• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 The inauguration
 Adam Herbert: The president
 Teachers making the difference
 Movers and shakers
 Bob Anthony
 Books: A teacher's best friend
 UNF news and notes
 Class notes
 Back Cover






Title: UNF soundings.
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 Material Information
Title: UNF soundings.
Uniform Title: UNF soundings
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Office of University Relations, University of North Florida
Publisher: Office of University Relations, University of North Florida
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, Fla.
Publication Date: Fall, 1989
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Bibliographic ID: NF00000235
Volume ID: VID00010
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Resource Identifier: notis - AAB3219

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    The inauguration
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Adam Herbert: The president
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Teachers making the difference
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Movers and shakers
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Bob Anthony
        Page 12
    Books: A teacher's best friend
        Page 13
    UNF news and notes
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Class notes
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Back Cover
        Page 22
Full Text

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UNF FOUNDATIONINC

OFFICERS:
W. Patrick Cusick
President
John J. Diamond
President-Elect
Daniel W. Connell, Jr.
Vice President/Governmental Relations
Celeste Hampton
Vice President/Programs
David C. Hammers
Vice President/Financial Development
Pamela Y. Paul
Vice President/ Community Relations
Past President 1986
Joseph Walter
Vice President/Facilities


TRUSTEES:
Edward L. Baker
George R. Bateh
Alumni Association
Margaret M. Black
Charles A. Clarkson
John S. Clarkson
Osprey Club
David E. Clavier
James E. Cobb
Ohlyne B. Coble
Charles E. Commander III
James E. Davidson, Jr.
Isabelle T. Davis
Dorothy S. Dorion
Mary Elizabeth D'Zamko
Faculty Association
William E. Flaherty
W. Thomas Hale
Lowell D. Harmon
Adam W. Herbert
David M. Hicks
Charles E. Hughes
Hugh H. Jones, Jr.
Delores Pass Kesler
Hy W. Kliman
William C. Mason
Valerie Molina
Student Government Association
J. P. Smith
Robert L. Stein
Michael A. Walters

EX-OFFICIO:
Thomas E. Quinlan
Executive Director
Curtis D. Bullock
Treasurer
Julia W. Taylor
Interim Director of Development


Students--235 of them--


moved into Osprey Hall,


UNF's newest residence


hall, when it opened over


the August 26th weekend.


The three-story dormitory


offers co-ed living by floors.


For the first time, students


are also offered a full cam-


pus meal-plan. Shown here,


workmen put finishing


touches on the brick struc-


ture.









EXECUTIVE STAFF
Adam W. Herbert
President/Publisher
Curtis I). Bullock
Vice President
Administration & Planning
Thomas C. Healy
Interim Vice President
Student Affairs
Kenneth E. Martin
Interim Vice President
Academic Affairs
Thomas E. Quinlan
Vice President
University Relations

SOUNDINGS Staff
H. A. Newman,Jr.
Editor
Joan D. Madeksza
Associate Editor
Paul E. Ladnier
Art Director
Cheryl Bates-Lee
Tony Burke
Colette S. Ladbrook
Gary Warner
Contributing Writers

Contributors
Paula Weatherby
Alumni Association
Kenneth P. Muth
Marta Jayk
Graphic Artists

Alumni Association
George Bateh (BBA'81, MBA'83)
President
Dean Layton (BBA '81, BT '82)
Vice President/Promotions
John Masters, Jr. (BBA '78)
Vice President/Finance
Margie Quintana (BBA'85, MBA '86)
Vice President/Administrative
Ronald Richards (MBA '88)
Vice President/Programs
Chris Stockton III (BBA '83)
Chairman of the Board


Osprey Club
John S. Clarkson
President
Robert Wilkinson
Vice President
Truly Jason
Treasurer
Donald G. Kelley
Athletics Director


