<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Introduction
 Appropriations and expenditure...
 Florida geological survey office...
 personnel
 Survey activities
 Summer work by consultants
 Studies by state and federal geological...
 Topographic maps
 Cooperation with other agencie...
 Oil and gas exploration in...
 The mineral industry of Florida...
 Known active mineral producers...
 Map: Surface occurrences of geologic...
 Map: Mineral resources and industries...
 Back Cover














Biennial report (Florida Geological Survey)
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000223/00001
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report (Florida Geological Survey)
Series Title: Biennial report (Florida Geological Survey)
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: Survey
Publication Date: 1957-1958
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Geology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Funding: Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Digitized from the Florida Geological Survey collections held by the Government Documents Department,George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000376187
notis - ACB5800
oclc - 1956611
System ID: UF00000223:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
    List of Illustrations
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Appropriations and expenditures
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Florida geological survey office building
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    personnel
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Survey activities
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Summer work by consultants
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Studies by state and federal geological survey personnel and by consultants for the survey - published between January 1, 1957 and December 31, 1958
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Topographic maps
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Cooperation with other agencies
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Oil and gas exploration in Florida
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    The mineral industry of Florida 1956-57
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Known active mineral producers in Florida, 1956-57
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Map: Surface occurrences of geologic formations in Florida
        Page 85
    Map: Mineral resources and industries of Florida
        Page 86
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text

SELOR I DA
GEOLOGICAL


N


-I BIENNIAL REPORT
1957-1958











STATE OF FLORIDA
LeRoy Collins, Governor

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Ernest Mitts, Director







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT

of the

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Covering Period
January 1, 1957 through December 31, 1958






Robert O. Vernon
Director and State Geologist





Tallahassee, Florida
1959













FLORIDA STATE BOARD


OF

CONSERVATION



LeRoy Collins
Governor


R. A. Gray
Secretary of State


Ray E. Green
Comptroller


Thomas D. Bailey
Superintendent of
Public Instruction


Richard Ervin
Attorney General


J. Edwin Larson
Treasurer


Nathan Mayo
Commissioner of
Agriculture


Ernest Mitts
Director


5 759









LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


March 30, 1959


Mr. Ernest Mitts, Director
Florida State Board of Conservation
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Mr. Mitts:

The Thirteenth Biennial Report has been prepared as a
report to the Florida Legislature upon the activities and needs
of the Florida Geological Survey. It will also be used to
supplement the Survey correspondence and fill requests for
information on the State's mineral resources and recent
mineral production. For the biennium, this report provides
a list of publications, topographic maps, personnel serving
the State with the Survey, and gives a comprehensive list of
mineral producers.

The first year that I have been privileged to serve as
Director and State Geologist has been one of organization,
but none the less productive. We anticipate a greatly in-
creased participation in the economic development of Florida
during the next biennium and the Survey looks forwardwith
pleasure to a continued close association with your depart-
ment.

Sincerely yours,

Robert O. Vernon, Director
and State Geologist










TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page
Letter of transmittal............................ .iii
Introduction... .................................. 1
Appropriations and expenditures ................. 3
Florida Geological Survey office building .......... 7
Personnel..................... ..... .......... 10
Florida Geological Survey .................... 11
U.S. Geological Survey in Florida ............. 13
Surface Water Branch ..................... 13
Quality of Water Branch ................... 14
Ground Water Branch ...................... 14
Survey activities ............ ................... 16
Water investigations ....................... 20
Surnmar work by consultants ..................... 22
Dr. Jules DuBar and Mr. Vincent Vanstrum .... 22
Mr. Glenn T. Allen, Jr. and Mr. Edward Dolan 24
Dr. W. A. White ........................... 25
Studies by State and Federal Geological Survey
personnel and by consultants for the Survey -
published between January 1, 1957 and Decem-
ber 31, 1958 ................................ 26
Estimation of funds needed for publications,
1959-60.................................. 30
Library report ..................... ......... 31
Topographic maps ................................ 33
Numerical index to topographic maps .......... 34
County index to topographic maps.............. 37
Cooperation with other agencies .................... 40
Florida State Board of Conservation and
Florida State University ................... 40
Florida State University, Department of
Geology..... ........... ................... 43
Florida State University, Department of
Ceramics ....... ........................ 44
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil
Conservation Service ...................... 44
State Road Department ................. ..... 44
Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund ...... 44
Water Resources Department ................. 47
Miscellaneous agencies...................... 48









Page
U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources
Division.................................. 49
Current program.......................... 49
Proposed future studies .................... 55
Oil and gas exploration in Florida .................. 58
1957 activities................................ 59
1958 activities................................ 59
The mineral industry of Florida 1956-57 .......... 61
Consumption, trade, and markets............... 63
Trends and development....... .......... .... 63
Review by mineral commodities ............... 64
Nonm etals ... .. ........................ .. 64
Cement................................. 64
Clays .................................. 65
Gypsum ................................. 65
Lim e.................................. 65
Perlite ............................... .. 65
Phosphate rock ......................... 65
Sand and gravel ........................ 66
Staurolite.............................. 66
Stone................................. .. 67
M etals ............ ....................... 67
Rare-earth metals.............. ......... 67
Titanium concentrates ................. 67
Zircon .......... ...................... 68
Mineral fuels .... ..... ..... .............. 68
Natural gas ............................. 68
Peat ............ ..................... 68
Petroleum .... .................. ....... 68
Preliminary review of the mineral industry
during 1958....................... ....... .. 69
Known active mineral producers in Florida,
1956-57..................................... 71

ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure
1 Front view of the Florida Geological Survey
Office and Research Building .............. 8
2 Ground floor of the Florida Geological
Survey Office and Research Building....... 8







Figure Page
3 Rear view of the Florida Geological Survey
Office and Research Building .............. 9
4 First floor of the Florida Geological
Survey Office and Research Building....... 9
5 Second floor of the Florida Geological
Survey Office and Research Building ....... 10
6 An abandoned 8-inch well flowing in excess
of 800 gallons per minute. This well is
located in section 32, T. 7 S., R. 30 E.,
St. Johns County, Florida ................ 21
7 Index to published topographic maps ....... 35
8 Streamflow measuring stations in operation
December 31, 1958 ...................... 50
9 Chemical quality sampling stations,
October, 1958 ........................... 51
10 Location of observation wells ............. 52
11 Areas of water resources investigation, 1958 53
12 Value of phosphate rock and stone and total
value of mineral production in Florida
1935-57................................. 62

Table
1 Mineral production in Florida, 1956-57 .... 61
2 Average unit value of mineral commodities
in Florida 1948-52 (average) and 1953-57... 62
3 Employment in the mineral industries
1955-57 ................................. 64
4 Preliminary mineral production in Florida
1958.....................................

Map
1 Surface occurrences of geologic formations
in Florida .................... Following page 84
2 Mineral resources and industries
Florida ...................... Following page 84














THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


OF THE

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


INTRODUCTION

During 1958 the Florida Geological Survey began its
second half century of continuous service to Florida. Since
its organization in 1907 it has had but three State Geologists:
Dr. Elias Sellards, 1907-1919, Dr. Herman Gunter, 1919-
1958, and Robert O. Vernon, 1958 to present. Dr. Gunter
retired after almost 51 years of dedicated service and upon
his retirement he had served the State longer than any other
employee. He also had been State Geologist for 39 years
and, although exact records are lacking, it is suspected that
he had hadmore service as State Geologist thanhad any other
head of state surveys in the United States.

The present Director and State Geologist was appointed
by Governor LeRoy Collins, the appointment becoming effect -
tive at the close of business on March 31, 1958.

From a two-man organization in 1907 with a yearly ap-
propriation of $7, 500, the Survey has grown to include 17 pro-
fessional and eight clerical and stenographic employees with
a biennial expenditure of $692, 668. The Geological Survey
operated under the 1957 Florida Statutes, Section 373. 011
setting forth the general duties of the geological department;
and Sections 373. 031/. 061 requiring the Survey to determine
the hydrologic facts of the State's water resources, and au-
thorizing Survey personnel and the county sheriffs to control
free-flowing artesian wells. Under Sections 377. 01/. 40, the
State Board of Conservation regulates exploration for oil and
gas in the State and this Board has directed the State Geologist

759
65759






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


to serve as administrator to the Oil and Gas Division of the
Board, the Survey retaining all records of oil and gas drilling
activities. The State Geologistwas also directed by the Board
to serve with the Interstate Oil Compact Commission as
needed.

Florida Law provides that the Survey shall explore for,
"minerals, water supply, and other natural resources of the
State, and shall prepare reports and maps covering "de-
scription of such surveys and explorations, occurrence and
location of mineral and other deposits of value, -surface and
subterranean water supply and power, and mineral waters,
and the best and most economical methods of development,
together with analysis of soils, minerals and mineral
waters.... "

The field of geology, with its many ramifying subdivi-
sions can be fully applied to the State's economy only if spe-
cialists in each of the subdivisions are available. For this
reason the Survey has been departmentalized. The staff has
been given general areas of responsibility to include: 1) stra-
tigraphy and general geology, 2) water resources, 3) eco-
nomic geology and mineral resources, 4) vertebrate and
invertebrate paleontology, and 5) oil and gas regulation and
finding.

Over the last 50 years the Survey has accumulated rock
cuttings and cores from about 4, 900 wells drilled in search
of oil and gas andas a water supply or water disposal well.
These samples are organized in an extensive rock sample
library which, for the most part, has not beenfully utilized.
In an attempt to realize the greatest value from a study of
these rock cuttings, the State has been divided into five gen-
eral regions with at least one geologist being given the re-
sponsibility of studying all of the well samples in a designated
region.

All well samples will be studied and county and regional
maps will be prepared to show the thickness of sediment
lying upon the first porous limestone encountered in the well.
This is essentially the casing interval for wells that develop
artesian water. Other maps will illustrate the structure or






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


attitude and the thickness of various beds as a lead to oil
finding and to further knowledge of the geologic history of
Florida. It is also planned to study the upper 100 feet of
each well analytically in search of minerals having possibil-
ities of economic development, and to outline these possi-
bilities, where they are found, upon suitable maps.

A comprehensive evaluation of Florida limestone, clay,
sand, and heavy mineral resources, partially in cooperation
with the U. S. Bureau of Mines, is underway. These evalua-
tions will include an estimation of tonnages available, amount
of reserves, cost of mining and/or manufacture, cost and
problems of marketing including transportation, and will
include analyses of the resource where possible. Individual
mineral resources will be worked by areas and our first
evaluation will include limestone and clay in Holmes, Wash-
ington, and Jackson counties, to be published in late 1959.

Considerable time and money has been saved during the
last year by revising some of our clerical procedures. The
cumbersome filing system is being completely reworked and
an accepted system is being installed. Old records will be
microfilmed and filing space requirements reduced to about
one-tenth.


APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES

The Florida Geological Survey has continued to expand
during the 1957-59 biennium. This expansion reflects a
growth in personnel, budget, and contribution to the economic
growth and welfare of the State. The part the Survey has had
in bringing new industries into Florida and in assisting old
industries to expand through the use of the State's water and
mineral wealth has been recognized by the Legislature. The
1955-57 appropriation was $450,995 whereas the 1957-59
appropriationwas $692, 668, being 154 percent of the previous
biennium.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY



Appropriations

July 1, 1957 June 30, 1959


7-1-57 to 7-1-58 to
6-30-58 6-30-59


Current
1. Geological Survey:
(a) Salaries .....................
(b) Expenses ....................
(c) Operating Capital Outlay.......

2. Special:
(a) Enforcing Section 373,031-
373.061 F.S..................

3. Trust Funds:
(a) Internal Improvement Fund ....
(b) Water Resources Department ..
(c) City of Pensacola .............
(d) Escambia County ............
(e) Hudson Paper & Pulp Company.
(1) Cities and counties of the Green
Swamp area .................

Total...................


$101,405
175,000
9,000


50,000 50,000


--- 8,000 8,000

$335,805 $356,863 $692,668


In addition, an appropriation of $387,800 was made by the 1955 Legislature
and construction was underway on an Office and Research Building during 1957.

The 1957 Legislature appropriated $300,000 for an Office and Research
Building-Second Unit, but none of these funds were released for expenditure.



1957
Statement of Funds Available
Expenditures and Balances
January 1 to December 31


SALARIES
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ...................
General Revenue Release January 1....
General Revenue Release April 1 ......
General Revenue Release July 1 .......
General Revenue Release October 1....

Total Available.................

Expenditures:
Salaries and Wages ..................


Less funds placed in reserve on July 1,
1957, by Budget Commission .........

Balance January 1, 1958..................


$ 1,078.05
22,012.67
22,012.66
24,083.75
25,183.25


$ 94,325.38



93,288.54

$ 1,036.84

65.65

$ 971.19


$106,863
175,000
5,500


Total


$208,268
350,000
14,500




100,000


400


2,000
4,000
2,000
1,000
2,500


2,400
4,000
2,000
1,000
2,500








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT



EXPENSES
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ................... $ 8,222.60
General Revenue Release January 1.... 18,400.00
General Revenue Release March 15 .... 9,953.87
General Revenue Release April 1 ...... 18,400.00
General Revenue Release May 30 1,700.00
General Revenue Transfer and Refund
June 30..... ........................ 23,398.07
General Revenue Release July 1....... 43,750.00
General Revenue Release October 1.... 43,750.00
Total Available.................


Expenditure s: Expenses
Day Labor ..........................
Professional Fees and Consultant
Services......... ...................
Communication and Transportation of
Things ..............................
General Printing and Reproduction
Services............................
Repair and Maintenance ..............
Travel...............................
Other Contractural Services ..........
Building and Construction Materials
and Supplies ........................
Coal, Fuel Oil and Other Heating
Supplies ............................
Educational, Medical, Scientific and
Agricultural Materials and Supplies....
Maintenance Materials and Supplies ....
Motor Fuels and Lubricants...........
Office Materials and Supplies .........
Other Materials and Supplies..........
Insurance and Surety Bonds ...........
Rental of Buildings and Equipment.....
Other Current Charges and Obligations.

Total Expenditures .............
Balance December 31, 1957...............

OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ...................
Transfer from Water Survey
Operating Capital Outlay Account......
General Revenue Release July 1.......
General Revenue Release October 1....
Total Available ................

Expenditures: Operating Capital Outlay
Books ..............................
Educational, Medical, Scientific and
Agricultural Equipment. ..............
Motor Vehicles-Passenger............
Office Furniture and Equipment .......


$ 1,367.60

702. 20

2,637.27

6,201.66
2,222.54
3,888.35
90,028.52

10.00

64.00

1,570.42
373.27
2,072.54
3,540.55
428.65
1,247. 22
6,284.30
646.28


$123,285.37
$ 44,289.17


$ 4,105.40

3,617.93
2, 250. 00
2,250.00




$ 1,054.04

457.30
1,170.85
7,317.43


$167,574.54


$ 12,223.33








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Total Expenditures ............
Balance December 31, 1957...............


1958
Statement of Funds Available
Expenditures and Balances
January 1 to December 31


SALARIES
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ...................
General Revenue Release January 1
General Revenue Release April 1 ......
General Revenue Release July 1 .......
General Revenue Release October 1....
Total Available ................

Expenditures:
Salaries and Wages ..................


Less funds placed in reserve on July 1,
1958, by Budget Commission..........
Balance January 1, 1959...................

EXPENSES
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ...................
General Revenue Release January 1....
General Revenue Release April 1 ......
General Revenue Release July 1 .......
General Revenue Release October 1....
Total Available ................

Expenditures: Expenses
Day Labor ..........................
Professional Fees and Consultant
Services............................
Communication and Transportation of
Things.... ..........................
General Printing and Reproduction
Services............................
Repairs and Maintenance .............
Travel..............................
Utilities ............................
Other Contractural Services ...........
Building and Construction Materials
and Supplies .........................
Coal, Fuel Oil and Other Heating
Supplies ............................
Educational, Medical, Scientific and
Agricultural Materials and Supplies....
Maintenance Materials and Supplies....
Motor Fuels and Lubricants ..........


$ 9,999.62
$ 2,223.71


$ 971.19
24,473.00
26,351.25
26,758.00
26,673.50


$105,226.94



103,521.25

$ 1,705.69

416.84

$ 1,288.85


$212,851.42


$ 44,289.17
10,000.00
72,500.00
43,031.75
43,030.50




$ 1,977.20

515.07

3,961.19

15,504.90
2,920.39
5,231.19
2,340.75
159,624.25

76.61

607.88

1,762.80
1,408.02
1,402.32







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 7
Office Materials and Supplies ......... 5,663. 15
Other Materials and Supplies........... 3,446.03
Insurance and Surety Bonds........... 449.34
Rental of Buildings and Equipment..... 51.98
Other Current Charges and Obligations. 250. 92
Total Expenditures ............. $207, 193.99
$ 5,657.43
Less funds placed in reserve on July 1,
1958, by Budget Commission .......... .75
Balance December 31, 1958 ............. $ 5,656.68

OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ................... $ 2,223.71
General Revenue Release January 1.... 2, 250. 00
General Revenue Release April 1...... 1,000.00
General Revenue Release July 1....... 1,375.00
General Revenue Release October 1.... 2,165.00
Total Available ................. $ 9,013.71

Expenditures: Operating Capital Outlay
Books ................................. $ 681.97
Buildings and Fixed Equipment ........ 422. 00
Educational, Medical, Scientific and
Agricultural Equipment .............. 47. 85
Motor Vehicles-Passenger .......... 1,421.27
Office Furniture and Equipment ....... 3,360.68
Other Structures and Improvements.... 382.30
Other Capital Outlay ................. 1,661.65
Total Expenditures ............. $ 7, 977.72
$ 1,035.99
Less funds placed in reserve on July 1,
1958, by Budget Commission .......... 1.08
Balance December 31, 1958............... $ 1,034.91
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OFFICE BUILDING


The 1955 Legislature appropriated $387,800 for con-
structing and equipping a building designed to house the office
and laboratories of the Florida Geological Survey. The build-
ing, designed by Guy C. Fulton's office, included space for
all activities of the Survey and a portion of the Ground Water
Branch of the U. S. Geological Survey, and we fit it nicely.
The building was completed in late 1957 and was occupied in
December of that year. Floor plans (figs. 2, 4, 5) designate the
activities and flow of work in the building, and a photograph
of the building taken March 26, 1959, shows the architecture
(figs. 1, 3).


