for whatever the Geological Survey accumu-
lates on ground water will be supplemental and additional to
that accumulated by the Water Survey and Research on sur-
face waters, the two divisions cooperating with each other to
the mutual advantage of both and to the citizens of the State.
United States Bureau of Mines and Bureau of Census: Data
on mineral production are gathered by these agencies and the
assembled and compiled information, together with the names
and addresses of the producers, is sent to the Florida Survey at
a great saving in clerical expense. In the event of any delin-
quents the Florida Survey makes contacts in an effort to get
complete statistics. For a summary of mineral production in
Florida for 1946 and 1947 and a graph showing the production
for the past ten years see pages 27-28 and Figure 3.
The Bureau of Mines, Tuscaloosa Division, Mining Branch,
has been especially cooperative. This is the Southern Experi-
ment Station of the Bureau of Mines supervising development
in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi. The Florida
Survey in applying its knowledge of the history of the geo-
logical development of the State concluded that inasmuch as
the separation of ilmenite, rutile and zircon from the sands of
quiescent or stabilized dune areas east of Jacksonville had
proven commercially feasible that a good area for further pros-
pecting would be the Trail Ridge section running from just
east of Macclenny, Baker County southerly through the cen-
tral part of the Peninsula and merging into the well known
Lake Region physiographic area and finally loosing its identity
in southern Florida by joining the flatwoods bordering the
prairies of the Everglades. This was suggested to Mr. J. R.







EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-ADMINISTRATIVE


Thoenen, Chief of the Tuscaloosa Branch, as a consequence of
which an investigation was started which resulted in the dis-
covery of commercial deposits of these minerals in the vicinity
of Starke, Bradford County. One paper-Report of Investi-
gation 4208, published in March 1948, sets forth the details of
these explorations. There is now, almost complete, a plant for
the removal of these minerals by the duPont interests, located
at Camp Blanding. It is expected that operations will begin
early in 1949. This splendid cooperation upon the part of the
Tuscaloosa Branch of the Bureau of Mines resulting in accele-
rated development of the titanium mineral industry in Florida
deserves merited commendation and thanks of the Florida
Survey and appreciation from the citizens of the State.
University of Florida Engineering and Industrial Experi-
ment Station: Cooperation has been maintained with the Uni-
versity of Florida in assisting the development of our clay
resources. This has proved mutually advantageous and it is
planned to enlarge this cooperation so as to include other raw
mineral resources, taking advantage of the opportunities of
research now made possible within the State through such co-
operation with the Engineering and Industrial Experiment
Station.
Florida State University: The Survey has reciprocated in
every possible way the courtesies shown us by the officials of
the Florida State University. During the past year the course,
Introductory Geology, was taught by members of this Depart-
ment. Student groups, as are all those who visit with us, are
welcomed and museum studies are encouraged.
Florida State Board of Health: During the biennium co-
operation with the Board of Health has been found mutually
advantageous, especially in the field of ground water contami-
nation problems. The Survey has been helpful in giving the
Board of Health information on the location and other data on
water wells in different parts of the State and in assisting in
certain areas that have given trouble in contamination.
Florida State Road Department: This state department
has been very helpful in supplying data on bench marks that
have been established in connection with Florida's road sys-
tem; also in giving data on the character of the subsurface







20 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

as determined by borings for bridge foundations and ap-
proaches and in supplying road profile data.

Florida Forestry and Park Service: Cooperation has been
maintained especially in the matter of assisting in periodic
inspections of cavern roofs and in water supply development
in some park site areas. A short paper on the geology of the
Marianna State Park area was prepared by R. O. Vernon for
the Park Service. This paper is available through the Park
Service and copies are made available to guests at the Mari-
anna State Park.

State Chemist-Florida Department of Agriculture: The
Survey is not equipped for making chemical analyses and the
State Chemist has courteously obliged in making various
analyses of soils, mineral specimens and bituminous materials.
The cooperation has been very helpful in determining the
exact character of many samples sent in for examination.

