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 Florida State Board of Conserv...
 Florida Geological Survey














Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000223/00005
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report of the Florida Geological Survey ( 8th-14th )
Physical Description: 11 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1945-1946
Copyright Date: 1970
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Geology -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation, Florida Geological Survey
Dates or Sequential Designation: 4th (1940)-14th (1959-1960).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACB5800
oclc - 01956611
alephbibnum - 000376187
lccn - sn 87028635
System ID: UF00000223:00005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Florida State Board of Conservation
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
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        Page A-26
        Page A-27
        Page A-28
    Florida Geological Survey
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
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        Page B-11
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        Page B-15
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Full Text









SEVENTH BIENNIAL

REPORT

BIENNIUM ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1946


FLORIDA STATE BOARD
OF CONSERVATION

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION
J. T. HURST, Supervisor
TALLAHASSEEp FLORIDA


--q
















LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Tallahassee, Florida
March 1, 1947
To His Excellency,
Millard F. Caldwell, Governor of the State of Florida,
Chairman, State Board of Conservation,
Tallahassee, Florida

Sir:
I have the honor to submit herewith the Biennial Report for
the State Board of Conservation for the years 1945 and 1946.
The activities of the State Board of Conservation are wide in
scope, and this department is charged with the supervision of
the entire salt water resources of the state.
Florida produces a greater variety of food and game fish
than any other state and the fishing industry is among the
state's most important resources.
The biennial report of the Florida Geological Survey, which
operates under the supervision of the State Board of Conserva-
tion is made under separate cover by Mr. Herman Gunter,
Director.
Respectfully submitted,
J. T. HURST, Supervisor.







Florda "a

FISHING INDUSTRY


Since the very first settlements were made, the Atlantic and
Gulf waters bordering Florida have furnished food. Shrimp,
oysters, crabs and shorefish, abundant in the warm Southern
bays and sounds, insured the early colonists against starva-
tion. Little by little the fisheries developed and today occupy
an important part in the state's economic life.
Commercial fishing is one of the oldest industries on eartn.
Its magnitude and value as a source of food supply are not
generally known, even to the citizens of Florida. It is reliably
estimated that more than 75,000 persons in the state are solely
dependent on fishing for their daily bread. The business has
an annual cash turnover running more than ten millions of
dollars. Moreover, many different businesses are dependent
on fishing to keep their establishments running.
The current annual gross value of the state's fisheries is in
excess of $30,000,000.
The Conservation Department has licensed more than 700
wholesale dealers whose establishments buy and sell seafoods,
and more than 2,940 retail dealers.
The commercial fishing industry has approximately 8,000
licensed boats operating in Florida waters.
More than 300 shrimp boats or trawlers have bought licenses
to operate in Florida waters. Shrimp canning plants, crab meut
producers, oyster shucking and canning plants, clam canneries,
and shark processing plants are dotted everywhere along the
coast.
Florida markets approximately 40,000,000 pounds of mullet
annually.
The mullet is Florida's money fish and tops the list of our food
fishes. It is high in food value and health-giving minerals. Its
iodine content is 900 times greater than that of the best grade
beef, and ranks higher than salmon and many other food fishes.





FLORIDA SHRIMPERS marketed almost 13,000,000 pounds
of shrimp in 1946. Shrimp are found in abundance on both
coasts of Florida.
Economically, shrimp are the most important seafoods item
produced in Florida. The principal production and canning
centers are at Pensacola, Apalachicola, Fernandina, and New
Smyrna. About half of the catch is canned. The remainder is
shipped frozen, or consumed locally.
Shrimp are prolific breeders and develop from the egg to
adult size in 12 months or less time.


CRABS also are an important and delicious food item. The
well-known blue crab or common crab, is found in all Florida
coastal waters.


STONE CRABS are found in the rocky bays of the west coast
in comparatively deep water, but they are nothing like as
abundant as the blue crabs. The demand for stone crabs is
greater than can be supplied by Florida fishermen.


OYSTERS are perhaps better known than any other seafood
and the flavor of the Florida oyster amply justifies its popularity.
As a food for universal enjoyment, oysters are unsurpassed.
They are very rich in minerals, rank high in vitamin content,
are deliciously good, easily digested, and their low cost enables
their general use.
Florida oysters grow to maturity from the spat in less time
than in other states.

Florida has one of the largest clam beds in the United States.
For many years clam production has been confined to the Ten
Thousand Islands section, on the southwest coast of Florida.
Large quantities for shipment all over the country are canned
in that area.

A very desirable table delicacy and one of the choicest sea-
foods are the Florida scallops. They are widely distributed along
the coast; found almost every place oysters will grow. These de-
liciously flavored and rich little shellfish are greatly desired.





FLORIDA LOBSTER, better known as the crayfish because it
does not have the heavy claws like its northern neighbor, is in
great demand as a delectable seafood. Production centers in
the Miami and Key West waters.


Florida waters produce the largest turtles in the world, the
loggerhead, the green turtle, and the trunk turtle being out-
standing examples. The trunk turtle reaches a weight of 1,000
pounds. These massive sea animals are found in the tropical
waters around Key West and northward up both coast lines.
They have for long been prized as food and in Key West great
pens are kept much like poultry. Sea turtles breed along the
entire gulf shore to Pensacola, coming ashore to lay their eggs
in the sand. Aside from being an important source of choice
seafood, the turtle is an attraction for visitors.


Shark fishing is a new and promising industry. The shark
is a great menace to our supply of food fish and until recently
it had been considered worthless, commercially.
These sharks now are being taken for their oil and skins, and
experiments are being conducted for utilizing the flesh for
fertilizers and feeds, after being properly processed. Those re-
sponsible for the new industry claim the business has great
promise of success and profit, both for the fishermen and the
plants which deal in the oil and the by-products.
Encouragement is being given the industry because of its
utilizing a predatory and a non-food fish.
MENHADEN FISH are caught in large numbers on both the
east and west coasts of Florida. In 1946, over 123,000,000
pounds were taken. These little fellows are taken for the oil
they produce when processed, as well as for the meal. The
meal goes into fertilizers and feeds. The menhaden is a non-
food fish, but is worth many thousands of dollars as part of the
varied list of Florida's salt-water products. Menhaden plants
are located on both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

FLORIDA CONCH, OR PERRIWINKLE is a little shellfish
found in the shallow waters along the gulf -coast. It is taken
by many as a delicious ingredient in soups. They also have a
commercial value in their shells, which are novelty articles in
this country and in Europe.








For over fifty years Florida waters have been producing vir-
tually all of the sponges harvested in the United States. The
coastal area from Saint Marks to Key West, on the west gulf
coast represents the great producing area. Three principal
species are marketed in large quantities.
The sponge industry in Florida represents production exceed-
ing 3 million dollars annually. Markets are at Tarpon Springs
and Key West, with the largest sponge market in the world
being located at Tarpon Springs.
Sponges are produced in two ways. Hookers, using small
boats, take sponges in territorial waters. In outside waters,
where there is no jurisdiction and no regulations, divers go
down in diving suits and pull the sponges from the bottom of
the sea by hand. These sponges then are dried and treated
for storing in warehouses, where the sales are held.





N>


THE WORLD'S FINEST f9am 96




SAILFISH
Istiophorus A nerican us
The smartest, prettiest and mno.-t
popular of Gulf Stream gamefish.
Words cannot describe the thrill
that comes with his tap, his leap-
ing acrobatics and the tinal
victory.


WAHOO
A canthocybium solandri
Acclaimed the fastest fish that ,,m:
the Wahoo presents a real challenge to
any angler.



ALBACORE
Cym,/niosarda alleterata
A hard fighter that makes long, :.rring
runs, the Albacore is often mistaken for
tuna and bonito. Usually caught while
sailfishing, and never very large, the
Albacore nevertheless will give a good
account of himself.


SEA TROUT
Cynoscion wlebulosu8
Usually caught in summer and fall near
inlets and in the surf. Large schools are
not infrequent when shrimp, mullet and
other food is plentiful.



POMPANO
Trackinotus carolinus
Prized for their excellent food value, the
"true" or common Pompano are caught
mostly in tidal and inland waters and in
': ';.' the surf, running in large schools during
"the spring. Not to be confused with
Permit, Great or African Pompano, they
are taken on sand fleas, clams or shrimp,
and will strike viciously at small feather
and plug lures.





MARL IN
,.'r,i iit' ii i ,,, l #i tin ,f 111 m:1 i akuirT .


Two types of most common Marlin are:
rth Blue Marlin and the White Marlin
The white marlin is the most common
and many are caught each year. Blue
marlin come much larger and are most
common in the Bahamas.

KINGFISH
Scomberomurts vavalla
King Mackerel are abundant in Florida
waters. Highly valued as a food fish, 4
a slashing striker and hard fighter, the Q
king is a streamlined thunderbolt that
,:.fl r:, a tough battle.


DOLPHIN
Coryphlaena hlppuTrus
A fighter known for speed and stamina,
the Dolphin is one of the most colorful
of gamefish. Often running in schools
of several thousands, slashing the water
for acres around, the Dolphin are usually
found in' the "fide rip" and strike sav-
Ogel, Once hooked they display every
kind of leaping acrobatics.


