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Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Introduction
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    List of species
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
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A LIST OF FISHES FROM THE SOUTHERN TIP OF
THE FLORIDA PENINSULA

JOHN D. KILBY and DAVID K. CALDWELL
University of Florida

The distribution of Florida fishes has not received sufficient atten-
tion to permit accurate delineation of the ranges for many species.
One of the least known areas of the state is the southern tip, much
of which is covered by the Everglades. This area is an extremely
difficult one to collect, except under the fortuitous circumstances
which we enjoyed during a recent field trip. A drought had con-
centrated the fishes in residual waters at a time when the noxious
insects were not intolerable, permitting us to obtain a variety of
fishes, some of which we took in satisfactory series. The specimens
obtained have been deposited in the University of Florida Fish
Collection.
We were reasonably satisfied that our collections, plus the several
sight records, produced the majority of the strictly freshwater
species to be expected. Such is not the case for the euryhaline
fishes, but many of these are known as a result of published records
from the Florida Keys. Thus this list is directed mainly to docu-
menting the occurrence of those freshwater fishes which we found
at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula.
The stations at which we collected were located in several of
the major physiographic regions of south Florida as defined by
Davis (1943), and we use his terminology below:
Everglades-Lake Okeechobee Basin: Stations 1 and 2.
Southern Coast and Islands:
Mangrove swamp present: Stations 11-17 and 19-24.
Mangrove swamp absent: Stations 3, 4, and 7-10.
Miami Rock Ridge: Stations 5 and 6.
Southwest Coast and Ten Thousand Islands: Station 18
(Narrow fringe of mangrove swamp bordering water-
course).

1A contribution from the Florida State Museum and the Department of
Biology, University of Florida.






196 JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Salinities, when stated to the nearest tenth of a ppt., were meas-
ured in the laboratory with a hydrometer. Several salinities were
estimated in the field by taste. Those stations for which no salinity
is indicated were considered to be strictly fresh water.
Bailey, Winn, and Smith (1954: 148-50) have treated the prob-
lem of subspecific designation of species considered polytypic by
one or more recent authors. For the purposes of this paper we
follow their example for most species.
Many of the stations visited were located within the Everglades
National Park. Collecting in the Park was made possible by the
kind permission of the superintendent, Mr. Dan Beard, whose staff
extended to us many courtesies in the field.


Figure 1. The approximate location of the collecting stations are shown by
numbers corresponding to the numbered stations in the text.
(Map prepared by E. Coogle, staff artist.)

COLLECTING STATIONS
The species numbers enclosed in parentheses are, for various
reasons, reliable sight records. All other species numbers listed
are represented by specimens in the University of Florida Fish







LIST OF FISHES FROM SOUTHERN FLORIDA


Collection. The approximate locations of the stations are shown
on Figure 1.
Station 1. Canal beside Florida highway 27, 17.6 miles north
of Homestead, Dade Co., May 8, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field
no. K-5-855-2). Water very turbid, greenish, very low; bottom
mud and rock; Ceratophyllum abundant, patches of Pontederia and
Typha along edges; depth to 4 feet, width 30 feet. Fish collected
by cast net and seine. UF 5068-76.
Species: 2, (3), 9, 10, 15, 20, 21, 29, 31, 32.
Station 2. Canal beside Florida highway 27, 13.8 miles north
of Homestead, Dade Co., May 8, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field
no. K-5-855-1). Water very turbid, greenish, very low; bottom
mud and rock; choked with Najas; depth to 4 feet, width 20 feet.
Fish collected with seine. UF 5061-67.
Species: 2, 14, 20, 21, (28), 29, 30.
Station 3. Roadside ditch 1 mile south of Florida City on U. S.
highway 1, Dade Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no.
K-5-755-1). Water clear, green, low; bottom limey mud; abundant
Najas, Cabomba, and filamentous green algae, some unicellular
green algae; depth to 6 feet, width 35 feet. Fish collected with
cast net and traps. UF 5013-18.
Species: 2, 10, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32.
Station 3A. From the same ditch but about a mile south of
Station 3, Mr. A. Newton made a collection on July 7, 1949. UF
211-13.
Species: 20, 21, 22.
Station 4. Canal beside U. S. highway 1, 8 miles south of Home-
stead, Dade Co., May 6, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-
655-1). Water clear, colorless, low; rock bottom; sparse Ruppia
and filamentous green algae along the edge; depth to 6 feet, width
50 feet. Fish collected with cast net, dip net, traps, and hook and
line. UF 5001-07.
Species: (2), 14, 20, 21, 28, (29), 30, 31, 32.
Station 5. Borrow pit along Florida highway 27, approximately
2 miles west of Florida City, Dade Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby and
Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-2). Water clear, colorless, very low;
bottom white marl mud and rock; very sparse patches of Chara;







