Citation
Edible, Poisonous, and Medicinal Fruits of Central America

Material Information

Title:
Edible, Poisonous, and Medicinal Fruits of Central America
Donor:
Taylor, Kathryn
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
Book
Physical Location:
Box 66
Folder 23

Subjects

Genre:
book
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Central America -- Panama Canal Zone

Notes

Abstract:
Book titled "Edible, Poisonous, and Medicinal Fruits of Central America" (1930)
General Note:
Item received on 5/27/2011

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Panama Canal Museum Collection at the University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, PCMC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
2004.038.016 ( Accession Number )
2004.038 ( PCM Object ID )

Full Text
MEDICINAL FRUITS
OF
CENTRAL AMERICA
ENINEflI SASE REPRODUCTION PLANT. USARCARIS, COROZAL. C. Z.
1REPIINTIED 1 950







EDIBLE, POISONOUS AND MEDICINAL
FRUITS OF CENTRAL AMERICA
BY
AMMON B. GODSHALL
CAPT.,C.E., U.S.A.

THE PANAMA CANAL
MARCH 20, 1942.
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE BY: W.R. LINDSAY & M.F. WARD, CANAL ZONE EXPERIMENT GARDENS

NOT TO BE REPROOUCEO EXCEPT BY PERMISSION OF THE PANAMA CANAL







tat

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rn




4 UNo L%- 100 01%
0,4
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04
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CASHE W or MARANON 64Anocordium occ/dent/I7/)
PART CAN Bf 5 A TEf V NA W OR COOKE D
PA RT PO/SONO/ '5

saO aCU/O Wn/ess roos/ed
THE CASHEW TREB IS FOUND IN FIELDS AND QN THE SIDES OF DRY, BUIY HILLS. THE TREE GROWS AS HIGH AS 30 FET. THE FRUIT CONS115TS O 2 PARTS: 1 A LARGE GRAYISH KIDNEY-SHAPED NUT THAT HANGS FlDM 2 A RED OR YELUW SPOWY JUICY MASS ABOUT THE SIZE AND SHAPE OF A PPPER. THIS PEPPER-SHAPED FRUIT CAN BE EATEN RAW, BUT THE NUT IS POISDOUS UNLESS ROASTED UNTIL ALL THE OIL 0L8 OUT. CARE MUST BE TAKEN OT TO TOUCH THE OIL IN TIE NUT WITH THE BARE NANDS. THE OIL WILL IRRITATE THE SKIN AND CAUSE S .ELIIN.
PAGE 3




MAANZA/ILLO (hippomone n-ncine//a) P0/50/0o./S

fruit- qreen, poison

l/eoves qreen, smooth

./4 re7u/ar J./Ze

THE MANZANILLO IS A SUALL TREE COMMON ON SEASHORESS IN MANY PARTS OF TROPICAL AMERICA, AND ABUNDANT ON BOTH COASTS OF THE ISTHMUS, WHERE IT FRS DENSE THICKETS ALONG THE BEACHES. THE BARK IS SVOC'H AND P.1IE BROWN; THE LEAVES AAE (GREEN IN COLCR AND ARE SMALL AND SMDOTH. THE GREEN FIAY ER. ARE ARRANGED IN STIFF SPIKES. THE FRUIT IS OVER AN INCH IN DIAMETER AND RESEMBLES A SMALL GREEN APPLE.
THE EARLY SPANISH EXPIDRERS UPON MEETING :JITH THIS TREE BELIEVED THEYf HAD FOUND CRABAPPLES IN THE NEW WORLD, AND ATE THE FRUIT, IN SOME CASES WITH "ATAL RESULTS. AFTER PROVING ITS POISONOUS PROPERTIES THEY IMMEDIATELY GAVE IT A FEARFUL REPUTATION, AFFIR[MING THAT A PERSON WHO RESTED BENEATH THE TREE WOULD BECOME BLIND OR EVEN DIE. THE MILKY SAP IS HIGHLY IRRITANT, CAIES SEVERE INFLAZ.lATION, ALTHOUGH, AS iN THE CASE OF POISON IVY, SOME PERSONS ARE IWaUNE TO IT. SMOKE FRCH THE BURNING WOOD SOTME-IMS CAUSES INFLAMMATION OF TIE EYES. IT IS SAID THAT THE SAP WAS EMPLOYED BY THE CARIB. FOR POISONING THEIR ARROWS.
PAGE 4




OR T/ OA, NETTLE5 (Jof#ropho urens)
PO/50vou,5

/77 /r

'/4rec7c//c7r size ~ w~-d '~

THE ORTIGA IS A WED COlaMON ON THE PACIFIC SLOPE. IT IS PARTICULARLY COMMON IN DRY REGIONS ALONG THE BEACHES, SUCH AS AT NEW GOODNA. THE PLANT GROWS ABOUT 3 TO 5 Fl ET HIGH. IT IS CCVERED WITH STIFF HAIRS MIlCH CAUSE GREAT PAIN vVIEN THEY STING THE FLE H. THE PAIN OFTeN LASTS FOR A M*OIE DAY OR LONGER. IN lOM CASES, HIGH FPMVRS HAVE RSULTED FROM STINES FrM THIS NETTLE. THE PLANTS HAVE A'HITE FLOWERS ABOUT 1/2 INCH IN DIAMETER, AND THE LEAVES LOOK LIKE SMAII PAPAYA IEAVE.
PAGE 5