BARRACUDA
Sphyraena barracuda
S.,.:..u;, slashing killer that'will strike Q
on, rh,,,, the Barracuda is the lone wolf
of the Gulf Stream, often taking fish
thjor are hooked, and generally an
angler's nuisance, yet giving plenty of
sport and a speedy, thrilling fight.


TUNA
Thunnuts secltndodorsi.alis
A vicious striker and a long runner, the
Tuna comes small in local waters as
compared with the big fellows of the
Bahamas and Nova Scotia.





AMBERJACK
Seriola lalandi
A tenacious fighter, sounding with long
surging runs after he is hooked, the 40
Amberjack is a favorite with many
,.nl r*




















































~-*~rnLhI


BLACK BASS (Larae Mouth)
Micropterus salmoides
Champion of fresh water gamefish, the
Black Bass is abundant in the lakes
and canals. A heavy striker, an acrobat
and a sturdy fighter, he gives a real
thrill to the plug or fly fisherman.


BLUEFISH
Chililodipterus saltatrix
A voracious feeder, a game fighter and
an excellent food fish, the Bluefish is
the "common angler's" favorite. Large
schools slashing through millions of silver
mullet along the shores from September
to May, afford an angler's paradise to
the surf and small boat fisherman.


SNOOK (Robalo)
Oxylabrax undccimalis
The "plugger's pet," thousands of
anglers, with light casting rods and
feather or plug lures, fish the inlets,
inland waterways and rivers all year
'round for the flashing, fighting Snook.


WEAKFISH
Cynoscion rcgalis
Related to the Croaker family, the
Weakfish is less frequently found in
Icoal waters than northward. The tender
structure of his mouth and his fighting
efforts make him difficult to land.




SPECKLED TROUT
A game fighter, these trout are plenti-
ful throughout the state.





COB IA
Rachyeetron canaduii
A large, swift and voracious gamester,
the Cobia frequents the waters of the
Gulf Stream during the winter months,
and occasionally inland and inlet waters.


W7*







TARPON
Tarpon atlanticus
The Silver King frequents inlets and in-
land waterways along the Florida coast,
but is found in greater numbers in the
Keys and on the west coast of the state.




BONITO
Sarda sarda
A savage fighter that never gives up
until dead, the Bonito is found all year
'round in these waters. Usually running
in schools, they will strike at almost any
lure.



CHANNEL BASS
Sciaenops ocellata
Feeding on crustacea, shrimp and small
mullet, the Channel Bass frequents
sandbars and channels. He will take
feather and small plug lures and give
a real account of himself as a fighter.






SNAPPER
The Red Reef Snapper is illustrated;
however, the waters of Florida abound
with a variety of snappers from the
Mangrove to the Dog Snapper.


i W 11











RECAPITULATION OF 1945 FOOD FISH CENSUS BY SPECIES

Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Am berjack ...........................--.. ....................... .......... 13 320,137
Ballyhoo .......--.--- .................----------.... ......... ------------- 2 24,200
Barracuda .---...- .............- ............ ... ......... 6 58,321
Bluefish .-- --............... ............................... ............ 24 1,852,042
Blue Runner ......... --.. ............................................ 17 1,955,217
Bottom Fish (Mixed) --.....................-...-....-.. 32 3,554,033
Bream .............. ---- .......----------------------........... 20 724,402
Butterfish ............. ... ........... ------ ..... ....... 10 65,798
Cabio ......... ---....... ...................-------...-- 9 47,911
C catfish .......................................................................... 25 5,326,112
Cero ..................---- ----- ------------................-------..... 2 39,900
Cigarfish .- --. ............... ........... ........................... 3 45,528
Crappie ---................----------...... ......... ---------- 12 867,009
Crevalle ............................ .............. ..... ---------- 11 585,107
Croaker ...................... ..... .... 12 60,533
Dolphin ------............. ............. 5 80,461
D rum ............................................................................ 21 609,874
E els ....................... ................ ................. ................... 3 51,794
Flounders ................................-------------------------..-----.. ....-... 27 290,499
Frogs ........................................--................. ------------- 9 82,815
G ar .................................. -- ---- .......... 5 1,045,224
Groupers ................. .............------- ........... 24 8,557,947
Grunts .-- --.................. .................... ...... ....------ ----- 13 196,193
Herring -.. ---.. --------................. ....... 3 498,971
Hogfish .............--- .......................--- ... ......... ..... .. -- 6 84,370
Jacks .....................-- ..... ... .... 2 25,839
Jewfish ............... ............... ......... .. 20 475,859
Kingfish (King Mackerel) ................---------------....------......--- 17 3,982,549
Ladyfish ......-------.....--................. --------- 5 23,807
M ackerel ....... ....... .................------.....-------. 26 10,244,124
Mullet -......---- --...... ........ --- ---......-------- 36 34,562,063
Silver Mullet ................-----------------------. 2 28,238
M uttonfish ....................---...-- .......- ....... 7 254,592
Permit -------...........----------....--...........-- --....-------- 8 66,457
Pigfish .-........-................-- ..... ------------------ ---------.. 11 88,337
Pinfish (Sailor's Choice) ........-----.--- ------........ ---- 5 36,213
Pom pano .... .. ---. -......... ........ ---------- -- 26 780,683
Sea Bass (Redfish) .......--..... -------.....----------------............ 33 1,291,436
Sea Trout (Gray) .......-.....------.... ....-------------........... 19 241,280
Sea Trout (Spotted) ..----------........... ---------..........------- 33 3,908,816
Shad ...................--..--.....---------------------..... 8 816,054
Shad (Hickory) ......--............-----------------.---------......-. 3 55,323
Sheepshead -.......... ................------- ..------- ..-- ..... 23 258,868
Skipjack .--..............------... -----------.........---- --.....---------..... 7 544,809
Snapper, Mangrove ...........-- ......------------ ...-- ......--------.. 20 226,772
Snapper, Red -...............--------------... ........................... -- 23 3,171,639






Snook (Sergeant Fish) ................
S pot ------------- ------ ...............
Stingray ................. - ..
Sturgeon .--.............................. ...
Sunfish ............................-
Tripletail (Black Perch) .............
T u rbot .............................-.... .....-
W ahoo ...... ......... ......... ...--
Whiting .. ... ......
Y ellow tail ........................................


.-...- ....... ........ 15
....---- ........ 16
-....---- ..---..... 1
....---...... 3
......-..----..... 3
-..--.--.. ......-- 4
...................... 2
- .......---- ...... 1
.--...-...- ..........- 13
.---- .......... 8


TOTAL FOOD FISH.....


441,424
113,595
4,186
7,272
15,350
39,359
2,010
290
848,102
438,893

90,018,637


RECAPITULATION OF 1945 FISH CENSUS
NON-FOOD FISH


Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Menhaden -------..................--- ......--- 10 71,607,719
Sharks .................. ..... ...............- ..---- .... 4 3,028,463
Trash Fish .....--............... .................. 14 3,554.675

TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH........... ..--.--.-...... 78,190,857


SHELL FISH


Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Gallons
Reported Reported
Oysters ..---- --------- ........................ 16 200,662
Clams --- --- ...................... 7 16,841
Scallops ..... ........ .................... .......... 8 12,246

TOTAL SHELL FISH .............. ------. 229,749


MISCELLANEOUS


Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Blue Crabs ......... --..---- ................ 14 5,468,869
Conchs ............. .. ----------...... 2 4,400
Crayfish ......----...... ---...--...........--.. 8 793,693
Sea Turtles ---- ................................---. 13 91,027
Shrim p .................. ......... ....... ........... ........ 16 10,745,010
Stone Crabs .... ................... ................ 8 102,606
Terrapin ............---...-- ..---- ..... 2 4,991

TOTAL .......- .....---......................----- 17,210,596






RECAPITULATION OF 1945 FISH CENSUS
BY COUNTIES


Counties

Bay
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Dade
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Franklin
Glades
Gulf
Hendry
Hernando
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lee
Levy
Manatee
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Taylor
Volusia
Wakulla
Walton

TOTALS


Food Fish

4,353,072
1,756,100
1,173,700
5,058,063


Non-Food Shell
Fish Fish

........ 4,860
500 ........
-.-...- 67


1,937,796 ........ 11,281
344,701 145,818
7,200,091
7,926,579 ........ 1,187
1,319,414 10,000
823,264 770,000 5,725
4,185,735 23,496 15,734
1,839,675 12,000,300 126,764
753,810 ........ ........
208,400 ........ 6,000
299,000 ........
37,708 ........
2,041,942 ........ 27
1,202,528 27,000
3,116,340 ........ 1,061
1,737,720 3,000 261
4.222,640 2,800 700
1,953,668 2,361,491
2,745,604 ........
433,352 59.346,852 140
2,298,384 6,915 ........
1,007,666 ........ .....
6,907,906 41,821 240
336,148
7,495,009 7,033 23,622
6,432,246 2.225,281 ......
230,999 25,800 ........
2,536,242 5,000 .......
31,524 ........
3,032,401 ........ 2,130
131,550 ........
363,853 ........ 200
1,627,772 1,187,750 28,300
807,232 ....... 1,450
108,804 ..... ........

