1890 Baby's annual

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Material Information

Title:
1890 Baby's annual pictures and stories for little people
Cover title:
Baby's annual
Physical Description:
128 p., 4 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1889

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

General Note:
Plates printed in colors.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002222717
notis - ALG2963
oclc - 181341532
System ID:
TRAI000002:00001

Full Text



1890

I8o












4~iere anj f Lor ie



for L2ittle d)eole




BOSTON
D LOTHROP COMPANY
WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD

















































COPYRIGHT, 1889,
BY
D LOTHROP COMPANY.














BABY'S ANNUAL





FOR 1890



'1 Here are pages and pictures where Baby can
find
Sjoy for the eye and a feast for the mind;
Here are jingles and tangles and story and
rhyme,
With lazuhter and glee and a jolly good
time -
A 11 gathered and garnered by pencil and pen
For the wee little maids and the wee little
M e6n. I
Take them and try them, small people so
deaYr -m by h
You will know then? by heart ere the end
of a year.






4 BABY'S ANNUAL.


DICK ON PEGASUS!


THE BIRTH

In Dick's red-and-gold Won-
der Book was a story of a
winged horse, a proud, snowy
.creature with silvery wings, who
roamed among the clouds.
Dick often wished he could
have a horse like Pegasus,
the sky-skimmer."
On his seventh birthday a


HORSE.


very grand horse appeared at
Dick's bedroom door, white
as Pegasus only, instead of
wings, this horse had wheels.
But oh! how he would go!
A' roll through the hall, a bump
down the steps, and with one
to push and two to pull -
away, away Dick rode!


















































































"LET DOLLY HAVE A SWIM TOO!"






BABY'S ANNUAL.


IUZZLES ABOUT PETER AND PATTY.


T -
The XT
i Lr YFh^


iATTYk T ARTY
C-9; ))) C CWC,.-
leDatty went cAp in
the V aprret to play
She. had
her
n and Ibon

and some

and 5he Pl &ed
te a art .


and there were
not an but Patt had lovely[
time until t\A/o visitor s camei who were not in -
vited\. ZJho do you think they werc -A I
T" who .crept out O his
corner alnd a little ..
Awho peeped From
b i rd- -


.- -. -. How poor


-~att, ran !


ynd the pat spider and the little mouse had the
part alt to themselves !
c -----*- ^





BABY S ANNUAL. 7


LAURA'S CALF-STORY.


Laura is a little girl three
years and a half old. One
day I told her a story about a
calf, and when I had finished
it, she said, Now I will tell
you a calf-story, Aunt Julia."
So she began:
"Once on a time a man
looked in a field and saw some-
thing. He opened a gate and
went in and what do you
think it was, Aunt Julia?"
"A calf."
"No, a shee and he took
it up in his arms and took it
home, and then he saw another
field with something in it, and
he opened the gate, and went
in and what do you think
that was, Aunt Julia?"
"A calf."
No, it was an elehkant!
and a monkey! and he took
them home, and then he saw


another field, and went in the
gate and what do you think
he picked up, Aunt Julia ?"
"A calf."
"No, it was a lamb! and


LAURA.


then he saw another field-
and what was it this time?"
"It must have been a calf."
No, it was a chicken, and
there wasn't any calf at all!! !"






BABY S ANNUAL.


L II.


Mamma, do see Dobbin go,
When I tell him to.


And now watch when
whoa!
See what he will do.


I.- say,


Won't


you come and take
ride ?


Get right on behind.
Don't be frightened, you can't
slide
Dobbin's good and kind.


ICIC~O~Ps~l---------





BABY'S ANNUAL.


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-I.


H IS is me. I am
Toddlekins' Boo-
'fer Kitten. I
used to live in a
Barrel with my
brothers and sis-
ters. But now I am Toddle-
kins' Boo'fer Kitten.
This is how I belong to
Toddlekins. One day my
mother boxed my ears. Tod-
dlekins heard me cry. She
climbed up the side of the
Barrel to peep in. The next
minute Toddlekins was in too,
standing on her head with her
feet in the air! I don't believe
you ever heard such a noise
as me and Toddlekins and
the rest of us made then, all
crying together!
"That's what comes of be-


ing
the


a .little
Nurse.


Peep-Girl!" said
The Nurse then


took hold of Toddlekins' feet
and pulled her out, and Tod-
dlekins, as she went out,
grabbed me by the neck and
pulled me out too. We looked
at each other. Boo'fer Kit-
ten, I love you !" said Toddle-
kins. "Miaow!" said I, And


,, .. ... .. g; ,; ... ; *


I LEAVE THE BARREL.
I have been Toddlekins' Boo-
'fer Kitten ever since.






BABY S ANNUAL.


RUDOLF'S FROG STORY.


There was once a frog who
got very tired of sitting on
banks and logs, and at last
one day he put on a Santa
Claus cap and went up on a
roof, and played that he was
Santa Claus. He looked
down and saw a snake, and
it frightened him so that he
jumped up into the sky. The


snake, when he saw the frog
was gone, ran away to the
woods. The frog jumped
down again, and he took up
a newspaper and read in it
that all the snakes were dead.
He then went into the woods
where he saw a wagon full of
barrels. The barrels were full
of apples. There were a great
many horses in front of the
wagon. The frog jumped up
on the wagon and said, "Get-
ap! getap!" and drove home.
When he got home he said
here are apples for us. The
frog then planted some of the
apples and trees grew up. On
the trees there were all kinds of
fruit. Apples, pears, peaches,
figs and bananas; and on top
of these trees were Christmas
trees, way up to the sky.
(Dictated to his mother by Rudolf S. Rickardson, 4 years old,
in November, 1887.)






























7'


U *'


SUCH A NEST OF EASTER EGGS!


