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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Group Title: Peter Rabbit and his Ma
Title: Peter Rabbit and his ma
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000011/00001
 Material Information
Title: Peter Rabbit and his ma
Physical Description: 55 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Field, Louise A
Albert, Virginia ( Illustrator )
Potter, Beatrix, 1866-1943
Saalfield Pub. Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Saalfield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Chicago
Publication Date: c1917
 Subjects
Subject: Rabbits -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1917
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Louise A. Field ; ill. by Virginia Albert.
General Note: Based on Beatrix Potter's The tale of Peter Rabbit.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00000011
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002257368
oclc - 11959831
notis - ALL0208
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Content
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Back Matter
        Back Matter 1
        Back Matter 2
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text
4-7


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I
A J


PETER RABBIT

AND

HIS MA.




------~----" ------~---~n~------r~~ .r--- -- -rpp~-ls~-----------~~- -------~~r~r~- ~~---r--














ETEK RABBIT
AND
SHIS MA.


Ilusrtraftol by V iiaAba.
TH E
SAALFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY
CHICAGO AKZRON.OHIO NEW YORK
PRINTED IN U. S. A.













'- a '


COPYRIGHT, 1917

BY

THE SAALFIELD PUBLISHING CO.


. It
,1?.


c5p






PETER RABBIT

AND HIS MA


It all came
i about be-

cause Mrs.
Rufus Rabbit had sud-,
denly become very
strict about the com-
ings and goingss of


U


13 i C)









PETER Rabbit and
Molly Cottontail
and Flopsy and
Mopsy. (Mrs. Rufus
Rabbit was Peter Rabbit's
Ma.)
They must get up and go
to bed at just such an hour,
and ask
permis-
IL 1J sion


every


time


they went
out of the
house.
Peter Rab-


bit was rather


fond of


.having


his


















own way and he promptly made up
his mind that while such rules were
all very well for Molly Cottontail,
who never had a mind of her own
anyway, and for Flopsy and Mopsy,
who were far too young to do any-
thing but to mind somebody else,

















as far as HE
concerned,
intended to
to bed when
liked and get
when
he


was
he

go
he

up


pleased.









^HE more he thought of it,
the crosser he became.
He had gone to bed very
much earlier than usual, and was not
a bit sleepy.








Visions of


many,


many


_- nights when
he would have to go to
bed when he was not
sleepy danced before his


eyes.























Finally he decided to

run away.








T first he thought of taking


Molly
with him

cluded


would
Peter
bunny.


be


-N
-.


ottontail


along


. Then he con-
that the twins


very lonely without


Rabbit


At


her.


was not a selfish


any rate, he thought


he would


get


on much faster


alone.









E began to make
his plans, and grew
so excited that he
found it impossible
to go to sleep at all.
He could hardly wait till
the first little smiling streak
of sun-

lightpeeked in at
peeked in at 4 (IV7


the door of
the burrow.



































------~--, 3~""~-~/~~
c~-----Z-----~---- ~-I -
~s~cc~---,~Z=Z-------------
I -


~---------~

-~ _


It seemed to beckon him,

















to offer all sorts of promises, and
to urge him to seek for the fun
about which he had been thinking
all night.
Very quickly and quietly he crept
out of bed and dressed,









pausing

every

now and

then to

glance

fearfully

toward

the

spot where

the other

members of








the family lay curled up in little
turry balls, peacefully-and Mrs.
Rufus Rabbit audibly-sleeping.
Soon he was
quite ready, and
after one dread-
ful moment when
he felt quite sure
the whole family
was wide awake
and ready to










grab him as he crept past
on tiptoe, he found himself
outside the burrow and run-
ning for his life through the
soft spring sunshine.








E ran
what


without noticing


direction


for


some


time. Then,
feel tired, he


beginning
slackened


speed, and finally stopped quite still


looked


about him.


A second


glance showed


turnips


only


him a great field


a few yards


ahead


him.


was beginning


to feel


hungry.


So in another moment he


was busily at work rooting up


in


to
his


and


of
of


He


very

























A fine, juicy turnip.









N this he fea
until he could
no more.
Unwilling to leave s
a tempting meal, he fir


.sted


eat


;uch
ally


dug up a second fine plump


turnip
and car-
>ried it
away, slung
over his


shoulder.