P/CA PICA COW/ TCH (/Mucu,?a pru r e ns)
\\ P0/S O5/VO U V5

Spods recu/orYize

COWITCH IS A CO.O1T PLANT I1 THE THICKETS. THE HAIRS WHICH COVE THE PODS IN THIS AND CRTAIN GTH.R STY:CIES ARE SASILY DETACHED) WHEN DRY, AND PENETRATE THE SKIN, CAUSING IJTENSE IRRITATION THEY ARE PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS TO THE EYES.
PAGE 6




SA 9 OX,01 TRONOA DOR c
9 /50O 0/ 51

THE SANDBOX TREE IS FREU~ENT ABOUT THE ZONE AID WAS OFTEN PLANTED
AS A SHADE TREE. THEY GROW AS FAR NORTH AS EXICO. THE TREE IS MEDIUM SIZED AND ITS TRUNK IS USUALLY DENSEY CCVER3 WITH SHCRT, SHARP SPINES. THE FRUIT IS SHAPED LIKE A PUMPKIN, 2 TO l INCHES BROAD. INSIDE THE FRUIT ARE ABOUT 15 ONE-SEEDED WOODY CELS WHICH LOOK LIKE THE SECTIONS OF AN ORANGE. WHEN RIPE, THE FRUIT EXPLODES VIOLENTLY WITH A LOUD REPORT AND THROWS THE SEEDS FAR AWAY FROM THE TREE. THE SEEDS CONTAIN AN OIL WHICH AFFECTS YOU WORSE T'lAN AN OVERDOSE OF CASTOR OIL AND DEATH IS SOMETIMES CAUSED FIOM EATING THESE OILY SEEDS. THE MILKY SAP OF THE TREE IS ALSO POISONOUS .ND SERIOUS INFLAMMATION IS CAUSED WHEN IT COMES IN CONTACT '.'ITH YOUR SKIN.
PAGE 7




5 TR YCHfA05 (5rychno5s ox/fera)
PO/S OAIOU5S

s/,l7der woody vine hairy on o0// ports /ecver oppos/t4y qreen vemn5 prominel:

NJAV requ/ar iz
THE PLANT IS COUMON IN THE WET FORESTS OF THE ATLANTIC SLOPE, AND IS EASILY RECOGNIZED BY THEi GREAT NUMBER OF FINE HAIUS ON ALL PARTS. THE FRUIT IS SHAPED LIKE A BALL AND IS USUALLY 2 INCHES OR MORE IN DIAMETER, WITH HARD, GREEN OR YELLOW SKINS. IT HOLDS SEVERAL LARGE SEEDS. IN SOME PARTS OF BRAZIL IT IS CALLED "URARI" AND IT IS FAMOUS AS ONE Or 'THE SOURCES 0? CURARE, ONE OF THE DEADLIEST POISONS KNOWN. A SMALL QUANTITY IN THE BLOOD STREAM WILL PARALYZE THE NERVES ALMOST INSTANTLY AND SOON CAUSE DEATH. CURARE IS OBTAINED FROM THE BARK AND FOOTS. IT HAS BEEN USED BY THE SOUTH AMERICAN INDIIANS FOR POISONING TEIRn ARROWS, ESPECIALLY THCSE SHOT FRCH BLWGUNS, AND IT IS REPORTED THAT SITILAR USE OF THE PLANT IS MADE BY THE INDIANS OF PANAMA.
PAGE 8




LIKE YAMS, THE TUCA HAS ROOTS THAT CAN BE EATEN. IT IS A LARGE
BUSHY PLANT WITH LON, STALK-LIKE LEAVES WICH ARE DfEPLY DIVIDED INTO 3 TO 7 LONG POINTED SECTIONS. THE ROOTS ARE BOILED AND EATEN LIKE POTASTCE. YOU CAN MAKE BREAD FROM THE GRATED (POWDMED) ROOTS. THERE ARE TWO KINDS OF THE PLANT; BOTH LOOK ALIKE. ONE CAN BE EATEN RAW. THE OTHER IS POISONOUS UNLESS IT IS HEATED. TO BE SAFE COOK ANY HOOT THAT LOOKS LIKE A SWEET POTATO.
PAGE 9




/VA, DE JUC de A&A, 6RAA PIC (klf,3 cr.e5
oooD foR wA TvR THf J5 A A
4/IV THESTE

/7o7n / Cf. 5Qo/rcc of vlcr

THERE
IN THE TH ICKETS CAN GET A LARGE SAFE SUBSTITUTE

/a ves- /Op, 5rl7com qrfvf
under -qrays h, woolly
a woody climb/ngq v/ec f', reCqu/lr 1re