UNF

University of North Flor


Soundings

ida Fall 1989


PROFILE

THE INAUGURATION
A New University President Takes Office

PROFILE

ADAM HEBERB T: THE PRESIDENT
New Challenges for the President

LIFE
TEACHERS MAKING A DIFFERENCE
Dreamers and Builders Build Futures

SERVICE
MOVERS AND SHAKERS
The People Who Make Things Happen


PROFILE
BOB ANTHONY
Succeeding in a Silent World


SERVICE
BOOKS: A TEACHER'S BEST FRIEND
UNF Faculty Have Best Sellers


BRIEFS
UNF NEWS AND NOTES
What's Happening Around Campus


ALUMNI
CLASS NOTES


Cover: The lure of the 90's surely includes computerization, and this photograph of the
John E. Mathews,Jr., Computer Science Center serves as a reminder of the technological
break-throughs that are ahead in the next five-to-ten years. UNFs third president, Adam
W. Herbert joins the University just in time to help point the way in that new decade.


UNF Soundings is the official magazine of the University of North Florida. published by the Office of University Relations All correspondence concerning the
magazine should be mailed to UNF Soundings, Office of Public Relations. University of North florida, 4567 St Johns Bluff Road. South Jacksonville. F 32216 Alumni
information and "Class Notes" may be sent to the same office, but marked to the attention of the Alumni Services Office Articles and excerpts may be used or reprinted dwlih
appropriate credit given to UNF SOUNDINGS and the writer Third class postage paid at Jacksonville. Florida.
lii pubhl doiulmlll ial pr lced .it a c iI S15,002, or 51.00 pic copl, to i.nlrni iitCr.Cl.d ptlhll 01 UNI lNroI ldi In -ichlll, reieaIch uind .cr.IC
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By Gary Warner


W while most people be-
lieve that inaugura-
tions at colleges and
universities are sol-
emn occasions, of
late the opposite has
proven to be true.
Inaugurations have become full-blown
celebrations-specifically targeted to pres-
ent an accurate reflection of the person as-
suming the presidency. As a secondary
benefit, inaugurations allow-in a figura-
tive sense-for an opening of the doors of
the university so that the university's var-
ied constituencies can reaffirm their friend-
ship and relationship.
Inaugurations are a sign of their times.
When presidencies were virtual life-long
positions, inaugurations at campuses and
across the United States were few and far
between. These days, however, there are
an average of 500 inaugurations each year,
no doubt owing to the astonishing statistic
that the average "life span" in office for a
college president has dropped to only five
years.
Although the University of North
Florida has had three "permanent" presi-


dents during its relatively short history, the
inauguration of Dr. Adam W. Herbert will
mark only the second inauguration.
Because Dr. Thomas G. Carpenter was
charged with building a university literally
from the ground up, he never had a formal
inauguration as such. His first day was
Aug. 1, 1969. Most people who remem-
ber Carpenter agree that he "never stood
too much on ceremony" and, by the time
classes began in October 1972, it was too
late for an inauguration.
Dr. Curtis L. McCray, the second
president of UNF, was appointed by the
State University System Board of Regents
in December 1981, assumed duties in July
1982 and was inaugurated on Oct. 2, com-
memorating the day classes began at UNF
exactly one decade earlier and concluding
a week-long celebration.
On hand for the first inauguration
were approximately 250 delegates, each
representing individual colleges, universi-
ties, and education societies and organiza-
tions from across the nation. More than
140 faculty and library staff members hold-
ing faculty status marched in the proces-
sional. Also on hand were former SUS


Chancellor Barbara Newell and former
State Education Commissioner Ralph
Turlington, as well as representatives of
the Student Government, Faculty and
Alumni Associations and UNF Foundation.
BOR Chairman C. DuBose Ausley con-
ducted the installation of the president.
The Sept. 28-29 inauguration of Presi-
dent Herbert and all the attendant ceremo-
nies and events reflect, very much, his style
and tone.
As a demonstration of the times, Presi-
dent Herbert's inauguration marks the fifth
in the State University System since Janu-
ary 1985, with searches for presidents in
progress at Florida Atlantic University and
the University of Florida. Inauguration
plans for Dr. Steven Altman, who began
duties as president of the University of
Central Florida only three months ago,
have not begun. Dr. Francis Borkowski
of the University of South Florida was
inaugurated in October 1988, and Dr. Mor-
ris Marx of the University of West Flor-
ida, in September 1988. Prior to those
inaugurations, Dr. Frederick Humphries
was inaugurated president of Florida A&M
University in October 1986, and Marshall