BUDGET REQUESTED
For the biennium beginning July 1, 1949, to June 30, 1951,
the following budget has been requested:
July 1, 1949 to July 1,1950 to
June 30, 1950 June 30, 1951
Salaries ....................---- ..................... .$ 78,500 $ 78,500
Necessary and Regular Expense ........ 90,500 90,500
$169,000 $169,000
The Survey has experienced the most active biennium since
its establishment. While this has been brought about by the
interest in the potentialities of Florida as an oil producing
State, it is also a reflection of increased interest and de-
velopment of our mineral industries. The record total mineral
production for 1947 indicates this without argument. This
has all brought about a very decided increase of demands on
the Survey for information and data that have accumulated
through the years. The many oil company representatives,
geologists, landmen and geophysical crews, have made much
of the data available through the Survey. Furthermore the
Survey has rendered directly, and through cooperation with
the U. S. Geological Survey, much help to different municipali-
ties, corporations and individuals, expressing concern over the







EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-OIL PROSPECTING


adequacy of our water supplies and their proper development.
In every instance the Survey has rendered beneficial service.
In order that we may more adequately take care of the ad-
ditional demands for professional and technical help we have
prepared the budget above, which is most conservative. With
the additional funds requested made available, it is certain
that more effective service can and will be rendered.

OIL PROSPECTING
The Seventh Biennial Report contains a summary of oil ex-
ploration activities to March 1947. The intervening two years
has witnessed steady exploration progress although no new
fields have been discovered. In the Sunniland Field, Collier
County, however, five additional producing wells have been
brought in, thus totalling nine producing wells in Florida, six
of which are flowing and three are pumping. The latest pro-
ducer was brought in March 11, 1949, and tests were in
progress at the time of preparation of this report. This is the
Lee Tidewater Cypress Lumber Company "B" No. 2 well of
the Humble Oil & Refining Company in the Sunniland Field.
The average daily production during the month of February
1949 from eight wells was 1,165 barrels. The total production
of oil in Florida from the discovery date September 26, 1943
to February 28, 1949, was 721,142 barrels.

The Survey has isued two mimeographed reports entitled
"Exploration for Oil and Gas in Florida." The first of these
covered such activities from earliest beginnings to January
1948; the second is a revision of the first with the addition of
exploration activities for the calendar year 1948. The follow-
ing data are therefore given in a summarized form.

From available records many of which lack desirable de-
tails it is known that 216 wells have been drilled in Florida as
tests for oil or gas up to December 31, 1948. On January 1,
1949, there were five wells drilling. During the year 1948
twenty-five wells were completed and of these three were com-
pleted as oil producers. The total footage drilled in 1948 was
196,820 feet equal to 37.28 miles. From these figures it is
readily apparent that prospecting for oil in Florida has as-
sumed comparatively large proportions and should additional








22 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

wells be brought in and other fields discovered it is difficult
to predict the proportions to which this industry will enlarge.
Of the wells completed during this two-year period one de-
serves particular mention because of the exceptional depth to
which it was drilled even though it did not prove productive.
This is the State of Florida J. P. Scranton No. 1, Lease No.
373 well of the Gulf Oil Corporation completed April 1, 1947,
on Big Pine Key about 30 miles east of Key West, Monroe
County. This well was begun November 7, 1945, and activi-
ties were stopped April 1, 1947, at a total depth of 15,455 feet,
in dense lime with irregular shows of dead oil. This is the
deepest test so far drilled in Florida.
It is a satisfaction to record the uniform courteous and
business-like manner in which the various oil companies
operating in Florida have responded to the rules and regula-
tions of the State Board of Conservation.
The table on page 23 gives pertinent data on the wells that
have produced oil in the Sunniland Field. Only one of these
has been finally abandoned as a producer, the discovery well,
which is now utilized for disposal of brine or salt water.

RECOMMENDATIONS

It is recommended that a policy relating to the adminis-
tration of the Oil Conservation Act be established. The ad-
ministration of the law has gone on fairly well since its enact-
ment but should oil be discovered in greater quantity the
needed attention could not be given by the Secretary of State
and the Florida Geological Survey as is now done. Provision
should also be made for the disposition of the funds already
collected and accumulated in the State Treasury. A sugges-
tion here would be that they be applied toward the salary of a
petroleum engineer whose duty would be to supervise the Oil
and Gas Act.