IS ONLY ONE GRAPE NATIVE 'lM CENTRAL AERICA. IT IS COMMON ABOUT THE CANAL ZONE. THE FRU ISr VERY SMALL AND SOUR. YOU AMOUNT OF WATERY SAP FI I A SECTION OF THE STEM. {IS IS A FOR WATER.
PAGE 10




frwY -brown k/I-/ike sin or,ne-co/ored /eh laree /f ,s jemo' s-z nmu? h reduced /
Jmo// free n a beihtl' of 25 f4eer
GUANABANO IS OMDvD ON THE PACIFIC SLOPE AND IN THE FORESTS OF PANAMA. THIS FIT HAS ORAW LO4URED ESH. IT IS NOT TERY MEATY AND HAS
A LOT OF SDS.
PAGE II




C / P UfL 0 or HOGPL UM (5pond, tsj pp.N A/,,N, f EA TE IVRA v' OR COOKED

*4reqular Yze ) ? 1<
THE SPONDIAS ARE SMALL TREES WITH CO1OUND LEAVES AND FRUITS. EACH FRUIT CONTAINS ONE LARGE 3 TO 5 CALLED STONE. THE TREES ARE VERY ODI ON ON THE ISTHMUS, BOTH IN OPEN FIELDS OR ON BUSHY HIIlSIDES, AND AS LIVING FENCE POSTS. THE FRUITS, WHICH RESEBLE A SMALL PLUM, GROW IN MANY SIZES, BUT ARE USUALLY RED OR ORANGE IN COLOR WYHZEN THEY ARE RIPE. THE FLAVOR IS SOMEWHAT LIKE THAT OF THE PLUM, AND THE FRUIT CAN BE EATEN RAW OR COOKED. THIs "GOLDEN APPLE" IS THE LARGEST FRUITED VARIETY OF SPONDIAS GROWN HERE, THE FRUITS AVERAGING CLOSE TO 1-1/2 INCHES IN DIAMETER.
PAGE 12




N/5 P&RO or SAPODIL LA (Achraj sopolo) CAN DE fA TEN RAW ONLY .i

c/ear ye//owish brown, Ke rCqu/.ar -ze

THE FRUIT IS SHAPED LIKE A BALL AND IS ABOUT 2 INCHES IN DIAMETER. IT IS SOFT, SWEET AND THE SKIN IS THIN, BR0 COLORED AND MAY BE SCALY CR SMOOTH. THERS ARE BLACK SHINY SEEDS NEAR THE CENTER. THE TREES GROH 60 PEET HIGH AND HAVE DARK GRES LEAVES. THE ILIUKY SAP IS NOT POISDNIOUS, BUT IS NOT GOCD AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR WATER.
* PAGE 13




STAP APPLZ or CA/MITO (Chrysophy//urm cain//o)

loves dar qreen on /op
- :iny brown hair on ol/orom

~b 4 7 --ll11C /7YFI
."u/" I~e/ ~ apple r teen or purple
sechon of fruit showmq
S /or-shaped core
-. reou/or s/ie

THE STAR APPLE TREE GROWS 60 FEET HIGH. IT IS C(AIMON IN THE FORESTS. THE LEAVES ARE DARK GRSEN ON TOP AND HAVE SHINY, SILKY, BROWN HAIRS ON THE BOTTOM. THE FRUIT LOOKS LIKE A SMALL APPLE, WITH SMOCTH,
GREEN OR PUIPLE SKIN, AND GREENISH MILKY MEAT. 1iEN CUT THROUGH THE GMLNTI THE BROWN SEEDS M; AKE A FIGURE LIKE A STAR. THE FRUIT IS SWEET.
PAGE 14




FRUTA de MONO, WATER CHESTNUT OPchiro qu
CAN BE EATCN RAW OR COOKED:

J'eed ac/en e/hee row or roosted

redd/sb brown

THE IrT CHSTIT IS COMM OK TE ATLANIC SIMI OF HI ISTWUS AND GRO IN WET FORESTS OR IN SWMPS. IT IS A S=ALL OR IEDIIW SIZE TREE AND HAS OML A FEW WIAN HES GROMI OUT FROM THE TRUNK. THE SHINE GREEN 1AVES HAVE 5 TO 7 NARROW IEAFIZTS, USUALLY POINTED AT THE TIP. THE LARGE FIDWOS ARE A PINKISH CODR. TIE FRUIT IS REDDISH BR0 IN COLR AND IS ABOUT 8 TO 10 INCHES
IOW. IT IS TVR HARD AND WAVI, AND) THE BROW SEEDS ARE INI=)D IN SOLID
MITE FLESH. THE LARGE SEMS ARE EATEN RAW OR ARE ROASTED AN) EATEN LIKE CHESTUTS, AllD IT IS RPORID THAT IN THE UIAAS THE YOUNG LEAVES ARE COOKED APA EATEN.
PAGE I&




rr po mYam
edi/4 por/han raugh braw ,eof
whIte Moat
TAMS HAVE AIGS ROOTS THAT 1OK AND ARE EATEN LIKE SMET POTATOES. THEY ARE USUALLY FOUND GROWING ALL TROUGH THE FORESTS. THEY ARE AN IMPORTANT
ARTICLE OF FOOD IN MANY PARTS OF TROPICAL AMERICA.
PAGE 16




toO 4Nw l04 oC wp -4 -4*.41r-4 N N N -V r-4 .. . . . . N (n nc
L4. (nlfQ m41F- z ..
In~ ~ ~ C3w N.n
Z e c i ) c L.40 04a
C- 44 0 cCO A
W m