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12 BABY S ANNUAL.




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Arthur, Beth and Baby May started to walk to auntie's.
Baby May soon got tired. Let's make a carriage," said
Arthur. So they took her between them in their arms. Baby
May liked this new kind of carriage so much they carried her
all the way.
'"lt, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ j ., il/,. IN/,t


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all the way.






BABY S ANNUAL. 13


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-II.


SHEN I first went at once, of course, and sat o
into Toddlekins' the top of the back fence.
n 'house, 1 liked it. How long do you think
'il. There was milk in stayed on the fence ? Till th
I7,. : "! a blue saucer, and Dog went away, and Toddl
-. a soft cushion to kins sat down and cried. The
lie on, and there were spools I came down. I felt sorry fc
and strings and balls to play Toddlekins. But if that Do
with. It seemed to be a good
house for kittens.
But one day things began to ..
happen. An awful creature,
with fierce eyes, and a great -.
mouth and dreadful teeth and :.
a frisky-whisky tail, came jump-
ing and barking into the room.
I knew the minute I looked at '. ""'". ..
it that it must be a DOG That '
is one of the things a cat knows .:.
without being told.
Jip! said Toddlekins. ''.
Bow-wow said .the Dog. ", CAN'T GET MEW-MEW DOWN."
But he was not speaking to her. Jip stays here, the Boofer Ki
He said it to me. I went out ten is going to run away.


n

I
e
e-
n
r
g


t-







4 BABY S ANNUAL.


UZZLES


ABOUT PETER AND PATTY.


o ; '



















ma -r! rnov what wa in]


tr ir Troubtle.


Peter Wa.. aL ver-,
i b


H CUI5
Hi5 Litt


pettin


. ,
lQ e


him


and
were,

into
trouble


He was in tie garden.

'vw 6 cwh n ke


top or the


it


waol .


He climbed up a[L


oeLic, but? the
s-lippCd a&nd Fe .

0 poor Pete He must sit there with the


broken


and


cnti[ some one


nothing in the tub


- -


75'.


\nd ther-e was
a&fto r all '


comes










































Nd ~
i


A VENTURESOME FOOT.


.. .- ::-__==~ lK,
ov1"
AM'






BABY S ANNUAL.


LITTLE POLL'S RELATIONS.


LITTLE POLL PARROT'S DREAM.


Poll is the little fat parrot
that sits on the perch alone.
She is a contrary young bird.
For one year she would not
talk. When her mistress tried
to teach her to say, "Polly
wants a cracker," which all
good parrots like to say, she
would only snap her bad little
bill and ruffle her feathers.
But one night Poll dreamed
a dream, and all her aunts and
cousins and grandmothers and


brothers and sisters, eleven of
them, came and said "Fie, for
samee" to her. The next
morning when the family said
as usual, "That parrot will
never talk--we may as well
sell her!" Poll cried out, "Fie,
for shame !" and then, "Poll!
Poll! Poll!" and then, "Polly
wants a cracker a cracker,
a cracker, a cracker, a crack-
crack-crack-cracker-r-r! "
But she has not spoken since.






BABY S ANNUAL.


It took a long time to get this ship ready for sea. The girls
hunted all over the attic for sails. Jack had to mend his tennis
racket before he could use it for a rudder. But now they're
off pussy cat, dolly and all. Ship ahoy!
We






18 BABY'S ANNUAL.




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Our black cat Topsy and Ned the horse, are great friends.
Ned is away at work a good deal of the time. Somehow
Topsy knows just when to expect him back in his stall. Sun-
days Ned doesn't work. Topsy knows when it is Sunday and
stays with Ned all the day long.
stays with Ned al -h dyl

















stays with Ned all the day long.
















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THE MADONNA AND THE CHILD.
(f'omi the ,. by Gabriel Max.)


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20 BABY S ANNUAL.


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-III.

NE day Toddlekins fell down again on the ground.
and me went to fly Everybody laughed when
her kite. "Come, Toddlekins told them about
Boofer Kitten," it. They thought it was a
Toddlekins says to great joke. But the Boofer
me when she goes Kitten doesn't ever want to
anywhere. The play with kites' tails any more.
kite was a big yellow-kite with
a long tail. The tail dragged
on the ground as she and me
ran along, and I stopped and I
ran after it, and caught up '
the end in my mouth. ;- ".
Just then there came a
great puff of wind. It car- \
ried the kite right up in the I/ I'
air, and O--the Boofer Kit- ',
ten was hanging to the tail! .
0, how frightened I was, --
-and how Toddlekins screamed! -.----- --
I did think we were going
Su t t s B WHAT A NICE TAIL TO PLAY WITH!
straight up to the sky! But
in a minute the wind was He will play with his own tail
gone, and the kite and me when he plays at all,












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A BIG i;:?!l


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BABY S ANNUAL.


PUZZLES AB UT PETER AND PATTY.


i











ort up ve I ate .


Ihere. zJ8~ o


had to be


LATE !
....*..,u (((~ (.C))))))) nan....


One
Patty


8g Pete r
zwere. late


ant
to


... ; ,:, : .. -" ,,

*hms lrts hotJ it
h p l ned R, rt thet
Then Peter could not Find hi

-fntt loTst hter

if ?a17 T' and pter'ns
mended Then they ran so


that Patt13 st5um bled over


and broke her .


S' o tihen at
-. -r


/'


last


te reached the .schooKroom. the.
said ha.f-pa-t nine Next timne
they tjirl et up ear l in the morning


fat


(,


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I

4


hLi


AN ATTENTIVE CONGREGATION.


1-1
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**"" .....


e
- ~1Cl)r


1





BABY'S ANNUAL.


FAITH'S


LETTER.