The 1957 Legislature appropriated $300,000 for con-
struction of an educational and industrial display building,
but these funds were not released. This was the last unit of








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Figure 1. Front view of the Florida Geological Survey Office
and Research Building.


P A k KI N 6


A I(t A



OC K fOJ5IL
JAMPLE STORAGE
PLAN

GROUND FLOOR
FLORIDA GEOLOGICALJURVEY
OFFICE AND RESEARCH BUILDING
COMPLETE, PEC. 158

Figure 2. Ground floor of the Florida Geological Survey
Office and Research Building.






THIRTEENTH BIENNAIL REPORT


~ :_i~ '


Figure 3. Rear view of the Florida Geological Survey Office
and Research Building.


Figure 4. First floor of the Florida Geological Survey Office
and Research Building.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Figure 5. Second floor of the Florida Geological Survey
Office and Research Building.

three designed to house the teaching functions of the Florida
State University Geology Department, the research and data
collecting functions of the Survey, and the display of geologic
and industrial collections, together in a geologic center;
thus, combining talents and equipment of the several depart-
ments for their best and most economic utilization.

We are grateful to the citizens of Florida and to the
Legislature for the opportunity to work in these pleasant
offices and laboratories, to contribute to the further develop-
ment of Florida's mineral and water wealth, and to insure
that these resources shall be used wisely to gain the greatest
benefit from their use.



PERSONNEL

With the move into the new Survey building, an intensive







THIRTEENTH BIENNAL REPORT


reorganization of the well sample library, geologic and pa-
leontologic collections, library, laboratory equipment, letter
and well files, buying procedures, accounting and internal
auditing, fixing responsibilities of individuals within the
Survey, and departmentalization of many duties were under-
taken. Much of the reorganization and cataloguing of equip-
ment, library, and collections, was done with part-time
employees and these have performed exceedingly well. An
attempt was made to employ students of geology, enrolled at
Florida State University, the thought being that these students
would give serious consideration and thought to our problems.
This has proved to be true.


Since the retirement of Dr. Gunter and the appointment
of Robert Vernon as State Geologist, the Survey has been
without an Assistant State Geologist. It is hoped to fill this
position reasonably soon and the Survey will be fully manned
technically. Because of the technical details of Survey bus-
iness, good clerical help is difficult to find and sometimes
to keep. The turnover the past two years has been exceed-
ingly high. While the Survey has excellent working conditions
and pleasant personnel, the technical aspects of the work
appeals to only the more talented clerical workers, for whom
competition is high.




Florida Geological Survey Personnel
Office Tallahassee
P.O. Box 631
Florida Geological Survey Office Building
Tennessee and Woodward Streets
January 1, 1957 to December 31, 1958


Full-time Employees
Gunter, Herman
Vernon, Robert O.
Bishop, Ernest W.
Calver, James L.
DeLaney, Walter J., Jr.
Hendry, Charles W., Jr.
Jaicks, Fredrick B.
Lavender, James A.
Reves, William D.
Sproul, Charles R.
Woodward, Herbert J.
Yon, James W., Jr.
Olsen, Stanley J.
Puri, Harbans S.


Retired Mar. 31, 1958
Apr. 1, 1958 Appointed

Resigned Apr. 30, 1957
July 1, 1957 to May 31,

Resigned Feb. 28, 1957

Entered Oct. 1, 1957

Entered June 1, 1958


Director and State Geologist
Director and State Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
1958 Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Geologist
Vertebrate Paleontologist
Paleontologist








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Maxwell, Earl L.

Thompson, Ralph D.
Janson, Andrew R.
Highsmith, Kenneth J.
Whitehead, Harry
Still, Wright P.
Murphy, Simmie L.
Kilpatrick, Rachel H.
Kirk, Muriel M.
Wildner, Gertrude P.
Harthern, Alvis T.
Little, E. Corrine
Novak, Mary C.
Youngblood, Betty L.
Barnes, Evelyn L.
Carroll, Genevieve C.
Corriveau, Mary L.
Coyner, Carolyn S.
Clark, Deborah F.
Shuler, Ruth A.
Barnes, Moses L.
Snellings, Charlie
Houston, Clarence

Part-time Employees
Almore, Mary G.
Austin, Robert W.
Balanky, Eugene F.
Benda, William K.
Blow, Robert M.
Brokaw, Jerry L.
Chin, Chih S.
Cofield, Starling
Dame, John W.
Barman, Roy K.
Gauvin, Lloyd D.
Goldbold, Phillip R.
Haslam, John H., Jr.
Kilbourn, James P.
Kurjack, Edward B.
Lammers, George E.
McArdle, Jane E.
Merriell, Jane S.
Paterson, Robert
Robinson, Eddie L.
Sheperd, Edwin A.
Strozier, Robert M., Jr.
Tait, William J.
Thompson, Leigh A.
Tonda, Alfred P.
Umstead, Emily B.
Umstead, Robert L.
Vanstrum, Vincent V.
Vega, Manuel
Waldron, Lynn K.
Warden, Bruce E.
Whitehead, Don A.


Entered May 4, 1957 Personnel Manager and
Accountant
Discharged Apr. 30, 1957 Accountant
Illustrator
Resigned Aug. 31, 1958 Draftsman
Entered Oct. 1, 1958 Draftsman
Duplicating Equipment Supervisor
Engineering Aide
Feb. 18, 1957 to Aug. 31, 1957 Librarian
Resigned Feb. 28, 1957 Librarian
Entered Sept. 6, 1957 Librarian
Entered Feb. 24, 1958 Secretary
Retired Mar. 31, 1958 Secretary
Secretary
Resigned Aug. 31, 1958 Secretary
Entered Dec. 16, 1958 Stenographer
Oct. 6, 1958 to Nov. 30, 1958 Stenographer
Entered June 16, 1958 Stenographer
Resigned Feb. 28, 1958 Stenographer
Entered June 20, 1958 Clerk-Typist
Clerk-Typist
Sample Washer and Janitor
Sample Washer
Entered Jan. 15, 1958 Janitor



Aug. 1, 1956 to Aug. 8, 1957 Typist
Entered Sept. 22, 1958 Sample Sorter
Entered Sept. 19, 1958 Librarian Assistant
Entered Sept. 2, 1958 Laboratory Aide
Entered Dec. 12, 1958 Sample Sorter
Feb. 1958 Draftsman
June 2, 1958 to July 31, 1958 Sample Sorter
Discharged Jan 31, 1958 Janitor
May 13, 1958 to Nov. 30, 1958 Sample Sorter
June 2, 1958 to Aug. 31, 1958 Sample Sorter
June 1958 Field Assistant
Entered Feb. 10, 1958 Sample Sorter
Entered Dec. 12, 1958 Sample Sorter
June 5, 1958 to Aug. 31, 1958 Rodman
June 1958 Field Assistant
Entered Dec. 20, 1957 Laboratory Aide
October 1957 Typist
Aug. 19, 1957 to Sept. 27, 1957 Typist
Dec. 20, 1957 to Aug. 31, 1958 Librarian Assistant
Discharged Jan. 31, 1958 Janitor
Dec. 23, 1957 to Mar. 31, 1958 Sample Sorter
June 16, 1958 to Aug. 31, 1958 Sample Sorter
June 4, 1958 to Aug. 31, 1958 Sample Sorter
Entered Oct. 21, 1957 Typist
Feb. 3, 1958 to May 31, 1958 Sample Sorter
June 2, 1958 to Aug. 31, 1958 Typist
Entered June 2, 1958 Sample Sorter
Entered Dec. 20, 1957 Laboratory Aide
June 3, 1958 to Sept. 30, 1958 Laboratory Aide
Dec. 20, 1957 to Jan. 31, 1958 Sample Sorter
June 1, 1958 to Sept. 30, 1958 Rodman
June 5, 1957 to Aug. 31, 1957 Rodman








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Withers, Ben C.
Zohler, Andrew J.

Research Consultants
Allen, Glenn
Brodkorb, Pierce
DuBar, Jules
Gorsline, Donn
Goodell, Grant
White, W.A.


Dec. 23, 1957 to Jan 31, 1958
Dec. 20, 1957 to May 31, 1958


Sample Sorter
Sample Sorter


Ocala, Florida -1957-58 Complete Archeological Study
Univ. of Florida 1957-58 Vertebrate Fossils
Univ. of Houston 1957,1958 Invertebrate Collection
Florida State Univ. 1958 Tampa Bay Sediments
Florida State Univ. 1958 Tampa Bay Sediments
Univ. of North Carolina 1957 Geomorphology


U.S. Geological Survey Personnel
Surface Water Branch
Florida District

District Office Ocala
P.O. Box 607
Building 211, Roosevelt Village
Phone MArion 2-6513


Patterson, Archibald O.
Pride, Roland W.
Anderson, Warren
Heath, Richard C.
Kenner, William E.
Meredith, Edwin W.
Musgrove, Rufus H.
Ray, Richard D.
Charnley, Raymond S.
Stone, Roy B. Jr.
Causseaux, Kenneth W.
Cunningham, Ray E.
Gardner, Milton S.
Newbern, Ernest K.
Potter, Phillip W.
Douglas, George M.
Jeffords, Wallace L.
Leake, Frances P.
MacLain, Helen Jones
Speir, Florence D.
Thomas, Robert


District Engineer
Assistant District Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer.
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineering-Technician
Mathematician
Engineering Aid
Engineering Aid
Engineering Aid
Engineering Aid
Engineering Aid
Hydrologic Field Assistant (WAE)
Hydrologic Field Assistant
Clerk
Clerk
Clerk
Laborer (WAE)


Miami Subsdistrict Office
P.O. Box 33348, Miami 33
3316 Pan American Drive
Phone HIghland 8-4564


Hartwell, James H.
Carter, Albert G.
Gallihey, Claiborne F.
Leach, Stanley D.
Beaumont, Edmund L.
Luethi, Doris B.


Engineer in Charge
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineering Aid
Clerk-Stenographer







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Sebring Subdistrict Office
P.O. Box 553
Highlands County Court House
Phone EVergreen 6-5771


Murphy, Walter R., Jr.
Bird, Robert A.
Miller, Charles R.
Hollingsworth, Violet C.
Childress, Donald M.


Engineer in Charge
Engineering Aid
Engineering Aid
Clerk-Typist
Laborer (WAE)


Quality of Water Branch
Florida District
District Office Ocala
P.O. Box 607
Building 211, Roosevelt Village
Phone MArion 2-6513


Geurin, James W.
Joyner, Boyd F.
Cherry, Rodney N.
Crooks, James W.
Menke, Clarence G.
Kennedy, Vance C.
Eff, Samuel
Cole, Catherine Lovell
Davis, Mary A.
Gore, James B.
Sanders, Bobby J.
Weisner, Hassel Lee
Wesley, Merle S.
Privett, Alta S.


District Chemist
Assistant District Chemist
Chemist
Chemist
Chemist
Geologist
Physical Science Aid (WAE)
Physical Science Aid
Physical Science Aid
Physical Science Aid
Physical Science Aid
Physical Science Aid
Clerk-Stenographer
Clerk-Typist (WAE)


Field Headquarters Miami
P.O. Box 33348, Miami 33
3316 Pan American Drive


Chemist (WAE)


Ground Water Branch
Florida District
Office of Research Engineer Tallahassee
P.O. Box 110
Florida Geological Survey Office Building
Tennessee and Woodward Streets


Cooper, H. H.


Research Engineer


District Office Tallahassee
P.O. Box 110
Florida Geological Survey Office Building
Tennessee and Woodward Streets


Rorabaugh, M.I.
Hoy, Nevin D.
Brown, Delbert W.
Foster, James D.
Essig, Carl F., Jr.


District Engineer
Administrative Geologist
Geologist
Physical Science Technician
Engineering Aid


Law, Berton








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Teel, John R., Jr.
Clarke, Marilyn Y.
Hall, Martha L.
Roache, Blanche D.


Engineering-Draftsman
Clerk-Stenographer
Clerk
Clerk-Typist


Miami Subdistrict Office
P.O. Box 33348, Miami 33
3316 Pan American Drive


Klein, Howard
Kohout, Francis A.
Lichtler, William F.
Sherwood, Clarence B.
Hull, John E.
Hermance, Ronald
Jackson, Kenneth L.
Voegtle, Henry J.
Pollard, Laura G.


Geologist in Charge
Geologist
Geologist
Hydraulic Engineer
Physical Science Technician
Engineering Aid
Engineering Aid
Engineering Aid
Clerk


Gainesville Field Office
P.O. Box 325
Professional Building, Rooms 310-311


Cagle, Joseph
Hoffman, John F.
Mills, Luther R. E.


Geologist
Hydraulic Engineer
Engineering Aid


Lakeland Field Office
P. O. Box 773
Broderick Building, Room 903
130 Kentucky Avenue


Stewart, Herbert G., Jr.
Wetterhall, Walter S.
Meyer, Frederick W.


McCoy, Henry J.


Naples Field Office
1039 6th Lane North




Pensacola Field Office
Town and Country Plaza, Inc.


Barraclough, Jack T.
Marsh, Owen T.


Geologist


Hydraulic Engineer
Geologist


St. Augustine Field Office
City Building, Room 337
90 St. George Street


Bermes, Boris J.
Leve, Gilbert W.
Tarver, George R.


Hydraulic Engineer
Geologist
Geologist


Geologist
Geologist
Geophysicist






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


SURVEY ACTIVITIES

The Survey is the geologic consultant to the citizens and
officials of Florida. Through correspondence, publications,
talks and personal contacts, the results of researches and
data collected on the mineral, water and related economic
resources, have been made available.

The offices of the Survey are now firmly established at
Woodward and Tennessee streets in Tallahassee. A new
office and laboratory building was occupied in December of
1957. This building is located adjacent to the Department of
Geology, Florida State University, and a close cooperation is
maintained with the various segments of the University, so
that Surveywork canbe closely coordinated with work of other
scientists. A particularlyactive program is anticipated with
the Department of Geology, whereby personnel and equipment
will be jointly utilizedto benefit the State's economythrough
a coordinated effort.

Throughout the biennium, officials from more than
100 new industrialplants involving investments in excess of
$250 million contacted the Survey for information on foun-
dation sites, water supply,, water quality, and available
mineral resources to be used in a proposed industrial ex-
pansion.

We are especiallypleased to havehelped to locate or to
expand the activities of a number of companies engaged in
mining, or in extracting metals or minerals. Especially
detailed assistance was given'to companies engaged in the
following activities: lightweight aggregate, beer, pipeline,
zirconium sintering, citrus concentrates, concrete aggre-
gate (4), road base course materials, air products, gypsum,
aluminium- and magnesium-oxide extraction, and water and
oilwelldrilling. Numerous other activities, citizens, cities,
and agencies have undoubtedly used data published by the
Florida Geological Survey, of which we have no record.

The first year of the biennium was used to prepare for
moving into new office quarters and the last year has been
one of reorganization of the well sample library, filing
system, office procedures, and work habits. The usual






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


large number of contacts with the public was continued and
21 talks were prepared and presented by personnel of the
Survey to various organizations and as short courses at the
universities to student groups.

During 1957-58 the very large job of complete evaluation
of the extensive well sample library was undertaken and the
first maps summarizing these data will be available next
biennium.

Dr. Harbans S. Puri, Paleontologist, has begun a com-
plete reorganization and recataloguing of the Survey micro-
fossil and mollusk collections. Jules DuBar and Vincent
Vanstrum shared with Dr. Puri the responsibility of rework-
ing and cataloguing the mollusk collections, particularly a
collection of Neogene shells presented to the Survey by
Charles Locklin of St. Petersburg, Florida.

Dr. Puri is studying ostracodes of the Caloosahatchee
marl, the Fort Thompson formation, the Arca faunizone, the
Tamiami formation, and Recent species from the west coast
of Florida. He has been given the responsibility of the sub-
surface geology of the south peninsular area. With R. O.
Vernon, he is preparing charts'and diagrams illustrating the
stratigraphy and paleoecology of the Florida Miocene, with
W.K. Benda, a student at Florida State Universityfor whom
Dr. Puri is directing a study, an ecological study of the
Tampa Bay area, with J.W. Yon, Jr. and W.R. Oglesby,
the geology of Gilchrist and Taylor counties, and with J. W.
Yon, Jr., the Foraminifera of the Avon Park limestone.

Mr, W.D. Reves, Geologist, has compiled some data
on the mineral resources of Florida and has completed the
field work and analyses covering a detailed analysis of the
clay and limestone resources of Jackson, Washington, and
Holmes counties. The report is scheduled to be published
during late 1959. Mr. Reves will join Mr. Bishop in addi-
tional complete areal tabulations of specific mineral re-
sources tobe used to attract additional industryinto Florida.

Mr. Ernest Bishop, Geologist, has been assigned the
duties of following through on the cooperation with the U. S.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Bureau of Mines to tabulate production data on Florida's
mineral resources. He has also served as a member of the
Florida State Rural Development Committee, of the Florida
Resource Education Committee, and with the director as the
Survey representative to the Interagency Coordination Con-
ference.