P R 0 ()F 1 1


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Criser, as inaugurated president of the
University of Florida in February 1985.
Dr. Modesto Maidique, who began duties
as president of Florida International Uni-
versity in October 1986, did not have an
inauguration, per se. However, FIU did
hold a convocation several weeks after
Maidique's arrival, and he used the forum
to deliver an address stating his aspira-
tions for FIU.
Many of the traditions which today
are such an integral part of inaugurations
throughout the world can trace their be-
ginnings to medieval times and beyond.
But, those traditions also are steeped in
very pragmatic beginnings.
Those "hot in the summer-drafty in
the winter" gowns worn by faculty and
administrators at university functions trace
back to the Middle Ages when attire in-
dicated a person's station in life. But, even
before gowns indicated one's social posi-
tion, they had a very practical application
for students and faculty. Although most
studies were conducted in huge medieval
cathedrals, students often were taught in
drafty little rooms-called cells-within the
recesses of the church. These cells-made


almost exclusively of stone-were ex-
tremely cold in winter. Students and
teacher alike donned robes and headgear
during instructional sessions in order to
stave off the cold.
The mace also can trace its beginnings
to medieval times. In the 12th century, stu-
dents and faculty alike were easy prey to
robbers and bandits and, quite often, car-
ried a weapon to protect themselves. Over
time, the most useful weapon against rob-
bers and bandits proved to be a club-like
instrument--handy to wield in case of at-
tack and easy to conceal beneath gowns.
The position of grand marshal-whose chief
function in modern times is to lead pro-
cessionals and to carry the symbolic
mace-traces its roots to the role of body
guard for high ranking officials of the
medieval university.
Of all the protocols and traditions
handed down to the modem-day inaugu-
ration ceremony, none seems to occupy as
much attention as the order in which rep-
resentatives of the colleges and universi-
ties march in the processional. Kara Tay-
lor, in her article in the May 1984 CASE
Currents (published by the Council for the


Support and Advancement of Education),
said, "It is quite gauche to allow a repre-
sentative of an upstart 20th century college
to slip ahead of someone from a venerated
18th century university. The marshals must
make sure everyone knows his or her
proper place-and stays there."
So, for the record, the order at UNF
is:
*the chief marshal;
*representatives from institutions
of higher education;
*representatives from learned
societies;
*faculty;
*deans and directors of the
institution's schools and college;
*the institution's principal officers;
*the speakers and any other
platform dignitaries; and
The recessional is reverse of the pro-
cessional. The president leads the way out.









ADA M




HERBERT



the


PRESIDENT

by Julia Howard, Education Writer
Excerpted and reprinted with permission from the
Florida Times-Union, August 6, 1989


The university, which
opened in 1972 as a
two-year school serv- Flor
ing only upperclassmen,
graduate students and local the
residents interested in adult
education, is developing as Ope
a four-year university.
The university has had
on-campus apartments, but m o
UNF will be opening its
first traditional dormitory to b
August 26 for 250 stu-
dents. With the dormitory
will come UNF's first
meal plan. L
To expedite the uni-
versity's development, its
new president, Adam W.
Herbert, wants to boost the
number of entering fresh-
men, expand the curriculum and otherwise
assure that UNF truly serves northeast
Florida's academic and cultural needs.
Herbert, who took over at UNF in
February, was chosen from more than 150
applicants to replace Curtis McCray, who
left last summer to become president of
California State University at Long Beach.
He came from Florida International Uni-
versity, where he was vice president for
the North Miami campus.
UNF is committed to improving the
economic base of the community, Herbert
said, by expanding the university's cur-
riculum to meet the needs of local busi-
nesses and corporations, particularly in the


The University of North

ida, the youngest school in

State University System, will

n its first dormitory this

ith and plans are underway

uild a gymnasium.