DATA ON PRODUCING WELLS OF THE HUMBLE OIL & REFINING COMPANY IN THE SUNNILAND
FIELD, COLLIER COUNTY

Farm Name Location Started Completed Depth Producing Remarks
Zone


Gulf Coast Realties


Corporation No. 1


Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation No. 4

Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation No. 5

c Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation No. 6
Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation No. 8

Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation No. 10
Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation No. 11

Gulf Coast Realties
Corporation No. 13
Lee Tidewater Cypress
Lumber Company "B" 1

Lee Tidewater Cypress
Lumber Company "B" 2


February September
28, 1943 26, 1943



October May 7,
31, 1944 1945

March 2, May 24,
1947 1947


1980' W. of E. line,
660' N. of S. line
of Sec. 29, T48S, R30E


1996' from N. line,
2054' from E. line
Sec. 20, T48S, R30E
Cen. SWY4 of SWY4 of
Sec. 20, T48S, R30E

SW%1 of NE% of
Sec. 19, T48S, R30E
SW1/ of SEY4 of
Sec. 19, T48S, R30E

Cen. SW%, of SEY of
Sec. 20, T48S, R30E
2323' N. from S. line,
660' E. from N. line
Sec. 20, T48S, R30E
Cen. NW% of NW%4
Sec. 19, T48S, R30E
660' W. of E. line,
660' N. of S. line
Sec. 13, T48S, R29E
Cen. SEY4 of NW%
Sec. 13, T48S, R29E


May 1,
1946
September
3, 1946

January
8,1948
October
14, 1947

December
25, 1948
September
22, 1948


January February
7, 1949 11, 1949


11,626 11,600- Pumper. Shut down June 15,
11,626 1946. Abandoned as producer
May 14, 1947. Used for dis-
posal salt water. Initial prod.
97 bbls. oil.
11,597 11,560- Pumper. Initial prod. 257
11,597 bbls.

11,578 11,560- Flowed initially. Pumped
11,578 since June 29, 1945. Initial
prod. 518 bbls.
11,578 11,556- Flows. Initial prod. 225 bbls.


11,578
11,576 11,564-
11,569


11,574

11,573


11,5721/2

11,588


11,566-
11,574
11,550-
11,573


Flowed initially. Pumped
since December 1948. Initial
prod. 527 bbls.
Flows. Initial prod. 175 bbls.

Flows. Initial prod. 120 bbls.


11,519- Flows. Initial prod. 395 bbls.
11,572/2
11,568- Flows. Initial prod. 137 bbls.
11,588


11,585 11,564- Flows. Testing.
11,585


November
7, 1945
May 24,
1946

November
1, 1947
July 5,
1947

October
7, 1948
May 21,
1948








24 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


FLORIDA MINERAL INDUSTRY DURING 1946 and 1947
Statistics Collected in Cooperation with the
United States Bureau of Mines
A new high record was attained by Florida's mineral in-
dustry during 1946 when the total value of mineral products
for the year reached $31,083,000. This record total was sur-
passed in 1947 when the industry reported a total value of
$45,992,00 for its products, an increase of approximately 48
percent. Startling new high records were made in the phos-
phate rock industry and the value of phosphate rock in 1947
was greater than the value of all mineral products during the
previous year. The growth of the mineral industry is shown
graphically in Figure 3 which will illustrate the value of Flor-
ida mineral products for the ten year period of 1938-1947 in-
clusive. From this graph it may be seen that there has been a
three fold increase in value of the mineral products of the
State from 1940 to 1947.
The principal mineral products for Florida in order of
their value, are: Phosphate rock, limestone, cement, and sand
and gravel. In 1946, the last year for which statistics are
available, Florida ranked first among the states in the United
States in the production of phosphate rock, rutile, and zircon;
second in the production of ilmenite; and third in the produc-
tion of both Fuller's earth and peat. Known and indicated re-
serves for all of the above mentioned products are sufficient to
support an expanding industry for many years.
The mineral output and value for the years 1946 and 1947
is shown in the table on page 27.

PRODUCERS REPORTING PRODUCTION IN
1946 AND 1947
Product Company Location
CEMENT
Florida Portland Cement Division,
General Portland Cement Company .......................... Tampa
CLAY
Used by Producer:
Florida Portland Cement Division........................................ Tampa
Peaden Materials Company .................... ..................... Chipley
Taylor Brick & Tile Company ........................................ Pensacola
Non-Commercial:
Florida State Hospital .......................................... Chattahoochee