DEAR BABIES:-
My name is Faith Butler.
I live in Chicago and am just
six months old. Once every
week I am put in a basket
and weighed. When I was
sixteen weeks old I weighed


sixteen pounds. The last time
papa put me in I heard him
say, "Mamma dear, Baby is
getting too large for this bas-
ket. Before she outgrows it we
must have her picture taken."
The first pleasant day after
that mamma took me to the
photographer's, and here I am
just as the man took me.
Auntie says, "Why, what a
basket full of Faith that is "
Folks say a great many strange
things about me.
The next time you see me
the basket will be too small
and I shall be in my carriage.
Good-by. FAITH BUTLER.


A CHRISTMAS SNOW-STORM.


Ho, ho!
A Santa Claus snow! "
Cries the Baby in glee;


"Santa
Is now
With


Claus in his
on the way
presents for


sleigh

me! "


24





BABY S ANNUAL.


"Ah, ah!" I
And out looks mamma 7.
On the snow fresh and i,..
white;
And with. Baby she feels T'
That Santa on wheels
Were a pitiful sight -


No snow,
And driving so slow
On a hard frozen road,
With a rumble and roll
Over hubble and hole,
And a jolt of his load!


But O,
See the Christmas snow-- -.
How it stretches away!
And the children declare
They can hear in the air
The bells of his sleigh,


So clear,
As the team of reindeer As the fleeter they fly
All a-galloping go, Through the Christmas-tide
Tossing antlers on high snow!






26 BABY'S ANNUAL.


One, two, three, four- four fine ladies and gentlemen taking
a basket ride-no, a car ride. "Toot, toot!" says Annie; Puff,
puff! says Emma; "Ding-a-ling," says Johnny; "'Oot, 'oot, 'uff,
'uff, 'ling, 'ling," says Baby. What fun!





















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AT II'


A SLEEPY VIS1YTOt


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Li


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28 BABY'S ANNUAL.


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-IV.


SHAT do you think?
k The Boofer Kitten
has had a Party!
Toddlekins' mam-
Sma wrote five little
notes, asking five
little girls to come to tea and
bring their five little cats. I
had a new pink ribbon, and
Toddlekins wore her best
dress.
We were all very still at
first, cats and girls. But when
the little girls began to play,
we little cats began to play too.
The little cats and I climbed
all over the tables and chairs,
and ran up the curtains, and
rolled on the rugs, and had "a
perfectly splendid time."
When tea-time came, they
put a big dish of cream on the
floor, and we cats all stood
around and ate. The biggest


cat pushed, and the smallest
cat put her paw in the dish.
Then we bathed our faces,
and slept until it was time to
go home. Toddlekins' mam-
ma says it was a funny thing
to do -to sleep at a party.


THE CREAM FOR THE CATS.


But Toddlekins' mamma never
went to a Cat's Party before.






























































A CALL ON BABY.


t
t
.


,II
II~8;8
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;'BjF:!";






BABY S ANNUAL.


CSUZZLES ABOUT ETER AND PATTY.


was lovely
and a 'X tc ed
tke
other
*'*l', I


IN THE ?tARK.
..,,wrcf(((& ) ) ) ) ", ......


Peterand P^tV ty
to\ e urk

(_ \ I O_


ze nt
The
)ne ,


and the


bloomed and the


_anh Ever ithin2
Th6 played in the


r'-h a* Then the ?o6 into


a TAWth a striped

rowe6d abo ut the Lake, and jed tl
They were sorrV rjhen theV had
" ~ut- te will come aain saic
ae nt out
^,^ ojf .the
^ ,,,, .Il. II ''r.-M ^^^^^' .


and












































































































"A PENNY FOR YOUR THOUGHTS, BABY?"


_ __










DAME CRICKET S BOYS.

While Baby sat in his mamma's lap,
Old Dame Cricket came out in a cap
Whose broad full frill went flapity-flap.

And she bent her crooked little black knee
With a bibity-bob of a courtesy,
And Baby jumped and giggled with glee,
ZLs








And cried, We hear such a funny noise
In the chink- who lives there ? "I and my boys -
I and my ten little crook-kneed boys!"

"Ten little boys!- and do they wear
Red Scotch caps on their curly hair ?"
"No ; their little bald heads are barc."

"If their knees are crooked, can they play?"
" 0, yes, they scamper and run all day
At hide-and-go-seek and pull-away."





BABY'S ANNUAL. 33


" What do you do when they quarrel?"
Their ten wee cots stand in a row,


"Oh,


And straight, straight, straight to bed they go.


" Do they cry?" "Cry? yes, the babies squeak,
The toddlers whimper- cree-cree-creak,
And the grown-up ones they fairly shriek -


I hear the whole of them now, I think!"
Then with flap of her cap and quick as a wink
Went little Dame Cricket back to her chink.









NAUGHTY TIM AND BOB.
Dame Cricket took out her handkerchief
Made of the lace of a fallen leaf,
And wiped her eyes in dreadful grief.

With every tear she sobbed, "Boo, hoo!
Oh, what shall I do, what shall I do ?
I had ten boys, but I've lost two!"


', .- i- 9"
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She spied the Baby. "Oh, have you seen
Two little crickets, sweet and clean,
Lost. anywhere in the clover green ?

" My Tim and Bob were on their way
To get for the cow a wisp of hay;
Now where they are no one can say!"

Then Baby laughed; he- had seen the pair
In a shady clover corner, where
With their little shiny black legs bare,







BABY S ANNUAL.


They were paddling in a drop of dew,
Splashing it over each other, too,
With kicks and screams, and both wet through.


~iK;


1-i. S


He told


Dame Cricket!


and my, oh, my!