90,018,637 78,190,857 229,749


Crabs
Crayfish
Shrimp
& Etc.
502
666,139
147,250
35,000
5,000


273,419
1,000
4,058,297
179,130
2,221,435
31,405
20,000
13,000

3,342
95,000
51.136
3,763
172,845

243,956
2,978,259

15,793
359,265

662
1,142,321
2,547,388
68,119

500

10,214
1,859,331
7,125


17,210,596






RECAPITULATION OF 1946 FOOD FISH CENSUS
BY SPECIES


Species Reported

A m berjack .................................................... ........
B allyh oo ......................................................................
Barracuda ...................... .........................................
B lu efish ... ................................................. .............
Blue Runner .............. .--.....-.-... .-......... ...........-
Bottom Fish (M ixed) ................ ...... .........
Bream ..................... ... ...........
Butterfish ............................................ ..............
C a b io ............. ... .- ..- ..- ...--. ..- .......... .... ... ...........--
Catfish .....................-- ......... ..... ......
C ero ............. .............................................. ...........
Cigarfish .....- ..-...--.- ...--.--.-....-...-...--...-.- ......- .....
C rap p ie ........- ....-- ...- ..- ..-.- ...- ....... .... .. ...........
Crevalle ............... .........................................................
C roak er ............ ....--.. ..- ...- .....- ....- .......... .........-
D olp h in --- ...-... ........- ........ ... .. .... ... ... ... ........--
Drum ..........................-.............-.........- ......... .--
E e ls --------.. .... ......... ... .... ... .............. ...... ..
Flounders ....................................................................
F rogs ..............-- ....- ...-- --...- ...- .. .--.... .................
Gar ................... ..
G rou p ers .....- ..- ..- ...... ...- ...- ....- .... .... ... .. ............
G ru n ts ........................................................ ............
H errin g .................-.-.-.-.- ..--.- .....- ...... .... .. ............
H og fish ........................................................ .........
J a c k s ........................................................... ............
J ew fish ......... ............................................. .... .........
Kingfish (King M ackerel) ..................... ............
King W hitting (Kingfish) ...................... .............
L a d fish ............ --.--.-..... .........-.- ... ..--. -- ...............
L in g ....................... .............
M ack erel ............... .........- .. ... ... ..- ..- .....- ........- ....
M u llet ...... ... ... .. ... ................................. .............
M uttonfish .............. ......-...-...............
P erm it .............. ......................................... ............
P igfish .................................................... .............
Pinfish (Sailor's Choice) ........................... ............
Pompano .............. .............. ..
P ork fish .................................................. .............
Sea Bass (Redfish) ........ ..........................................
Sea Trout (Gray) ...- ..............................................
Sea Trout (Spotted) ... .... .....................................
S h a d ...........................................................................
Shad (Hickory) ................. ..................................
S h eep sh ea d ................................................................
S k ip ja ck ....... ................................................... .......
Snapper, M angrove ..................-........ ... .......
Snapper, Red ............................................... .......
Sncok (Sergeant Fish) .................. ................
S p o t ................... .. ..................................... ...........
S tu rgeon ................. ......................... ........- .....


Number of Number of
Counties Pounds


Reported
15
2
6
28
14
30
16
10
11
24
3
2
9
10
15
5
25
1
30
19
4
28
11
3
5
6
22
21
10
4
1
25
36
11
10
13
6
28
4
33
15
33
6
3
25
7
20
24
19
14
4


Reported
184,640
6,300
52,849
1,707,461
714,942
2,360,270
1,333,091
152,178
33,715
4,298,452
14,412
61,414
358,297
233,947
92,746
47,659
311,460
53,093
342,079
342,102
1,507,350
6,480,249
86,211
636,353
53,236
134,123
251,243
2,463,336
721,227
308,980
35
14,951,543
36,889,793
329,274
23,821
160.410
54,128
831,282
15,575
1,223.031
270,685
4,161,758
837,309
47.020
475,402
255,369
258,425
4,201,737
465,486
135,840
3,318






Sunfish
Sunfish ..... ............. ...... .............
Tripletail (Black Perch) --..-............
T riggerfish ................. ...........................
T u rbot .............- ........... .....................---....-
W ah oo ...........................................................
W h itin g ................ .......................................
Y ellow tail ....................... ..... ...-- ..

TOTAL FOOD FISH.................................


............. 2
.--..-- 3 7
......... :--- 2


25,200
27,421
99,577
11,250
148
60,371
483,073

91,641,696


RECAPITULATION OF 1946 FISH CENSUS
NON-FOOD FISH


Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Baits ...........---- ...-.------- .---- 1 244,105
Menhaden .... --.... ........... .. ... ---.. ... 10 123,335,874
Sharks ...........- ....-..-- .-- ... ... ... .---. .... 2 1,124
Trash Fish .........................--- .... - ...... 15 3,343,406

TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH-.......... .......-.............. 126,924,509


SHELL FISH

Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Gallons
Reported Reported
O ysters ............ ........ .........................------- 21 137,847
Clam s ...............-- 9 29,412
S callops ...... ......................................... ..- .- ... 6 24,498
W helks ......- ... .----- -......-....- ..... 1 9,496

TOTAL SHELL FISH ............................................... 201,253


MISCELLANEOUS


Species Reported


Blue Crabs ..........
Conchs ................
Crayfish ..............
Sea Turtles .........
Shrimp ................
Squid ...... ..........
Stone Crabs ...
Terrapin .....- ....
Fish Roe ..............


Number of
Counties
Reported

.... ----- ... .- 14
............-- ......- ...... 3
---.......... .--- --- .......- 8
...... ---.-. .... -... -... 9
--- ............- --. .... ... 2 0
--- -- -- -- --. -----... 2
... ... .... .-- -. .... ...... 12
-----. 1------ 4


TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS ...... ..............


Number of
Pounds
Reported

6,709,301
39,140
1,585,510
41,847
12,988,124
303
96,904
4,790
318

21,446,237






RECAPITULATION OF 1946 FISH CENSUS
BY COUNTIES


Counties


Bay
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Dade
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Franklin
Glades
Gulf
Hendry
Hernando
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lee
Levy
Manatee
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Taylor
Volusia
Wakulla
Walton

TOTALS


Food Fish Non-Food
Fish


3,452,462
2,846,739
557,600
4,587,150
222,411
13,090
8,671,829
5,209,744
1,202,527
1,692,928
4,197,237
3,550,405
193,843
152,000
280,000
26,399
1,811,062
1,100,316
2,960,742
1,313,227
4,220,652
592,047
1,987,047
682,967
2,283,870
208,125
5,334,003
264,479


251,105
4,000





800

32.840,000
32,592
15,009,078
20,000




46,026
100
158
6,000
194,325
380
76,284,598
79.826
5,000
40,000


Crabs
Shell Crayfish
Fish Shrimp
& Etc.
1,450 3,457
140 503,033
850 36,700
43 43,001
7,913 3,863

17,652 4,494
3,800 609,461
900
11,175 5,636,007
466 79,918
101,059 2,082,422
........ 5.644
6,000 50,000


700
8,134

1,150


12,806,267 1,156 32,125
5,808,497 1,658,869 ........
660,001 68,461 335
1,972,968 28,000 ........
28,046 ........ 976
2,829,266 ........ 4,448
385,503 -....- 22
931,809 ........ 405
2,193,203 354,035 114
2,314,460 ........ 1,170
96,770 ........ 226

91,641,696 126,924,509 201,253


51,312
85.000
218,972

155,301

328,803
3,005,919
536
9,809
1,130,088
48.600
70,963
951,600
3,114,992
86,484
6,163

1.080

3,128,915
13.700


21,466,237






TARPON SPRINGS SPONGE EXCHANGE
TARPON SPRINGS, FLORIDA

1945
ANNUAL REPORT ON SPONGES SOLD THROUGH THE
TARPON SPRINGS SPONGE EXCHANGE, INC.


Rock Island Sheep Wool

Large & Ex. Med............
M ed. & Small.................
Lg. & Ex. Med. Rags...
Med. & Sm. Rags ..........


Bunches
2,939
5,267
4,901
9,120

22,227


Value
$ 621,584.59
510,391.20
642,606.16
603,132.05

$2,377.314.00


Av. Per Bunch
$211.36
97.02
131.12
66.13


Yellow and Grass
Y ellow ...............
Grass .............--


GRAND TOTAL


...... 4,031 $ 91,200.62
...... 14,159 247,859.73

18.190 $ 339,060.35


Rock Island Wool..........
Yellow and Grass..........


Poundage is not included
not standard size.


22,227
18,190

40,417
because the


$2,377.314.00
339,060.35

$2,716,374.35
bunches vary in


weight and are


Sponges Sold at Key West during 1945 amounted to ............ $115,170.16


22.62
17.51






TARPON SPRINGS SPONGE EXCHANGE
TARPON SPRINGS, FLORIDA
1 9 4 6
ANNUAL REPORT ON SPONGES SOLD THROUGH THE
TARPON SPRINGS SPONGE EXCHANGE, INC.