Mr. Bishop has cooperatedwith the U. S. Bureau of Mines
and with the Ceramics Department of Florida State Univer-
sity in obtaining clay samples for analysis and testing, these
data to be included in a comprehensive report on clays for
the future. He has also revised the collection of rocks and
minerals, a set of 18 minerals made available for one dollar
to schools and individuals upon request. His report on the
geology of Polk County, Florida, is being writtenand should
be available for publication next biennium. The study of well
cuttings and the preparation of charts and reports on the
southern-central part of the peninsula is a continuing respon-
sibility, as is the organization and maintenance of mineral
collections and locality descriptions.

Mr. J.W. Yon, Jr., Geologist, completed with C.W.
Hendry, Jr., a study of the "Geology of the Area in and
around the Jim Woodruff Reservoir, which has beenpub-
lished as Florida Geological Survey Report of Investigations
No. 16. He has beenassigned the responsibility of studying
wellcuttings andof preparing charts and reports on the sub-
surface of the northern peninsula area. He joins Dr. Puri
and Mr. Oglesby as authors of a report on Dixie and Gilchrist
counties, Dr. Puri on the Foraminifera of the Avon Park
limestone, andS.S. Winters, Professor of Geology at Florida
State University, in the "SedimentaryAnalysis of Pleistocene
Sands in Dixie and Gilchrist Counties. "

Mr. Charles W. Hendry, Jr., Director of the Water
Survey, together with James A. Lavender, H. J. Woodward,
Walter J. Delany (resigned May, 1958), and Charles R.
Sproul have been actively engaged in completing the inventory
of flowing wells, as directed by Florida Statutes 373. 031-
373. 061. A report to the 1959 Legislature is being written
to cover this inventory and a summary of this work is included
onthe following pages. Mr. Hendry joined Mr. Yon ina study







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


of the Jim Woodruff Reservoir area and has servedas assist-
ant to the Director during the past year. He has the respon-
sibility of preparing charts and reports on the subsurface of
the panhandle area.

Mr. Stanley J. Olsen, Vertebrate Paleontologist, has
reorganized and recatalogued all vertebrate collections.
During both years of the biennium he has, with Survey per-
sonnel, spent one to two months collecting at the Thomas
Farm locality in Gilchrist County. The Ichetucknee River
was also revisited. Much time has been spent in routine
determinations of vertebrates sent in by Florida citizens.
The Survey collections have been greatly expanded through
an exchange of casts and molds and specimens with other
museums of the United States. An extensive trip to all of
the larger museums enabled Mr. Olsen to cast and compare
many types for Survey files. He has actively participated in
the Tallahassee Junior Museum and prepared some exhibits
for display in the Junior Museum and in the Geology Depart-
ment. Mr. Olsen also directed George Lammers, student
at Florida State University, in a study of vertebrates of
Florida.

Mr. W. P. Still, Engineering Aide and Duplicating Super-
visor, has continued to tabulate the rainfall data for Florida,
which include many inaccessible stations reported by State
Forestry and Wild Life officers. These data are available
upon request. Mr. Still has also been made property officer
and he and Earl Maxwell, Accountant, have reinventoried
and renumbered all capital equipment. The Survey is fortu-
nate to have acquired a small multilithpress when the office
of the Water Survey and Research was abolished in 1955.
With this small press Survey printing costs have been re-
duced by about one-half. Seventeen publications, four multi-
color maps and various forms and charts were prepared and
published at a considerable savings to the State.

Mr. Andrew R. Janson, Scientific Illustrator, has work-
ed closely with Mr. Olsen in vertebrate studies and together
they have prepared for publication an excellent study, beau-
tifully illustrated, of the mammals of Florida. Mr. Janson
has also continued to work closely with Dr. Puri illustrating






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


ostracodes and foraminifers. Mr. Janson also has worked
closely with the Physics Department, teaching a short course
in Astronomy, with the Audio-Visual Department, reviewing
films, with the BiologyDepartment and FloridaState Univer-
sity library relative to illustrations and the purchase of
charts.

Mr. Harry Whitehead, Draftsman, has undertaken to
prepare county and regional maps to be used in Survey data
plotting. These are being placed on Kronar, a very stable
and tough plastic, from which work copies will be prepared.
Various illustrations, charts, slides, and photographs are
being redrawn and colored for better illustrations to be used
in talks and demonstrations.


Water Investigations

The 1953 Legislature passed alaw (1957 Florida Statute
373. 021/. 061) that was designated to protect and control the
artesian waters of Florida. The Florida Geological Survey
was made the regulating agency of this statute since the
Survey is empowered to designate which of the water-bearing
beds in Florida are a part of the artesian system. This
legislation requires that all flowing wells be equipped with
valves (nonused flowing wells to be capped) and further
states thatanyone using artesian water in a wastefulmanner
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and subject to the penalties
provided by law.

No appropriation for the enforcement of this statute was
provided during the 1953-55 biennium. As a result, little
actual work was accomplished during these two years,
although much time was given to the discussion and organi-
zation of the program. The State Geologist realizedthat this
program could provide additional basic data needed in the
analysis of the water-supply problem. Subsequently, he
requested and was granted by the 1955 Legislature an appro-
priation that was used to activate the first phase of the en-
forcement of 1957 Florida Statute No. 373. 021/. 061.

This first phase of the program was set up as a well
inventory which consisted of searching the area of artesian
flow (roughly one-third of the State) for flowing wells and
cataloguing flowing wells, primarily those in violation of the







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Figure 6. An abandoned 8-inch well flowing in excess of
800 gallons per minute. This well is located in
section 32, T. 7 S., R. 30 E., St. Johns County,
Florida.

artesian well statute. To date, the inventory program has
data on over 4,011 flowing wells in 45 counties, flowing more
than a million gallons per day. Of this number approximately
1,883 are in violation of the law and from 242 of these, water
with chloride contents of 1,000 parts per million or greater
was flowing. The inventory of flowing wells will be terminated
at the end of the 1958-59 fiscal year.

The Florida Geological Survey is petitioning the 1959
Legislature to remove the enforcement section of 1953 Florida
Statute No. 373. 021/. 061 from the jurisdiction of the State
Geologist and place it under the Director of the Department
of Water Resources. The Florida Geological Survey would
remain as a research consultant to the Department of Water
Resources, but wouldn't be directly engaged in the enforce-
ment of the statute.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


SUMMER WORK BY CONSULTANTS

Several consultants were employed for special problems,
and numerous part-time student helpers were engaged in
reorganizational work.


Dr. Jules DuBar and Mr. Vincent Vanstrum

Dr. Jules DuBar, Assistant Professor of Geology of
Houston University, completed his study of the "Stratigraphy
and Paleontology of the Late Neogene Strata of the Caloosa-
hatchee River Area of Southern Florida, which was pub-
lished in May, 1958, as Bulletin 40. During the summer of
1958, Dr. DuBar continuedhis study of these beds and organ-
ized the Survey mollusk shell collections. He was assisted
in his work by Vincent Vanstrum, a graduate student at
Florida State University.

The summer work was divided into two major endeavors:
1) the identification and indexing of invertebrate fossils
donated to the Survey by Charles Locklin; 2) two weeks of
field work, mainly in the area of Punta Gorda, Florida.

The numerical data concerning the identification and
indexing project is given on the accompanying pages. It is
mostly concerned with the Locklin collection, in which the
specimens are tabulated according to age, location, and for-
mation.

Field work in the Punta Gorda area consisted mainly
of the detailed mapping of the geology on Shell Creek. The
creek was investigated from the low coastal area to a point
near the source where exposures ceased. Between these
two points, many good exposures enabled the measuring of
a complete Caloosahatchee section in composite form. Par-
ticular emphasis was placed on the fossil content of the
various beds and numerous samples were taken.

Borrow pits in the vicinity of Acline and Arcadia were
also examined. Sections exposed in these pits were described
and samples collected in an effort to better determine the








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 23


lateral extent of near-surface beds. Borrow pits and all
known drainage canals in the St. Petersburg area were exam-
ined. Where justified, sections were measured, described
and collected. The work was desirable because the rapid
growth of the St. Petersburg area would soon cover places
of important fossil accumulation.

Breakdown on Locklin Collection Processed Summer 1958

Total number of specimens processed 2,380

Recent
Gulf Coast (Florida to Texas) 209
Gulf of Mexico 200
Florida Keys 149
Bahamas and West Indies 42
Florida East Coast 29
Miscellaneous areas 23
Numbered but unidentified 27
Identified but location unknown 26
Total Recent 705

Pleistocene (Caloosahatchee formation)
Shell Creek 468
Ft. Thompson 112
Type area Caloosahatchee River 287
St. Petersburg 322
Acline pits 177
Total Pleistocene 1,366

Miocene
McClelland's Farm 91
Tenmile Creek 51
Total Chipola 142

Jackson Bluff 152
Harvey's Creek 7
Total Choctawhatchee 159

Goodno 6
Sunniland 1
Total Tamiami 7

White Creek 1
Tqtal Shoal River 1
Total Miocene 309


Locklin Collection Yet to be Identified and Indexed

Plum Point Md., Miocene 48 vials and 28 specimens in small boxes
Tenmile Creek, Miocene, Chipola fm. 5 cigar boxes of assorted specimens
Pinecrest, 42 miles W of Miami, Pleistocene ? 4 cigar boxes assorted specimens
Sunniland, Miocene, Tamiami 1 cigar box assorted
Jackson Bluff, Miocene, Choctawhatchee 152 specimens in small boxes and 1450 vials
Harvey's Creek, Miocene, Choctawhatchee 28 vials
Buckingham, Tamiami, Miocene 8 specimens in small boxes
Snell Island, Miocene? 21 specimens in small boxes







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Dripping Springs, Miocene, Duplin 2 specimens in small boxes
Recent 95 vials
Natural Well, Duplin, N. C., Miocene 748 vials and 95 specimens in small boxes
Ft. Thompson, Caloosahatchee 9 specimens in small boxes
St. Petersburg, Caloosahatchee 2 specimens in small boxes
Shell Creek, Caloosahatchee 2 specimens in small boxes
Loxahatchee, Ft. Thompson?, Pleistocene 2 specimens in small boxes
Ocala, Eocene 4 specimens in small boxes
Largo pits, Pleistocene? 3 specimens in small boxes
Tampa Bay area 1 specimen in small box
White's Creek, Miocene 46 specimens in small boxes and 74 vials
Spence Farm, Miocene 13 specimens in small boxes and 82 vials
McClelland'sFarm, Chipola, Miocene 21 specimens in small boxes and 93 vials
Oak Grove, Miocene 44 specimens in small boxes, 2 cigar boxes assorted
specimens, 221 vials and 12 vials of small assorted specimens
DeLeon Springs Golf Course, Caloosahatchee 45 vials
Myrtle Beach, Miocene? 81 specimens in small boxes

There are also 18 well sample boxes with assorted sizes and specimens. Their
locations are as follows:
McClelland Farm 4
Tenmile Creek 11
White's Creek 1
Natural Well 1
Shell Creek 1
Plus an unknown number of vials and individual specimens in the possession of
Dr. DuBar.



Most of the specimens presented to the Survey by Mr.
Locklin are identified as to genus and many as to species.
These identifications have not be substantiated, but the col-
lection includes many individuals of species formerly known
only from broken, poorly preserved and rare specimens.
Many new species, particularly in the small sizes are pres-
ent. The Survey is grateful to Mr. Locklin for his continued
courtesy to the Survey and for his interest in its work.



Mr. Glenn T. Allen, Jr. and Mr. Edward Dolan


Late in 1951, the Survey cooperated with William E.
Edwards, then a graduate student at Columbia University,
in a study of paleo-Indian artifacts known to be present in
Florida and believed to correlate closely with the Folsom
culture and fluted arrowheads of western states. Survey
personnel, under Mr. Edwards' direction, explored several
sites, including paleo-Indian sites at Hornsby Spring, Darby
Springs, and a site near Archer in Alachua County. This







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


field work was terminated by the Survey in February, 1952,
and Mr. Edwards was to have prepared progress reports at
monthly intervals and to have submitted a final report before
returning to school.

No report covering this work has been published or pre-
pared and submitted to the Survey for publication. Because
of the importance of the archeologicalmaterials, Mr. Allen,
a graduate in archeology at Florida State University and with
considerable experience in Florida archeology,was contacted
and asked to undertake the evaluation of these data in order
that this wealth of information would be available to other
students of Florida archeology.

Mr. Allen suggested that the study be undertaken in
cooperation with the Graduate School in Archeology at Florida
State University and Edward Dolan, a graduate student at
Florida State University, undertook the analysis of the arti-
facts under the supervision of Mr. Allen and the faculty at
Florida State University.

Allof the artifacts have been checked and studied, sep-
arated by sites and levels and photographed. Two field trips
to Hornsby and Darby springs were made to verify maps,
relocate old pits, and sample test pits dug for stratigraphic
sampling and other artifacts. A report is being prepared and
will be published in late 1959 a a Report of Investigations
of the Survey.



Dr. W. A. White

Dr. W.A. White, Professor of Geologyatthe University
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, completed
his manuscript covering, "Some Geomorphic Features of
Central Peninsular Florida," during early 1957 and sub-
mitted it November 25, 1957, for publication. The paper
discusses various changes in stream patterns and their
association with landforms of Florida. These patterns and
landforms record the geologic history and will be useful in
interpretating the stratigraphy and geology and in finding
new sources of mineralwealth. The paper has beenpublished
as Bulletin 41.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


STUDIES BY STATE AND FEDERAL GEOLOGICAL
SURVEY PERSONNEL AND BY CONSULTANTS FOR THE
SURVEY PUBLISHED BETWEEN JANUARY 1, 1957
AND DECEMBER 31, 1958

Bermes, Boris J.
1958a Interim report on the ground-water resources
of Flagler County: Florida Geol. Survey Inf.
Circ. 13, 32 p., 11 figs.

1958b Interim report on geology and ground-water
resources of Indian River County, Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey Inf. Circ. 18, 74 p.,
12 figs., 4 tables.

Brown, D. W.
1957 (and Kenner, W. E., and Brown, Eugene)
Interim report on the water resources of Bre-
vard County, Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
Inf. Circ. 11, 109 p., 30 figs., 15 tables.

1958 Interim report on the changes in the chloride
content of ground water in Pinellas County,
Florida, between 1947 and 1956: Florida Geol.
Survey Inf. Circ. 16, 11 p., 4 figs., 1 table.

Calver, James L.
1957 Mining and mineral resources: Florida Geol.
Survey Bull. 39, 132 p., 35 figs., 12 tables.

DuBar, Jules R.
1958a Stratigraphy and paleontology of the late Neo-
gene strata of the Caloosahatchee River area
of southern Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
Bull. 40, 267 p., 4 pl., 49 figs., 10 tables.

1958b Neogene stratigraphy of southwestern Florida:
Gulf Coast Assoc. Geol. Soc. Trans., v. VIII,
1958, p. 129-155, 14 figs.

1958c Age and stratigraphic relationship of the Caloo-
sahatchee marl of Florida: Illinois Acad. Sci.
Trans., v. 50, p. 187-193.







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Hendry, Charles W., Jr.
1957 (and Lavender, James A.) Interim report on
the progress of an inventory of artesian wells
inFlorida: FloridaGeol. SurveyInf. Circ. 10,
178 p., 27 figs., 3 tables.

1958 (and Yon, J. W., Jr.) Geology of the area in
andaroundthe Jim Woodruff reservoir: Florida
Geol. Survey Rept. Inv. 16, pt. I, 52 p., 8 figs.

Klein, Howard
1957 Interim report on salt-water encroachment in
Dade County, Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
Inf. Circ. 9, 17 p. 12 figs.

1958 (and Hoy, Nevin D.) Biscayne aquifer of Dade
and Broward counties, Florida: Florida Geol.
Survey Rept. Inv. 17, 56 p. 24 figs.

Leve, Gilbert W.
1958 Interim report on the ground-water resources
of Putnam County: Florida Geol. Survey Inf.
Circ. 15, 11 p., 4 figs., 1 table.

Lichter, W. F.
1957 Ground-water resources of the Stuart area,
Martin County, Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
Inf. Circ. 12, 47 p., 9 figs., 4 tables.

Lund, Ernest H.
1958a Phosphate concentrations near bird rookeries
in South Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Rept.
Inv. 16, pt. II, 16 p., 1 fig., 5 tables.

1958b (and Haley, Patrick C.) An analysis of Och-
lockonee River channel sediments: Florida
Geol. Survey Rept. Inv. 16, pt. III, 9 p.,
3 tables.

Musgrove, Rufus H.
1958 Interim report on the flood of June 9, 1957,
at Perry, Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Inf.
Circ. 17, 12 p., 8 figs.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Olsen, Stanley J.
1957a Leptarctines from the Florida Miocene: Am.
Mus. Novitates, no. 1861, p. 107, 2 figs.

1957b The lower dentition of Mephititaxus ancipidens
from the Florida Miocene: Jour. Mammalogy,
v. 38, no. 4, p. 452-454.

1957c A new beak-jawed Mastodont from Florida:
Paleontological Soc. India Jour., v. 2, p. 131-
135.

1958a The skull of Leptarctus ancipidens from the
Florida Miocene: Florida Geol. Survey Special
Pub. 2, Paper 2, p. 1-11, 3 figs.

1958b The fossil carnivore Amphicyon intermedius
from the Thomas Farm Miocene: Mus. Comp.
ZoologyBull., pt.I, Skull and Dentition, v. 118,
no. 4, p. 157-172, 5 figs.

1958c Some problematical carnivores fromthe Flor-
ida Miocene: Jour. Paleontology, v. 32, no. 3,
p. 595-602.

1958d The Wakulla Cave: Nat. Hist. Mag., LXVII,
no. 7, p. 396-403.

1958e The bog lemming from the Pleistocene of
Florida: Jour. Mammalogy, v. 39, no. 3,
p. 537-540.

Peek, Harry E.
1958a Ground water resources of Manatee County,
Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Rept. Inv. 18,
99 p., 12 figs., 4 tables.