She chirred so loud and she
That Baby was ready almost


hopped
to cry.


so high


~} I :y
7 ; 1

-~ .-f J#

--F~s.. ''_:
/


/


For he knew that Tim would come to grief,


And that Bob would have need


Made of the lace of


of that handkerchief


a fallen leaf.


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FOUR SCHOOL-BOYS.
Little black cambric coats they wore,
As tumbling and scrambling out of their door
With hurry and scurry came crickets four.

They were Tim and Bob and Nick and Nate;
Each had a primer, each a slate,
And all were afraid of being late.









Baby called to them merrily: "Ho,
Four black crickets! where do you go
That you hurry and scurry and scamper so ?"
STo school, to school; for don't you see
Our books and slates ? Oh, creakity-cree,



Or is she cross ?" Why, she's the wise
Grasshopper Green with great round eyes.






BABY'S ANNUAL. 3
"Such big round eyes they are she knows
If a single cricket in all the rows
Even dare to wiggle his tired toes!"


"Can you read and spell ?" Then, cree-cree-creak,
They laughed and laughed till they couldn't speak,
Cree-cree-creak, and squee-squee-squeak!









"Read and spell! why, squeak-ety squee,
You little-boy Baby, can't you see
We don't even know our A, B, C ?"








THE LULLABY.

The crickets out in the frosty grass
Could see, through the lighted window-glass,
That the Baby was crying alks, alas!
" Look at his pretty drooping head,
He's sleepy," little Bob Cricket said;
" Yet he doesn't want to go to bed."


" Let's stand in a row," said Tim, and we
Will sing him a lullaby, cree-cree-cree!
A bed with a pillow white I see!"
Then piped up hopping, nimble Nick,
Loud and shrill: Crik-crik, crik-crik!
Lay your little head on it quick, quick, quick!"


And Chirr-rr-rr !"


droned the other eight,


" Mother is rocking, do not wait,
T'is late for a Baby late late late !"





BABY S ANNUAL.


When old Dame Cricket heard them sing


She helped along
Louder than all:


with her mother-wing,
" Cling-clang-cling! "


The lids dropped
While again and
Where chanted ur


low
again


on the drowsy
the lullabies


ider the frosty


skies:


"Cling-clang! crik-cree! clin
Cover him up and let him
We've hushed the Baby to


g-clang!
be!-


crik-cree!


sleep, you


eyes,


39


see !"


-~b~









huW TIM AND BOB RAN AWAY.

"Oh, little Bob Cricket, are you sick?"
The Baby asked him, when, click, click,
He limped along on his dried-grass stick.

Bob Cricket hung his shiny head;
I'm- not exactly sick," he said,
Then stammered and blushed a burning red,





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And showed the baby his bandaged knee:
"The way it happened was this you see,
We didn't mind mother, Tim and me!

"She said to us all .the other day,
'Don't go out of our weeds to play!'
Yet Tim and me -we ran away.

"Ran far as the door-step where there sat
A great big green-eyed tiger cat,
Nodding and drowsing' on the mat.






BABY'S ANNUAL. 41
"She heard us creep, creep, past her nose,
And thought 'twas a mouse-step, I suppose,
For, to our horror, up she rose;


"Her green eyes glared, her mouth was grim,
One blow of her paw, and down went Tim!
Another, and I fell over him!


" "rl l '-i .. ..





Now the others, who didn't disobey,
Laugh at us when we limp, and say,
'It served you right for running away.'"








THE CHRISTMAS-TREE.
When the candles were lighted, the Christmas-tree,
Hung full of trinkets as tree could be,
Was a wonderful, wonderful thing to see.

And out of the darkest fire-place chink,
With little old face as black as ink,
Dame Cricket peered with wink and blink,



I- -





To see the candles and baubles shine,
And she sighed: "I wish those chicks of mine
Were awake to see how bright, how fine!"

There were flocks of children, girls and boys,
That chattered and laughed with happy noise,
So the Cricket lifted her tiny voice,

And their play was hushed for a minute, when
"Cree-crick for Christmas!" she cried, and then,


" Cree-crick for Christmas "


over again.






BABY'S ANNUAL. 43
That meant "three cheers," the children knew,
And they answered back, Three cheers for you,
Old Cricket, and Merry Christmas, too!"


With a backward scrape of her small toes
She curtesied and dipped and rose,
Till the glasses dropped from her funny nose.


And they laughed, and crowded eagerly
About the corner, and cried, See, see!
She's better than even our Christmas-tree!"





BABY'S ANNUAL.


A FEBRUARY PROMISE.


LOOKING FOR MRS. SPRING.
There was a little baby-girl,
And she had heard her
mamma say,
Each time the winter sun
shone out,
That Spring, dear Spring,
was on the way.

This little baby-girl, she asked,
"O who is Spring? What
will she bring?
Does Mrs. Spring bring lit-
tle girls
A doll or any pretty thing ? "


"0, yes; to little children
dear
Spring brings some pretty
gifts, I've heard;
Let's see--two lovely things
in blue,
My sweet a flower and
a bird!"

And now when shines the
winter sun,
She does a funny, funny
thing -
This little girl stands in the
door
And watches there for Mrs.
Spring."

And soon this trustful little
child
Shall hear a darling blue-
bird sing,
And in the grass blue vio-
lets find -
Two gifts for her from
"Mrs. Spring."






BABY S ANNUAL. 45


The nanny goat and her kids are after that apple. "Give
me just one little bite," they would say, if they could talk. The
little girl is afraid of them and would run away just as fast as
her little legs could carry her, if her mother were not there.






BABY S ANNUAL.


DAISY'S


LETTER.