The signs are everywhere

INF is growing up.

0 '


areas of high technology and health care
services.
"Our students and the taxpayers of
this region and state must see demon-
strable evidence that we are committed to
serving them to the best of our abilities,"
Herbert said.
"I believe that this university will be
recognized throughout the country as one
of the nation's outstanding comprehensive
urban universities," he said.
Ensuring that UNF earns that national
reputation will take money and strong ad-
ministrators who will see the growth
through, the new president said.
Herbert wants his top administrators


to commit five years to
working with him at UNF
to achieve his economic
and academic goals.
Herbert's association
with South Florida law-
makers from his years at
FIU will provide an addi-
tional force in bringing
state educational funds to
Jacksonville, said Mark
Hulsey, chairman of the
Jacksonville Chamber of
Commerce.
One of his first priori-
ties has been petitioning
the state to raise a 613-
student enrollment cap on
UNF's lower division.
State educators im-
posed the enrollment cap


when the lower division, comprising the
freshman and sophomore classes, was
added four years ago.
W. Patrick Cusick, president of the
UNF Foundation, said the cap was im-
posed because education officials feared
that making UNF a four-year university
might hurt enrollment at Florida Commu-
nity College at Jacksonville and Jackson-
ville University, a private institution.
But that didn't happen, Cusick said.
Because of the cap, entering as a
freshman has been increasingly difficult,
even for some of the best high school stu-
dents. Herbert said he does not want ad-
missions standards to become so stringent


I





P R F I I F


as to shut out many stu-
dents who, although above-
average, might not meet a
lofty entrance standard.
The number of fresh-
men applicants has in-
creased from 636 in 1984-
85 to 1,400 for the 1989
fall term. And recent
population estimates indi-
cate that Jacksonville is the
fastest-growing city in the
state, which means the
number of applicants will
President Adam
keep going up, he said.
The cap must be lifted so UNF can ful-
fill its mission of serving North Florida,
Herbert said.
The Florida Board of Regents is con-
sidering Herbert's request to raise the en-
rollment cap and is expected to decide at
its September meeting.
"He's [Herbert] working very hard to
get permission to expand the enrollment
base," Cusick said. "I think he's doing an
outstanding job." In addition to expanding
the enrollment, Herbert wants the univer-
sity to add academic and extracurricular
programs that will meet the needs of a
growing and changing student population.
He plans to "go through a careful proc-
ess of upgrading" the entire university cur-
riculum. And with UNF's five deans and
directors, he plans to identify programs the
university should develop to bring it inter-
national recognition.
"We're going to develop that reputa-


W. Herbert
tion on a foundation of high-quality under-
graduate education," he said.
"We're going to maintain our commit-
ment to small classes, to close relationships
between the students and the professors and
finally to the integration of the latest tech-
nologies which enhance the learning proc-
ess," Herbert said.
And he plans to bring about change
with the help of UNF's top administrators,
faculty and staff. The new president said
he wants faculty and staff to help define
UNF's directions and priorities.
Duval County School Superintendent
Larry Zenke said he and Herbert have dis-
cussed ways the university can encourage
high school students to enter college.
Zenke and Herbert have also discussed
cooperative programs for in-service train-
ing for Duval County teachers that will
bring technology into the classroom.
"I have been very impressed with his


desire to establish very
close connections with the
school system," Zenke
said.
When UNF opened,
most of its students at-
tended classes part-time at
night. But in 1985, the
first freshman class of 382
students began classes,
many of them enrolled in
daytime courses.
The freshmen, com-
bined with a growing full-
time day student enroll-
ment, are changing the composition of the
student body and creating a need for addi-
tional services at UNF.
"As we admit more traditional stu-
dents, it is especially important that we
have access to facilities that are respon-
sive to the needs of those students," Her-
bert said.
Providing that access means extend-
ing library hours, improving food service
facilities and building the gymnasium.
"We anticipate next year getting $7 mil-
lion for construction of the gym," Herbert
said.
Other recreational facilities will also
be added or improved, including lighted
tennis courts, a track, baseball fields and
other amenities for intramural sports.
"All these are just important steps in
the evolution of UNF into a university that
serves traditional and nontraditional stu-
dents," Herbert said. 0