A KEE or HUf VO PART CAN 5Df

VE GE TA L (Bh /o .,apida)

EA TE /V

RA4 W OR COOKED

PART

P0/5 ONOU5

rpo/sonou no/ r/* can be ow*n / ripe

THE AKEE IS A SMALL TREE WITH DOUBLE LEAVES WITH ABOUT 10 LARGE,
OBLONG LEAFLETS. THE FRUIT HAS 3 CELLS AND IS COLORED RED OR ORANGE. IT CONTAINS 3 LARGE, BLACK, SHINY SEEDS THAT SIT IN A WHITE CENTER. THE CEnTER IS THE PART OF THE FRUIT THAT CAN BE EATEN. IT IS USUALLY BOILED IN SALT WATER, AND THEN FRIED. HOWEVER IT CAN BE EATEN RAW. THE SEEDS AND THE UNRIPE FRUITS AHICH HAVE NOT OPENED BY THEMSELVES ON THE TREE, ARE DEADLY POISONOUS.

PAGE 18




MDA DU or COCO Xon/hosomo violceum)
CAN D_ fA TENAl COOKEfD OAIL Y POISOAIOUS If NOT COOKED

- qro u d leve/

Sunderqroued srnfc-an be ea*en .

BADU IS GROW IN THE CANL ZONE FOR I COOKED AND EATEN LIKE POTATOES. THE PLANT HAS BOTH THE BOOTS AND LEAVES OF THE BADU CONTAIN C ARE DESTDTED BY COOING. SEVERE IRRITATIOE C BY EATING THE UNCOOKED TUBERS.
PAGE 19

800TS, WICH AB (N S0MS PLACES. CRSTALS MaCB %MAAT 35 CAIND




BALS5A MINO, DALSAM-PEAR (Momordica c/oronhio) PULP CAN Df f A TEN RAW OR COOKED

rl furro e
oronqe color i
6-6inches long o/frui
redr Ae neWP-ac
THE BALSAM-PEAR IS A TIN, Ms, VI WITH SMALL LEAVS AW SMALL TELOW FOW THAT GROW SIELY FRONM W END OF A LAW SLISR STW. THE
FMIT IS OBNOG AND POINTS, ORAMiE, SPLITS OWS IN 3 SETIOW. INS)DS IS A RSD PULP N WHICH THE LAIB SMS GROW. TH PIULP MA BE SATIEN RAW. THS SEDS ARE POISDOIUS. THE PLANT IS USED IN HOM WDISIM, TO MAKE A TA lICH A lEM) FOR FWRS, AND TO CAUS V IW.
PAGE 20




C fl / NA E RRY, JAC/NTO Afe/,re/ ozedorac*)
P015 ONOLUJ

THE CHINABERRY IS NATIVE OF EASTERN ASIA BUT IS PLANM IN CENTRAL A E RICA .-R CfRANEAW. THE BIRDS HAVE BEEN RESPONSIBLE FOR DISTRIBUTING THE SEED, 0SO THAT NOW THE TREE IS SOUETIMES FOUND IN A SEMI-WILD STATE. THE TREE IS SMALL, WITH A ILW, THICK TOP AND SVET-SCENTS) FLn ERS SOM MAT LIKE LILACS. TOU CAN AIMOT SEE THROUWI THE 4-S )DED PULPIT FRUIT. IT IS VERY POISONOUS TO HUMAN BEINGS.
PAGE 21




/ick, dc6rk
sometimes withl white

p/lon? qrowJ 3-4 feet hiqh /he sop In conftac wi/h 1he kin c-cAuejc Jerious in/o-am noion

MA~WV~1-~FZ

THSS AR PLAIS AT (ROW 0Wi LAMD. THBT ARB AW THR E FUT
Hio, WITH LARGE, WHICK STs mICH ARE UALLY FLAT WITH THE (ROUND AND WOSS M00TS 00 SOME DISTANCE ALOW TH AUND. THE PANMS, W CUT, 011
MF A STW1 OMWSIVE, SKUNK-LIE OR. THE JUICE IS VMY ITATE WWM
IN C0DNTACT WI THE SKIN AND CAW= 8U200 SMILN.
PAGE 22




ZLfP PAN T EAR 'A/ocojao tncrorh iza)
PO/SONOU5

THE ANT EAR IS A LARGE, SPREADIMG, ORNAXME1L PLANT THAT
LOOKS LIKE THE DASHN. IT HAS A LARGE STW AS THEK AS A MAN'S LEG IICHI GROS FROM 2 TO 4 FERt HIG THE BIG, HEART-SHAWED LEAVES ARE SE .RAL FET HIGHER THAN THE STEMS. ND PART OF THE PLANT CAN BE EATW. THE PLANT CONTAINS SWALL OXALATE CRYSTALS 1WICH CAUSE SEVEN IRRITATION TO THE MDUTH AND THROAT IF EATEN.
PAGE 23




MA DRONO or FRL TA de MONO (Rheedoa Idruo)
fR UI T CA A/ O ZfA TEN/V RAW OAILY
JA P CA NV Df U5L D fOR Mf D/ C/NIVf