DAISY HERSELF,


Here's a very tiny letter, from a very tiny girl;
Will you see?
Daisy wrote it w; i a pencil, here a quirk and there a quirl,
All for me.
Look! she made two, three, four kisses, like the prints of fin.
ger tips,
Round and small,
And she held the paper for me while I touched them with my lips,
Took them all.
Then she read me what she'd written, told me every word
she'd said;
Will you hear?
"Dear Mamma: My dolls are good now; My dolls are sick a-bed!
Daisy Dear."






BABY'S ANNUAL. 47


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-V.

NE hot day Tod- when we got home. While
dlekins and Me Toddlekins' mamma looked at
went out on an the milk, Toddlekins and Me
errand. We went turned our backs. After she
to get a pail of had looked at the milk she
S--- milk at the corner looked at Toddlekins' mouth,
grocery store. On the way
home it was hotter, and Me --
and Toddlekins were thirsty.
So Toddlekins took off the
cover of the pail and looked in.
"Boofer Kitten," said she,
"are you thirsty ?" I said I
was. Then she took a little 'i
tiny sip, and gave Me a little '
sip too. By and by she took
another little tiny sip, and she
said, Are you thirsty again ? "
I said I was, and she held the
pail low and let Me sip. But
w and let Me sip. But ME AND TODDLEKINS TURNED OUR BACKS.
Me and Toddlekins were thirst-
ier and thirstier, so that there and then she looked at my
was only a little bit of milk whiskers, and then she laughed.
left in the bottom of the pail Poor things she said.














=_2
`4 C


- 1


A-^w
^ '^ './


f.,
5 4'4; ~


I' ii '


BABY IN THE APPLE TREE.


LI --


FFrontis.


~f~7~~J.,



3'! d
r,






BABY S ANNUAL.


PUZZLES ABOUT PETER AND 'PATTY


T-R H k EAT.
'1~,tt\ ha /C~S-~/ezj


it tyJ ha Irrne-



It was trimmed r


;ith


S;. and
and s~he a& S
ve r proud of it


manv


00ood


W6kile the.


and thou t. of it during.
But on the t wey home, it


no td hen she

s iht the. poor hat zJa.s !
NexIt ti me I TwiLl not be


the


rinpAn? Ji~r

5errY2oY2.. TP~-.


be an.


to ra;l n


i-:.. L B~attv h
reached ",], ..
the O'j b+tde

o van aad tt ,


smitn through her Teara


r-


.ad


t






50 BABY S ANNUAL.


THE WH'1ISPER{.


A SECRET.

These two little dears
A secret they know -
Little Bo-Peep
And little ieep-Bo !
Little Peep-Bo
She whispered Bo-Peep,
(But I heard it too)
That the cat was asleep!















SI' p t h e t e l t.
,, 1 ,I .,li, 0 ,llrh i. '


nly Ia 3a's bCen ,,one fall lay,

A\ndbS:,. t,_- 5h,:,w\ him the way,
I.l e put h- the light."











_-i-~- ___~
Ke--i-~-><7i1--~~--


SIi


THE DOLLIES TAKE A SAIL.


\---_

i----=-l


--=------;






BABY S ANNUAL.


NO SAFETY IN A GUN!


So he got some soldier-things:
Ducky-drake he raised his wings
S (O, that duck he was tricky)
And away ran poor Dicky!


r
AZ ,-~
x


There was once a little lad,
And his temper was made bad
By a duck that was tricky;
Every time that he went out,
That bad duck would flap about
And annoy little Dicky -
O, that duck he was tricky!


"I will buy myself a gun,
Then we'll see who has the fun!"
.To himself said poor Dicky;


Do you think that
Eats the milk
Every drop of
With a spoon like


the Man in the Moon
in his cup,
it up,
your own silver spoon?







BABY'S ANNUAL. 53


Polly and Jimmy had a quarrel. Both wanted to swing at
once. Polly would not push Jimmy and Jimmy would not
push Polly. This is the way they settled it at last. Jimmy is
a little cross about it yet.


--
i .
~
-s.~















rM
I


'1 -
*-y 3


I :


r: I~.


CAUGHT IN A SHOWER.


r -


' -*o ... .
...f.L .:
I-:- ... 9- -" -
'- ._ ,'": --,


'''~
sFI


f kn-"
10U .


I;


i4` r'


i'

1
i





r





BABY S ANNUAL.


ALONE WITH THE CLOCK.

To-day you and I are alone, old Clock,
And though very loud you lick and you stock,
'Tis 1, and not you, who will give the commands!
It is I who will rule with my two hands!
I hear you are made of wonder- -
ful parts, ..'
But I know very well you have -..
no hearts- JfI -'.
You can point, and strike, and '.
whiz with a whirl,
But never will favor a poor little I
girl! I !
You never have been at all kind '"i / i
to me
You always were stern as a Clock
could be,
And I must get up whenever you said,
And whenever you pleased must go to bed,
And you rule my meals, and you rule my play,
And I'm glad I'm alone with you to-day!
As I always play when 'tis three, you see,
I will turn you round and make you strike three,
And I'll keep you at three all day, old Clock,
Ah yes, I will, though you lick and you tock






56 BABY'S ANNUAL.


TWO LITTLE CHINESE.


D(

D(




I t


LEE LING AND LING LEE.


Little-child Chinamen Ar
Over the sea,
Which one is Lee Ling? E)
And which is Ling Lee?


A WELL-BRED

I've brought up my donkey
Never to bray -
If he open his mouth
'Tis only in play. 4
Though he lay back his ears
He never will kick;
I am sure you will find
He despises a trick.


tn't your heads ache
With that very tight braid ?
don't the wild jumping-jack
Make you afraid?
im told that you eat
With two little sticks-
hink that would be
The cutest of tricks!
id I think to take tea
With you would be nice-
ccept that I hear
You live mostly on rice!


DONKEY.