Rock Island Sheep Wool

Large W ool......................
X Med. Med., Sm. Wool
Large Wool Rags.--.........
X Med. Med., Sm.
W ool Rags....................
Yellow and Grass
Y ellow ................ ... ....
G rass ..............- .. .... ......
Grand Total
Rock Island Wool..........
Yellow & Grass..............


Bunches*
1,508
3,173
2,623

11,228

3,975
11,523

18,532
15,498

34,030


Value
$ 616,590.70
505,401.82
584,239.77

884,458.23

112,862.86
242,277.97

2,590,692.52
355,140.83

$2,945,833.35


NOTE: Sponges are sold by the pound and there being
the bunches vary in weight.


Av. Per Bunch
$408.88
159.28
222.74

78.78

28.39
21.03


no standard


Sponges Sold at Key West during 1946 amounted to............ $181,239.68


























RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

January 1st, 1945 through December 31st, 1945






STATE CONSERVATION FUND
SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR YEAR
JANUARY 1, 1945 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 1945

Balance Credited to State Conservation
Fund in Comptroller's Office as of
D ecem ber 31, 1944 .................................. .................$ 89,160.06 $
Balance Credited to State Conservation
Fund in Capital City Bank as of
Decem ber 31, 1944... ......................... ............ 130.00 89,290.06

RECEIPTS
Commercial Salt Water Fishing Industry-
Resident Wholesale Seafood Dealers Licenses $ 34,700.00 $
Resident Retail Seafood Dealers Licenses ....... 28,820.00
Resident Commercial Fishing and Oyster
B oat Licenses ........................... .... ............. 17,448.20
Alien or Non-resident Commercial Fishing and
Oyster Boat Licenses............. ..................---- 2,350.00
Alien or Non-resident Commercial Fishermen
Licenses ................................ .... ............. 1,115.00
Excess Net Commercial Licenses ....................... 64.00
Sale of Shipping Permit Tags.......................... 3,120.25 87,617.45

Shrimp Fishing Industry
Resident Shrimp Fishing Boat Licenses ....... 2,903.75
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishing Boat
Licenses ...........----......... .............. .................... 2,000.00
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishermen
Licenses ....--.........-.. ......... ................ 785.00 5,688.75

Menhaden Fishing Industry
Resident Menhaden Fishing Boat Licenses... 445.75
Alien or Non-resident Menhaden Fishing
Boat Licenses ..............-- ...........------- --------------------. 275.00
Alien or Non-resident Menhaden Fishermen
Licenses .... ..... ---.. .... -----... .. ....-- .. 645.00
Purse Seine Licenses............................---- 350.00 1,715.75

Oyster Industry
Oyster Bottom Lease Rentals.....-.- .............. 1,261.12
Two Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 1,340.95
Three Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 1,195.84
Five Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 1,019.04 4,816.95

Sponge Industry
Resident Sponge Fishing Boat Licenses ......... 957.75 957.75

Pleasure Fishing
Resident Pleasure Fishing Boat Licenses... 1,724.70
Alien or Non-resident Pleasure Fishing Boat
Licenses .. ...-----....................----........ 325.00 2,049.70






Oyster Shell Sales
Sale of Oyster Shell............ -..-....----------................... 2,484.56 2,484.56

Miscellaneous Collections
Sale of Confiscated Fish, Nets and Other
Equipment .................-...... ....-..-- .. ..------- ..-..-- 386.24
Sale of Outboard M otor -....... --............ ....... 135.00
Sale of Patrol Boat "Keys" ................ ............. 1,000.00
Court Cost Collected ................................ .......... 60.50
Refunds on Insurance and Other Small Items 125.73 1,707.47

$107,038.38 $196,328.44
DISBURSEMENTS
Administrative and Office:
Salaries ............ ... ----- ....... ...........$ 12,738.39 $
Travelifig Expenses ....-- ---............. ----.......... 1,193.73
Printing and Stationery ...............-. ........-... 1,725.65
Telegraph and Telephone ...................-- ...... 138.95
Postage and Box Rent ....--- .....---....... 916.73
Employees Bonds ........... ----. ..... 55.00
Employees Insurance ............... ......... 16.78
Office Rent .............-------- .......... 1,572.00

18,357.23
Field Division:
Salaries ............... .................. 44,461.04
Traveling Expenses .... .......... ............. 25,805.98
Printing and Stationery .................................... 2,295.92
Purchase, Maintenance and Operation
of Patrol Boats ..................----.. -- .... ......--. 4,276.11
Telegraph and Telephone ................. ........... 642.52
Purchase Tags ................... ....... 927.62
Money Order Fees .................----- ........ ...... 84.87
Employees Bonds ......... ... ............. .......... 145.00
Em ployees Insurance.---......-. --.-.-..--...-....- ........-- 1,036.09
Insurance on Boats ..... ............. ........ 616.00
Rent ............... ...... ..................---- ........ 85.00
University of Miami ........ ....... ........... 321.96
Boat Tags .......................... .. ............. 164.40
Portable House, Miami ................... ........ 375.00
Refunds ....................... -.. ---- ...... 131.00
M miscellaneous ......... .............. ............... ........ 10.81
L. A. Baxter Check Payment Stopped
License Cancelled .................------ ............. 53.00

$ 81,432.32

Total Disbursem ents ........... ......................................... ..... $ 99,789.55
Balance Credited to State Board of
Conservation Fund in Comptroller's Office
December 31, 1945............ ...... .- ...................$ 96,538.89

$196,328.44


























RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

January 1st, 1946 through December 31st, 1946






STATE CONSERVATION FUND
SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR YEAR
JANUARY 1, 1946 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 1946


Balance credited to State Conservation
Fund in Comptroller's Office as of
Decem ber 31, 1945 ............... ..................... $ 96,538.89 $ 96,538.89

RECEIPTS
Commercial Salt Water Fishing Industry
Resident Wholesale Seafood Dealers Licenses..$ 36,650.00
Resident Retail Seafood Dealers Licenses.... 33,600.00
Resident Commercial Fishing and Oyster Boat
Licenses ......... .. ... .................------------ .................. 15,013.40
Alien or Non-resident Commercial Fishing
and Oyster Boat Licenses................ ......... 2,825.00
Alien or Non-resident Commercial Fishermen
Licenses ...... ........... .. ...... ....... ... 1,345.00
Excess Net Commercial Licenses ....................... 34.00
Sale of Shipping Permit Tags........................... 3,310.50 92,777.90

Shrimp Fishing Industry
Resident Shrimp Fishing Boat Licenses ............ 3,478.90
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishing Boat
L icen ses ...................................- .......................... 2,775.00
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishermen
Licenses ................ -- --- .. ..................... 985.00

7,238.90
Menhaden Fishing Industry
Resident Menhaden Fishing Boat Licenses.... 400.10
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishing Boat
Licenses ...............-- ----......... ---. .................... 250.00
Alien or Non-resident Menhaden Fishermen
Licenses ......... ... ..... ---..........--- .... 720.00
Purse Seine Licenses.....-.. ..................... 400.00

1,770.10
Oyster Industry
Oyster Bottom Lease Rentals .............---...--. 1,646.25
Two Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 416.73
Three Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 113.61
Five Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 3,317.94

5,494.53
Sponge Industry
Resident Sponge Boat Licenses.... ............. 934.20
Alien or Non-resident Sponge Boat Licenses .... 25.00
959.20
Pleasure Fishing
Resident Pleasure Fishing Boat Licenses........ 2,939.50
Alien or Non-resident Fishing Boat Licenses.. 2,500.00
5.439.50






Oyster Shell Sales
Sale of Oyster Shell.................... ............


795.87


Miscellaneous Items
Sale of Confiscated Nets, Fish and Other
E quipm en t --------..------..........- .. ... ........... ........... 1,128.50
Court Cost Collected---................. -...-. .-....... 206.32
Sale of Postage Stam ps ..... ...............-.-..... 10.13
Sale of Outboard Motor............................... 30.00
Sale of Credit Memo on Automobile ................ 90.00
Sale of Outboard Motor................. ---..... 10.00
Sale of Boat and Trailer ................... ......... 90.00
R efund on G gasoline ........................................... 16.67
Refund on Insurance and other small items.... 170.03
W arrant Cancelled ................ .............. 1.00

$116,228.65

DISBURSEMENTS
Administrative and Office
Salaries ................... -- ..-- ...................--- $ 13,029.18
Traveling Expenses ......... .... ---- ........... 1,748.80
Printing and Stationery ....................................... 803.50
Telegraph and Telephone .............-- -----........ 379.92
Rent .......................... .............. 1,572.00
Employees Bonds -----------................--..... 50.00
Postage and Box Rent..........-.....--..--.............. 895.84
Employees Insurance ....... ........-- ..... 16.78
Court Cost ...............---- .. --- ........ ........... 16.70

Field Division:
Salaries ............... ............... --- 47,018.03
Traveling Expenses ....................... 32,321.28
Printing and Stationery ............................---- 4,523.65
Purchase, Maintenance and Operation
of Patrol Boats ----........... ........ -----........... 5,824.64
Telegraph and Telephone............... ......... 260.59
P. 0. Money Order Fees.... -..................--- 50.28
Employees Bonds ....... ....................... 310.39
Employees Insurance ........................... 677.70
Insurance on Boats ..................-........... ........ 616.00
University of Miami, Research Work ................ 798.23
Boat Tags ..........-----............-- ... ..-- ...... 160.00
Other Tags ....... .......-....... 756.00
Miscellaneous items .......................... 60.76
Refunds .-............-........ 165.00


Balance Credited to State Board of
Conservation Fund in Comptroller's Office
Decem ber 31, 1946 ............... .................