24 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


FLORIDA MINERAL INDUSTRY DURING 1946 and 1947
Statistics Collected in Cooperation with the
United States Bureau of Mines
A new high record was attained by Florida's mineral in-
dustry during 1946 when the total value of mineral products
for the year reached $31,083,000. This record total was sur-
passed in 1947 when the industry reported a total value of
$45,992,00 for its products, an increase of approximately 48
percent. Startling new high records were made in the phos-
phate rock industry and the value of phosphate rock in 1947
was greater than the value of all mineral products during the
previous year. The growth of the mineral industry is shown
graphically in Figure 3 which will illustrate the value of Flor-
ida mineral products for the ten year period of 1938-1947 in-
clusive. From this graph it may be seen that there has been a
three fold increase in value of the mineral products of the
State from 1940 to 1947.
The principal mineral products for Florida in order of
their value, are: Phosphate rock, limestone, cement, and sand
and gravel. In 1946, the last year for which statistics are
available, Florida ranked first among the states in the United
States in the production of phosphate rock, rutile, and zircon;
second in the production of ilmenite; and third in the produc-
tion of both Fuller's earth and peat. Known and indicated re-
serves for all of the above mentioned products are sufficient to
support an expanding industry for many years.
The mineral output and value for the years 1946 and 1947
is shown in the table on page 27.

PRODUCERS REPORTING PRODUCTION IN
1946 AND 1947
Product Company Location
CEMENT
Florida Portland Cement Division,
General Portland Cement Company .......................... Tampa
CLAY
Used by Producer:
Florida Portland Cement Division........................................ Tampa
Peaden Materials Company .................... ..................... Chipley
Taylor Brick & Tile Company ........................................ Pensacola
Non-Commercial:
Florida State Hospital .......................................... Chattahoochee








EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-MINERAL PRODUCERS 25

FLINT ROCK
Crushed:
Coy Thomas Industries .............................. ............... Gainesville
FULLER'S EARTH
The Floridin Company, Inc. ...............................-- ..--- ... -Quincy
ILMENITE, RUTILE AND ZIRCON
Riz Mineral Company ....................... .............................. Melbourne
Rutile Mining Company of Florida ............................ Jacksonville
KAOLIN
Edgar Plastic Kaolin Company --.......................................... Edgar
United Clay Mines, Inc. ...................... ...................- Hawthorn
LIME
Dixie Lime Products Company ............................................... Ocala
Miami Lime and Chemical Company, Inc. ......-..-................ Miami
LIMESTONE
Concrete, Road Metal and Screenings:
Camp Concrete Rock Company ................................................ Ocala
Central Quarries Company ............................................. Lakeland
C. Meekins --- --------.................................... ... Hollywood
Coral Rock & Sand Company ............................................ Miami
Crystal River Rock Company ......................................... Leesburg
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Co .... Ocala and Jacksonville
Dixie Lime Products Company ...........................................-. Ocala
E. A. Pynchon ................-----------........-- .................... North Miami
Florida Lime Products Cimpany ........................................... Ocala
L. B. McLeod Construction Company ................................ Orlando
Levy County Lime Rock Corporation .............................. Williston
Miami Crushed Stone Company ............................................ Miami
Miami Lime & Chemical Company, Inc. ............................ Miami
Mills Rock Company of Miami, Inc. .................................... Miami
Naranja Rock Company, Inc. .......................... Naranja and Miami
Newberry Corporation ......--...........................------- .....- Jacksonville
Oolite Rock Company ...........................- -............. .......... Miami
Southeastern Rock Company, Inc. ................................ Homestead
S. P. Snyder and Son, Inc. .................................... Fort Lauderdale
Troup Brothers ........................ ---------.............-- ---- ...- Miami
W illiston Shell Rock Company ...............................--............ Ocala
Wm. P. MacDonald Corporation .................................. Auburndale
Railroad Ballast and Aggregate:
Miami Crushed Stone Company .....................-- .....-...- .......... Miami
Naranja Rock Company, Inc. .......................... Naranja and Miami
Agricultural:
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Co..... Ocala and Jacksonville
Dixie Lime Products Company ...........................-.................. Ocala
Florida Dolomite Company ......---..............-......-......-..... Pembroke
Florida Lime Products Company .........................................- Ocala
Other Limestone Uses:
Connell and Shultz ............................. ..-- ..................-...... Inverness
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Co. .. Ocala and Jacksonville
F. W Hildebrand ...................------- ......------.......-------- Hobe Sound
Ocala Lime Rock Corporation ............................................. Ocala
Thompson-Williston Mine .....................-................... Jacksonville
Non-Commercial:
Broward County Highway Department ................ Ft. Lauderdale
Palm Beach County Highway Department .... West Palm Beach
PETROLEUM
Humble Oil and Refining Co. .......................................... Sunniland