THE GOOD DONKEY.






BABY S ANNUAL.


The red cherries are so pretty that Fan has forgotten to eat
her bread and butter. See my earrings," she says to her
brother. I don't think she will forget to eat the pretty cherries
when she gets tired of looking at them, do you ?





BABY S ANNUAL.


Yesterday some one called Tommy a girl, because he wore
long curls. So when mamma went out calling in the afternoon,
Tommy took her biggest scissors and cut off every one of those
curls. That made his head look all scraggly. The barber is
making Tommy look like other boys.


































































































TALK TO ME, TOO, MAMMA.






60 BABY'S ANNUAL.


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-VI.


;A bad thing hap-
pened the other
/ day. There was a
fight in our back
-t: yard! I was sit-
ting out there, in
the sunshine, eating a chicken
bone, when the Smith cat came
and looked over the fence, and
made faces at my chicken bone,
and the Jones cat came too.
Then the Smith cat jumped
down into the yard and when
she thought I was not looking,
she snatched at the bone.
Then how Toddlekins' Boo-
fer Kitten boxed that Smith
cat's ears! The Jones cat
jumped down in the yard too,
and then we 'three jumped at
each other and growled and
spit and scratched and bit, and
I was so glad when Bridget
ran out and drove us away.


Then I came in to Toddle-
kins and she tied up my poor
head with her handkerchief,
and gave me a long lecture of
advice about fighting. I think
she would better have gone
out and lectured some over


"DO YOU NOT KNOW IT IS NAUGHTY TO FIGHT ?"

the fence to that Smith cat
and to that Jones cat!

































































































" HAPPY NEW YEAR, GRANDPA "


4- i







2 BABY S ANNUAL.


PUZZLES ABOUT JLPETER AND PATTY.


- J,


I
I A |,]I
* ,


Or I should like, to be a
I should not


~KAvE "PETER


I should

b ke

to be ,
a -< I!


said Peter &a1nd can
a. ,ret sharp


Hunter ;tith a bi lon
be afYr*d of -an athin?


Dot a b
12o or of- a ,

said3 "P: .^3h^t. a brave. boy goa are tr
"r" t_ --


e ctL
0d()ST3

tn I "I


Then


:ame runnyrin


toward


0 dear !" said Patty He's pretty bi "said
er Sha.l we run ?" said UPatty "I think
ce 'd better sad RPterr A nd then this brave
boy took hold J his sister's and ran
az s a st as he cold !
G "----.-- -


2
o,


I" -


rl


a





BABY S ANNUAL.


"'1V' LQ P\ B 9 Y ,5 "1 U /, l y Ml

c RorI'N I
VERY BFRICqHT;
SHE VYIPES
TH E PLFITE S
FOR ME -- -
I/ND SOON SHE'LL SET THE TABLE,
AFND A9S5 THE DOLLS TO TEJ ;
NOy/ IS N'T THAT REFIL USEFUL
FORf B/,BY-qlRL TO BE ?


63'





64 BABY'S ANNUAL.


BA-BY'S OUT-FIT.

Heigh ho, the ba-by wants to go
A And fetch the rain-bow down;
The red would make her a pret-ty dress,
The gold would make her a crown,
The pur-ple would make her a love-ly cloak;
BA-BY. Then she could ride up and down,
And through the roads and over the seas,
A-way to Lon-don town.



MOTH-ER LONG-BILL.

Moth-er Long-bill is quack-ing and call-ing
Her puff-balls of duck-lings to come.
Quack-quack! q zick! quick! -
Now, what have you found, Moth-er Long-
bill ?
A worm, or a seed, or a crumb ?
Quack-quack quick quick -
Hur-ry on, lit-tle green puff-balls,
You'll have your din-ners, if spry!
Quack-quack quick quick! -
Keep your cour-age up, Moth-er Long-bill, TE ILL.
They'll care for them-selves by and by.






BABY'S ANNUAL. 65


Kitty has come to say good-night to little master. Master
is sleepy, but Kitty's eyes are bright as silver dollars. He will
have a fine frolic while master is fast asleep. To-morrow, when
master is wide awake, Kitty will be asleep under the stove.





66 BABY'S ANNUAL.


Be careful, my boy, with that soft pretty house,
If mother-bird comes, keep as still as a mouse;
Those four little eggs as blue as the sky,
Will four little birdies be by and by.





Pages
67 -68
Missing
From
Original














(1


I'll


FOURTH OF JULY IN THE KITCHEN.


'IL : -


I I I
k .,.'






70 BABY S ANNUAL.


Harold has a battledoor in his hand. That bunch of feathers
is a shuttlecock. Harold is trying to keep the shuttlecock going
in the air. His dogs think he is doing finely. "Our little
master catches it every time," they seem to say.
























4;-


A.


-I' -


-


1F4


t..,~.


rw


ON THE BEACH.


__ I


___~-
;----I
=,


.*r
/


. -

ii i


ON H BAH


I r ,V,,
*jdA /_l





BABY S ANNUAL.


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-VII.


(7N 0 that was a Boy up to the top of a tree and sat
that came to our on a limb and looked down.
i house the other day. By and by the Boy turned
Toddlekins sai d around, and when he saw the
S it was a Boy. A cart was empty, he sat down
Boy looks much on the ground and laughed.
THE BOY. like a Girl, but he I have never scratched my
is bigger and stronger. mistress Toddlekins, and never
"Let us play house," said
Toddlekins.
"And have the kitty for a
doll," said the Boy. I heard
him say that and tried to run
away, but the Boy was too ...
quick. He tied a big white
cap on my head and a big red --:
bow on my tail, and held me '
up and waved me around for
Toddlekins to see. Then he
put me in his cart, and they :_- .
began to pull me around the '
yard. As soon as the Boy's THEY THINK I AM IN THE CART.
head was turned, I softly intend to, but I will scratch
jumped out of the cart and ran that Boy as soon as I can.















u- _
hkidi


-,


-4


MY PLAYMATE.