1958b Record of wells in Manatee County, Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey Inf. Circ. 19, 199 p.,
2 figs. 1 pl. 1 table.

Puri, Harbans S.
1957a Stratigraphy and zonation of the Ocala group:
Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 38, 248 p., 31 pl.
31 figs.







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


1957b Reclassification, structure and evolution of the
family Nummulitidae: Paleontological Soc.
India Jour., v. 2, p. 95-108, pl. 11-13, 10
figs.

1957c Henryhowella, new name for Howella Puri 1956:
Jour. Paleontology, v. 31, p. 982.

1957d (and Hulings, Neil C.) Recent ostracode facies
from Panama City to Florida Bay: Gulf Coast
Assoc. Geol. Soc. Trans., v. 7, p. 167-190,
12 figs.

1957e Postscript notes on the ostracode subfamily
Brachycytherinae: Washington Acad. Sci.
Jour., v. 47, p. 306-308.

1957f Notes on ostracode subfamily Cytherideidinae
Puri 1952: Washington Acad., Sci. Jour.,
v. 47, p. 305-306.

1958a Ostracode subfamily Cytherettinae: Gulf Coast
Assoc. Geol. Soc. Trans., v. 8, p. 183-195,
3 pl.

1958b Ostracode genus Cushmanidea: Gulf Coast
Assoc. Geol. Soc. Trans., v. 8, p. 171-181
2 pl.

Ray, Clayton E.
1957 A list, bibliography, and index of the fossil
vertebrates of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey
Spec. Pub. 3, 175 p.

Schroeder, Melvin C.
1958 (and Klein, Howard, and Hoy, Nevin D.) Bis-
cayne aquifer of Dade and Broward counties,
Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Rept. Inv. 17,
56 p., 24 figs.








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Tarver, George R.
1958 Interim report on the ground-water resources
of St. Johns County, Florida: Florida Geol.
Survey Inf. Circ. 14, 32 p., 11 figs., 1 table.


Unklesbay, A. G.
1958 (and Heath, R. C., and Peek, H. M.) Biblio-
graphy and index of articles relating to the
ground-water resources of Florida: Florida
Geol. Survey Spec. Pub. 4, 104 p.


Valley, James L.
1958 (and Vernon, Robert O.) The mineral industry
of Florida: U. S. Bureau of Mines Minerals
Yearbook, v. 3 (1957), 14 p. 1 fig., 16 tables.


Vernon, Robert O.
1957 New techniques in casting and forming molds:
Jour. Paleontology, v. 31, no. 2, p. 461-463.


White, William A.
1958 Some geomorphic features of central peninsular
Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 41, 92 p.,
14 figs., 3 pi.


Estimation of Funds Needed for Publication
1959-60


Geology & Hydrology
of (Area Covered)
Ruskin Area
Lake Placid-
Lake Istokpoga
Polk County Interim
Lee-Charlotte counties
Seminole County
Columbia County
Brevard County
Volusia County
Martin County
Glades-Hendry counties
Alachua County &
Bradford, Clay & Union
counties
St. Johns, Putnam &
Flagler counties
Hillsborough County
Naples Area (Supplement)


Estimated Date
Manuscript is Ready
Awaiting publication

Awaiting publication
Late 1959
Late 1959
Late 1959
Late 1959
Late 1959
Late 1959
Late 1959
Late 1959


Late 1959

Late 1959
Early 1960
Summer 1959


Type of Report
RI & IC 1

RI & IC
Information Circular
RI & IC
RI & IC
RI & IC
RI & IC
RI & IC
RI & IC
RI & IC


Information Circular

RI & IC
RI & IC
RI & IC


Estimated
Cost
$3,000

1,900
500
2,600
2,400
1,200
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000


350

3,000
2,500
1,700







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Collier County Interim Fall of 1959
Escambia-Santa Rosa
counties Interim Summer 1960
Green Swamp Interim Fall of 1960
Polk County Spring of 1961
Fossil Mammals of
Florida Late 1959
Description of a Tapir
from the Bone Valley
formation
A Fish from the
Marianna Oligocene
Comparison of Florida
Bison Remains with
those of Other States
Dixie & Gilchrist counties Late 1959
Darby & Hornsby springs
report Late 1959
Limestone Resources of
Panhandle Florida Late 1959
Glass Sands in Florida Late 1960
Biennial Report
Legislature Early 1961


Information Circular 400

Information Circular 400
Information Circular 400
RI & IC 6,000

Bulletin 4,500


Special Paper 250

Special Paper 250


Special Paper 250
5,000

Rept. of Investigations 2,500


Bulletin
Bulletin


4,000
4,000


iReport of Investigations and Information Circular.

Library Report


Since its establishment the Florida Geological Survey
has been collecting books, articles, pamphlets and other
materials on geology and related subjects. Through the years
the library has grown into a sizable scientific collection.
For the first time in its history the library of the Florida
Geological Surveyhas quarters planned and built for its own
special needs. The new building has made it possible to
arrange all materials so that they are readily accessible.
Many publications heretofore stored on high shelves are now
easily reached by the library personnel.


At thepresent time the library contains 19, 000 volumes.
These have been collected through exchanges with other state
surveys and foreign countries, as well as from scientific
societies, the U. S. Geological Survey, the U. S. Bureau of
Mines, the U.S. National Museum, and other governmental
agencies. In addition, the Florida Geological Survey budget
provides for the purchase of current scientific journals and
general reference books.


The library also maintains a reference collection of
maps and charts covering Florida and other states as well.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


During the past year the index tothese maps has been com-
pleted to provide quick reference for the library patrons.
In the new quarters it is possible to spread materials out for
closer inspection and study on the counter or on the reading
table.

The more frequently used reference books have been
placed in the conference room on the main floor for ready
reference during discussion periods.

The new location has permitted many students and faculty
of the Geology Department of Florida State University, and
other interested persons, to avail themselves of the geological
library resources. The number of persons, exclusive of
Florida Geological Survey personnel, who have made use of
the library facilities for theperiod from February 24, 1958,
through December 31, 1958, has been 418.

The libraries in Tallahassee have cooperated with the
Florida Geological Survey in interlibrary exchanges. After
rearranging the collection, the library presented Florida
State Library with many pamphlets of a historical nature;
the State Library in turn gave the Geological Survey 25
volumes dealing with geology. Florida Geological Survey
received 44 volumes from Florida State University Library
and 15 volumes from the Leon County Library.

During 1958, Joseph R. Reever presented the library
with a set of the National Geographic Magazine, which covers
a period of some 40 years. Charles R. Locklin donated 30
publications dealing with Florida geology and paleontology,
some of which were very rare.

In keeping with the binding program, the library selects
the most important serials each year for permanent binding.
In this manner the scientific periodicals can be preserved as
complete volumes and are readily accessible for reference
work. During 1958, the libraryhad 87 such volumes bound.






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Summary
(September, 1957, through December, 1958)

Number of volumes added (subscriptions, exchanges
purchases) 1,000
Gifts (number of volumes)
Florida State Library 25
Florida State University Library 44
Leon County Library 15
Joseph R. Reever 40
Charles R. Locklin 30
Number of maps added or replaced 1,200
Material sent to bindery (volumes) 87
Visitors 418


TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS

In Florida, topographic maps can be obtained from the
following companies:

Bartow:
Aero-Engineering, Inc., 270 West Pearl Street,
P.O. Box 162.
Fort Lauderdale:
Frank B. Dolph Co., 370 Southeast Second Street.
Fort Pierce:
Horton's, 122 North Second Street.
Gainesville:
Campus Shop & Book Store, University of Florida.
Florida Book Store, Inc. ,
1638 West University Avenue.
Jacksonville:
The H. & W. B. Drew Company.
The Nautical Supply Co., 15 North Newnan Street.
Lakeland:
Edwards Surveying and Blueprinting,
1218 East Main Street, P.O. Box 230.
Miami:
Hopkins-Carter Hardware Co., 135 South Miami.
Orlando:
George Stuart Inc., 133 East Robinson Avenue,
P.O. Box 593.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Punta Gorda:
Van Dyke Blueprint Service, Post Office Arcade.
Sarasota:
Ellie's Book & Stationery, 1350 Main Street.
Tallahassee:
Jon S. Beazley, Photogrammetric Engineers,
1903 North Monroe Street.
Tampa:
Poston Marine Hardware & Supply Co.,
1012 East Cass Street.
West Palm Beach:
Hopkins Marine Hardware Co., 207 Sixth Street.

Reference facilities are available in the following libraries
where maps published by the U. S. Geological Survey are
deposited:

Gainesville:
The University Libraries, University of Florida.
Lake Alfred:
Library, Agricultural Experiment Station,
University of Florida.
Tallahassee:
Research Library, Florida Development Commission,
East Wing, Carlton Building.
Florida Geological Survey.
Library, Florida State University.
Winter Park:
Mills Memorial Library, Rollins College.



Numerical Index to Topographic Maps

A numerical index to the names of quadrangles for which
topographic maps have been published appear in the Eleventh
Biennial Report. The index numbers correspond to the 15'
quadrangles and these index numbers appear on Figure 7.
The following additional maps have been published since the
Twelfth Biennial Report and should be added to that list:







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


L I


a,.


-.:




A,


LEGEND

S15'QUADRANGLES

S7.5'QUADRANGLES

7.5'QUADRANGLES
(Prellminary)
NOT COMPLETED


10.


INDEX TO PUBLISHED

TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS

SEPTEMBER, 1958


ml. 6.~___


Figure 7. Index to topographic mapping.


?, ;








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Name


20. Holt
21. Niceville
28.
A Mt. Pleasant
B Dogtown
29.
A Havana N
B Calvary
30.
A Beachton
B Miccosukee NE
31.
A Metcalf
B Monticello NE
32.
A Grooverville
B Baden
33.
A Nankin
B Clyattville
34.
C Octahatchee
D Jennings
37.
C Sargent
D Eddy
46. Ft. Walton Beach


Series Date

15' 1956*
15' 1956*

7.5' 1955
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1957
7.5' 1957

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1957

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
15' 1956*


(Formerly Mary Esther)
47. Villa Tasso 15'


B Panama City
Beach

A Panama City
B Springfield
C Beacon Beach
D Long Point


A North of Allanton
C Allanton
87.
B Crooked Island
88.
A Beacon Hill
154.
D Winter Garden
155.
C Orlando W
D Orlando E
169.
D Citrus Park
170.
C Sulphur Springs


Safety Harbor
Gandy Bridge
St. Petersburg
Port Tampa


1956*


7.5' 1955*

7.5' 1956*
7.5' 1956*
7.5' 1956*
7.5' 1956*

7.5' 1956*
7.5' 1956*

7.5' 1956*

7.5' 1956*

7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


Name


180.
A Tampa
B Brandon
C Gibsonton
D Riverview
190.
A Pass-a-Grille
Beach
B Cockroach Bay
191.
A Ruskin
B Wimauma


Ft. Lonesome
Duette NE
Keentown
Duette


C Griffins Corner
202.
A Myakka City NW
B Myakka Head
C Myakka City
D Edgeville
203.
A Ona
B Zolfo Springs
C Limestone
D Gardner
204.
A Sweetwater
C Crewsville SW
213.
A Murdock NW
B Murdock NE
C Murdock
D Murdock SE
214.
A Nocatee
B Arcadia
C Ft. Ogden
D Arcadia SE
215.
A Long Island
Marsh NW
B Long Island
Marsh NE
C Long Island
Marsh SW
D Long Island
Marsh SE
216.
C Venus SW
D Venus
222.
A Englewood NW
B Englewood
D Placida


Series Date


7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


7.5' 1957

7.5' 1957

7.5' 1956

7.5' 1957

7.5' 1957
7.5' 1957

7.5' 1957
7.5' 1957
7.5' 1957








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Name


El Jobean
Punta Gorda
Punta Gorda SW
Punta Gorda SE

Cleveland
Bermont
Gilchrist
Tuckers Corner

Telegraph Swamp
NW
Telegraph Swamp
NE
Telegraph Swamp

Grossman Ham-
mock


Series Date


A
B
C
D
224.
A
B
C
D
225.
A

B

C
270.
D


Name


Series Date


A South Miami NW 7. 5'
B South Miami 7.5'
C Goulds 7.5'
D Perrine 7.5'
272.
C Soldier Key 7.5'
275.
B Royal Plam Ranger
Station 7.5'
D Royal Pam Ranger
Station SE 7.5'
276.
A Homestead 7.5'
B Arsenicker Keys 7. 5'
C Glades 7.5'
D Card Sound 7.5'
277.
A Elliot Keys 7.5'


C Pacific .Reef


7.5' 1956*


New edition of map previously listed

County Index to Topographic Maps

County index to the names of quadrangles for which topo-
graphic maps have been published since the Twelfth Biennial
Report:


Name
BAKER COUNTY
37.
C Sargent
D Eddy

BAY COUNTY
68.
B Panama City
Beach
69.
A Panama City
B Springfield
C Beacon Beach
D Long Point
70.
A North of Allanton
C Allanton
87.
B Crooked Island
88.
A Beacon Hill

CALHOUN COUNTY
70.
A North of Allanton

CHARLOTTE COUNTY
213.
A Murdock NW
C Murdock
D Murdock SE


Series Date



7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


1955

1956
1956
1956
1956

1956
1956

1956

1956


7.5' 1956




7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


Name
214.
C Ft. Ogden
D Arcadia SE
215.
C Long Island
Marsh SW
D Long Island
Marsh SE
222.
B Englewood
D Placida
223.
A El Jobean
B Punta Gorda
C Punta Gorda SW
D Punta Gorda SE


A
B
C
D
225.
A

B

C


Series Date


7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


Cleveland 7.5'
Bermont 7.5'
Gilchrist 7.5'
Tuckers Corner 7.5'

Telegraph Swamp
NW 7.5'
Telegraph Swamp
NE 7.5'
Telegraph Swamp 7.5'


7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


7.5' 1956


1955*
1956*
1956*
1956*

1956*


1956

1956

1956*
1956*
1956*
1956*

1956*


1956

1957

1956
1957

1957
1957
1957
1956


1956
1956
1957
1957


1956

1956
1956







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Name Series

COLUMBIA COUNTY
37.
C Sargent 7.5'

DADE COUNTY
270.
D Grossman Ham-
mock 7.5'
271.
A South Miami NW 7. 5'
B South Miami 7.5'
C Goulds 7.5'
D Perrine 7.5'
272.
C Soldier Key 7. 5'
275.
B Royal Palm Ranger
Station 7.5'
D Royal Palm Ranger
Station SE 7. 5


A Homestead
B Arsenicker Keys
C Glades
D Card Sound
277.
A Elliott Key
C Pacific Reef

DE SOTO COUNTY
202.
D Edgeville
203.
C Limestone
D Gardner
204.
C Crewsville SW
213.
A Murdock NW
B Murdock NE
D Murdock SE
214.
A Nocatee
B Arcadia
C Ft. Ogden
D Arcadia SE
215.
A Long Island
Marsh NW
B Long Island
Marsh NE
C Long Island
Marsh SW
D Long Island
Marsh SE


Date



1956





1956

1955
1956
1956
1956

1956


1956

1956


7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956




7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1957
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


7.5' 1957

7.5' 1957

7.5' 1956

7.5' 1957
7. 51 1957


Name Series Date

GADSDEN COUNTY
28.
A Mt. Pleasant 7.5' 1955
B Dogtown 7.5' 1956
29.
A Havana N 7.5' 1956
B Calvary 7.5' 1956

GLADES COUNTY
215.
D Long Island
Marsh SE 7.5' 1957
216.
C Venus SW 7.5' 1957
D Venus 7.5' 1957
225.
B Telegraph Swamp
NE 7.5' 1956


GULF COUNTY
70.
A North of Allanton
C Allanton
88.
A Beacon Hill

HAMILTON COUNTY
33.
B Clyattville
34.
C Octahatchee
D Jennings

HARDEE COUNTY
192.
B Duette NE
D Duette
194.
C Griffins Corner
202.
B Myakka Head
D Edgeville
203.
A Ona
B Zolfo Springs
C Limestone
D Gardner
204.
A Sweetwater
C Crewsville SW

HIGHLANDS COUNTY
215.
B Long Island
Marsh NE
D Long Island
Marsh SE


7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956




7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


1956
1956

1956

1956
1956

1956
1956
1956
1956

1956
1956


7.5' 1957

7.5' 1957







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Name Se
216.
C Venus SW
D Venus

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
169.
D Citrus Park
170.
C Sulphur Springs
179.
A Safety Harbor
B Gandy Bridge
D Port Tampa
180.
A Tampa
B Brandon
C Gibsonton
D Riverview
190.
A Pass-a-Grille
Beach
B Cockroach Bay
191.
A Ruskin
B Wimauma
192.
A Ft. Lonesome
B Duette NE

JEFFERSON COUNTY
31.
A Metcalf
B Monticello NE
32.
A Grooverville
B Baden

LEE COUNTY
222.
D Placida
223.
C Punta Gorda SW
D Punta Gorda SE
224.
C Gilchrist
D Tuckers Corner
225.
C Telegraph Swamp

LEON COUNTY
30.
A Beachton
B Miccosukee NE


ries Date

7.5' 1957
7.5' 1957




7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956


7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956




7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1956
7.5' 1956




7.5' 1957

7.5' 1957
7.5' 1956

7.5' 1957
7.5' 1957

7.5' 1956




7.5' 1957
7.5' 1957


Name Series Date
MADISON COUNTY
32.
B Baden 7.5' 1956
33.
A Nankin 7.5' 1956
B Clyattville 7.5' 1956
34.
C Octahatchee 7.5' 1956

MANATEE COUNTY
190.
B Cockroach Bay 7.5' 1956
191.
A Ruskin 7.5' 1956
B Wimauma 7.5' 1956
192.
A Ft. Lonesome 7.5' 1956
B Duette NE 7.5' 1956
C Keentown 7.5' 1956
D Duette 7.5' 1956
202.
A Myakka City NW 7.5' 1956
B Myakka Head 7.5' 1956
C Myakka City 7.5' 1956
D Edgeville 7.5' 1956
213.
B Murdock NE 7.5' 1956

MONROE COUNTY
276.
D Card Sound 7.5' 1956
277.
C Pacific Reef 7.5' 1956

OKALOOSA COUNTY
20. Holt 15' 1956
21. Niceville 15' 1956
46. Ft. Walton Beach
(formerlyMaryEsther) 15' 1956
47. Villa Tasso 15' 1956

ORANGE COUNTY
154.
D Winter Garden 7.5' 1956
155.
C Orlando W 7.5' 1956
D Orlando E 7.5' 1956

PINELLAS COUNTY
179.
A Safety Harbor 7.5' 1956
B Gandy Bridge 7.5' 1956
C St. Petersburg 7.5' 1956
D Port Tampa 7.5' 1956







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Name Series Date Name Series Date
190. 222.
A Pass-a-Grille A Englewood NW 7.5' 1957
Beach 7.5' 1956 B Englewood 7.5' 1956

POLK COUNTY SEMINOLE COUNTY
192. 155.
B Duette NE 7.5' 1956 D Orlando E 7.5' 1956

SARASOTA COUNTY WALTON COUNTY
213. 21. Niceville 15' 1956
A Murdock NW 7.5' 1956 47. Villa Tasso 15' 1956
B Murdock NE 7.5' 1956
C Murdock 7.5' 1956
D Murdock SE 7.5' 1956



COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES

Florida State Board of Conservation
and Florida State University

Studies by Harbans S. Puri, H. Grant .Goodell, Donn
Gorsline, and William K. Benda are under way to determine
the bottom conditions and ecology of the Tampa Bay area.
This study was undertaken at the request of the Assistant
Director of Conservation, to determine the migration and
eating habits of Florida shrimp. Salt-water shrimp feed
mostly on sea bottom and live on sea weeds, ostracodes,
foraminifers and diatoms. Since certain ostracodes and
foraminifers are restricted to specific depth zones and bio-
facies, the migration of the shrimp could be established by
identifications of the ostracode and foraminiferal fauna con-
tained in their stomachs.