.........$100,712.27

$212,767.54


795.87


1,752.65

$212,767.54


18,512.72


93,542.55

$112,055.27










SEVENTH BIENNIAL

REPORT



BIENNIUM ENDING

DECEMBER 31, 1946


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
HERMAN GUNTER, Director
TALLAHIASSEE. FLORIDA
1947






LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Tallahassee, Florida
March 15, 1947

Mr. J. T. Hurst, Supervisor
State Board of Conservation
Tallahassee, Florida


Sir:


Again I am glad to transmit the biennial report of the Florida
Geological Survey. This is the seventh in the series beginning in
1933, when the Survey became a part of the Department of Con-
servation. These biennial- reports give a resume of (1) the ad-
ministration, (2) the program-accomplished and recommended,
(3) summaries of the mineral production, and (4) financial state-
ment for the current biennium. This report covers the calendar
years 1945-46. This has been a most active period, but accomplish-
ments have been somewhat limited by our inability to secure per-
sonnel, and by other deterrents brought about by the War
emergency.


Please accept my appreciation of your always courteous and
considerate attitude toward the work of the Survey.


Respectfully submitted,

Herman Gunter, Director.





SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

INTRODUCTION
.Florida's first geological survey dates back to the administra-
tion of Governor E. A. Perry, 1885-1889. In his message to the
Legislature of 1885 Governor Perry had the following to say:
"Appreciating the great value to our State, as well as to science,
of a geological survey and having no funds available for this pur-
pose, I was gratified at a most liberal proposition from Dr. J. Kost
to make a preliminary geological survey of the State without any
expense to the State". This was done, and a report covering the
general geological observations of Dr. Kost was submitted in 1887.
It was anticipated that a bill creating a geological survey and pro-
viding for its maintenance would be passed as a result of Dr. Kost's
work and recommendations. Such a bill was introduced as Senate
Bill No. 15 and referred to the Committee on Education. While
it received a favorable report from the Committee, the Senate
passed by one vote the motion to "postpone indefinitely". The
Florida Geological Survey is fortunate in having an original copy
of this report.
Twenty years passed before the establishment of the present
Geological Survey by the Legislature of 1907, when Dr. E. H.
Sellards was appointed State Geologist by Governor N. B. Broward
in June of that year. It has had but two directors; Dr. Sellards,
1907-1919, and Herman Gunter since 1919. Dr. Sellards served
the State well and established the Geological Survey on a firm
foundation, even though it struggled along on an entirely inade-
quate continuing appropriation. After twelve years he resigned
to accept a more promising position with the Bureau of Economic
Geology of Texas. It is of interest to record that Dr. Sellards re-
tired, September 1946, as Director of that Bureau after more than
25 years of enviable service.
From the establishment of the Survey in 1907 to 1933, when
it was merged with the State Conservation Department, the Survey
has issued twenty-four annual reports, eleven bulletins, and thir-
teen press bulletins-the latter being in the nature of press re-
leases of reports on progress in certain investigations. After be-
coming a part of the Conservation Department in 1933, the policy
of issuing annual reports gave way to that of making biennial
reports to include mainly the administrative work, and to that
of issuing bulletins containing the technical reports of the depart-





ment. This has proven to be a very good method of repoTting,
each bulletin containing the results of a specific investigation.
Since 1933 the Survey has issued, including this report, seven
biennials, nineteen bulletins, and five reports of investigation.
Reports of investigation are mostly in mimeographed form,-ivith.
printed illustrations, charts, and graphs, thus making them valu-'
able for filing and reference. In addition to reports issued by
the Survey, staff members have contributed a number of articles
to trade journals and magazines. A complete list of the publica-
tions of the Survey can be obtained upon request. The edition
of our bulletins is small, ordinarily 3,000 copies, and these are
distributed without cost to citizens of Florida and to others for
a nominal charge to cover postage and handling.
The Survey maintains a sizable exchange list of libraries in
Florida, throughout the United States, and in some foreign coun-
tries. Filing our reports in numerous libraries has proven a good
practice; it makes them available for permanent reference to many
individuals who would not otherwise have access to them both
now and in future years. There is a rapidly increasing demand
for our reports as the State develops and its potential resources
are investigated. This fact carries a challenge to maintain the
high standard of our publications, and it is with pardonable pride
that we receive many compliments on the appearance and accuracy
of our reports.
A service to the citizens of Florida which we are glad to per-
form is that of identifying and reporting individually on the
numerous samples of soil, minerals, and rocks sent to us. Often
these samples are disappointing, yet many have proven to be im-
portant leads from which commercially valuable deposits have
been discovered and developed. Therefore, we invite all citizens
of Florida to continue sending samples to us for identification.
Such determinations are made without charge and reported di-
rectly to the sender.

THE STAFF
During the period covered by this report, 1945-46, we ex-
perienced insurmountable difficulties in securing, or even main-
taining, a full staff. Staff members were called into the War
effort and it was impossible to replace them. Upon the return of
men in service, educational institutions were flooded with record
enrollment following a period of years when no graduates had
been turned out as in normal times. This gave rise to an unprec-
edented demand for teachers at a time when the supply had






reached a record low. Our staff members were again drawn upon
to fill the need, and it is hoped that vacancies thus created can
soon be filled. The personnel for the biennium has been as follows:

PERSONNEL

1945-1946
Herman Gunter, Sc.D., Director.
Robert 0. Vernon, Ph.D., Associate Geologist, Returned, Military leave
February, 1946.
David B. Ericson, M.S., Geologist. Petroleum Engineer, Resigned Aug-
ust 1945.
Hans G. Naegeli, Ph.D., Micropaleontologist.
John H. Davis, Ph.D., Economic Research Assistant, Resigned Sep-
tember 1946.
W. Storrs Cole, Ph.D., Micropaleontologist-Special research. periodic
W.m. A. Jenkins, B.S. Geologist, March to September, 1946.
J. Clarence Simpson, Field and Laboratory Assistant.
Walton B. Jones, Laboratory Aide, Veteran, reemployed June 1946.
Corinne Little, Secretary.
Lily Moore, Librarian.
1Marward E. Rogers, Clerical Assistant, Resigned March 1946.
Pearl Gatlin, Typist, Resigned March. 1946.
Mary W. Blount, Secretarial Assistant. Employed March 1946.
Jean Neel, Secret.,rial Assistant. Employed July 1946.
Frances Choate, Typist, October-November 1945.
Robert Hart, Vetvran, student helper-part time.
Haywood Atkinson. Veteran, student helper-part time.
Bernard M. Eaton, Veteran, student helper-part time.
Jack Wells, Veteran, student helper-part time.
DeWitt Miller, Student helper-part time.
John McBride, Janitor, Employed September 1945.

SURVEY QUARTERS

Since December 1939, the Survey offices have been located
in the former east lower dining hall on the campus of the Florida
State College for Women. This space of about 4,700 square feet
has been allocated through the courtesy of the State Board of
Control. It is anticipated, however, that more adequate space for
the Survey will be provided in the Natural History Building
planned under the building program now in progress by the Flor-
ida State Improvement Commission.

While it has not submitted drawings, the Survey has pro-
posed a separate building for its offices, library and laboratories
that will be in keeping with its needs. If such a building were
provided, it is proposed that the museum have at least four large
exhibit halls covering some 19,000 square feet, and that considera-
tion be given to the use of building materials native to or being






manufactured in Florida. Native stone, brick, concrete, and other
building materials of the State could be utilized in such a manner
as to make this building of outstanding interest and one of the
show buildings of the Capitol Center.

COOPERATION WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS
AND SURVEYS

During this biennium the Survey has continued its coopera-
tion with the United States Geological Survey on a somewhat ex-
panded scale; with the United States Bureau of Mines; and in the
collection of mineral statistics, with the Bureau of Census. Co-
operation is maintained as usual between the Survey and other
State Departments, especially the Road Department, the Forest
and Park Service Department and the Office of the State Chemist.

U. S. Geological Survey

Active cooperation has been continued with the U. S. Geo-
logical Survey in studies of surface water, ground water and
quality of water. This cooperation, initiated early in the history
of the Survey, has continued since 1930 without interruption,
although at times on a much reduced scale. That the importance
of water resources to the State has been appreciated by the Geo-
logical Survey since its establishment in 1907 is evidenced by the
first bulletin published by the Survey entitled, "A preliminary
Report on the Underground Water Supply of Central Florida".
The intervening years have shown the correctness of this first
evaluation, the justifiable concern felt about the water supplies
of the State, and a need for conservation and for protective
measures.