4 regular jize

THE MADRONO IS A TREE 00WONLY FOUND IN THE FORESTS OF THE ATLANTIC SLOPE OF CENTRAL AMERICA. IT IS A TREE ABOUT 3) OR 35 FEET HIGH WITH OBLONG, GLOSSY, GREEN, WAXY LEAVES AND YELLOW SAP. THE JUICY, WHITE MEAT AOUI) THE LARGE SEEDS IS SWEET AND REFRESHING. THE FRTS, WHICH ARE VERY ROUGH ON THE OUTSIDE, ARE YELLOW WHEN THEY ARE RIPIT. TH3 YELLOW SAP OF THE RHEEDIA IS USED FOR TREATING ULCERS AND OTHER SORES.
PAGE 24




DANA NA (tausa Jo pientum)

p/an/ row 20-300 feel hlqb /eoveJ /hin, briqht qreen 5-6 feae /0on, 2 feet wide
of fruit
fruit -/hree ned 3-/ lon ye//ow when ripe
typico/ 'hond" of frui"

THE BANANA IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT FRUITS OF CENTRAL AMERICA, BOTH FOR SALE TO OTHER DUNTYRIES AND FOR LOCAL MAMETS. BANANAS ARE USUALLY EATEN FRESH, FRIED, CR ROASTED .
THE GRZ88 BANANA WIEN BOILED MAKES A GOOD SUBSTITUTE FOR POTATOES.
PAGE 25




par/ ofoa fru// c/ud/er V4i requ/or size
THE BLACK PALM OF PANWMA IS BEST KNOWN FOR ITS VERY HARD, VERMY BLACK WOOD. THE MEAT AROUND THE LARGE, BALL-SHAPED (1-1/2 INCH) ORANGE CR RED FRUITS IS SWEET, AND ALTHOUGH STRINGY CAN BE EATEN. THE KERNEL OF THE FRUIT IS OILY AND IS FLAVORED LIKE THAT OF THE COCONUT.
PAGE 26




B/fAD/FpI T FTUTA de PAN (Ar/ocarpus comnmun/s)
CAN E fATEN ONLY WHEAl COOKED
'tif c/ub-hMe
'low qree
K fruit- green,
*-6 nch di/ornam., Sgfrows1 near ends a of bron c hes. Ott

* regu /or ,/ze

/eoves leohery,
shiny dork 9reer Ae,9ht of /ree 30-40 fet

THE BREADFRUIT, NATIVE OF THE EAST INDIES AND THE PACIFIC ISLANDS, IS PLANTED ABOUT THE ZONE. THE LARGE, STARCHY, FRUITS ARE A GOOD SUBSTITUTE FOR POTA0IES. THEY ARE PRE ARMED) F0R EATING 7B SAME WAY AS CRDIARY fIlTE POTATOES.
PAGE 27




7CA /VA A VA (Lactfr/s rninor) f CAN DE fA TE N RA W ONLY

00- 0147r ofZIY f.,fC/i'sf14rV4 re qv/or Ur/Z 2Fiva
THE PLA ITS ARE SMALL PALMS WITH THIN STEMS (1-1/2 TO 2 INCHES). THEY USUALLY GROW IN CLUMPS AND HAVE LONG, THIN SPIN-ES 01 THE STALK. THE SEEDS ARE HARD, ABOUT ONE INCH OR MORE IN DIAMETER, AND CAN BE EATEN RAW. THEY ARE COARSE AND DON'T TASTE VERY CX00..
PAGE 28




COCONUTS (Cocos rnucife ro)
CAN EATEfN/ RAW OR COOKED
GOOD 5UD55T/TUTE FOR WATER
se c//oof ofrw

COCONUTS ARE PLENTIFUL NEARLY EVYWHERY ABOUT THE INHABITED PORTIONS OF THE ZONE, HAVING BEEN PLANTED IN ALMOST EVERY CLEARING FOR THE FRUITS. IT IS MOST PLENTIFUL ALONG THE SEASHORES. IN CENTRAL AMERICA COCONUTS ARE USED CHIEFLY FCR THE "MILK" OR SWEET LIQUID WHICH FILLS THE FULL-GROWN BUT Ul,' FRUITS. THIS IS ALWAYS COOL, NO MATTER HOW HOT THE ATMOSPHERE, AND FUFRNI. A SATISFYING BEVERAGE IN REGIONS WHERE THE AVAILABLE WATER IS NOT ALWAYS SAFE TO DRINK. THE TENDER MEAT IN THE UNRIPE COCONUT IS GOOD TO EAT, AND MAY BE SCOOPED OUT WITH A SPOON. T1E MEAT OF RIPE COCONUTS IS GOOD TASTING, ALTHOUGH IT IS RARELY EATEN IN THIS REGION. THE SPANISH NAME FOR COCONUT IS "COCO"; FOR THE TREE "COCOTERO"; AND THE FRUITS READY F(R DRINKING USUALLY ARE CALL "I AS".
PAGE 29