__ I __ I I


Is,1
1~







'4 BABY S ANNUAL.



PUZZLES ABOUT'- TER AND 'FATTY.


T TY s XURPRIS E.



ETEP PLANNED IT FOR HER.
'tE HAD BEEN BUSY WITH
HIS



AN

AXW.J
Cl' = == ^


FOR MANY DAYS ,
IN A CORNER BY


DOWN
THE


R D.R .'-A"- ,. ,..
BORDER AND WATERED


HIS SEEDS WITH THE
HIs 6EEDS WITH THE


HER OWN NAP


"W EVERY DAY
I7fT LA
BIRTHDAY CAME AND
HER TO THE GARDEN

IE IN GREAT <-


ST TTY '
JETE'R LED
HERE SHE SAW


MADE OF


TINY GREEN -* NApPY ?ATTY

8HE VWAS ALMOST AS -PLEASED AS PETE1 W/Ab "PROUD


A
BIG





































iI











































































BACK-DOUR SUNSHINE FOR BABY.






BABY'S ANNUAL.


Three of these kitties are waiting for their dinner. After
dinner, they will take a nice nap under the stove. The other r
kitties are going to steal that fish. They will have no warm
nap, and when they come in they will be whipped.


__ _I~





BABY S ANNUAL.


0, WHAT A HAPPY DAY!

BABY'S WALK.


O, what a happy day!
0, happy, happy, 0!
A day to take a walk,
And Baby dear shall go!

The children are at home-
'Tis joyous Saturday!
Nurse-maids they all shall be
And help the Baby play!

O, such a happy day!
And where shall Baby go?


Why, in the daisy-field
To see the daisies blow!

And she shall take her hoop,
And take her bouncy ball,
And take her picture book,
Yes, let her take them all!

This is the Baby's walk -
Just let her have her way-
A little uncaged bird
To fly about all day!






78 BABY'S ANNUAL.


BABY'S BREAKFAST.


Baby wants his breakfast,
O! what shall I do ?
Said the cow, "I'll give him
Nice fresh milk moo-oo!"


Said the hen, Cut-da/-cut!
I have laid an egg
For the Baby's breakfast-
Take it now, I beg!"

And the buzzing bee said,
"Here is honey sweet -
Don't you think the Baby
Would like that to eat?"

Then the baker kindly
Brought the Baby's bread.
" Breakfast is all ready,"
Baby's mother said;

" But, before the Baby
Eats his dainty food,
Will he not say 'Thank you!'
To his friends so good r"

Then the bonny Baby
Laughed and laughed away-
That was all the "thank you"
He knew how to say!





BABY S ANNUAL.


Little birds are always 'hungry. See how these stretch up
their necks and open their mouths. One of them has got hold
of the little boy's finger. It thinks it has got a fine fat worm.
Perhaps the mother-bird will come with a real worm before long.


79









BABY S ANNUAL.


4,


S ,~

.4- .


t~.
.4


HOW A LITTLE GIRL LOST HER BREAD AND MILK.


"2~"~
d c~--~-~Y~a
~ji~ ~PP~ P


I!
i,




















iiPP
---' ~'' "" ,,.. _



h ';4"L
:r








NOT PLEASANT To THE TASTE.






BABY S ANNUAL.


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-VIII.


EAR, dear!" said
Toddlekins' Grand-
ma. Somebody
has been at my knit-
ting, and got my
ball of silk in a
tangle! The young person who
did it must have her hands
tied together with a piece of
silk to make her remember not
to meddle with other people's
things."
Toddlekins and I, Mew-mew,
were sitting on a cushion on
the other side of the screen.
Toddlekins ran over and
climbed up beside her Grand-
ma. "Ididn't touch your knit-
ting, Grandma," she said.
Didn't you, dear? Well, I
suppose, then, it must have been
that Boo'fer Kitten."


mustn't she?" said Toddlekins,
looking very sorry.
They tied up my paws with
a piece of blue silk and made
me sit in the corner and I did
not like it. Why are balls of
silk so nice and round, if Boo-
'fer Kittens cannot play with


TODLLEKINS TIES MY PAWS.


"Then the Boo'fer Kitten them? And I don't think Tod.
must have her paws tied up, dlekins wanted to tie my paws.
























7.
'. '-L


I.l


"A NIBBLE."


_I






)4 BABY'S ANNUAL.


P1ZZLE$S --oUTl:TER -AND ePATT.Y.

~iL1UII

/ I v2 IDANCING' 1OSSON.


Sii ~eFore the




S2i) the roartor ~ere, was

under neath covered with


on e@ch side.. -.
0Oho, little gt 'nI the 'S "cried attkff, t think -gou
Cayl Jance
b ut you ckn't until I show
like er. how I tkde Lessons anJ
learn to t-urn out my toes Like this & 6 t3e
twirteJ h i ke,
a &nd her cfress 5prea& out like
alSJentl she trippeS and' pdI and when
56Pa pr e~t broken I
Mid~ there was a
1 k g in the glss.
YOU )&,jI girl, S&1 6 Rtty to make me do that
.;But whose_ 'ault was It ?






ANNUAL.


Hurrah! hurrah !


hurrah !


Hurrah, for this glorious ball!


urrah, for the snow so white!
Push, push with all your might!


Hurrah!


hurrah! hurrah!


We've only just begun.


Get all the boys and girls, we'll make it weigh a ton.


BABY S








































r
:~i n;~


.

r)
i


" I LOVE YOU, MAMMA.