26 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

PHOSPHATE
Hard Rock:
C. & J. Camp, Inc. .................. ............ ..... ..................... Ocala
Dunnellon Phosphate Mining Company ........................ Dunnellon
J. Buttgenbach & Company ....................................... --- Lakeland
Soft:
Colloidal Phosphate Sales Company .............................Dunnellon
Kellogg Company --.......................................... ........... Ocala
Lakeland Phosphate & Fertilizer Company ,................... Bartow
Loncala Phosphate Company ..................................-----.. High Springs
Seaboard Phosphate Company ........................................ Dunnellon
Soil Builders, Inc ......................... ......--------- ........----- Dunnellon
Superior Phosphate Company .................................... Dunnellon
Land Pebble:
American Agricultural Chemical Corporation ........... Pierson
American Cyanamid Company ..................................... Brewster
Coronet Phosphate Company .......................................... Plant City
International Minerals and Chemical Company ............ Mulberry
Pembroke Chemical Corporation .................................. Pembroke
Swift and Company Fertilizer Works ........................ Bartow
The Davison Chemical Company .................................... Bartow
The Phosphate Mining Company ........................................ Nichols
SAND AND GRAVEL
Structural Sand:
Alfred Destin Company ..................................... .. Miami Beach
Bailey, Westcott and Bailey, Inc ................................ Clermont
Campbell & Johnson ......................................... Flomaton, Ala.
Central Sand Company .......--.......................... ...... Tavares
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Co. .. Ocala and Jacksonville
D. & B. Sand Company ............................................-- --.. Tampa
Diamond Interlacken Corporation ........................... Jacksonville
Florida Gravel Company ................................... Chattahoochee
Howard Backus ....... ................................................ Miami
Keuka Sand Company ........................................................ Keuka
Lake Wales Concrete Sand Company ........................ Lake Wales
Lake Wales Independent Sand Company .............. Lake Wales
Lakeland Cement Company ................................... Lakeland
Largo Washed Sand Company .................................. Largo
Maule Industries ................ ....... ...... ...... Miami
The Davison Chemical Company .................................... Bartow
United Clay Mines Corporation ................................ Hawthorn
Paving Sand:
Central Sand Company ................................... .......... Tavares
Diamond Interlacken Corporation .............................. Jacksonville
Florida Gravel Company ................................ ... Chattahoochee
Keuka Sand Company ..........---...............--...............-. Keuka
Lake Wales Concrete Sand Company .................... Lake Wales
Ward Gravel Company ................ .............. .............. Pensacola
Other Sand Uses:
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Co. .... Ocala and Jacksonville
Florida Gravel Company ..................................... Chattahoochee
Keuka Sand Company ...................... ....................... Keuka
Ward Gravel Company ........................................ Pensacola
Non-Commercial Sand:
Clay County Highway Department ............. Green Cove Springs
Palm Beach County Highway Department .... West Palm Beach









EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-MINERAL PRODUCTION


Structural Gravel:
Campbell & Johnson ........................................ Flomaton, Ala.
Florida Gravel Company ...................................... ... Chattahoochee
Hauser Concrete Company ............................................ DeLand
Maule Industries ......................................... Miami
Paving Gravel:
Edgar Brothers Concrete Products .................... Daytona Beach
Florida Gravel Company .......................................... Chattahoochee
Ward Gravel Company ........................................... Pensacola
Railroad Ballast and Other Gravel:
Florida Gravel Company ......................................... Chattahoochee
Maule Industries ............................... ..... .......... ....- Miami
Ward Gravel Company .............................................. Pensacola



SUMMARY OF MINERAL PRODUCTION IN 1946 and 1947


1946 1947
Product Quantity Value Quantity Value


Clay (Raw)
(short tons) ..........
Natural Gas
(M cubic feet) ......
Peat
(short tons) ..........
Petroleum
(barrels) ................
Phosphate
Land pebble
(long tons) ............
Soft rock
(long tons) ............
Hard rock
(long tons) ............

Total value of
phosphate ..............
Sand and Gravel
(short tons) ..........
Crushed limestone
(short tons) ..........
Miscellaneous* ..............

Total value, eliminating
duplications ............


80,379 $ 486,791


6,000


19,979 81,832 42,300


57,000 *


4,807,563 19,867,339

97,067 387,708

100,881 762,127


21,017,174


1,534,667 1,320,819

2,863,070 3,212,135
5,005,456


.................... $31,093,000


96,147 $ 527,976


193 8,000


259,000


6,314,077

88,620

79,330


126,000


31,975,858

326,064

618,330


32,920,252

1,880,866

4,511,894
6,083,838


$45,992,000


2,067,401

3,534,010


Miscellaneous includes value of: Cement, Heavy Clay Products,
Fuller's earth, Kaolin, Lime, Petroleum, Dimensional limestone, Un-
classified stone, Titanium concentrates: ilmenite and rutile, and zircon.
Water, Shells, Concrete Blocks, Sandlime Brick statistics not
collected.