Cooperation is maintained on a basis of equal expenditure
of funds, the amount allotted by the Florida Geological Survey is
matched by the U. S. Geological Survey. During the years 1945-46
the funds appropriated by Florida to the three divisions of the
U. S. Geological Survey were as follows:
January 1, 1945 to June 30, 1945
Ground W ater .................................... .... ............. $ 2,175
Surface W ater ...... ........................................... ...... 775
$ 2.950
July 1, 1945 to June 30, 1946
Ground W ater ..................................... ............. $13,000
Surface W ater .................................................... .......... 3,000





Quality of W ater (Analyses) ........................... 500
$16,500
July 1, 1946 to December 31, 1946
Ground W ater .............................. ................... $11,000
Surface W ater .............. ....................... ................ 1,500
Quality of W ater (Analyses) ................................ 250
$12,750
Total for biennium .......... .......................$............. 2.200
This total has been provided by specific appropriation for
this work of the Geological Survey, supplemented by a special
allotment of $15,000 made available by action of the Budget Com-
mission January 8, 1946, under Chapter 22827, Section 12, Laws
of Florida, 1945. This additional amount has made it possible to
procure needed equipment such as automatic water level recorders,
well exploratory equipment, pumps and similar supplies. Thirty
additional recorders were ordered promptly after funds were
available on January 8, 1946, but delivery was delayed and a
partial shipment was received March, 1947. It is expected, how-
ever, that the balance of this equipment will be received in the
very near future and installed on selected wells in areas of the
State where water level data are urgently needed.
At the close of 1946 there were 309 wells included in the
observation program of which 35 were equipped with automatic
water level recording instruments. In addition there were many
miscellaneous records and observations of wells not included in
the above. The detailed data are published annually in a series
of the U. S. Geological Survey Water Supply Papers. Such re-
ports can be obtained at a nominal price from the Superintendent
of Documents, Washington. This applies to stream gaging data
also, obtained by the U. S. Geological Survey, Surface Water
Branch, Ocala, Florida, in cooperation with the Florida Survey
and other State,, Federal and official agencies. At the close of
1946 there were 110 gaging stations throughout Florida on 73
rivers, canals, creeks and springs. In addition, there were at least
60 stations for which records of stage only were collected. These
records of stage only are mostly lake stage records and are not
published in the Water Supply Papers, but such records are avail-
able by addressing the District Engineer, U. S. Geological Survey,
Ocala, Florida. Frequently information additional to that given
in printed reports is available direct from the files of the Survey
and cooperating agencies.





The information collected from all the gaging stations in the
State is fundamental and absolutely essential to the planning of
power dams, flood control, highway construction, bridges, irriga-
tion, and water supplies for industrial, municipal and private uses.
With the rapid development that Florida is experiencing there
has come a very insistent demand for information about the
adequacy of water supplies. Many municipalities have already suf-
fered from the over development of present sources and have
desperately sought help in locating new .sources. In many instances
the Florida Survey has rendered most satisfactory service and such
service is becoming more and more sought and appreciated.
One of the problems giving concern is the encroachment of
salt water. This is especially true of coastal areas, and many of
the towns and cities along the coast are hard pressed to get ample
supplies of potable water. Much information about the encroach-
ment of saline water in the southeastern region has been obtained
by the municipalities in direct cooperation with the U. S. Geolog-
ical Survey. Surveys made in recent years have made it possible
to outline accurately the depth to salt water and the apparent
rate of encroachment. Many observation wells have been drilled
in order to obtain needed data and these are being visited regularly
to record water level fluctuations and quality of water. Although
large funds have already been expended on these investigations the
City of Miami is still actively engaged in procuring additional
information and at present is planning to test an area southwest
of the city as a supplemental water supply source.
It is generally admitted that water is Florida's most im-
portant natural asset. It is also true that this resource has not
only been wasted, but developed without regard for conservation
practices. As a consequence, during times of drought many areas
are now suffering from the effects of this overdevelopment, waste
and unwise use. The reaction is a growing and insistent demand
that conservation measures be adopted. As reported in the Sixth
Biennial report, 1945, there was a very determined effort to pass
effective legislation designed to control and regulate the uses of the
water resources of the State, but such legislation failed of passage.
It is anticipated that additional effort will be made in 1947, per-
haps looking toward the assembling of all available data from every
source for correlation and study, following which recommenda-
tions for remedial measures can be taken.






U. S. Bureau of Mines and Bureauii (f Census
Statistics on mineral production are obtained cooperatively
through the U. S. Bureau of Mines and the U. S. Bureau of Census.
Data on mineral production are gathered by these agencies, and
the assembled and compiled information, together with the names
and addresses of the producers is sent to the Florida Survey at
a great saving in clerical expense. The Florida Survey contacts
any delinquents in an effort to get complete statistics. (See Sum-
mary of Mineral Production 1944-45, page 17.)

Florida State Road Departmnnt

The State Road Department has been very cooperative, espec-
ially in supplying descriptions of their permanent bench marks.
Florida Forestry and Park Service
The Survey has cooperated with the Florida Forestry and
Park Service in numerous ways and in particular has assisted in
establishing their recently organized archaeological survey.

Florida Department of Ag'riculture-State C'hemist

The State Chemist has very obligingly made analyses of soils,
mineral specimens and bituminous materials which have been most
helpful in determining the exact character of many samples sent in.

OIL PROSPECTING
Since the appearance of our Sixth Biennial Report published
in March, 1945, oil prospecting in Florida has proceeded actively,
methodically, and satisfactorily. At that time only one oil produc-
ing well could be recorded, although mention was made of one
that was drilling at about 4,000 feet. This well, when completed
at 11,597 feet on May 7, 1945, became Florida's second commercial
oil well. The second producer is located about one and one-half
miles north of Sunniland, and is the Humble Oil and Refining
Company's Gulf Coast Realties Corporation No. 4. A third pro-
ducer in this field was brought in May 1, 1946, at a depth of
11,578 feet, when the Gulf Coast Realties Corporation No. 6 was
completed. A fourth producer, namely, the Gulf. Coast Realties
Corporation No. 8, came in September 3, 1946, at 11,576 feet.
These are all the producing wells in the State up to this time, al-
though the Humble Oil and Refining Company is still attempting






DATA ON PRODUCING WELLS IN THE SUNNILAND FIELD, COLLIER COUNTY

Farm Name Location Started Completed Depth Remarks

Gulf Coast Realties 1980' W.. of east line, February Seple hier 11,2 mper, shut
Corporation No. 1 60 N. of south line of 28, 1943 26, 1943 6 dovn June
Sec. 29, T48S, R30E2 15, 1946


Gulf Coast Realti 1996' from N. line, 2054' October May
Gulf Coast Realties froin E. line of Sec. 20, O,9y5 11,597 Pumper
Corporation -No. 4 4 31, 1944 7, 1945


Gulf Coast Realties SW14 of NE% of Sec. November May 11,578 Flow.
Corporation No. 6 19, T48S, R30E 7, 1945 1, 1946.

Gulf Coast Realties SW% of SE'4 of See. May September 11,576 Flows
Corporation No. 8 19, T48S, R30E 24, 1946 3, 1946






to complete the Gulf Coast Realties Corporation No. 9 successfully.
At present, March 12, 1947, this well has a depth of 11,595 feet.
During the two-year period of this report, 1945-46, there have
been 51 wells begun and completed in 26 of Florida's 67 counties.
The footage drilled, according to the records of the depths reached
by each well, totals 303,897 feet. In this total are included a few
wells actually completed several days after January 1, 1947, and
one, the Gulf Oil Corporation well in the Big Pine Key area, Motn-
roe County, started November 7, 1945, was still drilling on March
12, 1947 at 14,980 feet.- This is approaching a world record for
depth which is at present held by a well drilling in Oklahoma at
more than 17,000 feet.
The four producing oil wells in Florida, all in the Sunniland
Field, Collier County, were drilled by the Humble Oil and Refining
Company. The pertinent data about each appear in the table
on page 11.
The oil is very dark, almost black, heavy, asphaltic base crude,
with an API gravity of from about 200 to 25. In wells No. 6 and
No. 8 the gravity ranged from 24.5 to 25.6, while from No. 1
and No. 4 it averaged more nearly 200. At the present time only
two wells are producing, No. 6 and No. 8. The discovery well was
taken off the pump June 15, 1946, and it may be that this well
will be given a workover job as was done for No. 4. Production
has not been kept separately for each well so that it is possible
to report only the total annual production. For 1945 the total
cumulative production was 27,645 barrels, while for 1946 it was
56,885 barrels.
It is very appropriate to acknowledge the very satisfactory
relations that have existed between the Survey and the companies
carrying on extensive exploration for oil. They have all cooperated
fully, complying with the conservation law and abiding by the
rules and regulations of the State Board of Conservation. The
Survey wishes to express its appreciation of this splendid co-
operation, and also for the uniform courteous response to all re-
quests for data on the activities of each company.
LEGISLATION
It is with distinct satisfaction that we can report that Florida
has a model law relating to the conservation, control and develop-
ment of the natural resources of oil and gas within the State. This
is the result of the active interest of the Governor and his cabinet
*Since this copy went to press this well was completed dry and abandoned at
15,439 feet on March 29, 1947.





members, assisted by the Interstate Oil Compact Commission and
the major oil companies operating in the State. This legislation
is Chapter 22819 (No. 305), Laws of Florida, 1945, and copies may
be obtained upon request to the State Board of Conservation, Oil
Division, Tallahassee, Florida.