198 JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

depth to 10 inches, width to 15 feet. Fish collected with seine.
UF 5094-99.
Species: 13, 15, 18, 19, 20, 22.
Station 6. Borrow pit along Florida highway 27, 0.8 miles west
of the main entrance to the Everglades National Park, Dade Co.,
May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-18). Water
clear, colorless, very low; bottom marl rock; sparse filamentous
green algae; depth to 4 feet, width 75 feet. Fish collected with
seines and traps. UF 5051-54.
Species: 20, 22, 29, 31.
Station 7. Canal and adjacent Taylor Slough (Anhinga Trail)
along Florida highway 27, in the immediate vicinity of the Royal
Palm Ranger Station, Everglades National Park, Dade Co.; bottom
rock with mud in patches; abundant Najas and various emergent
aquatic plants; depth to 4/2 feet, width 5 to 25 feet.
7A. February 2 and 3, 1955, Caldwell. Water clear, colorless,
level normal.
Species: (2), (3), (10), (20), (28), (29), (30), (32).
7B. May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-14).
Water clear, greenish, low. Fish collected with seines and traps.
UF 5055-60.
Species: 2, 10, 15, 20, 21, 29.
Station 8. Canal beside Florida highway 27, 0.5 miles west of
the Royal Palm Ranger Station, Everglades National Park, Dade
Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-3). Water
clear, greenish, low; bottom mud on rock; abundant Najas and
filamentous green algae, some Nelumbo; depth to 3 feet, width 20
to 25 feet. Fish collected with cast net and traps. UF 5019-24.
Species: (2), 9, (10), (15), (20), (21), 28, 29, 30, 31, 32.
Station 9. At concrete bridge beside Florida highway 27 in canal
12.6 miles southwest of the Royal Palm Ranger Station, Everglades
National Park, Dade Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field
no. K-5-755-12). Water clear, colorless, low; bottom rock; very
sparse Najas; depth to 2 feet, width 25 feet. Fish collected with
seine. UF 5048-50.
Species: 2, 28, 30.






LIST OF FISHES FROM SOUTHERN FLORIDA


Station 10. Canal beside Florida highway 27, 15 miles southwest
of the Royal Palm Ranger Station, Everglades National Park, Dade
Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-4). Water
clear, colorless, low; bottom lime mud and rock; abundant Najas
and filamentous green algae; depth to 2 feet, width 20 feet. Fish
collected with cast net and dip net. UF 5026-30.
Species: (2), 9, 15, 20, 21, (28), 30.
Station 11. Canal beside Florida highway 27, 16.5 miles south-
west of the Royal Palm Ranger Station, Everglades National Park,
Dade Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-5).
Water very turbid, green, low; salinity 2.4 ppt.; bottom mud on
rock; abundant Najas and filamentous algae; depth to 5 feet, width
30 feet. Water very stagnant, numbers of dead fish floating.
Species: (2), (4), (13), (20), (21), (22), (29), (30).
Station 12. Canal beside Florida highway 27, 17.4 miles south-
west of the Royal Palm Ranger Station, Everglades National Park
(at Whiskey Creek), Dade Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell
(field no. K-5-755-6). Water moderately turbid, brownish, low;
salinity 22.2 ppt.; red mangrove (Rhizophora) along the edge, some
filamentous green algae; depth to 6 feet, width 10 to 30 feet. Fish
collected with dip net. UF 5031-32.
Species: (2), (4), 16, 20, 21, 22, (29).
Station 13. Boat landing on north side of West Lake Pond along
Florida highway 27, 23 miles southwest of the Royal Palm Ranger
Station, Everglades National Park, Dade Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby
and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-7). Water very turbid, milky, low;
salinity 7.0 ppt.; no vegetation; depth to 2 feet. Fish collected with
seine. UF 5033-37.
Species: 16, 19, 20, 22, (25), 37.
Station 14. Boat landing on south side of Coot Bay Pond at the
Coot Bay Ranger Station, Everglades National Park, Monroe Co.
Bottom rock fill; no vegetation; depth to 4 feet.