LII F E


TEACHERS


MAKING A


DIFFERENCE
Dreamers and Believers Build Futures
By Cheryl Bates-Lee

ing the foundation for offices and class-
rooms that would, one day, be called
the University of North Florida.
Into the thick, jungli-'ike foliage, bulldozers
slowly traveled, removing carefully identified trees
and scrub underbrush. Engineers and technicians
scurried about, snatching plans off of dusty draw-
ing boards and hovering around the construction
site like an anxious mother expecting her firstborn's
birth. Administrators shook their heads, studied
budgets and plans, silently offering prayers as an
intangible dream became a tangible reality.
It took planners and builders to construct a new
university, but it takes dreamers and believers to
build futures.
During the 1989 Spring commencement cere-
mony, six University of North Florida professors
were chosen by their faculty peers to become Out-
standing Teachers for 1989. Each winner, unlike
one another in appearance, mannerism, or even
teaching methods, has a common goal: building fu-
tures and creating tangible dreams at UNF.






LIFE


Dr. Linda Foley


DR. LINDA FOLEY


Linda Foley's two-piece, green suit is
hardly wrinkled even after a long day at
work. As she perched on her chair, a faint
smile played at her lips. Her ash blond hair
is cut to perfection, and her manner conveys
the epitome of professional woman; slightly
cool and demure. She slowly began to talk
about "her" profession and what teaching is
actually about. All sense of aloofness is
lost. Her eyes began to shine. For Dr. Foley,
professor of psychology, teaching is her
masterpiece, her greatest work of art.
She is a teacher, not just an instructor,
and for this psychology professor, therein
lies the difference.
"You know, to be a good teacher, a
good instructor, you have to show some en-
thusiasm for what you are teaching. It has to
be enjoyed; enjoyment of your subject just
has to show through to the student. That is
the only way they will learn," she said.
As she spoke someone softly tapped on
her office door. It was a student from the
previous semester.
"Are you here to interview Dr. Foley?"
she asked. "I think she is a good teacher. I
learned a lot from her."
Wanting to learn is a unique gift not all
students are blessed with, Foley said. Some,
no matter how hard they try, just don't seem
to comprehend, she added.
Attributing part of the problem to in-
structors who don't continuously update their
materials and make their classes fun, Foley
said, "It really hurts when you know there
are students you haven't reached. I am con-


stantly changing my courses to keep them
interesting, not just to my students, but to
myself."
A teacher at UNF since 1974, she was
chairman of the psychology department, but
resigned that post to teach full-time. She re-
ceived her B.A. degree from Western Con-
necticut State College and her M.A. and
Ph.D. from the University of Florida. In
1982, Foley's hard work and dedication were
rewarded when she received the UNF Dis-
tinguished Professor Award.
Not bad for a one-time housewife, math
major and college dropout.
"I was originally a math major, but I
quit school, got married and then returned
(years later) for my degree," she said.
However, upon returning, Foley was
not as interested in math as she was in psy-
chology. She took a social psychology
course in her senior year of college taught by
a female instructor who conveyed her en-
thusiasm for the subject to her students and
encouraged Foley to go on to graduate school.
Subsequently, Dr. Foley's love affair with
social psychology took root, and her new
obsession with teaching began.