COROZO (Schee/,o zones') 497
YOUN6 L A Vf 5 ONLY CAN Z5 fA TE N RAW OR C09KED

~'! ll

III

fruit c4,3iers

U

m"eo / A usk u/r//- oronqe colored
Secton of Fruit i vp to 3 inches /orA ,
THIS IS ONE OF THE LARGEST AND MOST COMMON PALMS OF THIS REGION. THE TRUNI IS THICK AND OFTEN SHORT, BUT IT SOMETIMES GROWS VERY HIGH. THE LEAVES ARE THE LARGEST LEAVES GROWN BY ANY OF OUR PALMS. SOMIME THEY ARE OR 30
FET LO AND 6 FEET WIDE. THE DROOPING FRUIT BUNCHES ARE 4 TO 6 FET LONG, AND ARE VERY CLOSE TOGVTHE AND HEAVY. THE RAWDE-COLRED FRUIT LOOKS LIKE SMALL COCONUTS. THEY ARE ABOUT 3 INCHES 11. THE OIL PFROM THE FRUITS MAT Hc USED IN COOKING. THE "HEART", OR FOLDED) YOUNG LEAVES, NEAR THE TOP OF THE TREE IS OFTEN EATEN RAW OR COOKED. IT RESEMBLES CRISP CABBAGE OR HEART OF LETTUCE
PAGE 30




yj\cOROZO COLOPA DO (Corozo o/e/fero)
O/L GOOD FOR COOKINo

THIS IS ONE OF THE COMON PAIMS OF THIS REGION AND IS USUALLY FOUED GROWING IN WET OR SWAMPT FOKST, ALTHOUGH IT MAY ALSO BE FOUND IN SWAMPY CLEARINGS. THE IARGF, STOUT TRUNK USUALLY GROWS ADLONIG THE GROUND) LOG-LIKE FOR SEVERAL FEET, THEN THE PART OF THE TRUNK THAT G0WS STRAIGHT UP IS HIGH ENOUGH TO HOLD TIHE CROWN OF LEAVES. THE SMALL EGG-SHAPED ~ USUALLY SQUEEZED BT PRESSURE, ARE RED WHE THEY ARE RIPE. THEY ARE VER RICH IN OIL, 1ICH CAN BE lCR COOKING.
PAGE 31




/GVA (Psid/r /4a/e-v)

fruit corn rnon/y ye //owwi/'A meal ye/low,,fh to deep pink

'4 requ/ar size

THE CO1ON GUAVA, NATIVE IN TROPICAL AMERICA, AND GROWN THROUGHOUT THE TROPICS OF THE 'WORLD, IS COR~ON IN PASTURES AND RATHER DRY THICKETS ABOUT THE ZONE. THE TREES ARE NO.RMALLY FROM 10 TO 15 FEET HIGH, WITH PECULIAR PALE BROAN, SMOOTH BARK THAT SCALES OFF IN THIN SHEETS. THE FRUIT VARIES GREATLY IN SIZE, SHAPE, COLOR, AND FLAVOR, AND HAS A MUSKY ODOR THAT IS VERY STRONG. THE FRUIT IS OFTEN EATER RAW, BUT IS MORE GENERALLY KNOGN FOR THE EXCELLENT JELLY THAT IS PREPARED FROM TrHE RIPE FRUITS.
PAGE 32




C#fAtM BEANY or L/A VA f/nqgo spec;
C4AN BE fA TEN RAW ONLY

ve 6 -6n ch
7>q,.5,-7. vy/dd! q reen on

THE INGAS ARE RATHER COMON TREES IN THE LOCAL FORESTS; OVER 15
SPECIES HAVE BEEN SEEN IN THE FORESTS O THE CANAL ZONE ALONE. THE FRUIT !XOOKS LIKE A BEAN. THE SEEDS GROW IN THE PULP THAT IS VERY THICK, SWEET AND JUICY.
PAGE 33




/MAA ffi MAIAM Y f CAR TA &A (Mmae amerIoCrna
CANBf fA TEA N RAW OR COOKED

rf ruit browvnish, leCo/hery skin /a inch thick -mereo ye//ow 7o red In' color(

*l requ/ar size

THE WELL-KNOWN MAE, NATIVE OF THE WEST INDIES IS PLANTED A LITTLE IN CENTRAL AERICA AND IS SOMETIMES FOUND GROWING WILD. THE TRSS, 3D~WTIES AS HIGH AS 60 FEET, HAVE A DWSE TOP OF THICK, GLOSSY OVAL LEAVES 5 TO 8 INCHES LONG. THE FRUIT IS ROUND, 4 TO 6 INCHES LONG, BROWNISH, WIvTh FIRMK, TELOW OR REDDISH MEAT, WHICH, WIEN CUT, DRIPS A WHITE SAP. THE MEAT IS CF VERY GOOD-TASTING FLAVOR, SOEWIAT LIKE A CLIN'STONE PEACH.
PAGE 34