14A. February 1, 1955, Caldwell. Water very turbid, milky,
level normal. Salinity not taken.
Species: (20).





200 JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

14B. May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-10).
Water very turbid, greenish, level normal; salinity 21.0 ppt. Fish
collected with seine. UF 5042-47.
Species: 5, 7, 22, 23, 26, 27, 37.
Station 15. Florida Bay at end of Snake Bight canal, Ever-
glades National Park, Monroe Co., May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell
(field no. K-5-755-11). Water very turbid, milky, high tide; salinity
estimated by taste to exceed 25 ppt.; bottom lime mud; no vegeta-
tion; depth to 2 feet. Fish collected with seines. UF 5088-93.
Species: 11, 12, 16, 19, 22, 26.
Station 16. East end of Homestead canal near the Coot Bay
Ranger Station, Everglades National Park, Monroe Co. Bottom
mud; no vegetation; depth to 3 feet, width 25 feet.
16A. January 23 and 24, 1955, Caldwell. Water fairly turbid,
brownish, level normal. Salinity not taken.
Species: (1), (2), (20), (25).
16B. May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-8).
Water fairly turbid, greenish-brown, level normal; salinity 41.1 ppt.
Fish collected with cast net. UF 5038.
Species: 4.
Station 17. Florida Bay at Flamingo, Everglades National Park,
Monroe Co. Bottom mud and sand.
17A. April 19, 1954, Caldwell and Leonard Giovannoli (field
no. C-4-1954-1). Water turbid, colorless; low tide (rising); salinity
39.3 ppt.; depth 5 feet; approximately 1 mile from shore; sparse
shoal grass (Halodule) and turtle grass (Thalassia). Fish collected
hook and line. UF 5156-57.
Species: 6, 35.
17B. May 7, 1955, Kilby and Caldwell (field no. K-5-755-9).
Water very turbid, milky brown; high tide; salinity 42.1 ppt.; depth
to 3 feet; along shore; no vegetation. Fish collected with cast net
and seine. UF 5039-41.
Species: 7, 36, 37.
Station 18. Junction of Avocado Creek and Rookery Branch at
Little Banana Patch (headwaters of Shark River), Everglades Na-






LIST OF FISHES FROM SOUTHERN FLORIDA


tional Park, Monroe Co., January 28, 1955, Caldwell, Noble Enge,
Nathan Moskowitz, Dale W. Rice, and Gerald Simon (field no.
C-1-2855-1). Water clear, colorless, level normal; moderate current;
bottom mud, marl, peat, and detritus; abundant Najas, some Ca-
bomba and filamentous green algae; depth to 6 feet. Though this
creek is fed by runoff from the Everglades proper, it has a marked
resemblance to the run of a typical large Florida spring. Fish
collected with hook and line and dip net. UF 4459-62.
Species: (2), (9), (15), 20, (25), 28, 29, 30, (32).

Station 19. Southeast shore of Middle Fox Lake, Everglades
National Park, Monroe Co., January 24, 1955, Caldwell, Enge,
Moskowitz, Rice, and Simon (field no. C-1-2455-1). Water clear,
colorless, level normal; brackish by taste; bottom mud, marl, and
detritus; no vegetation; depth less than 1 foot. Fish found in a
submerged hollow log. UF 4463.
Species: 88.

Station 20. Southeast shore of Gator Lake, Everglades National
Park, Monroe Co., January 24, 1955, Caldwell, Enge, Moskowitz,
Rice, and Simon (field no. C-1-2455-2). Water fairly turbid, color-
less, level normal; brackish by taste; bottom mud, marl, and detritus;
red mangrove (Rhizophora) prop roots; depth 1 foot. Fish collected
with dip net. UF 4464.
Species: 20.

Station 21. Southeastern end of Little Sable Creek near its
junction with Lake Ingraham, Everglades National Park, Monroe
Co., January 26, 1955, Caldwell and Enge. Water turbid, colorless,
low tide; salinity estimated by taste to exceed 25 ppt.; bottom black
mud; no vegetation; depth 1 foot, width 25 feet. Fish collected
by flipping it onto the bank with a canoe paddle.
Species: (33).

Station 22. Northeastern portion of Little Sable Creek, Ever-
glade National Park, Monroe Co., January 26, 1955, Caldwell, Enge,
Moskowitz, Rice, and Simon. Water turbid, colorless, mid tide;
salinity estimated by taste to exceed 25 ppt.; bottom black mud;
no vegetation; depth to 3 feet, width 30 feet.
Species: (1), (2), (4), (20), (23), (25).