PUBLICATIONS

The most recent bulletin of the Survey relates to the peat re-
sources of the State. This volume of some 247 pages is replete with
data, 27 illustrations, graphs, and maps, detailing the occurrence
of these deposits throughout the State. The requests for this bul-
letin indicate already that it is filling a need and will be instru-
mental in giving desired information about this important resource.
Copies of this Bulletin No. 30, and any others still available, can
be obtained by addressing a request to the Florida Geological Sur-
vey, Tallahassee.

PUBLICATIONS IN PREPARATION

A report on the Springs of Florida is almost ready for the
press and should be ready for distribution in the very near future.
This volume will furnish information on the many large and well
known springs of Florida, and also many of the less known ones.
Certainly it will be a welcome addition to the file of reports dealing
with Florida's resources.

A bulletin dealing with the geology of Levy and Citrus coun-
ties is now in preparation by Dr. Robert 0. Vernon. The field
work is almost completed and the writing is well along. It is an-
other in the series of bulletins treating of the geology and mineral
resources of the counties, a plan which the Survey started some
time ago and will continue.

Another bulletin in this series of county reports is nearing
completion, and this relates to the geology and water resources of
Lee and Hendry counties. This bulletin is being prepared by and
under the direction of Garald G. Parker, U. S. Geological Survey,
Miami.

Preparations are nearing completion to issue another report
on the elevations of Florida similar to that contained in our 17th
Annual Report. This will be much enlarged and will include all
the elevations established to date on which we have obtained record.






For several months cooperation has been maintained with the
U. S. Bureau of Mines, in an investigation of the concentration of
certain so-called rare earth minerals in the sands throughout an
area in peninsular Florida. As now contemplated a progress
report on this investigation will be issued as soon as the area now
being prospected is completed, thus making the results available
as soon as possible. It is hoped that cooperation can be
continued until the extensive region through central penin-
sular Florida can be entirely prospected and also to extend
the prospecting into western Florida. If this can be done it is
further planned to test out the area for kaolin-bearing clays, and
outline more or less definitely the area in which such clays may
be found.

CURRENT APPROPRIATION
The appropriation under which the Survey is operating, for
the biennium July 1, 1945 to June 30, 1947 is:
July 1. 1945 to July 1, 1946 to
June 30. 1946 June 30, 1947
Salaries ......................... ........................ $38.755 $38.755
Necessary and Regular Expense ........ 22.050 22.050
Total ................................. ............. $60.825 $60,825
This was an increase over the previous biennium, but it did
not provide sufficiently for the proposed investigation of the water
resources of the State. To assist in this the Budget Commission,
on January 8, 1946, provided an additional $15,000 specifically
for this work. This has greatly facilitated these investigations,
sufficiently so to provide much needed automatic water stage re-
corders and other equipment. These recorders (all such scientific
instruments are hard to get and of slow delivery) will be installed
on selected wells so that variations in water levels can be obtained
accurately in many sections of Florida where such data are badly
needed.

BUDGET REQUESTED
For the biennium beginning July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1949,
the following budget has been requested:
July 1. 1947 to July 1, 1948 to
June 30, .1948 June .30, 1949
Salaries .......................... ................... $ 55,400 ., $ 55,400
Necessary and Regular .................. 50.200 50,200
$105.600 $105,600





The Survey has experienced the most active biennium since its
establishment. While this has been brought about by the interest
in the potentialities of Florida as an oil producing State,
it is also a reflection of increased interest and development of our
mineral industries. The record total mineral production for 1945
indicates this without argument. This has all brought about a
very decided increase of demands on the Survey for information
and data that have accumulated through the years. The many
oil company representatives, geologists, landmen and geophysical
crews, have made much use of the data available through the
Survey. Furthermore the Survey has rendered directly and
through cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey, much help
to different municipalities, corporations and individuals, express-
ing concern over the adequacy of our water supplies and their
proper development. In every instance the Survey has rendered ap-
preciated service. In order that we may more adequately take care
of the additional demands for professional and technical help we
have prepared the budget above, which is most conservative. With
the additional funds requested made available, it is certain that
more effective service can and will be rendered.

FLORIDA MINERAL INDUSTRY DURING 1944 AND 1945
Statistics Collected in Cooperation with the United States
Bureau of Mines.
Florida recorded its largest mineral output during 1945 with a
total 'value of $24,928,362. The previous yearly total most nearly
approaching this was 1943 with a record of $24,856,295. This
record total indicates the activity Florida has displayed in the
effort to supply needed mineral products brought about by the
World War. Phosphate production increased to $16,298,474 or
$4,208,997 more than for the year 1943.
The mineral industries of Florida are the fourth largest in-
dustry in the State being exceeded only by the Trades and Services
group which includes the Tourist or Recreational industry; Manu-
facturing; and Agricultural industry. In the United States Flor-
ida stands first in the production of phosphate having held that
position since shortly after the discovery of phosphate in the State;
it is second in fuller's earth, an industry that has been most active
in current years; it leads in the production of sedimentary kaolin,
a type of white-firing clay used in the manufacture of high grade
white wares; it has tremendous quantities of very high grade lime-
stones extensively used as road material, in agriculture, chemical





industries and in the manufacture of lime and cement; building
stone from coquina, oolitic, coral and other limestones is produced
and used in construction in many parts of the State; large deposits
of peat and muck which finduses for the growing of crops, as a
fertilizer filler, for application to soils; sands for various construc-
tion and manufacturing purposes and mineral concentrates in
sands, ilmenite, rutile and zircon. Common brick, tile and pottery
products are also among products of Florida during more normal
times. The mineral output and value for the years 1944 and 1945
is shown in the table which follows:






SUMMARY OF MINERAL PRODUCTION IN 1944 AND 1945


Phosphate (Long Tons) 1!
Quantity
Land Pebble .......................... 3,670,208
H ard Rock ............................ 22,500
Soft-or Phosphatic Clay .... 60,087

Total Value of Phosphate
Limestone-Crushed (Short
Tons)
Road Material, Concrete ....1.772,710
Railroad Ballast, Rip Rap,
Other .................................... 868,040
Agricultural, Miscellaneous
Stone ....................................... 89,270

Total Value of Limestone
Limestone-Dimension
(Short Tons)
Dressed and Rubble ........ ............
Miscellaneous Stone-
Crushed ................................. ............
Lime (Hydrated and Quick)
Agricultural and Building .. 2.135
Chem ical ................................ 15,824,

Total Value of Lime ........


Value
$13,136,472
138,952
259,523

$13,534,947


$ 1,612.647

686,463

301,352

$ 2,600,462


$ 22,507
163,058

$ 185.565


Fuller's Earth. Kaolin, Clay
and Clay Products .............. 99.418 $ 935,070
Sand, Gravel and Cement .... 1.567,104 $ 3,425,007
Gypsum .....................................- 5,891 $ 44.412
Petroleum (Barrels) .............. 11.822 $ 26,718
Peat, Rutile, Ihmenite
and Zircon .......................... 28,229 $ 1,040,560

TOTALS ...................... $21.792,741
Water, Shells. Concrete Blocks.
Sandlime Brick, statistics
not collected.


1945
Quantity Value
4,103,022 $15,578,980
63,491 426,061
71,715 293,433

$16,298,474


1,945,600

550,030

120,320




1,230

3,350

525
17,906



145.702
1,553,204

27.645

37,677


$ 2,183,601

430,950

407,149

$ 3,021,700


$ 2,765

$ 8,934

$ 5,300
205,777

$ 211,077

$ 985,075
$ 3,286,744

$ 34,833

$ 1,078,760

$24,928,362






PRODUCERS REPORTING PRODUCTION FOR 1945


COMPANY ADDRESS
PHOSPHATE FLORIDA OUT OF STATE
Hard Rock:
J. Buttgenbach & Company .............................................Lakeland, Box 67
C. & J. Cam p, Inc. ................................... ........ ......... Ocala, Box 608
Dunnellon Phosphate Mining Company ...........................Dunnellon ........................... Savannah, Ga., Box 157

Sof t:
Colloidal Phosphate Sales Company ............................. Dunnellon
Kellogg Com pany ................................................................ Ocala
Lakeland Phosphate & Fertilizer Company ..................Bartow, 225 E. Main St.
Loncala Phosphate Company .........................................High Springs, Box 338
Sea Board Phosphate Sales Company ..............................Dunnellon
Soil Builders, Inc. .. ..................................--Dunnellon
Superior Phosphate Company .......... .......................Dunnellon, Box 476
Land Pcbble:
American Agricultural Chemical Corporation ..............Pierce ........................New York 7, 50 Church St., N. Y.
American Cyanamid Company ...............-................... Brewster .............New York 30, Rockefeller Plaza, N. Y.
Coronet Phosphate Company ..........................................Plant City ..................... New York, 19 Rector St., N. Y.
International Minerals and Chemical Corporation ........Mulberry................Chicago, 20 North Wacker Drive, Ill.
Pembroke Chemical Croporation ....................................Pembroke
Southern Phosphate Corporation ...................................Bartow ..........New York 17, 342 Madison Ave., N. Y.
Swift and Company Fertilizer Works .............................Bartow, Rt. 1
The Phosphate Mining Company ..................................... Nichols ..............New York 7, 110 William Street, N. Y.