Dr. Goodell and Dr. Gorsline are scheduled to present
a summary of their work on the Tampa Bay sediments to
the American Associationof Petroleum Geologistat Dallas,
Texas, on March 19, 1959. A summary of their study is
reproduced below:


Tampa Bay, Florida, is a large multi-lobed
estuary which opens into the Gulf of Mexico about
midway up the west coast of Florida. The series
of en echelon barrier islands which comprise the
northern and southern boundaries of the bay mouth






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


have formed in response to north and south long-
shore current convergence at the bay opening. Be-
tween these islands and the mainland is a series of
interconnected lagoons whose sedimentation is en-
tirely controlled by tidal currents.

The sediments within this bay-lagoon complex
are composed almost entirely of terrigenously
derived quartz sand which has been admixed within
the bay environments of deposition with calcium
carbonate in the form of mollusk shell hash. Anal-
ysis of variance of the textural data shows the
shallow water lagoon environments to be extremely
homogenous really and to a depth of at least three
inches. Statistical tests between different environ-
ments within the Bay complex show no significant
differences in the size distribution or mineralogy of
the terrigenous fractionbut large differences in the
amount and distribution of the shell material. The
channels and lagoonal beaches have the greatest
amount of shellhash, followed by open sea beaches,
slope environment, shallow water sand, and grass
flats in order of decreasing amounts and mangrove
beaches which have none. Carbonate is overwhelm-
ingly concentrated in phi sizes larger than 1, but
every sample which contained any shell material had
traces of carbonate down through the finest clay
size separated (10-11 phi). The sediments which
show the best sorting of the terrigenous components,
the beaches and channels, show the poorest sorting
considering the entire mineralogy because of the
large amounts of shell material added in situ. The
quartz sand grains are largely subangular and exhib-
it no frosting, pitting, or etching. The heavy min-
erals, which are insignificant in amount, are pre-
dominantly metamorphic with Sillimanite compris-
ing 30% of the suite; Kyanite 9%; yellow tourmaline,
staurolite, and zircon 6%each; the remainders are
largely magnetite and ilmenite.

The organic content of the sediments varies
widely from as high as 7% in a rare mud to almost






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


zero on the Gulf beaches. The channels and slopes
have less organic matter and are somewhat less
variable organically than the shallow water sand
and grass flats and the mangrove beaches.

The parameters which control the sedimenta-
tion and eventual petrogenesis within the bay com-
plex are as follows:

1. Provenance Limestones and sandstones
ofCenozoicage. There are no shales with-
in the source area. Marine terraces of
Pleistocene and Recent ages are composed
of quartz sand which has textural and min-
eralogical characteristics similar to the
terrigenous faction of the present bay sed-
iments.

2. Transportation Slow, placid rivers which
have little or no bed or suspended load, no
deltas, natural levees, etc. Tidal cur-
rents which sweep the bay are a simple
tidal exchange with ebb velocities slightly
higher than flood. Most tidal flow is re-
stricted to the channels.

3. Environment of depression -Salinities vary
from normal marine at the mouth to brack-
ish in the headwaters and from west to east
across the bay due to river influx on the
eastern bay shores. The pH values are
8.3-8.5 in the lagoonal water masses but
decrease slightly in areas of river de-
bouchment. Sediment-water interfaces
show pH's of 7.1-7.8 and decrease slightly
with depth. Fauna and flora vary widely
between sand and grass flat shallow water
environments as well as between deeper
environments. Reconnaissance ecology is
presented.

4. Diagenesis Organic matter increases






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


slightly up to about 10-12 cm in depth, then
decreases with further burial. H2S was
observed 2-5 cm below the surface in all
environments except the sand-flat areas of
shallow water. Sulphur reducing bacteria
have been cultured from allbut the channel
areas. Carbonate percentages do not ap-
preciably decrease with depth within the
core lengths investigated.

Cross sections of the Bay fill reveal estuary
flooding to be comparatively recent.


Florida State University, Department of Geology

A cooperative agreement has been made between the
Florida State University Geology Department andthe Florida
Geological Survey, whereby R. O. Vernon, Harbans S. Puri,
and S. J. Olsen will serve as participating faculty and assist
the University in the establishment of a strong Ph.D. pro-
gram. The Survey personnel will continue to direct the field
and laboratory studies of some of the students working on the
various problems in Florida geology. The results of such
studies, if they merit, will be published by the Survey.

The Survey has for many years worked closely with
Florida State University, having been housed at the Univer-
sity from 1939 to 1957, as a courtesy of the President and
the Board of Control. With the occupation of the Florida
Geological Survey Office Building in late 1957, housing both
the Ground Water Branch of the Federal Survey and the State
Survey, the cooperation between these departments can be
expected to expand and all departments will benefit.

During the past biennium three individual studies were
directed by Florida Geological Survey personnel, these
studies to be used as partial fulfillment of the requirements
for a Master's Degree in geology and oceanography. Mr.
Olsen, Dr. Puri and Dr. Vernon served on the examining
committee for defense of theses. With the appointment of
some Survey personnel as participating faculty it is antici-
pated that the close cooperation with the University will







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


continue to mature and that the Department of Geology will be
in a position to offer work leading to a degree of Doctor of
Philosophy in geology. Survey personnel will have special-
ized training and skills that will broaden the curriculum of
the University. Much of the Survey's large geologic library
and study collections are available to qualified students for
research purposes.


Florida State University, Department of Ceramics

Mr. William Watson, Professor in Ceramics, desired
to test Florida clays to determine their ceramic properties.
One field trip to the Panhandle was made with University
personnel and samples from a number of localities in the
Panhandle, at Russel, Orlando, St. Petersburg, andBraden-
ton, have been collected and submitted to Mr. Watson for
evaluation of their handling, working, and firing character-
istics.


U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service

Several conferences and trips were held with Soil Con-
servation personnel to discuss the geology as it relates to
soil and toassist in the processing of work of the Service as
it related to water resource problems, particularly at Orange
Lake and Tsala-Apopka Lake.



State Road Department

Rock cuttings from severaldrainage wells placed by the
State Road Department were studied and electric logs were
prepared on two where some trouble in completing the wells
has been experienced.



Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund

Numerous conferences with the Chief Engineer of the
Trustees relative to water resources, lake levels, Suwannee






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


River development, and ownership of lake bottom lands were
attended by Survey personnel. Robert Vernon and Ernest
Bishop participated in the Lake Maitland ownership case in
which the State was an intervenor. The case was important
in establishing a precedent of law in effect that Florida is
the owner of all sovereignty lands whether theywere meander-
ed in the original government surveys or not. The findings of
the court are reproduced as follows:

In the Circuit Court of the Ninth Judicial Circuit
In and For Orange County, Florida

John E. Crews, et al.
Plaintiffs
and
Le Roy Collins, et al.
Intervenors
vs Chancery No. 32832
Elmer V. Adams and Esther
Weber Adams, et al.
Defendenants

Findings of the Court

The Court having heard all the evidence presented in this
case by all the parties andhaving considered the same makes
the following findings of fact:

1. The plaintiffs are respectfully owners of land adja-
cent to and abutting upon Lake Maitland.

2. The State of Florida is the owner of all sovereignty
lands.

3. Lake Maitland is now in fact a navigable fresh water
lake in Orange County, Florida, and was navigable
at the time Florida was admitted to the Union in
1845 and at all times in between.

4. The normal high water level of Lake Maitland is
now 66 feet contour mean sea level and has been
substantially the same at all times since Florida
attained statehood.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


5. The parties, by their stipulation made before the
Court and incorporated in the transcript of these
proceedings, have agreed that upon the foregoing
basis the correct location of the contour line on the
lands of defendants, Adams, (not including Picnic
Island) shall be established as a line equally distant
from two lines shown upon joint exhibit 1 filed in
evidence, whereon these lines are marked "three
line" and "suggested compromise line" respectfully.
The exact description of which line is to be deter-
mined by the two surveyors appointed by the Court
for that purpose.

6. The defendants have dredged and filled in sand or
dirt upon lands formerly under the navigable waters
of Lake Maitland beyond and lakeward from the fore-
going contour line.

The Court further makes the following findings of law
based upon the foregoing findings of facts:

1. The plaintiffs and intervenors are entitled to main-
tain this suit.

2. All lands beneath the water of Lake Maitland, be-
cause of it being navigable fresh water lake, became
sovereign lands of the State of Florida upon it attain-
ing statehoodand have remained sovereignlands up
to the present time.

3. The normal high water mark, or contour line, of
Lake Maitland establishes the perimeter or shore
line of the lake, beyond which line lakeward are
sovereign lands.

4. The location of the contour line on the land of de-
fendants Adams shall be established in accordance
with the stipulation of the parties hereinbefore
referred to.

5. The defendants, Adams, shall be required within
thirty (30) days from the final decree herein to re-
move, at their own expense, all sand or dirt dredged






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


onto the lands of the State of Florida beyond the
contour line as established by the proceeding para-
graph, so that at zero feet at said line the depth
would be at least two and a half feet twenty feet there-
from.

6. The defendants shall be perpetually enjoined from
dredging or filling in any of the lands hereinbefore
found to be sovereign lands, or in any way inter-
ferring with the free and unobstructed use of the
water by the public over said lands for purposes of
navigation.

7. The costs of this suit to be borne by the parties in
accordance withthe stipulation, with respect there-
to.

8. Two surveyors, R.H. Jones and W. C. Hart, agreed
upon by the parties hereto in their stipulation, are
hereby appointed by the Court to supply a description
of the actual line as agreed uponby the parties as the
contour line on the lands of defendants, Adams.

9. That the lakeward boundary of all prior conveyance
is the line of ordinary high water mark, and the
deeds to the defendants, Adams, and their prede-
cessors, in title are therefore void to that portion
of the lands lying lakeward from said contour line,
except Picnic Island, whichthe parties have agreed
are not sovereign lands.


Water Resources Department

The Water Resources Department has the responsibility
of regulating and managing the water resources of Florida,
and the Florida Geological Survey is the principal contracting
agency working with the U. S. Geological Survey to obtain the
facts about the occurrence and quality of Florida water. The
two departments work closely together and have shared the
problems that arise in connection with these water responsi-
bilities. The Survey cooperated in the initial organization
of the Water Resources Department, providing some surplus






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


equipment.

The Survey also assisted in particular water problems
at Big Alligator Lake in Columbia County (lowered water
levels and possible construction of a low-water dam); Lake
Wales, Polk County, a conflict of interests in water rights
and a lowered water level; Orange Lake inAlachua and Marion
counties, lowered water level, conflicting interests, and a
desire to construct a low-level dam; White Springs and
Suwannee Springs, development of the Suwannee River Valley
and the construction of low-level overflow dams; Cross
Florida Barge Canal, reactivation of interest in the con-
struction of the canaland the possible effect of the construc-
tion upon ground-water levels of the area; Raiford Prison,
investigation of a cavity reported to be several hundred feet
deep and penetrated by a well at the prison (an electric log
indicated a small fifteen foot cavity); Lake Letta, Highlands
County to determine the normal and high water levels of the
lake in a conflict of interest; Green Swamp, to initiate a co-
operative study of the area with the U.S. Geological Survey,
the Water Resources Department, and counties and water
control agencies bordering the Swamp. This project was
begun in late 1958 andwill continue during the next biennium.



Miscellaneous Agencies

The Florida Geological Survey and the Paleontology and
Stratigraphy Branch of the Washington, D. C. office of the
U. S. Geological Survey have joined their efforts in an attempt
to correlate the surface formations of the Acline and Fort
Myers areas. Due to the nature of these sediments, strati-
graphy alone is not sufficient to adequately interpret these
beds so that both their vertebrate and invertebrate remains
are being studied at this time in an effort to bring about this
much needed correlation.

Dr. P. Brodkorb of the University of Florida has con-
tinued the cooperative program, started two years ago, under
which the vast quantities of Pleistocene microvertebrates
were obtained. The Reddick Cave fauna from these collections
is being studied by Dr. R. Bader of the University of Illinois,






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


and the Pleistocene peccari remains were requested by D. E.
Lundelius of the University of Texas. The Survey's collec-
tion of Miocene rodents is being studied by Craig Black of
the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University.
A field party from the last named institution, during one of
its visits to Florida to collect vertebrate fossils, was aided
in field prospecting by E.W. Bishop of the Survey staff, who
guided the party to some of the better collecting areas in the
phosphate region of Polk County.

Many organizations participated in the loan of needed
comparative material to aid in the completion of projects by
Survey staff members. Among the foremost of these insti-
tutions are the American Museum of Natural History, the
Museum of Comparative Zoology, the U. S. National Museum,
the Museum of Paleontology of the University of California,
and the University of Florida.


U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division

Current Program

The Florida Geological Survey and the Water Resources
Division of the U. S. Geological Survey have been coopera-
tively engaged in investigations of Florida's water resources
for a number of years. This cooperationwas continued during
the 1957-59 biennium. These investigations are for the pur-
pose of appraising the water resources of Florida, as toboth
quantity and quality.

One part of making an appraisal of the water resources
of the State is the collection of basic data over a long period
of time. This part of the cooperative program consists of
the collection, interpretation, evaluation, and publication of
long-term records of lake and stream stages, stream and
spring discharge, ground-water levels, and quality of water,
on a State-wide network of stations. The program with the
Florida Geological Survey is coordinated with programs of
other cooperating agencies to achieve the best coverage of
the State within the limits of available funds. Under the data-
collection part of the program the network of gaging stations








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


STREAM FLOW MEASURING STATIONS
in operation De 31, 1958


SCALE OF MILES
00 20 40 50

U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
OCALA, FLORIDA


Figure 8. Streamflow measuring stations in operation
December 31, 1958.









THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 51


MAP OF
FLORIDA
SHOWING
CHEMICAL QUALITY SAMPLING STATIONS
OCTOBER 1958


EXPLANATION
*
DAILY STATIONS
0
PERIODIC, QUARTERLY AND
SEMIANNUAL STATIONS


Note: Number given only in
project are


bCALE OF MILES
00 20 40 50


U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
OCALA, FLORIDA


Figure 9. Chemical quality sampling stations, October, 1958.









FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


LOCATION OF OBSERVATION WELLS

LEGEND
NON RECORDING GAGES
@ RECORDING GAGES


9 0so0


Figure 10. Location of observation wells.


-<\






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 53


Figure 11. Areas of water resources investigations, 1958.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


has been extended to nearly every part of the State and as of
December 31, 1958, included 153 streamflow measuring
stations, 253 water-level recording stations, 80 periodic
water-level stations, 65 chemical quality sampling stations,
and 64 sites where some data are collected occasionally.

In addition to the continuing program of data collection
the following project investigations designed to determine
the water resources of local areas within the state were
undertaken:

1. A comprehensive investigation of the surface-water
resources of Baker County was made to determine
the feasibility of developing conservation and rec-
reational areas in the county. A report on the find-
ings of this investigation has been published as
Information Circular No. 20.

2. A four-year investigation of the water resources of
Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union counties was
started in 1957. This investigation has proceeded
as scheduled.

3. A six-year investigation of the water resources of
Santa Rosa and Escambia counties and adjacent
areas was started in 1958. This investigation has
proceeded as scheduled.

4. A three-year project covering the review, conden-
sation, and compilation of all streamflow records
collected in Florida to September 30, '1950, was
completed in 1958. These records will be published
as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper No.
1304, and will contain all such records for the South
Atlantic Slope and Eastern Gulf of Mexico basins,
Ogeechee River to Pearl River. Some Federal funds
were available and used for this work but were in-
adequate for completion of the project on a desirable
schedule. The Florida Geological Surveyfurnished
the necessary funds to expedite this project.