DR. JAMES MITTELSTADT

He arrived at UNF in 1972 just to"stay
a few years." Now, the wiry, silver-haired
professor will consider "nothing but" UNF
as his home.
It's not only that the University has
been good to him; he has been good for the


University. But, Dr. James Mittelstadt
would never admit that!
A professor of education, Mittelstadt
strikes his listener as little different, a mite
quaint.
Textbook teaching is not for him. Tell-
ing wonderful stories is what he does best,
and he tells these stories to teachers, stu-
dents, or to anyone who will listen.
"I go into a class intending to inspire.
and I go into a class intending to share.
Teaching is a servitude profession. You
have to give more than the content or the
skill; you have to give yourself to be good."
Mittelstadt, gesturing grandly with his
hands, said establishing and maintaining a
relationship with his students through com-
munications is the best form of teaching.
"Whenever we inform or instruct, we teach
- maybe not in a traditional manner- but it
is still teaching. And you know," his facial
expression instantly changed and an impish
look sparkled in his eyes, "it also is fun!"
Although extroverted upon meeting,
Mittelstadt began to look inward to the real
reason he teaches. His voice became a
whisper, a soft melodic sound. "Because of
my upbringing, my childhood and the people
who influenced me, I find I now have a need
to share, to express feelings inside of me."
Expressive feelings are what makes
Mittelstadt's classes so interesting and
unique. During a one-hour "story-telling"
course, his animated face and body move-
ments can hold the attention of even the
most jaded student. He finds nothing at all
"unusual" about teaching in a non-tradi-
tional manner. What's important to him is
that students learn. "If you're really going to
care, you have to do what is necessary to
instruct and train," he said.
Receiving his B.S. and M.S. degrees
from Mankato State and his Ph.D. from
Wayne State, Mittelstadt says that, accord-
ing to his original plans for life, teaching
education courses just did not fit.
In his home town, Mittelstadt ("Little
Jim" to his friends) had visions of being
anything but a professor. At one time, he
was going to coach track, a sport in which he
excelled. At another point, he dreamed of
becoming a band instructor. But through
life's mysterious twists and turns, he "sort of
by accident" became a professor and "sort
of by fate" came to UNF.






LIFE


ur. .onn rcI.Uoww y,


DR. JOHN McELDOWNEY

The tall, blond student entered Dr. John
McEldowney's office, a little boy astride her
hip. She cheerfully quipped, "Dr. McEl-
downey, thank you so much for the toy."
Unembarrassed, McEldowney quickly re-
plied, "You're welcome, and if you need
anymore, they're here somewhere in the
office." The student responded with a
chuckle, "I won't need anymore. He won't
let this Smurf go. I promise I'll return it
when I can."
Most professors in the College of Busi-
ness Administration would never dream of
keeping blue, cotton-stuffed Smurf toys lying
around their offices. But for McEldowney,
it is a common, everyday occurrence. He
simply provides the services his students
need, whether it is lending toys so a married
student with a baby can complete an assign-
ment, or taking a few moments to chat and
counsel a future graduate.
He cares about his students.
"Teaching...is caring. You cannot read-
ily teach without caring. If you don't care
for the whole person, then you are only
giving them part of the tool; part of what it
actually takes to learn," he said.
Another student walked into McE1-
downey's office, looking for something to
munch on. "What do you have to eat, Dr.
McEldowney?" he asked. McEldowney
reached up, stroked his red mustache, then
smiled and explained his practice of keeping
Cokes and cans of soup around. He does not
want hungry students interrupting their stud-
ies to run out to eat.
"Kids avoid me like the plague," McEl-
downey jokingly said, as another student
paused in the doorway.
He takes his profession seriously. To
him, teaching is not a "job," or just an
"adventure"; it is a style, an important way
of life.


"Teaching fills me with enthusiasm. I
guess I really want to make a difference in
the world. I believe the problem with some
students today is that some teachers
haveactually stopped teaching. Our job is
not to just quote a fact; it is to teach students
to think on their own. We need to give them
something permanent; a way of looking at
issues so they can solve their own prob-
lems."
At UNF since 1981, McEldowney has
had plenty of time to make himself at home
on campus. Plaques of appreciation adorn
one office wall, while splendid, colorful
photos of nature and his family dot the rest.
He received his B.A. degree from
Anderson University, his M.A. from UNF,
and his Ph.D. from Mississippi State. His
1989 Outstanding Teacher Award is his
second, his first award came in 1985.
"If you teach a subject correctly, the
way it should be, you'll always be on the
right track," McEldowney said. "Teach it
right, and you'll never go wrong."
His students say that's an axiom they
truly believe!