202 JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Station 23. Streams connecting West Lake and Long Lake and
connecting Long Lake and Cuthbert Lake, Everglades National
Park, Dade Co., February 2, 1955, Caldwell. Water fairly turbid,
colorless; level normal; salinity estimated by taste to exceed 25 ppt.;
bottom mud; no vegetation except red mangrove (Rhizophora)
roots; depth 1 foot.
Species: (2), (20).

Station 24. Whitewater Bay about midway down eastern side on
a spit of land, Everglades National Park, Monroe Co., February 1,
1955, Caldwell (field no. C-2-155-1). Water clear, colorless, level
normal; salinity estimated by taste to exceed 25 ppt.; bottom marl
and sand; very sparse green algae, red mangrove (Rhizophora) roots;
depth to 3 feet. Fish collected with dip net. UF 4465.
Species: 27, (34).

LIST OF SPECIES
The station numbers in parentheses indicate that the species was
observed but not collected.

SHARKS
1. Sharks
Though none were definitely seen or collected, evidences seen
by one of us (DKC) at stations (16A), (22), and in the Little
Shark River near Tarpon Bay (just southwest of Station 18), and
statements by park rangers, indicate that sharks occur in en-
closed waters in the southwest tip of the peninsula.

LEPISOSTEIDAE-Gars
2. Lepisosteus platyrhincus DeKay. Florida spotted gar
This is undoubtedly the most abundant large fish in the fresh-
waters of the area studied.
Stations: 1, 2, 3, (4), (7A), 7B, (8), 9, (10), (11), (12), (16A),
(18), (22), (23).

AMIIDAE-Bowfins
3. Amia calva Linnaeus. Bowfins; Mudfish
Stations: (1), (7A).






LIST OF FISHES FROM SOUTHERN FLORIDA


MEGALOPIDAE-Tarpons
4. Tarpon atlanticus (Valenciennes). Tarpon
Stations: (11), (12), 16B, (22).

ELOPIDAE-Ten Pounders
5. Elops saurus Linnaeus. Ten pounder; Ladyfish
Station: 14B.
CLUPEIDAE-Herrings
6. Harengula pensacolae pensacolae Goode and Bean. Pilchard
Station: 17A.
ENGRAULIDAE-Anchovies
7. Anchoa mitchilli (Valenciennes). Bay anchovy
Stations: 14B, 17B.

CATOSTOMIDAE-Suckers
8. Erimyzon sucetta (Lacepede). Lake chubsucker; Eastern chub-
sucker
A single specimen (UF 458) of this species is in the University
of Florida Fish Collection labeled "open limestone cave be-
tween Coomes and Florida City, Dade Co., (vicinity of Station
3), collected on December 17, 1930, by M. K. Brady".

CYPRINIDAE-Minnows
9. Notemigonus crysoleucas (Mitchill). Golden shiner
Stations: 1, 8, 10, (18).

ICTALURIDAE-Catfishes

10. Ictalurus natalis (LeSueur). Yellow bullhead
Stations: 1, 3, (7A), 7B, (8).

CYPRINODONTIDAE-Killifishes
11. Fundulus grandis Baird and Girard. Killifish
Station: 15.
12. Fundulus similis (Baird and Girard). Long-nosed killifish
Station: 15.





204 JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

13. Fundulus confluentus Goode and Bean. Spotfin killifish
Stations: 5, (11).
14. Fundulus chrysotus Holbrook. Golden topminnow
Stations: 2, 4.
15. Lucania goodei Jordan. Red-finned killifish
Stations: 1, 2, 5, 7B, (8), 10, (18).
16. Lucania parva (Baird and Girard). Rainwater killifish
Stations: 12, 13, 15.
17. Adinia xenica (Jordan and Gilbert). Diamond killifish
Reported from the stomachs of the Wood Ibis, Mycteria
americana, from Alligator Lake (vicinity of Station 20) by
Howell (1932: 115) as A. multifasciata.
18. Jordanella floridae Goode and Bean. Flagfish
Station: 5.
19. Cyprinodon variegatus Lacepede. Sheepshead killifish
Reported by Howell (loc. cit.) from Alligator Lake (vicinity
of Station 20).
Stations: 5, 13, 15.