5. A two-year reconnaissance-type investigation of







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


water conditions of the Green Swamp area in central
Florida was begun in July 1958.

6. On June 9, 1957, floods occurred on streams in the
vicinity of Perry. An investigation of this flood was
made and the findings are published in Information
Circular No. 17.

7. The field work of a comprehensive investigation of
the water resources of Brevard County has been
completed and a report is being prepared. An
interim report for this project was published as
Information Circular No. 11.

8. The field work of ground-water investigations, in-
cluding quality of water studies, in Charlotte, Co-
lumbia, Glades, Hendry, Lee, Martin, Seminole,
and Volusia counties has been completed and reports
are either in the process of being prepared or re-
viewed.

9. Ground-water investigations are currently underway
in Flagler, St. Johns, Putnam, and Collier counties
and are proceeding as scheduled. Interim reports
for Flagler, St. Johns, and Putnam'counties were
published as Information Circulars No. 13, 14, and
15.

10. Water-resources investigations are currently
underway in Hillsborough and Polk counties.

In the progress of these studies the Florida Geological
Survey personnel spent 36-mandays logging water wells with
a WIDCO electric logging machine and a comprehensive file
of electric logs is being collected. In addition the State
Survey's mobile drill rig was used 43 days in drilling shallow
test wells.'



Proposed Future Studies

Water resource investigations in Florida for the most







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


part are accomplished through a cooperative agreement be-
tween the Florida Geological Survey, a few other State depart-
ments, various cities and counties, and the Water Resources
Division of the U. S. Geological Survey. Three branches of
the Water Resources Division of the Federal Survey have
responsibilities of investigations in surface, quality, and
ground waters. The total cooperative program in Florida
during 1958-59 was $620, 000 of which $313,975was in ground
water.

As the 1959-61 biennial budgetwas being planned, several
conferences between the various interested state agencies
and the Federal Geological Survey were held to discuss the
needs for water resource data, particularly as these related
to planning for the future. A ten-year target was set and
these conferences developed the following suggestions and
recommendations for a ten-year expanded water resource
investigation in Florida grouped under four headings:

1. Basic Data The basic data program should be
doubled over a five-year period. If carried out this
would provide good areal coverage on stream flow,
ground-water levels, and chemical quality of water.

2. Research Several research studies were proposed
and listed under the proposed year of the initial
study. These studies are needed to obtain a better
understanding of the complicated interrelationships
of various phases of the hydrologic cycle.

3. Special Studies A number of special studies to
interpret basic data and put them in a more usable
form is critically needed.

4. Area Studies Water resources investigations for
several areas which have or will have major water
problems in the foreseeable future will be under-
taken.

In view of the possible problems of financing and staffing
the entire proposed program it was agreed that a proposal be
prepared, covering a two-year period ending June 30, 1961,







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


giving priority to certain parts of the program.

From a long range viewpoint, an expansion of the basic
network and research studies should have the highest priority.
This willhelp fillout the broad state-wide appraisal of water
resources and will provide valuable data for future planning
and design, special studies and area studies. The thought
was expressed that area studies would probably be partially
supported by county and city funds as has been done in the
past. Under this assumption, area studies would continue
at about the same rate as in the present program.

Accordingly, it was proposedthat the following additions
be made to the present program of water resources investi-
gations:

First Year (1959-60)
Install and operate the following:
9 new gaging stations in primary streamflow net-
work
25 new gaging stations in secondary network
115 new lake stage gages
30 new recording ground-water stations
20 new nonrecording ground-water stations
2 index quality of surface water stations
An undetermined number of indexwells for chemical
quality of ground water
Make reconnaissance of the chemical quality of sur-
face waters of Florida
Begin study of hydrology of lakes.

Second Year (1960-61)
Install and operate the following:
18 new gaging stations in secondary network
15 new lake stage gages
25 new recording ground-water stations
15 new nonrecording ground-water stations
2 index quality of surface water stations
An undetermined number of index wells for chemical
quality of ground water
Continue study on hydrology of lakes.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


The following table summarizes the funds required from
the Florida Geological Survey in order to carry out the ex-
panded program. Should these funds become available, the
Federal matching funds wouldbe contingent upon their avail-
ability and approval of the program by the Director of the
U. S. Geological Survey.

SW GW QW Total
Present (FGS
cooperation) $37,700 $ 95,500' $15,300 $148,500
Additional funds
needed 50,900 38,000 12,600 101,500
Total proposed:
(.1959-60) 88, 600 133,500 27,900 250,000
(1960-61) 88,600 133,500 27,900 250,000

The Legislature is being asked to increase the current
water resource cooperative budgetby $244,000 for the bien-
nium of 1959-61 and it is hoped to continue these investiga-
tions at this level for a period of 10 years, following which
time it is hoped to have a sustained re-evaluationprogram at
a lesser budget. The accelerated program should provide
much of the needed fundamental data upon which the Water
Resources Department can base reasonable rules and regu-
lations for control and management of the State's water re-
sources.


OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION IN FLORIDA

The Florida State Board of Conservation Oil and Gas
Division operated under the 1957 Florida Statutes, Chapter
377. 01-377.40. By request of the Board, the State Geologist
serves as Administrative Officer, keeps the records of the
Board, reviews all requests for permits, and approves the
method of plugging oil and gas exploratory wells. The office
of State Geologist is designated by Chapter 377 of the 1957
Florida Statutes as the depository for all well logs, rock
cuttings, cores and records pertaining to these exploratory
activities and the State Geologist is the official historian and
statistician for the industry in Florida.






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


1957 Activities

The decline in the exploration for oil and gas in Florida
during 1956 continued through 1957, 13 wells being completed
in 1956 and nine in 1957. One location in Escambia County
was abandoned and only the Humble Oil and Refining Company
was drilling on January 1, 1958. The total completedfootage
drilled during the year was 63, 632 feet, seven of the wells
prospected in Panhandle Florida, three in the peninsular
area.

Geophysical prospecting by seven major oil companies
covered 20 counties in Florida. In crew weeks, 137 weeks
were given to seismology, 55 to gravity and 52 to core drill-
ing, this workbeing limited to Escambia, Santa Rosa, Walton,
Washington, Gadsden, Liberty, and Franklin counties in the
panhandle and Highlands, Okeechobee, St. Lucie, Martin,
Glades, Charlotte, Lee, Hendry, Palm Beach, Broward,
Dade, Monroe, and Collier counties in the peninsula.


1958 Activities

Eight permits to drill were issued in 1958, including
one to deepen an old well. Seven wells were completed, all
being dry and abandoned. Thesewere located in Glades, Lee,
Okaloosa, Palm Beach, two in Santa Rosa and Walton. They
represent a total footage of drilling of 67, 705 feet which
represents a continued decline of activity over previous
years. Little in the way of encouragement has been developed
since the discovery and development of the Sunniland Oilfield
in Collier County in 1943, and the excitement of the discovery
and disappointment in the wane of the Pollard, Alabama, oil
field. Only the Sun, Humble, California, Amerada, Coastal,
Gulf, Continental, and Commonwealth retain active interest
in the state.

Fairly good shows, with some drill-stem tests being
run, were present in the Lower Cretaceous limestones of
the peninsular part of Florida inthreewells. Four panhandle
wells gave no shows, but the deep exploration in Walton
County, the Pan-American Petroleum Corporation No. 1







60 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Sealy, provided important data on the stratigraphy of the
Lower Cretaceous in Panhandle Florida.

The most encouraging activity in the State was an in-
creased geophysical exploration. At least three seismic
crews were active throughout the year and as high as six were
working at times. A total of 169 crew weeks of seismograph,
52 of core drill, and 62 of gravitywas spread over 14 counties,
and 77 crew weeks of work were completed offshore.

As of December 31, 1958, Florida had 11 producing oil
wells, all owned by the Humble Oil and Refining Company.
The smallfield is located in Collier County, near Sunniland.
During 1957 a total of 459, 612 barrels of oilwereproduced,
and in 1958 the production totaled 445, 886 barrels.







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA1
-f 1956-57


Mineral production in Florida declined three percent
to $136 million from the record breaking output of $140. 5
million in 1956. The value of phosphate-rock production
declined ($9.5 million) 13 percent; titanium concentrates,
seven percent; monazite, 34 percent; and zirconium concen-
trate, nine percent; and although clays, sand and gravel,




Table 1. Mineral Production in Florida, 1956-571

1956 1957
Thousand Thousand
short tons short tons
Mineral (unless Value (unless Value
otherwise (thou- otherwise (thou-
stated) sands) stated) sands)
Clays............. ..................... 432 $ 5,826 422 $ 6,067
Gem stones............................... (2) (3) (2) (3)
Lime ......................................... 40 490 (4) (4)
Natural gas......... million cubic feet.. 35 3 540 53
Peat................................. 58 203 38 195
Petroleum..thousand 42-gallon barrels.. 479 (4) 461 (4)
Phosphate rock .... thousand long tons.. 11,822 74,290 10,191 64,789
Sand and gravel....................... 5,815 5,033 6,753 6,148
Stone ............................... 18,779 25,183 21,786 30,467
Titanium concentrates................. 284 6,651 263 6,204
Zirconium concentrate ................ 44 2,160 57 1,976
Value of items that cannot be disclosed:
cement, abrasive garnet (1956), rare-
earth metals concentrates, staurolite
(1957), andvalues indicated byfootnote4. --- 21,802 --- 22,514
Total Florida6 .................. 140,490 136,026


1Production as measured by mine shipments, sales
including consumption by producers).
2Weight not recorded.
3Less than $1, 000.


or marketable production


4Figure withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data.
5Preliminary figure.
6The total has been adjusted to eliminate duplicating the value of clays and stone.


Reprinted and condensed from Volume III, Mineral
Yearbook, 1957, U. S. Bureau of Mines and compiled by
James L. Vallely and Robert O. Vernon.








62 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Table 2. Average Unit Value of Mineral Commodities in Florida
1948-52 (Average) and 1953-57


Commodity 1948-521 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957

Cement:
Masonry.......376-pound barrel. (2) (2) (2) $ 3.78 $ 4.03 $ 4. 16
Portland....................do. $ 2.57 $ 2.87$ 2.89 2.96 3.21 3.34
Clays:
Fuller's earth......... short ton. 17.18 18.84 19.82 21.46 22.37 24.34
Kaolin ......................do. 22.73 23.92 24.49 23.09 25.24 26.03
Miscellaneous.............. do. .82 1.00 .78 1.03 1.05 1.02
Garnet (abrasive) .............do. 42.25 46.49 30.00 60.69 25.00 ---
Lime ........................do. 12.95 12.57 11.97 12.03 12.39 12.51
Natural gas.... thousand cubic feet. .06 .06 .08 .11 3.09 4.08
Peat ................... short ton. 5.42 6.70 4.49 3.79 3.47 5.15
Phosphate rock ..........long ton. 5.76 6.06 6.18 6.13 6.28 6.34
Sand and gravel:
Gravel ............... short ton. 1.23 1.27 1.50 1.51 1.43 1.47
Sand ........................do. .82 .82 .71 .76 .77 .77
Staurolite .................... do. --- 3.57 4.40 4.75 4.50 4.21
Stone:
Limestone:
Crushed ...................do. 1.19 1.20 1.25 1.31 1.30 1.39
Dimension .................do. 9.74 9.00 2.53 143.96 32.26 30.66
Shell .......................do. --- --- --- 2.28 2.03 1.34
Titanium:
Ilmenite .................... do. 15.41 15.37 15.36 18.97 (5) (5)
Rutile ......................do. 59.09 108.54 119.05 122.20 (5) (5)
Zircon ....................... do. 43.42 37.38 45.66 49.31 49.31 34.78
1Average.
2Data not available.
3Revised figure.
4Preliminary figure.
5Figure withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data.

MILLION DOLLARS






Total vlue














1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960


Figure 12. Value of phospate rock and stone and total value
of mineral production in Florida, 1935-57.







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


stone, and petroleum were higher, the State total was $4. 5
million less than in 1956.

Florida led the States in producing phosphate rock and
zircon, ranked second in output of monazite and titanium
concentrates, and stood third in peat production. Leading
industries were mining and processing phosphate rock,
quarrying limestone, and manufacturing cement.



Consumption, Trade, and Markets

Florida's construction minerals, limestone, shell, and
sand and gravel, together with cement and lime, were
marketed almost exclusively within the State. Crude gypsum,
perlite, andvermiculite produced elsewhere were processed
in Florida for local consumption. Fuller's earth, kaolin,
titanium, and zirconium concentrates were shipped out of the
State for further processing and consumption. Phosphate
rockwasprocessedinto ordinary andtriple superphosphate,
elemental phosphorus, and phosphoric acid and marketed
throughout the United States. Over 2. 6 million tons of dried
phosphate rock, 25 percent of the State's marketable pro-
duction, was exported.

Unit values of most minerals produced in the State in
1957 were higher than 1956. Exceptions were miscellaneous
clay, natural gas (estimated), staurolite, dimension lime-
stone, shell, and zircon.



STrends and Developments

The phosphate industry continues to expand. During the
year two new superphosphate-plant improvements to produce
powdered superphosphate were under construction. Inter-
national Minerals & Chemical Corporation, contracted to
supply more than 10, 000 tons of fluosilicic acid (a byproduct
of proce s sing phosphate rock) to Kaiser Aluminum & Chemi-
cal Corporation. Kaiser planned to convert the fluosilicic
acid into sodium silicofluoride at a new plant in Mulberry for
shipment to Louisiana for final processing into synthetic
cryolite. The Virginia Carolina Chemical Corporation







64 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


byproduct uranium-from-phosphate plant at Nichols was
found to be uneconomical. Plans for a new plant to produce
lightweight aggregate at Bartow from phosphate slimes to
cost $250, 000 were announced. Also announced was imme-
diate construction at Tampa of a $2 million electric steel-
rolling mill; locally obtained scrap will be melted bythe new
electrical process to produce 35, 000 tons of reinforcing bars
and me r chant bars annually. Interest continues in exploration
for titanium minerals; the Union Carbide & Carbon Corpo-
ration new dredge and plant on Amelia Island was the chief
development in this field. Construction of two new cement
plants near Miami will guarantee ample supply of this mate-
rial for the State's needs for several years. A new natural-
gas pipeline which will be constructed to serve the State has
been authorized. At present only the northwestern part of
the state has natural-gas service except for the small pro-
duction in Collier County.




Table 3. Employment in the Mineral Industries, 1955-57

1955 1956 19571
Men Aver- Men Aver- Men Aver-
Industry work- age Man- work- age Man- work- age Man-
ing active days ing active days ing active days
daily days worked daily days worked daily days worked
Nonmetal mines... 1,640 284 465,523 3,068 295 906,248 3,193 274 875, 236
Quarries andmills. 1,895 284 537,521 1,334 294 391,591 1,959 279 546 676
Oil and gas....... 1,175 256 300,819 593 256 151,516 (2) (2) (A)
Metal mines ..... 391 293 114,497 423 300 126,838 416 279 116,138
Sand and gravel
mines ..... ...... 292 275 380,335 3328 3279 391,578 368 271 99,875
Total....... 5,393 278 1,498,695 5,746 290 1,667,771 5,936 276 1,637,925
Preliminary figures.
2Data not available.
3Excluding Government-and-contractor operations.





Review by Mineral Commodities


Nonmetals


Cement: The value of cement production was little
changed from 1956. Portland cement decreased four percent
in tonnage and less than one-half percent in value. Masonry
cement declined one percent in tonnage but increased three






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


percent in value. Construction of two new cement plants
west of Miami was in progress at the end of the year, and
both were expectedto operate in 1958. Their combined capac-
ity will increase the State's total by 4.5 millionbarrels.
Expansion program at Lehigh Portland Cement plant at
Bunnell was undertaken.

Clays: Production of clay was 422,000 tons valued at
$6. 1 million two percent less in tonnage but four percent
higher in value than in 1956. Fuller's earth totaled 223, 000
tons valued at $4. 5 million a decline of two percent inton-
nage but six percent higher in value. Kaolin and miscella-
neous clay declined in both tonnage and value; kaolin de-
creased 16 percent in tonnage and 13 percent in value and
miscellaneous clay, one and four percent in tonnage and
value, respectively. Fuller's earth was mined in Gadsden
County, kaolin in Putnam, and miscellaneous clay in Citrus
and Gadsden counties.

Gypsum: Importedcrude gypsum was calcinedandused
in manufacturing building products by the United States
Gypsum Company at Jacksonville.

Lime: Production andvalue of lime were lower than in
1956. The City of Miami and Dixie Lime Products Company
were the only producers.

Perlite: Crude perlite shippedfrom western states was
expanded for use as a lightweight aggregate and building
plaster by three companies at plants in Hialeah, Jacksonville,
and Vero Beach. Production of the expanded materialin-
creased 15 percent and 25 percent in tonnage and value,
respectively.

Phosphate rock: Florida was the leading State in phos-
phate-rock production, 73 percent of the nation's output in
1957. Marketable production was 10.2 million tons valued
at $64. 8 million, a decrease of 14 percent in tonnage and 13
percent in value from 1956. Phosphate rock sold or used by
producers, however, increased one percent and four percent
in tonnage and value, respectively, over 1956, totaling 10. 6
million tons valued at $67.9 million.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Land-pebble phosphate comprised more than 98 percent
of the total production; output came from eight companies at
15 mines in Polk and Hillsborough counties. American
Cyanamid Company began producing at the new Orange Park
mine washer and flotation plant, four miles north of Lakeland,
to replace the Saddle Creek mine that was depleted and closed
early in the year. Large-scale plant improvements and addi-
tions were undertakenby several pebble-phosphate companies
during the year, including new triple-superphosphate plants
of American Cyanamid at Brewster and International Min-
erals & Chemical Company at Bonnie. Several articles on
Florida's phosphate industry were published during the year.