LIMESTONE
Concrete, Road Metal and Screnings:
Camp Concrete Rock Company ........... ...................Ocala, Box 608
Central Quarries Company ................ ....................Lakeland, Box 351
Crystal River Rock Company .............. ........ ........... Leesburg






Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Company ................ Ocala and Jacksonville, Box 4G40
Dixie Lime Products Company ..........................................Ocala, 19 N. Main Street
Florida Lime Products Company ..................................... Ocala, Box 478
Levy County Lime Rock Corporation ............................Williston
Win. 1. MacDonald Corporalion .................................... Lakeland, Citrus Center Bldg.
L. B. McLeod Construction Company ...........................Orlando, Box 1513
C. M eekins .................................................. .................... I ollywood, Box 36, 2027 Johnson St.
Miami Lime & Chemical Company, Inc ..........................Miami, Rt. 2, Box 815
Mills Rock Company of Miami .............. ...................... Miami 38, 301 NW 79th Street
Naranja Rock Company, Inc. ......................................Naranja and Miami, 324 SW 16th St.
Oolite Rock Company .................. ....................... Miami 30, Box 1751
E. A. Pynchon .......................................... ........................ North M iam i, Box 1921
Seminole Rock Products ................................................Miami 24, Box 3940
S. P. Snyder and Sons .........................................................Ft. Lauderdale, Box 2681
Southern Rock Company, Inc. .....................................
Sunset Rock and Sand Company ................................... Miami, 1011 Langford Bldg.
Tigertail Quarries, Inc .... ............. .... .................. Dania
Troup Brothers ................................ ...... ......................... iami 33, 4151 S. Dixie Highway
United Lime Rock Company .........................................Tampa, 406 Stovall Bldg.
Williston Shell Rock Company .....--.............................Ocala, Box 600
Railroad Ballast and Aggregate:
Camp Concrete Rock Company ..................................Ocala, Box 608
Win. P. MacDonald Corporation ...................................Lakeland, Citrus Center Bldg.
Naranja Rock Company, Inc. ...................... ...............Naranja
E. A. Pynchon ......................... ... ................ .................North M iami, Box 1921
Seminole Rock Products ..................................................M iam i 24, Box 3940
Tigertail Quarries. Inc. ............................ ...................... D ania
Agricultural:
Cummer Lime & Manufacturing Company ..................Ocala and Jacksonville, Box 4641)0
Dixie Lime Products Company .....................................Ocala, 19 N. Main Street
Florida Dolomite Company .. ............... ..... ....................Pembroke
Florida Lime Products Company .................................Ocala, Box 478
Win. P. MacDonald Corporation .................................Lakeland, Citrus Center Bldg.
Tigertail Quarries, Inc. ........................ ......... ..........Dania






Other Uses:
Calcium Products, Inc ................................... ............... Bunnell
Connell and Shultz ... .......... .......................... .... Inverness, Box 397
Crystal River Rock Company .......................................... Leesburg
Summer Lime and Manufacturing Company ............... Ocala and Jacksonville, Box 4640
F. W H ildebrand .................................. ........................... H obe Sound
Win. P. MacDonald Corporation .. .............................Lakeland, Citrus Center Bldg.
Newberry Corporation ... ......... ........................ ......... Jacksonville 1, Box 1588
Ocala Lime Rock Corporation ................................... Ocala
Seminole Rock Products Company ................................. Miami 24, Box 3940
Thompson-Williston Mine ..........................................Jacksonville, Box 1588
Non-Commercial:
Broward County Highway Department .......................F...t. Lauderdale
Palm Beach County Highway Department ..................West Palm Beach

LIME
Cummer Lime and Manufacturing Company ..............Jacksonville, Box 4640
Dixie Lime Products Company ......................................Ocala, 19 N. Main Street
Miami Lime and Chemical Company, Inc. .....................Miami, Route 2, Box 815

KAOLIN
Edgar Plastic Kaolin Company .....................Edgar ...................................................... Metuchen, N. J.
United Clay Mines, Inc. ................... ........................ Hawthorn ............ Trenton, 101 Oakland Street, N. J.

FULLER'S EARTH
Floridin Company ............... ..... ......................Quincy ............-- Warren, 220 Liberty Street, Penna.

CEMENT
Florida Portland Cement Company .............................Tampa, 305 Morgan Street

ILMENITE AND RUTILE
Riz Mineral Company ...................... ............................. Verb Beach, Melbourne, Box 236
Rutile Mining Company of Florida .................................. Jacksonville .....................- New York, Room 815,
111 Broadway, N. Y.






STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


FINANCIAL STATEMENT
January 1, 1945, through Decemnber 31, 1945
RECEIPTS


Balance in Salary Account January 1, 1945
General Revenue Fund July 1, 1945 ............
Balance in Necessary and Regular Expense
Account January 1, 1945 ............................
General Revenue Fund July 1. 1945 ........
Refund, State Warrant No. 23572 Cancelled


$20.558.18
30,775.00 $57,333.18

14.041.75
22.050.00 36,091.75
1.085.39 1.085.39 $94,510.32


DISBURSEMENTS


Salaries, January 1, 1945 through Decem-
ber 31. 1945 ......................................... ...
Travel Expense ...................... ..............
C ar O operation ..................................-. ..........
Supplies. Field. Laboratory, Office.
Library. M useum ...................... ...............
U utilities ....................... ..................... .............
Subscriptions. Books. Dues, Etc. ..................
Postage. Telegrams. Telephone. Freight
and Express ......................- ..-. ... ......-
Printing of Publications ..........................
Co-Operative Program with U. S. Geo-
logical Survey
Ground W ater ............................ ............
Surface W ater ................ ................-
M miscellaneous .......................... .....................
Balance in Salary Account Absorbed by )
General Revenue Fund June 30. 1945 ...)
Balance in Salary Account December 31,
194 5 ............................................... ...............
Balance in Necessary and Regular Expense
Account December 31. 1945 ........................


26,291.34


1.177.10
098.55

2.716.74
206.09
737.09

451.89
7,140.06


4.877.29
1,719.61
67.67

6.800.13

23.330.10


19.793.59

6.800.13


18.295.16 41,625.56 94.510.32


FINANCIAL STATEMENT
January 1, 1940 through December 31, 1946

RECEIPTS
Balance in Salary Account January 1. 1946 $23.330.10
General Revenue Fund July 1, 1946 ........ 40.800.00) $64.130.10
Balance in Necessary and Regular Ex-
pense Account January 1, 1946 ............ 18.295.10
General Revenue Fund July 1, 1946 ....... 28,218.00 46,513.16
Governor's Special Emergency Fund
January 8, 1940 ............... .............. 15.000.00 15,000.00 $125,043.20






DISBURSEMENTS


Salaries. January 1, 1946 through Decem-
ber 31. 1946 .................. .......... .......
Travel Expense ..............................................
Car T rade-in .................. ................ ........
C ar O operation .................. ............. ..... ......
Supplies. Field. Museum, Office, Library
Maintenance-Buildings .............................
Postage. Telegrams, Telephone, Freight
and Express ..............................................
Subscriptions, Books, Dues, Etc. ...............
Printing of Publications ..............................
Co-Operative Program with U. S.
Geological Survey
Ground W ater ............. ......................
Surface W ater ......................................
Quality of W ater ................- ......... ...
M miscellaneous .......................................... .......
Special emergency fund. co-operative pro-
gram with U. S. Geological Survey ....
Balance in Salary Account absorbed by
General Revenue July 1, 1946 ....-.........
Balance in Necessary and Regular Ex-
pense Account Absorbed by General
Revenue Fund July 1, 1946 .........---........
Balance in Salary Account December 31,
1946 .................................... ....................
Balance in Necessary and Regular Ex-
pense Account December 31, 1946 ........
Balance in Special Emergency Fund De-
cember 31. 1946 .............. ......................
*Comptroller's balance $10,972.90 due to
warrant in amount of $1,556.21 having
been drawn in error against this account
but credited back to this account March,
1947.


2,469.05
574.30
1,072.72
4,122.23
603.24

670.08
433.24
2,282.47


11,650.80
3,187.54
500.00
125.03

4,333.02

8,826.31


6,293.35

24,560.85

12,529.11*


30,742.94













27,690.70

4,333.02




15,119.66


10,666.98 47,756.94 125,643.26