- *'





Pages
87 90
Missing
From
Original





BABY'S ANNUAL. 91


THE CATS AT THE PLAY; THEY SEE A TRAGEDY.


THE CURE.

Pink caramels three,
S- And peppermint tea,
They sipped in a cinnamon
i' chowder,
S' But were cured at last,
When the danger was past,
THE PEANUT POWDER CURED THEM." By a beautiful peanut powder.


~-- ---------






92 BABY'S ANNUAL.


THE ROCKING-HORSE TRIP.


My pony has a pretty head
And a very dark brown mane
And is a faster trotting-horse
Than grandpa's heavy cane.
H is name is Billy Button Budge,
And he and I to-day
Must take a trip, and it is time
That we were on our way.

The sewing-machine is a buzz-
ing Mill,
That has so nice a wheel,
Where I must go for a bag of
flour
And a half-a-peck of meal.
At Book-Case Corner I will
stop
To get my papa's mail,
And at the Centre Stand I'll
ask
What fruit theyhave for sale.

A pound of tea to Betty Brown
I'll not forget to take -


She lives down in the narrow
lane
The chairs and table make.
Then at the grand Piano Hall,
Some music I must hear,
While pony stands all safely
tied
To the rack so handy near.

Then half way-at the Sofa
Inn
Some luncheon we will eat,
And Budge shall have his hay
and oats,
And I'll have bread and meat.
Waste-basket manger ready
stands -
Where pony always feeds,
And scuttle-trough is ever full
Of all the drink he needs!

Bay-window Market I must
see
With all its flowers fair,






BABY S ANNUAL.


And order too a gay bouquet The carpet's flowery Park,
For sister May to wear. And yet get home to Mother's
A trot we'll have all up and Chair
down Before 'tis very dark.


WHY KIT

One time a girl called Little
Kit left her play and was gone
and gone and gone, until her
mamma went to the door and
said Kit Little Kit!" very
loud.
Just as mamma could not
see her and said "I must go
and look for her," she saw
Kit's blue dress and little white
sun-bonnet in the barnyard
among the calves and lambs.
i
i i i '


LITTLE KIT.
She went and got her, and


WAS GONE.

away? Mamma got fright-
ened about you, Little Kit."
Because, mamma, Black
Rooster and Silver Lady came
and crew to me, 'Cut dah cut!
come see, Kit!' and I went
and Silver Lady .
had laid an egg on
the hay! Black
Rooster and Silver BLACK ROOSTER
Lady and me all AND SILVER LADY.
climbed up together and saw
it, and I touched it and it was
all warm and nice."
Well," said mamma, "the
next time Black Rooster and
Silver Lady crow to you to go
anywhere, you must come and


you run I ask whether you can.


said, Why did






BABY S ANNUAL.


SHE'S MINE! SAID SHE.


"HE'S MINE!" SAID HE.


A TALE OF A TOY.


Once was a little horse
That daily was the joy
Of a pretty little girl
And a pretty little boy.
But now the little horse
No longer is the joy
Of the pretty little girl
And the pretty little boy.


They could not think alike
About the horse one morn;
One wished to feed him oats
And one to feed him corn.
Then pulled the little girl!
Then pulled the little boy!
And soon their darling horse
Was just a broken toy.


A chocolate drop and a caramel,
SAnd Tommy my boy will not sleep well!
M A saucer of pink-and-white ice-cream,
/ And what think you my Tommy will dream ?
A slice of cake and a piece
of pie,
And Tommy'll go riding by and by
On steeds with claws and steeds with wings
And several other griffinous things!





"OUT OF REACH."


``


'


.-<

- ~ .~v J






96 BABY'S ANNUAL.


ME AND TODDLEKINS.- IX.


Z. I E, cake, cheese,
-everything I
put in the cup-
board is nibbled
by that naughty
mouse! It was
Toddlekins' mam-
ma who said that, and the
Boofer Kitten heard her say
it. I began to think of my
duty right away, and my fur
stood up straight on my back,
I wanted so much to see that
mouse. When it was all dark
that night, I crept into the
storeroom, and sat down by a
little hole under one of the
cupboard shelves. By and by
something moved, and then
by and by a little dark thing
came running out of the hole.
One! Two! Three! JUMP!
The Boofer Kitten had
caught Toddlekins' mamma's


nibbling mouse! Such a time
as we had then! Everybody
praised me, and Toddlekins
came downstairs in her night-
gown, with her little pet pillow
under her arm, to give me an
extra plate of milk. And Tod-
dlekins' mamma said The


TODDLEKINS AND HER PET PILLOW.


Boofer Kitten is going to be a
good mouser." And I am.


L- "ni


n















ll l .


I N








PJdry J
it




r 2dr I












:IK





































iABY SWEET AS A ROSE.







18 BABY S ANNUAL.


PUZZLES ABOUT TER AND PATTY.


SA2tTTLE COOK.


it was afciuryd I
iPaLftt went9 oiut in
kitcen It was


nice place to
6e walls were
wAtn briobl-t


S.
(A -


on the
shelves .


stood


a.nd plenr of


she worked busi


and

.sweet"


all -te,


and when Fetere car


morn I" n
had o.


ne 6ome.


she.


to show b.im .


jBid was


cook -too


making
andt Tl musf


and


I did noT Iasf 50no between tem, I can 1e.Lr IOu!
te____________i__________t______a


and


""`~ ~""'"

" C~`


b nd
be a.


~Iy~


lz-ft


BL~L ~k






BABY S ANNUAL.


I -


J 1 1! 1


Isn't he a good swimmer ? See how easily he holds his head
above the water. He is racing with another rabbit just out of
sight. That solemn-looking rabbit on the shore is the judge
of the race. Go it, Bunnies!