Hard-rock phosphate decreased 17 percent in tonnage
and 15 percent in value. Kibler-Camp Phosphate Enterprises
in Citrus County was the only producer. Most hard-rock
production was used for elemental phosphorus.

Soft-rock production was 14 percent lower in tonnage
but only three percent lower in value. Output came from
five producers in Citrus County and one producer at mines
in Columbia and Gilchrist counties. Soft-rock phosphate was
used for stock and poultry feed and direct application to the
soil.

Sand and gravel: Sand and gravel ranked fifth as a min-
eral in the State in value and was produced at a record new
high for the third consecutive year 6. 8 million tons valued
at $6. 1 million, gains of 16 percent in tonnage and 22 percent
in value. Both sand and gravel increased in tonnage and
value the latter more than 50 percent. Thirty-one operators
were actively producing sand in 14 counties; four of these
companies also produced gravel in Dade, Escambia, Gadsden
and Putnam counties. Sand and gravel was used principally
for building and paving; small tonnages were classified as
blast, engine, filter and molding sands, and railroadballast.

Staurolite: Staurolite was recovered as a byproduct in
concentrating titanium minerals and marketed principally
as an iron and aluminum additive in making portland cement;
a small quantity was used for sandblasting monumental stone.
Staurolite production is included for the first time in 1957 in






THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


the total of the State's mineral production.

Stone: Total stone production, including shell and lime-
stone used for cement and lime, continued to rise and exceed-
ed 1956 production 16 percent in tonnage and 21 percent in
value, totaling 21.8 million tons valued at $30. 5 million.
Dimension limestone made up only one percent of the pro-
duction value, crushed limestone 92 percent, and shell the
remaining seven percent.

Crushed stone was produced at 66 quarries in 21 counties
by 49 companies and one county highway department.

Dimension stone was quarriedbyfour companies in three
counties, and shell was dredged in five counties by four
producers.

Metals

Rare-earth metals: Monazite production was 22 percent
higher in tonnage but 34 percent lower in value than in 1956.
Humphreys Gold Corporation was the only producer, re-
covering monazite as a byproduct in concentrating titanium
minerals.

Titanium concentrates: Production of titanium concen-
trates ilmenite and rutile totaled 263, 000 tons valued at
$6. 2 million, a decrease of seven percent in tonnage and
value from 1956. Illmenite tonnage and value decreased
more than five percent and rutile overd10 percent. Humphreys
Gold Corporation produced a mixed titanium concentrate,
zircon, and staurolite at the Highland and Trail Ridge dredges
and concentration plants in Clay County for E. I. du Pont de
Nemours & Company, Inc. Humphreys also recovered
ilmenite, rutile, and zircon at a dredge and concentrating
plant for the Rutile Mining Company of Florida at Jackson-
ville. Florida Minerals Company produced ilmenite, rutile,
and zircon from sands mined in Indian River County. E. I.
du Pont de Nemours & Company, Inc., announced that the
Trail Ridge and Highlandplants would be operatedby du Pont
when the 10-year contract with Humphreys Gold. Inc.,
expires in February, 1958.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Union Carbide & Carbon Corporation announced plans
for mining and concentrating titanium sands on a 3,000 acre
tract on Amelia Island, 30 miles northeast of Jacksonville.
Production will begin in 1958. Nuclear Magnetic Mining,
Inc., merged with the Chesapeake and Colorado Corporation
in December and expected to begin producing titanium con-
centrates in 1958. Heavy Minerals Company has a new
titanium mining plant in Walton County at Panama City.

Zircon: Production of zircon in 1957 was 57,000 tons
valued at $2 million, a 30-percent increase in tonnage but
nine percent lower in value. Zircon was obtained as a by-
product in concentrating ilmenite and rutile from heavy sands
at the Trail Ridge and Highland plants of Humphreys Gold
Corporation, the National Lead plant at Jacksonville, and
the Florida Minerals Company plant.

Columbia National Corporation was constructing a $7. 5
million plant for producing zirconium near Pensacola. Zir-
con concentrate produced in Florida was to be used in the
plant.



Mineral Fuels

Natural gas: Production of natural gas in Collier County
was about the same as in 1956.

Peat: Peat produced chiefly for agricultural purposes
dropped to 38, 000tons valued at $195, 000, 35 percent lower
in tonnage but only four percent less in value than in 1956.
Production came from Hillsborough, Orange, Palm Beach,
and Putnam counties.

Petroleum: Crude-petroleum production, all from
Collier County, declined four percent in quantity but increased
eight percent in value.







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Preliminary Review of the Mineral Industry During 19581

The mineral production of Florida in 1958 is estimated
at $138. 7 million, an increase of two percent over the total
($136.0 million) of 1957, according to the Bureau of Mines,
U. S. Department of the Interior.

Production figures are based principally on advance
estimates by producers. They include mine or plant ship-
ments or marketable production and consumption by pro-
ducers.

Phosphate rock, which supplied 48 percent of the total
State mineral production, increased $2.7 million or four
percent. Cement and lime recorded increases. Shipments
of cement increased 19 percent in value.

Clay and petroleum production recorded declines of five
and two percent respectively.

Stone and sand and gravel supplied 27 percent of the
total mineral value. Tonnages and values of the foregoing
items differed only a relatively small amount compared to
1957.

Major losses were encountered by heavy minerals.
Titanium concentrates decreased 20 and 32 percent in tonnage
and value respectively, and zirconium concentrate losses
were 54 and 57 percent respectively.

Staurolite production and value increased 38 and 40 per-
cent respectively in tonnage and value.










U. S. Bureau of Mines and Florida Geological Survey
Data Area Report G-73 U. S. Bureau of Mines. Prepared
by Fred P. Giese, Knoxville.







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Table 4. Preliminary Mineral Production in Florida, 1958


Thousand
short tons
Mineral unless Value
otherwise (thou-
stated sand)

Clays (including fuller's earth ....... 379 $ 5,777
Peat ............... ................ 41 212
Petroleum. thousand 42-gallon barrels 450 (1)
Phosphate rock thousand long tons 10,577 67,480
Sand and gravel ....................... 6,739 6,206
Stone.............................. 21,881 30,832
Titanium concentrates ............. 187 4, 228
Zirconium concentrates ............. 26 861
Value of items that cannot be dis-
closed: cementlime, monazite,
staurolite and petroleum --- 23,081

Total Florida2 ................ --- 138,677

IFigure withheld to avoid disclosing confidential data.
2Total have been adjusted to eliminate duplicating values
of stone and clays.


KNOWN ACTIVE MINERAL PRODUCERS IN FLORIDA
1956-57


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry or Plant


Production
Reported
1956 1957


Address


CEMENT


General Portland Cement Company
Florida Portland Cement Division
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Tampa Mill

Lehigh Portland Cement Company
FLAGLER COUNTY
Bunnell Mill


X X



X X


Box 1528
Tampa 1, Florida



Bunnell, Florida


CLAY
Common


General Portland Cement Company
Florida Portland Cement Division
CITRUS COUNTY
Sec. 2, T21S, R19E


Box 1528
Tampa 1, Florida


X X








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry or Plant

Osceola Clay & Topsoil Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Alden Pit-Sec. 15, TZS, R30W
Jackson Pit-Sec. 15, TZS, R30W

Taylor Brick and Tile Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Molino Plant

Walton Brick and Tile Company
WALTON COUNTY
Glendale Road Plant


Production
Reported
1956 1957


Address


P. O. Box 649
Pensacola, Florida




land Manresa Street
Pensacola, Florida


DeFuniak Springs,Florida


Non-Commercial


Apalachee Correctional Institution
GADSDEN COUNTY
River Junction Brick Plant-Sec. 4,
T3N, R6W


Box 548
Chattahoochee, Florida


X X


Fuller's Earth


Floridin Company, Inc.
GADSDEN COUNTY
Quincy Plant
Jamieson Plant
Pits: Sec. 18, T2N, R3W
Sec. 7,TZN, R3W
Sec. 9,T3N, R3W
Sec. 8,T3N, RZW
Sec.11, T3N, R3W
MANATEE COUNTY
Pit: Sec. 10, T34S, R18E


X X
X X


P.O. Box 998
Tallahassee, Florida


Magnet Cove Barium Corporation
GADSDEN COUNTY
Havana Mine and Plant-Sec. 15,
T3N, R2W

Minerals & Chemicals Corp. of America
Attapulgus Division
GADSDEN COUNTY
Pit-Sec. 15, T3N, R3W X X


P.O. Box 677
Havana, Florida




Attapulgus, Georgia


Kaolin


Edgar Plastic Kaolin Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Edgar Mine-Sec. 25, T1OS, R23E

United Clay Mines Corporation
PUTNAM COUNTY
No.4 Mine-Secs. 27 & 28, TIOS, R23E


Edgar, Florida


X X




X X


P.O. Box 27
Hawthorne, Florida








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Production
Company, Name and Location Reported


Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

DOLOMITE
Crushed

Dixie Lime Products Company
LEVY COUNTY
Lebanon Quarry-Sec. 12, T16S, R16E


1956 1957


X X


Florida Dolomite Company
SARASOTA COUNTY
Sarasota Quarry-Sec. 1, T36S,R17E X

Golden Dolomite Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Red Level Quarry-Sec. 25, T17S, R16E X

Manatee Dolomite Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Minton Quarry-Sec. 5, T35S, R18E X

Southern Dolomite Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Palmetto Quarry-Sec. 19, T34S, R18E X

Dimensional (also see Limestone, dimensional)

Bradenton Stone Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Bradenton Quarry-Sec. 32, T34S, R18E X

Florida Travertine Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Clark's Quarry-Sec. 7, T35S, R18E X

Keystone Art Company
MONROE COUNTY
Windleys Key Quarry X

Phillip McLeod
ST. JOHNS COUNTY
St. Johns County Quarry X

GEM MATERIAL
Calcite and Agatized Coral (from Tampa Bay)

Rock & Shell Shop
DADE COUNTY

Agatized Coral

Willard Olson
PASCO COUNTY

(From Tampa Bay)

Dee Rocks and Minerals
PINELLAS COUNTY


Address


P.O. Box 578
Ocala, Florida


Pembroke, Florida




P.O. Box 1193
Orlando, Florida


P.O. Box 37
Samoset, Florida


P.O. Box 23
Bradenton, Florida





P.O. Box 256
Bradenton, Florida


Oneco, Florida




684 NW 7th Street
Miami, Florida


Box 673
St. Augustine, Florida


Miami, Florida





Rt. 1, Box 337
New Port Richey, Florida




231-24th Avenue N.
St. Petersburg, Florida








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant


Production
Reported
1956 1957


Sol Hommerick House
PINELLAS COUNTY


1401-25th Avenue S.
St. Petersburg, Florida


GYPSUM
Calcined


U. S. Gypsum Company
DUVAL COUNTY


300 W. Adams Street
Chicago, Illinois


ILMENITE


E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Inc.
CLAY COUNTY
Highland Plant-Sec. 18, T4S, R22E X
Trail Ridge Plant-Secs. 5 & 6,
T6S, R23E X


The Hobart Brothers Company
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
Winter Beach Plant-Sec.4, T32S,
R39 E

Humphreys Gold Corporation
CLAY COUNTY
Trail Ridge Plant-Sec. 13, TZS, R27E


P. O. Box 631
Starke, Florida


Box 1482
Vero Beach, Florida


X X




X X


Rutile Mining Company of Florida
and
Titanium Alloy Manufacturing Division
of the National Lead Company
DUVAL COUNTY
Jacksonville Plant-Sec. 13, TZS, R27E X
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.
P. O. Box 5492, Jacksonville)


Box 753
Starke, Florida


P.O. Box 5492
Jacksonville 7, Florida


LIME


Dixie Lime Products Company
MARION COUNTY
Kendrick Plant

City of Miami
Department of Water and Sewers
DADE COUNTY
Hialeah Plant


P. O. Box 578
Ocala, Florida


X X


P.O. Box 316
Coconut Grove Station
Miami 33, Florida


X X


LIMESTONE
Crushed


Belle Glade Rock Company
PALM BEACH COUNTY
South Bay Quarry-Sec. 23, T44S, R36E

Brooksville Rock Company, Inc.
HERNANDO COUNTY
Broco Quarry-Sees. 23 & 26, T21S,
R18E


X X


P.O. Box 37
Northwest Branch
Miami, Florida

Box 158
Brooksville, Florida


X X


Address








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

Camp Concrete Rock Company
HERNANDO COUNTY
Gay Quarry-Secs. 6 & 7, T22S, R19E

Central Quarries, Inc.
SUMTER COUNTY
Sumterville Quarry

W. L. Cobb Construction Company
MARION COUNTY
York Quarry-Sec. 26, T15S, RZOE
SUMTER COUNTY
Sumter Quarry

Connell and Shultz
LEVY COUNTY
Williston Quarry-Sec. 31, T12S, R19E

Cummer Lime & Manufacturing Co.
MARION COUNTY
Kendrick Quarry-Sec. 24, T14S, R21E
Martin Quarry-Secs. 10 & 11, T14S,
R21E

Deerfield Rock Corporation
BROWARD COUNTY
Deerfield Quarry-Secs. 4 & 9, T48S,
R42E

Dixie Lime Products Company
LEVY COUNTY
Lebanon
MARION COUNTY
Kendrick, Plant No. 3
Reddick, Plant No. 1

Driskell and Mayo
PALM BEACH COUNTY
DuBois Quarry-Sec. 31, T40S, R42E

Florida Dolomite Company
SARASOTA COUNTY
Quarry-4 miles North of Sarasota

Florida Rock Products Corporation
HERNANDO COUNTY
Diamond Hill Quarry (opened
October, 1957)
Lansing Quarry-Sec. 22, T21S, R19E

General Portland Cement Company
Florida Portland Cement Division
CITRUS COUNTY
Storey Quarry-Sec. 35,.T20S, R19E


Production
Reported
1956 1957




X X




X X




X X


X X




X X




X X


Address


Box 608
Ocala, Florida


P.O. Box 822
Leesburg, Florida


1102 N. 22nd Street
Tampa, Florida


Box 97
Inverness, Florida


P.O. Box 4640
Jacksonville, Florida


X X

P.O. Box 781
(Ft. Lauderdale, Florida)

X X Deerfield Beach, Florida


X X


X X


P.O. Box 578
Ocala, Florida


Jupiter, Florida




P.O. Box 1180
Sarasota, Florida


P.O. Box 4667
Jacksonville, Florida


X
X X


Box 1528
Tampa 1, Florida


X X








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

Hallandale Rock Corporation
BROWARD COUNTY
Hallandale Quarry-Sec. 28, T51S, R42E

Hollywood Quarries, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY


Industrial Limerock Co.
COLLIER COUNTY

Levy County Lime Rock Corporation
LEVY COUNTY
Pits: Sec. 19, TIZS,R19E
Sec. 25, T1ZS, R19E
Sec. 29, T12S, R19E


Production
Reported
1956 1957


Address


Box 781
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida


W. Taft Street &
X X SAL Railway
Hollywood, Florida


X


Box 194
Williston, Florida


Live Oak Stone Company
SUWANNEE COUNTY


Manatee Dolomite Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Quarry-Travertine Road, 1.5
miles east of Samoset

Marjax Company
JACKSON COUNTY
Quarry-Sec. 30, T5N, R10W


Maule Industries, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Prospect Quarry-Sec. 18, T49S, R42E
DADE COUNTY
South Dade
Ojus-Sec. 5, T52S, R42E
Red Road-Lots 1 & 2, T53S,R40E
Tropical-Sec. 22, T54S, R40E

W. P. McDonald Corporation of Florida
HERNANDO COUNTY
Conroc Quarry-Sec. 19, T22S, RZOE

Phillip McLeod
ST. JOHNS COUNTY
McLeod Quarry-Sec. 28, T7S, R30E

Meekins, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Meekins Quarry-Sec. 20, T51S, R42E

E. L. Montgomery, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Montgomery Quarry


P.O. Box 327
X X Live Oak, Florida


P.O. Box 37
Samoset, Florida


X X


Marianna, Florida




5220 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida


X X


X X




X X




X X




X X


Box 157
Brooksville, Florida


Box 673
St. Augustine, Florida


Box 36
Hollywood, Florida


815 NW 7th Terrace
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida









FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

Naranja Rock Company
DADE COUNTY
Naranja Quarry-Secs. 33 & 34,
T56S, R39E

Newberry Corporation
ALACHUA COUNTY
Haile Quarry-Sec. 13, T9S, R17E

Ocala Lime Rock Corporation
MARION COUNTY
Kendrick Quarry

Oolite Rock Company
DADE COUNTY
Oolite Rock Quarry-Sec. 23, T45S,
R40E

Charles E. Peacock
LEVY COUNTY
Peacock Quarry

Charles E. Phillips
PINELLAS COUNTY
Alverton Road Quarry

Road Rock, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Road Rock Quarry-Sec. 20, T50S,
R42E

Rozzo Mining Company
BROWARD COUNTY
Quarry-Sec.4, T48S, R42E
Quarry-Sec. 32, T50S, R42E

Seminole Rock Products Company
DADE COUNTY
Red Road Quarry-Sec. 31, T53S, R41E
Medley Quarry-Secs. 9 & 10, T53S,
R40E

Finley P. Smith
Dania
BROWARD COUNTY
Quarry-Sec.4, T48S, R42E

Snyder Paving Company, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Dania Ouarry-Sec.4, T51S,R42E
Ft. Lauderdale Quarry-Sec. 17, T49S,
R42E

Southern Dolomite Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Pit: Sec. 19, T34S, R18E


Production
Reported
1956 1957


X X




X X




X X


X X




X X




X X


X X




X X
X X




X X

X X


X X




X X

X X




X X


Address


P.O. Box 98
Naranja, Florida




P. O. Box 1588
Jacksonville, Florida


P. O. Box 842
Ocala, Florida


P. O. Drawer 868
South Miami 43, Florida


Williston, Florida




1307-2nd Ave. SW
Largo, Florida


2700 W. State Road 84
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida




1900 SW State Road 84
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida


P. O. Box 335
Tamiami Station
Miami, Florida


Rt. 1, Box 733
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida




P.O. Box 1199
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida


P. O. Box 23
Bradenton, Florida







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

Sunniland Limerock Company
COLLIER COUNTY
Sec. 29, T48S,R30E

Suwannee Limerock Company
SUWANNEE COUNTY
Ralph Quarry-Sec. 32, T5S, R14E

Charlie Toppino & Sons, Inc.
MONROE COUNTY
Stock Island Quarry

Three Bays Improvement Company
DADE COUNTY
Pit: Sec.35, T52S, R41E
(Acquired Troupe Quarries, Inc.)