He


thought ;it


might taste good for luncheon.






















robin red-breast flew across


his path and
a cheery go


wished


him


od-morning,


Peter
ments


gaily


stopped for


a few


of chatter.


mo-


P1








Already


little lonely'


he felt a
1 1 1 1 A!


after


robin


wistfully as

it flew ove

the bushes.








little further on a
wee Shrew-Mouse


' I popped her head
6W out of a hole right
ahead of him and
squeaked a shrill but good-
natured greeting.
[ Peter sat down on his
haunches
and had a
Very
1 pleasant
half hour.
The Shrew-
SMouse told
him her name
was Susan, and advised him to throw








down the big turnip as it
was a heavy burden and,
besides, he would be sure
to find plenty of nice things
to eat if he followed her in-
structions. Then she
wished him good luck and
vanished into her hole in
the
ground.
Ac- r


cordingly he
dropped the
load of
luncheon that
had already


given


him a backache,





ND trotted


more


comfortably


much

and


quickly.


Right around


a turn


in, the


ran a clear

stream of blue

water with a

little wooden

bridge cross-


And


on the


very edge of the water

sat an old bullfrog

who croaked out:


"Look out


will fall into


or you


the


water!"


/


road,


along






OW the warning sounded


so funny that


s had


Peter,


who


just started to cross


the bridge,

and laughed


commenced to


laugh,


so hard that he lost his


balance and tumbled straight

the water.


2/--


into







The bullfrog seemed to think this


a very great


joke and in his


began


to laugh loudly.


It did


seem so comical to Peter, but luckily


the water was so shallow
quickly scrambled to dry


that he
ground,


with no more inconvenience than
thorough wetting.


turn


not




















- '.


OOK


nice red


off, the


coat


his Ma had


made


for him and hung it on a


sumac bush to dry.

He was beginning to feel








hungry and wondered where
all the good things were that
Susan Shrew-Mouse had
promised him. While won-
dering where he would find
his luncheon, and wishing he
had not
so hastily
disposed
of his nice
turnip, he
Heard a funny
little squeak-
ing voice behind him.







It seemed to be speaking as well as

squeaking to him.

"How do you do, Peter Rabbit?"

it said.


I.


/7fT/?


And turning around, Peter saw a

plump little field-mouse sitting by

the side of the path.





Y cousin, Susan


Shrew-


Mouse, sent me word


by the


carrier


pigeon









ETER


Rabbit was certainly


delighted,


for his little


round tummy had started to


him some inside


information,


and it was of a kind that made him
uncomfortable. He had never been
hungry before, and he thought with


regret of the


good food


his mother


had always provided,
to see himself in the


and he began


light


of a very


ungrateful bunny, indeed.


give










UPPOSE he never
found his way home
and never saw his
Ma and Molly Cottontail
and the twins again?









WO


large
tears
rolled
down his
long
nose at
the

dreadful
thought.







UT the voice of Freddie
Field-Mouse broke in up-
on his gloomy reverie.
Luncheon was all laid out on a large,
flat stone under a shady green bush
and the two
furry friends
feasted -, -4









on crisp green lettuce, fresh pink
radishes and tempting yellow car-
rots. So long did they sit over the
meal that Peter discovered, much to
his dismay, that the sun was begin-
ning to sink in the west.







ITH many thanks to his


kind little


host, he put


on the little red


coat


that was now

quite dry and

with a last

good-bye

started down


the path at a good pace, feeling much


rested and


rl









refreshed, but not knowing
at all where he was going, for
the field-mouse had been
unable to give him much in-
formation as he had but
lately come to that part of
the country.
When
Peter
Rabbit
did not
reach home
by dusk,








Mrs. Rufus Rabbit


began


to get








took her lantern and a walking stick
that had belonged to Peter Rabbit's
Pa ("For who knows but there may
be bears in


C5









the woods?" she said to her-
self) and not very far did she
have to go. For without
knowing it, Peter Rabbit had
been traveling in a circle, and
at the foot of a big oak tree,
in a nest of soft green ferns,























she found him fast asleep.











ND Peter


Rabbit went


nicely to sleep, very


to be


at home again and


very much ashamed of
himself for having run away from it.
And the last thing he remembered
after he had rolled over to get a look


at Molly


Cottontail


and the twins


was


glad



































I























feeling


his Ma's soft muzzle


bing


against his


the way bunnies


face.


For that is


kiss one another


good-night.


rub-




-! w


"'~ '1"B



4 1,A
:L


billS
i-"--* |
vr't *




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