PoEcLnDAEm-Livebearers
20. Gambusia afinis (Baird and Girard). Gambusia
Reported by Howell (loc. cit.) from Alligator Lake (vicinity
of Station 20). Mr. Luis R. Rivas of the University of Miami
has a Gambusia from brackish waters of southern Florida which
is in the process of description (personal communication).
Quite possibly some of our specimens, especially those from
the brackish water stations, represent the new form.
Stations: 1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, (7A), 7B, (8), 10, (11), 12, 13, (14A),
(16A), 18, 20, (22), (23).
21. Heterandria formosa Agassiz. Least killifish
Stations: 1, 2, 3A, 4, 7B, (8), 10, (11), 12.
22. Mollienesia latipinna LeSueur. Sailfin molly
Reported by Howell (loc. cit.) from Alligator Lake (vicinity
of Station 20).
Stations: 3A, 5, 6, (11), 12, 13, 14B, 15.






LIST OF FISHES FROM SOUTHERN FLORIDA


BELoNIDAE-Needlefishes
23. Strongylura sp.
We have juvenile specimens from Station 14B which we are
unable to place specifically. Sight records of adults from
Station (22) are also included here for like reason.

APHREDODERIDAE-Pirate-perches
24. Aphredoderus sayanus (Gilliams). Pirate-perch
There is a single specimen (UF 541) in the University of
Florida Fish Collection labeled "open limestone cave between
Coomes and Florida City, Dade Co., (vicinity of Station 3),
collected on December 17, 1980, by M. K. Brady".

MUGILIDAE-Mullets
25. Mugil cephalus Linnaeus. Striped mullet
Stations: (18), (16A), (18), (22).
26. Mugil curema Cuvier and Valenciennes. White mullet
Stations: 14B, 15.

ATHERINIDAE-Silversides
27. Menidia beryllina (Cope). Tidewater silverside
Stations: 14B, 24.

CENTRARCHIDAE-Sunfishes
28. Micropterus salmoides floridanus (LeSueur). Florida large-
mouth bass
Stations: (2), 8, 4, (7A), 8, 9, (10), 18.
29. Chaenobryttus coronarius (Bartram). Warmouth
This appears to be the most abundant Centrarchid in the area.
Stations: 1, 2, 3, (4), 6, (7A), 7B, 8, (11), (12), 18.
80. Lepomis punctatus (Valenciennes). Stumpknocker; Spotted
sunfish
Apparently the most abundant Lepomis in this region.
Stations: 2, 3, 4, (7A), 8, 9, 10, (11), 18.
81. Lepomis microlophus (Giinther). Shellcracker; Redear sunfish
This species was reported from Alligator Lake (vicinity of
Station 20) by Howell (loc. cit.) as L. holbrookii.
Stations: 1, 3, 4, 6, 8.





206 JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

32. Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque. Bluegill
Stations: 1, 3, 4, (7A), 8, (18).

SERRANIAE--Sea Basses
33. Mycteroperca microlepis (Goode and Bean). Gag
Station: (21).

LUTJANIDAE-Snappers
34. Lutjanus griseus (Linnaeus). Gray snapper; Mangrove snapper
Station: (24)
SPARIDAE-Porgies
35. Lagodon rhomboides (Linnaeus). Pinfish
Station: 17A.

LEIOGNATHIDAE-Moharras
36. Eucinostomus gula (Cuvier and Valenciennes). Common mo-
harra
Station: 17B.
37. Eucinostomus argenteus Baird and Girard. Spotfin moharra
Stations: 13, 14B, 17B.

BATRACHOmDiEAE-Toadfishes
38. Opsanus beta Goode and Bean. Toadfish
Station: 19.
LInTEATURE CITED
BAILEY, REEVE M., HOWARD ELLIOTT WINN, and C. LAVETT SMITH
1954. Fishes from the Escambia River, Alabama and Florida, with ecologic
and taxonomic notes. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phil., CVI: 109-164.
DAVIS, JOHN H., JR.
1943. The natural features of southern Florida. Fla. Geol. Surv., Geol.
Bull. No. 25, pp. 1-311.
HOWELL, ARTHUR H.
1932. Florida Bird Life. Florida Dept. of Game and Fresh Water Fish
in cooperation with Bureau of Biological Survey, U.S.D.A., i-xxiv,
1-579, 58 pls., 72 figs.


Quart. Journ. Fla. Acad. Science, 18(3), 1955.




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