United Limerock Company
LEVY COUNTY
Quarry at Hodgson

W. & M. Construction, Inc.
LEVY COUNTY
Raleigh Quarry-Sec. 24, T12S, R18E

West Coast Rock Company
LEE COUNTY
Ft. Myers Quarry

WillistonShell Rock Company
ALACHUA COUNTY
Buda Quarry-Sec. 32, T8S, R17E
Haile Quarry
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
Dell Quarry-Sec. 32, T4S, R11E


R.H. Wright & Son, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Wright Quarry

Zinke and Smith, Inc.
BROWARD COUNTY
Quarry-Sec.31, T48S, R42E


Production
Reported
1956 1957



X X



X X



X X




X X





X X




X X




X X




X X


X X




X X




X X


Address


Box 1547
Fort Myers, Florida


Branford, Florida




Box 787
Key West, Florida


2601 NW 75th Street
Miami, Florida



P.O. Box 4667
Jacksonville, Florida


Williston, Florida


Box 600
Ocala, Florida


Box 781
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida


Box 2004
Pompano Beach, Florida


Non-Commercial


Palm Beach County Highway Department
PALM BEACH COUNTY
County Quarries X X
Dimensional

Burkhart Quarry & Supplies Company
MANATEE COUNTY
(Formerly operated by Bradenton Stone Co.) X


Box 2429
West Palm Beach, Florida


P.O. Box 256
Bradenton, Florida








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant 19

Bradenton Stone Company, Inc.
(Dolomite)
MANATEE COUNTY
Bradenton Quarry-Sec. 32, T34S, R18E X
(Mill at Oneco under development 1956)

Florida Travertine Company (Dolomite)
MANATEE COUNTY
Clark's Quarry-Sec. 7, T35S,R18E X
(Under development Formerly
Alclaries Travertine Company)


Keystone Art Company
MONROE COUNTY
Windleys Key Quarry

Native Stone, Incorporated
DADE COUNTY
Ball Quarry


Production
Reported
56 1957


X X



X X


Address


P.O. Box 256
Bradenton, Florida


Oneco, Florida


X


684 NW 7th Street
Miami, Florida


Box 252
Miami 43, Florida


Oyster Shell


Bay Dredging & Construction Company
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Dredge-Lease No. 639

Bay Dredging & Towing Company
WALTON COUNTY

Bradenton Dredging & Shell Company
MANATEE COUNTY
Lease No. 61


X X


X X


Benton & Company, Inc.
PINELLAS COUNTY
Lease No. 460


P. O. Box 1484
Tampa 1, Florida


Box 1263
Bradenton, Florida


Box 1347
St. Petersburg, Florida


Dean F. Cox
PASCO COUNTY


Duval Engineering & Contracting Co.
DUVAL COUNTY
Dredge


White Shell Corporation
DUVAL COUNTY
Dredge


Box 1588
Jacksonville, Florida


1746 E. Adams Street
Jacksonville, Florida


MONAZITE


Rutile Mining Company of Florida
(National Lead Company)
DUVAL COUNTY
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.) X


Box 5492
Jacksonville 7, Florida







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant


Production
Reported
1956 1957


NATURAL GAS


Humble Oil & Refining Company
COLLIER COUNTY
Sunniland Field


X X


Box C
Everglades, Florida


PEAT


Agricultural Organics Corporation
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Seffner Pit-Sec. 2, T29S, R20E


Rt. 1, Box 25
Seffner, Florida


Arnold Soil Company
BROWARD COUNTY
Ft. Lauderdale Pit

Daetwyler Peat Mine
ORANGE COUNTY
Pine Castle Pit


P.O. Box 558
Ft. Lauderdale, Flrida


Rt. 7, Box 535
Orlando, Florida


Fernwood Humus Company
ORANGE COUNTY
Zellwood Pit

Glen St. Mary Nurseries Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Florahome Pit-Sec. 11, T9S, R24E

Jack O. Holmes, Inc.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Tampa Pit


P. O. Box 183
Zellwood, Florida


Glen St. Mary, Florida




P.O. Box 417
Tampa 1, Florida


PERLITE
Lightweight


Perlite Inc.
DADE COUNTY


P.O. Box 157
X X Hialeah, Florida


Expanded


Tennessee Products & Chemical Compa
DUVAL COUNTY


Airlite Processing Company
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY


First American National
X Bank Bldg.
Nashville 3, Tenn.


Building No.9, Air Base,
X X Vero Beach, Florida


PETROLEUM


Humble Oil & Refining Company
COLLIER COUNTY
Sunniland Field


X X


Box C
Everglades, Florida


Address







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant


Production
Reported
1956 1957


PHOSPHATE
Hard Rock


Kibler-Camp Phosphate Enterprise
CITRUS COUNTY
Mine and Plant-Sec. 17, T17S, R19E
Dunnellon


Box 608
Ocala, Florida


X X


Soft Rock


The Camp Phosphate Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Mine: North Inverness

The Howard Phosphate Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Mine: Inverness, Florida

The Kellogg Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Mine: Hernando-Sec. 23, T17S,
R19E

The Loncala Phosphate Company
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Ft. White mine: Lake City Junction
GILCHRIST COUNTY
Mona mine: Sec. 25, T1OS, R16E

Soil Builders, Inc.
CITRUS COUNTY
Mincoll Pit-Sec. 23, T13S, R9E

The Sun Phosphate Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Mining done by Manko Company, Ocala
Mine: Sec. 34, T17S, R19E

The Superior Phosphate Company
CITRUS COUNTY
Bar mine: Sec. 20, T17S, R19E
Dunnellon mine: Sec. 2, T16S, RI8E


X X


X X




X X

X X




X X


Hernando, Florida




Box 3028
Orlando, Florida


P. O. Box 665
Ocala, Florida




Box 338
High Springs, Florida


Box 368
Dunnellon, Florida


Dunnellon, Florida





Box 476
Dunnellon, Florida


X X
X X


Land Pebble


The American Agricultural Chemical Company
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Boyette mine: Pierce-Sec. 14, T31S,
R21E X
Carmichael Pit-Sec. 6, T30S, R22E X
South Pierce Pit-Sec. 31, T31S, RZ4E X


American Cyanamid Company
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Sidney mine-Sec. 28, T29S, R21E


Pierce, Florida


Brewster, Florida


Address







THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

POLK COUNTY
Orange Creek Mine-Sec. 22, T27S,
R24E
Brewster: Sec. 25, 26, 35, T31S, RZ3E
Eaton Park: Sec. 36, T29S, R24E


Coronet Phosphate Company, Division
of Smith-Douglas Company, Inc.
POLK COUNTY
Coronet Plant: Sec. 2, T29S, RZ2E
Hopewell mine: Sec. 32, T29S, R22E
Tenoroc mine: Sec. 26, 35, 36, TZ7S, R24E

Davison Chemical Company, a division
of W. R. Grace & Company
POLK COUNTY
Bonny Lake Mine-Sec. 33, T29S, R24E X X
Pauway Mine No. 4-Sec. 33, T28S,
R24E X X

International Minerals & Chemical
Corporation
POLK COUNTY
Achan Mine-Sec. 23, T30S, R23E X X
Noralyn Mine-Sec. 25, T30S,R23E X X
Peace Valley Mine-Sec. 10, T31S,R25E X X


Swift and Company
POLK COUNTY
Varn Mine-Sec. 31, T31S, RZ6E
Watson Mine-Sees. 5,8,9, T32S, R25E


X X
X X


Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation
POLK COUNTY X


Armour Fertilizer Works, Inc.
POLK COUNTY
Secs.11, 12, T30S,R24E


X X


P.O. Box 790
Plant City, Florida






P.O. Box 471
Bartow, Florida


P.O. Box 867
Bartow, Florida


P.O. Box 200
Bartow, Florida




Nichols, Florida


Marbary Road
Bartow, Florida


RUTILE


Rutile Mining Company of Florida
and
Titanium Alloy Manufacturing Division
of the National Lead Company
DUVAL COUNTY
Jacksonville Plant-Sec. 13, TZS, R27E
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.,
P. O. Box 5492, Jacksonville, Florida)

Florida Minerals Company
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
Winter Beach Plant-Sec. 4, T32S,
R39 E


P.O. Box 5492
Jacksonville, Florida


Box 15 7
Vero Beach, Florida


X X


Production
Reported
1956 1957




X X


Address








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant


Production
Reported
1956 1957


E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Inc.
CLAY COUNTY
Highlands Plant-Sec. 18, T4S, RZZE X
Trail Ridge Plant-Secs. 5, 6, T6S, RZ3E X


P.O. Box 631
Starke, Florida


SAND AND GRAVEL


All-Florida Sand Company, Uninc.
PUTNAM COUNTY
Interlachen Pit-Sec. 21, T10S, R24E

Asa Maige Sand Company
LEON COUNTY
Norfleet Pit-Sec. 36, T1N, R1W

Campbell Sand and Gravel Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Flomaton Mine -Sec. 22, T5N, R30W

Cato Sand Company
BAY COUNTY
Mill Bayou Pit

Central Sand Company
LAKE COUNTY
Tavares Pit

Clark Sand Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Pensacola Pit-Sec. 37, T15S, R32E

Davenport Sand Company
POLK COUNTY
Davenport Pit-Sec. 24, T26S, R27E

Des Rochers Sand Company, Inc.
DADE COUNTY
Cape Florida Pit

Diamond Interlachen Sand Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Interlachen Pit-Sec. 21, TO1S, R24E

Florida Gravel Company
GADSDEN COUNTY
Dredged from Apalachicola River

Gall Silica Mining Company
POLK COUNTY


Hoyt Sand and Muck
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Pit-Sec.20, T41S, R43E


X X




X X




X X




X X



X X




X X




X X




X X




X X




X X


P.O. Box 4667
Jacksonville, Florida


409 W. Gaines Street
Tallahassee, Florida


Rt. 1, Box 89
Flomaton, Alabama


Box 21, Springfield Sta.
Panama City, Florida


P. O. Box 1175
Tavares, Florida


901 Dominque z
Pensacola, Florida


P.O. Box 350
Lake Wales, Florida


3660 NW North River Dr.
Miami 42, Florida


P.O. Box 4667
Jacksonville, Florida


P.O. Box 156
Chattahoochee, Florida


Davenport, Florida


Box 50
Lake Park, Florida


X X


Address








THIRTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

Ideal Crushed Stone Company, Inc.
DADE COUNTY
Dade County Pit-Sec. 4, T53S, R40E

T. J. James Construction Company, Inc.
DADE COUNTY
Dade County Pit

Keuka Sand Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Keuka Pit-Sec. 29, T10S, R24E

Keystone Sand Company
PUTNAM COUNTY
Grandin Pit-Sec. 8, T9S, RZ4E

Lake Wales Concrete Sand Company
POLK COUNTY
Lake Wales Pit-Sec. 10, T30S, RZ8E

Lake Wales Independent Sand Company
POLK COUNTY
Independent Pit-Sec. 4, T30S, R28E

Largo Washed Sand Company, Inc.
PINELLAS COUNTY
Largo Pit-Sec. 25, T29S, R15E

MacCalla Brothers, Inc.
POLK COUNTY
Auburndale Pit

Mammoth Sand Company
POLK COUNTY
Lake Wales Pit

Middle Florida Sand Company, Inc.
LEON COUNTY
Tallahassee Pit-Sec. 5, T13N, R1W.

Miller & Jenkins
WASHINGTON COUNTY

Oak Ridge Sand Company, Inc.
POLK COUNTY
Achan Pit

The Suwannee River Sand Company
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
Dell Pit-Sec. 8, T4S, R11E

Standard Sand and Silica Company
POLK COUNTY
Standard Pit-Sec. 27, T16S, R27E


Production
Reported
1956 1957



X X








X X



X X




X X




X X




X X




X X




X X




X X


X X




X X




X X




X X


Address

5500 NW 37th Avenue
Hialeah, Florida


1700 NW 119th Street
Miami 47, Florida


Box H
Edgar, Florida


47 W. Forsyth Street
Jacksonville, Florida


P.O. Box 707
Lake Wales, Florida


415 N. Scenic Highway
Lake Wales, Florida


P.O. Box 677
Largo, Florida


Box 791
Winter Haven, Florida


Pembroke, Florida




P.O. Box 922
Tallahassee, Florida


P. O. Box 1565
Mulberry, Florida


Drawer C
Foley, Florida


P.O. Box 35
Davenport, Florida








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Company, Name and Location
Product of Pit, Quarry, or Plant

United Clay Mines Corporation
PUTNAM COUNTY
Crossley Mine-Sec. 27, T10S, R23E

B. M. Walker
Indian River County
Vero Beach Pitt

Ward Gravel Company
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
Century Pit-Sec. 22, T5N,R30W

Waverly Road Sand Company
POLK COUNTY

White Sands and Materials
VOLUSIA COUNTY
White Pit


Production
Reported
1956 1957




X X




X X




X X


Address


P.O. Box 27
Hawthorne, Florida


1945 18th Avenue
Vero Beach, Florida


Route 1
Flomaton, Alabama


Route 1, Box 382
X X Winter Haven, Florida


Box 1168, New Smyrna
Beach, Florida


X X


STAUROLITE


E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Inc.
CLAY COUNTY
Highland Plant-Sec. 18, T4S, R22E
Trail Ridge Plant-Secs. 5, 6, T6S,
R23E X
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold
Corporation, P. O. Box 5492,
Jacksonville 7)


P.O. Box 631
Starke, Florida
r:


EXFOLIATED VERMICULITE

Zonolite Company
DUVAL COUNTY
Jacksonville Plant
Hillsborough County Plant
Palm Beach County Plant


Box 3281, Station F
Atlanta, Georgia


X X
X X
X


ZIRCON


Florida Minerals Company
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
Winter Beach.Mine-Sec.4, T32S,
R39E

Rutile Mining Company of Florida
and
National Lead Company
DUVAL COUNTY
Mine-Sec. 13, T2S,R27E
(Contractor: Humphreys Gold Corp.)


X X


P.O. Box 1579
Vero Beach, Florida




P.O. Box 5492
Jacksonville, Florida


































Anastasia formation
Miami oolile
Key Largo limestone
Fort Thompson formation
Caloosahatchee marl


T1i.-i


Voldi, Arca, Ecphora,
Concellarlo faunizones
Tamiami formation
"BoneValley" and
Alachua formation


Unnamed coarse clastics
Hawthorn formation
Shoal River facies
Chipola faces


SURFACE OCCURRENCES

OF GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS

IN FLORIDA

After Cooke,1945, with Revisions by Vernon and Purl, 1959


25 0


I ,!h
I i


25 50


75 100 iles







































FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Herman Gunter, Director


MINERAL RESOURCES AND INDUSTRIES


OF FLORIDA


BY
JAMES L. CALVER


LEGEND
RESOURCE AREAS:
The areas are generalized and represent the dominant material
of surface formation.
DOLOMITE. ................................
LIMESTONE...............................................
PEAT... .............. .......... .............................
PHOSPHATE..................................................
SAND...............................................................
SAND WITH CLAY KAOLIN........................
SAND SHELL & CLAY...............................
SAND SHELL 8 MARL................................
SAND SHELL GOQUINA'..........................
SAND CLAY 6 LIMESTONE.........................
PHOSPHATIC SANDS a CLAYS,
LIMESTONES 6 FULLERS EARTH.........

INDUSTRIES
Each industry symbol indicates a producing mine, quarry or
plant. No attempt has been mode to show inactive and abandoned
locations Ci"c locolntis for wh.cc p sIs ii, a- ,
represented by appropriate symbois
SAND 8 GRAVEL
Pit...
PEAT
Producer.
LIMESTONE
Q uorry......... ............... .. .. ...
DOLOMITE
Ouarry..................... ...... v
CLAY
Mine...
Locality.... ................... 0
KAOLIN
Mine ... ......................
Locality .. .... .... .-..... ...
FULLERS EARTH
Mine.
Loclity.... .............. ...... ........ .
Locality....... --- .... ............ ...U
PETROLEUM
Field............... ................
PHOSPHATE, LAND PEBBLE
Mine......._........... .................
PHOSPHATE,SOFT ROCK
Mine ......... ........ ... .........
PHOSPHATE, HARD ROCK
HEAVY MINERAL SAND
Mine.......................
PORTLAND CEMENT
Plant................... ........
LIME
Kiln.............. ........ .. .... ............


r-4 .
z"ro
-'o


7s11


Compiled from reports by the U. S.
Bureau of Mines, the U. S. Bureau
of the Census, U. S. Geological
Survey, and file data of the Florida
Geological Survey.


(1.1

J/


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SUVEY BAS


--'-


2-i


0


j


c--
1
~J.c~-: ;W






"You never miss the water till the
well runs dry"
Rowland Howard. 1876 /,


THE LARGER MAP ILLUSTRATES THE WATER
PRESSURES IN THE ARTESIAN SYSTEM
THE SMALLER MAP ILLUSTRATES THE ARE
WHERE FLOWING WELLS CAN BE
DEVELOPED.