AAN/O (ofera ,nd/c60) I

9

see'd~v'/ e\' 7f Zru 4/4 /ony 9ree ye//ovish, redd/, im' co/or, ..r/mq y. MAw.od-.
THE 1ANGO IS 0OGXCNLY PLANTED EVERYWHERS IN TROPICAL AMERICA. MWT OF THE LOCAL TRESS WICH HAVE RUN WILD IN THE FORHETS, BEAR FITS OF POOR QUALITY. THEY ARE VERY STRINGY AND HAVE A FLAVOR SOMEWHAT LIKE TURPENTINE. MANGOES ARE USUALLY EA(EN RAW.
PAGE 35




if i

SUf A/Q Uf (Oenocorpu5 ponmern/s) 1O/L /5 GOOD TO DRINK< '

AF FWard V-L

THE MA(QUJZNUE IS A TALL PALM WITHOUT BRANCHES. IT GROWS IN CLUMPS. THE FRUITS, WICH ARE DARK PURPLE IN COLOR, AND) ABOUT 3/4 OF AN INCH LONG, ARE FULL OF OIL WHICH IS EASILY TAKEN OUT BY SOAKING THE FRUITS IN HOT WATER. WHILE TRAVELING THROUGH THE JUNGLES, THE NATIVES OFTEN SUCK THE FRUITS TO GET THE NOURISHING OIL WHICH THEY CONTAIN. THEY ALSO PLACE THE FRUITS IN THEIR COFFEE, IN PLACE OF MILE.
PAGE 36




/fMA hBRA LL O(AusRova sV perb NC4N EA TfN RAtA/ ONLY/

THE VMERILl IS ONE OF THE COWMN AND OUTSTANDING TREES OF THE WET FORESTS. IT GROWS AS HIGH AS 45 FEET, BUT IS USUALLY SMALlER. THE FEW BRANCHES ARE LEAPFY AT THE ENDS, AND THE SHORT-STMW4ED EAVES ARE PROM 15 to 50 INCHES tl. THE PRETTY WHITE OR PURPLE-TINGED FLOWERS WHICH EITHER GROW LIKE GRAPES EAR THE END OF THE BRANCH OR 0E BUNCHED ON THE OLD, NAKED BRANCHES, ARE 4 to
6 INCHES BROAD. THE IARGE FRUITS WHICH FOLLOW THE FLCWS, RIPEN IN SUMMER AND CAN BE EATEN RAW.
PAGE 37




/ecove3 qreen, .rMoo/,

frUl/ rouqh qFeen
ye//ow or oranrqe n
'4 requ1 ORANGES AND LIMES ARE OFTEN PLANTED AND ALSO GROW WILD IN MANY PLACES. LOILD CEAWES LOOK ABOUT THE SAME AS ANY OTHER ORANGE EXCEPT THAT ThEY ARE USUALLY A LITTLE SMALLER. THEY ARE ABOUT 2 to 3 INCHES IN DIAETE. MLMES ARE 3ALL DARK GREEN FRUITS SHAPED LIKE A BALL AND ARE USUALLY ABOUT 1 TO 1-1/2 INCHES IN DIAMETER.
PAGE 38




SPANAMA NUT TREE (5lerculao ope/o/o) Jf D5 MAY D5 fA TN RAW OR ROASTED

THE PANAMA NUT TREE IS A GIANT FOREST TREE, SOMETIMES 125 FEET HIGH, WITH THICK TRUNK AND A BROAD HFAVY OR THICK BUNCH OF LEAVES AT THE TOP. THE
3 TO 5 SFCTION5) LEAVES ARC OFTEN 15 INCHES OR MOR E WIDE, AND THE UNDERSIDE IS COVERED WITH VERY SOFT HAIRS. THE FRUIT IS A BUNCH CF 5 PODS, 5 INCHES LOMG IN WHICH ARE BLACK PEANUT-LIKE SEEDS. THE INSIDE OF THE FRUIT PIECE IS COVERED WITH STIFF BRISTLES THAT STICK IN THE SKIN EASILY AND CAUSE SEVRE IRIRITATION. THE SEEDS MAY BE EATEN EITHER IN THE RAW OR ROASTED STATE.
PAGE 39




'.2ff PC V/'fT M ,""v -2~. AfAI4eRD :w
THE PAPAYA IS PLANTED A GREAT DEAL ABOUT THE ZONE AND ALSO GRM WILD. THE PLAIT HAS A SINGLE, STRAIGHT, THICK GREEN STEM, 6 TO 20 FEET HIGH, WITH MIIAY SAP. THE LONG-STALED, LARGE LEAVES ARE CLUSTERED AT THE TOP OF THE STEM AND) HAVE UNEVEN ED(GS. THE FRUITS GROW RIGHT FROM THE STEM JUST BENEATH THE LEAVES, VARY A ILT IN S{AE, SIZE AND QUALITY, BUT IN GrNERAL THEY RESEMBLE A LONG CANTALOLWE WITH YELLOW OR GHEENISH SKIN, AND SWEET, JUICY KEAT. THE FRUITS OF WILD PLANTS ARE USUALLY SMALL. THE RIPE FRUIT MAY BE EATEN RAW. GREEN F.UIT MAY BE BOILED AND EATEN LIKE SQUASH. THE FRUIT AND SAP CONTAIN A SUBSTANCE WHICH WILL MAKE MEAT TENDER IF THE SAP IS PLACED ON THE MEAT BEY=R IT IS C00GD OR PLACED IN THE WATER WHEN THE MEAT IS BEING BOILED.
PAGE 40