28 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


VALUE OF

FLORIDA MINERAL PRODUCTS

1938-1947


50


45


40


35

n-

0
S30
-i
o
25
LL.
0


0
o

- 15


10


5


0


5,

$45,992,000



4


3

$ 31,095,000
3


Sg5,070.000] 2


$20,304,000













C


IO 0 1 W 0 I I I I II(D
ro ro qt It It 'T a-q

Figure 3-Graph of Total Value of Mineral Production of Florida for
the Period 1938 to 1947 inclusive.


LEGEND



All Others


Sand 8 Gravel


Limestone


Phosphate








EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT-FINANCIAL STATEMENT 29



FINANCIAL STATEMENT
1947
January 1-December 31

RECEIPTS
Salaries, Balance Jan. 1. ......................$24,560.85
General Revenue July 1 ...... 37,306.87
$61,867.72
Expenses, Balance Jan 1 ........................ 12,529.11
General Revenue July 1 ........ 34,693.13
47,222,24
Governor's Emergency Fund, Balance
Jan. 1 ..........................................- -............ 10,666.98
Special fund-Chapter 24,283 .............. 24,000.00*
34,666.98
$143,756.94
DISBURSEMENTS
Salaries .......................-..................... 35,717.12
Expenses
Travel ........................ .................. 2,346.30
Car trade-in .................................... 750.00
Car operation .................................. 1,730.43
Supplies: Field,Laboratory, Office,
Library ...................................... 6,574.04
U utilities .........................--........- ...... 489.73
Subscriptions, Dues, Books .......... 557.69
Postage, Tel. and Tel., Express ... 951.72
Printing Publications ...................... 7,387.17
Miscellaneous .................-- ............... 421.80
U.S.G.S. Cooperative Program, F.G.S.
Ground W ater .................................. 6,751.74
Surface W ater ......................-- ........ 2,869.81
Quality of W ater ............................ 500.00
31,330.43
U.S.G.S. Cooperative Program
Governor's Emergency Fund ...... 10,666.98
Special Fund-Chapter 24,283 .. 7,673,36
18,340.34
Balance in Salary Account Dec. 31 ...... 26,150.60
Balance in Expense Account Dec. 31 .. 15,891.81
Balance in Special Fund-Chap. 24,283 16,326.64
58,369.05
$143,756.94

$25,000 was available but U. S. Geological Survey could match only
$24,000.








30 CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT-GEOLOGICAL SURVEY



FINANCIAL STATEMENT
1948
January 1-December 31
RECEIPTS
Salaries, Balance Jan. 1 ......................$26,150.60
General Revenue July 1 ........ 52,906.48
$79,057.08
Expenses, Balance Jan. 1 .................... 15,891.81
General Revenue July 1 ...... 34,724.28
Refund-Express loss .......... 35.00
50,651.09
Special Fund-Chapter 24,283,
Balance January 1 ................................ 16,326.64
16,326.64
$146,034.81
DISBURSEMENTS
Salaries ..... ................................... 39,699.39
Expenses
Travel ....................................... 2,245.08
Car trade-in ................................ 1,426.26
Car operation ................................ 1,502.44
Supplies: Field, Laboratory, Office,
Library .................................. 3,318.52
Utilities ........... ....... ............ 207.33
Subscriptions, Dues, Books .......... 452.65
Postage, Tel. and Tel., Express .... 566.32
Printing publications .................... 8,945.26
Miscellaneous ................................ 849.13
U.S.G.S. Cooperative Program, F.G.S.
Ground Water .............................. 2,253.69
Surface W ater ................................ 2,727.46
Quality of Water ......................... 500.00
24,994.14
U.S.G.S. Cooperative program,
Special Fund-Chapter 24,283
Ground Water ................................. 16,326.64
Balance in Salary account July 1 ........ 8,432.57
Balance in Expense account July 1 .... 1,944.30
Balance in Salary account Dec. 31
(Unreleased) .......................... 30.925.12
Balance in Expense account Dec. 31
(Unreleased) .......................... 23,712.65
65,014.64
$146,034.81