Dr. Charles Winton


DR. CHARLES WINTON

A blue hue radiated from the com-
puter screen softly lighting the room and in-
tensifying the silhouette of the lone figure.
Charles Winton was engrossed in his work.
Fingers rapidly traveling along a familiar
keyboard, he did not hear the intruder's
knock on his door. Startled, he glanced up.
"Come in, come in," he said. "I'm so sorry,
I was doing a little bit of work here."
Motioning his guest to a chair while
crossing his legs and folding his arms across
his chest, Dr. Winton, the professor, was
ready to begin.
Throughout history, parents have told


their children that patience is a virtue. Bib-
lical scholars expound the virtues of Job,
bestowing upon him the title of history's
most patient man. Then along came Dr.
Charles Winton, professor of computer and
information sciences, to-well, maybe not
tie Job's record but, in his own way, rival it.
Winton has been a teacher at UNF for
15 years. He has watched students come
and go and, in some cases, return again.
But he has never had to change his game
plan which, to put it simply, is to teach.
Quiet, reserved, and dignified are good
descriptive words to characterize a schol-
arly professor upon meeting, but Winton
says these words don't necessarily describe
him. He, in his way, is still a student.
"Being a professor makes you stay
young, at least at heart," he said.
The off-white computer equipment
takes center stage in his office, appearing
technical andcomplicated. However, Win-
ton says computer fears have to be dealt
with before he can effectively instruct.
"I've discovered that technical equip-
ment really intimidates some students. But
as long as I teach in a challenging manner,
an interesting way, they will have very
little trouble mastering the computer."
Students in the College of Computer
and Information Sciences know they live
in a rapidly evolving, technological world,
and their success is possible only after they
master this world, Winton says.
"Teachers need to challenge students,
present materials to them that they want to
learn, and then push them as much as pos-
sible to learn the subject."
Thoughtful for a moment, he contin-
ued, "Really, the important thing about
teaching is to go beyond what's expected.
To really teach!"
Winton has an insider's perspective on
education and what it takes to be an effec-
tive educator. Almost every member of his
family is involved in some aspect of the
field.
"Coming from a background in educa-
tion, I know what institutions need to ad-
dress. I've found that students learn and re-
tain more in the classroom with updated
materials. This field changes so rapidly
that, as an instructor, you just have to stay
current."
Winton has no plans to leave UNF
anytime soon. If by chance he decides to
update his vita, it might read like this: ex-
cellent challenger of students; outstanding





LIFE


ability to make difficult subjects easy; goes
beyond what is expected; and, most impor-
tant of all, excellent teacher.
"If you love yourjob, love what you do,
you will be quite reluctant to ever leave," he
said.
Winton received his B.S. degree from
North Carolina State University, and his
M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill.


Dr. Elizabeth Furdell


DR. ELIZABETH FURDELL

There are books everywhere in Dr.
Elizabeth Furdell's office. Shelves reach
from floor to ceiling, dutifully guarding
each wall. Their contents, books surpris-
ingly free of dust, are frequently read by
their owner, an apt background for the gre-
garious, extroverted associate professor of
history. She is a staunch believer in "conta-
gious entities," one of which is education.
Her "tools of the trade," as she fondly refers
to them, are her books.
"If you are involved in your material, it
can really be contagious," she said, pointing
out some of her favorite readings.
Sitting comfortably in her chair, the
British history professor glances at a de-
coupaged photograph of Sir Winston
Churchill leaving the famous 10 Downing
Street address. The intricate art work was
designed by a quadriplegic friend who held
his paint brush with his teeth. Determina-
tion and a willingness to learn are attributes
Furdell relates to students at UNF.
"I want to challenge students' precon-
ceptions. I want..."she pauses,"no, I need
students to ask questions, to burn for knowl-
edge."
"Students need to be aware of the vari-
ous interpretations available to them. They
need to understand that, when dealing with
history, we tend to bring chronological bi-