P/lIA PPL E, P/NVA (4Anono5 5ohvus)

PneDop/e 4o#. uch rcdVced-,
..ihow.,n /acoon of fruit
PINEAPPLES, CoM cLY Calu "PIxAS" IN SPANISH, ARE GRIO TnuGeOT"r CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA, AND ARE ALSO FOUND GROWINGD WILD IN SOME OF TH1SE PLACES.
PAGE 41




Opr f f frting btncho "
A VERT 0WAON PLANT IN THE F~RS THAT LOW LIKE A PINEAPPLK PLANT, OFTUM MAKES THICKETS SO DEWE THAT YOU CAN'T (T TIROWUH THM. THE W T 8ID, ACID FRUITS CAN BE EATEN RAW CR 00OKED. TH LOMNG LEAVES CONTAIN A 0 FIBER OF SUPERIOR QUALITY FOR MAKING ROPS OR TWINE.
PAGE 42




P/ VA or Pf J/ BA YA ( il/we Ino u/ilir) CAN Bf A TE N COOKfD ONLY
M rA % II i 4AC:M 'B, i/

I

' hew .r dkrk grsen or&e
5 /,ght green he/ow
/ fo 3 0 fe/ fedi
a//crnofi/nq /iqhf qnd

' r dorkc bwdy ol spo/ies
rk
ru'uJ red' or ye//ow
whn ripoe -aboutZinches long awrne1v. s.
TE PIVA PALK IS PLANTED OCCASIONALLY IN THIS REGION AND Mr BE
NATIVE. IT IS O OF THE BEST oKNWN PALMS OF COSTA RICA, WERE IT IS PLAYED FOR ITS FRUITS. THE TRUNK IS VERY TALL, OFTEN 26 HET OR M(ORE, AND IS &AIL RECOGNIZED BY ITS ALTERNATIVE LIGHT AND DARK BANDS Op S ES THE FRUITS AM RED OR YELLOW AT MATURITY AND GROW IN LARGE BUNCHES THAT HAIG DOWUWAD IK
GRAPES. BOILED IN SALT WATER THE THICK MEALY FLESH Or TIHE FRUIT IS SM, LIKE nTtKV SeMET POTATOES OR CHESTNUTS.
PAGE 43




p/ont grows 20-30 feet hqh /eoves-briqhf qreen, /'hir, 5-8 fe et /on/7 2 fe efwide fruit / &oe /Iong ye//ow when ripe 1

THE PLANTAIN LOCKS LIKE THE BANANA BUT IS KUCH BIGGER. TH U AT BE EATEN FRESH, IF ELL RIPEN BUT THEY ARE USUALLY COOKED. THEY IMA BE FRIED, BOILED OR BAKED WH RIPL. 'E GR, FU 1T, 'EN FRIED OR BOILED AS POTATOES, IS VERY GOOD.
PAGE 44




50 UIP SOP or GUA NABANA (Annono nur/cata)

\ /1J/eoves smooth, rk green
K$< Iv V regular size
THE SOURSOP IS PLANTED THROUGHOUT TYPICAL AMIRICA. THE LEAVES ARE
STROWLT SCENTED WHEN CRUSHED. THE SPINY FRUITS ARE PTRE AS LARGE AS A MAN'S HEAD, AN WEIGH UP TO 10 OCR 12 POUNDS. THE JUICY WHIE PULP IS CHIEFLY USED FOR PREPARING BIEAGES. SIMPLY CRUSH THE PULP AMD ADD WATER. THE PULP CAN ALSO BE EATEN RAW.
PAGE 45




SUGAR CANE or CAA/A de AZUCAR/'occhorunm ot6icnc/l)
CAN Bf Cf HEWED fOQ JUI C
.\ ..lil fM /

/

/7 rows 0-20 Rtbh' c/urn
sA qeer A v reto/s-Iv
qen, oifer s/rlo /ilverV
h esl fo r,,etrove Awma otr kyer
before chewii9.
WU WL-KW D UOW C R IS WrO DUaJIT THE ICAL T M OF TMW MUD OR ITS S W JUICS WIl IS TM CHM 80W C OF C AW SWAR. TI SOT, JU2T SUCMS ARE ALSO CHW, AMD AIMBT Wr SULL FAR IM II RM WA AT LEAS A sALL PATWm oF CAW l0 CMWIN Pw~ss.
St4G 48




ZA POTE (CO/ocorpum monmmosum) :AN BE CA TEAN RAW OR COOKED

TH ZAPOTn, CA OF TB MSToR-KNII FRUITS OF TROPICAL AUICAL, IS PLANTED AOU THE ZONE AND IS SCHRIMS FND WILD. IT IS A IARGE TREE, SOMTMS 100 ET HIGH WITH KII SAP. TH FRUIT IS SUlAPED LIE A BALL 4 TO
8 INCHES IN DIANETER, 11R ROUGH BRMISH SKIN AND PINK OR REDDISH HEAT IN RICH ARE STEV AL IARGE BROWN SHINY SES. THE FRUIT IS USUALLY EATEN RAW.
PAGE 47