ases to things associated with the past. Cor-
recting those biases and opening new
thoughts are important to me."
If students are going to learn, Furdell
says, teachers must teach. "To inspire and
teach, I think you also have to perform.
Good teaching involves performances." Dra-
matically, she throws her hands into the air.
"I like being in front of people, directing
them, directing their (students) minds. Ac-
tually, I've found that we (teachers) can be
just as stimulated by students as we attempt
to stimulate them. It's inspiring!"
Furdell feels strongly about UNF's fac-
ulty. If she could have her way, the entire
teaching faculty would receive awards. She
credits UNF's faculty as the best teachers
anywhere. "Teaching is the single most im-
portant thing we do here at the University.
Through teaching, we reinforce the mission
of UNF. Good teaching keeps good profes-
sors around."
Although a member of UNF's commu-
nity of scholars for nearly five years, she
said she felt it was truly home after one.
"Coming to UNF was like being reborn."
Furdell received her B.A. degree from
the University of Washington, and her M.A.
and Ph.D. from Kent State.
"I believe in the betterment of the next
generation, or I wouldn't be attempting to
teach them. There really is hope!"


Dr. Mary Borg


DR. MARY BORG

"I simply care about the students," Dr.
Mary O'Malley Borg said, even though to
the untrained eye she appears as young as
some of her prodigies.
Shoulder-length, dark hair frames her
youthful face. Her brown eyes appear large
and luminous against the paleness of her
skin, and her slender frame is small and
seems fragile behind her desk.


But appearances can be deceptive. Borg,
assistant professor of economics, is in no
way fragile. As an instructor, you don't
have time to be soft, she says. "Students
have got to learn."
"As instructors, we have to get across to
our students that we care about the require-
ment that they learn the material. That has
to be the bottom-line," she said.
"I try to show students that learning is so
important," she added. "Sometimes the best
way to teach is not necessarily through a
textbook. It's easier to show that we care
about them individually, and we want good
things for them."
Borg and economics colleague Paul
Mason, are known throughout Jacksonville
and Florida for their collaborative "educa-
tion lottery" research. "We teach students
the best way we know how. For our educa-
tional structure to really be effective, it
simply takes money," she said, warming to
her subject. "Lottery money promised for
educational purposes should go toward edu-
cation. That is how it has got to be!"
A mass exodus from the teaching pro-
fession by top educators could be alleviated
if money allocated to education was used for
the intended purpose, Borg said. "Most
teachers love what they do, but there should
be better incentives to keep them in educa-
tion.
"I really love to teach on the college
level. But, I have to admit there is a certain
amount of respect we receive on this level
that I don't think other teachers receive.
This may account for good instructors con-
tinuing to leave this field."
"The reality is," she continued, immersed
in her subject, "teaching salaries are lower
than corporate salaries, and there are so
many educational programs that need fund-
ing, but don't get it. I think this is why
teachers get so discouraged. There always
seems to be a money shortage.
"We need to stop valuing people based
on how much money they make. That's
something I try to get across to my students.
It is not money that will make you happy; it's
loving what you do." Emphasizing her
point, she added, "I tell my students defi-
nitely to major in what they enjoy."
Borg received her B.A. degree from
Randolph-Macon Woman's College and her
Ph.D. from the University of North Caro-
lina, Chapel Hill.





SERVICE


and


People Making

Things Happen


They are considered the movers and the shak-

ers of Jacksonville, powerful corporate people

located throughout the city. They meet four

times a year to discuss their futures and the fu-

ture of the University of North Florida. When

they speak, like E. F. Hutton, people listen.


By Cheryl Bates-Lee


or many people, the College of
Business Administration's
Business Advisory Council, in
its three short years of existence,
has become the eyes and ears to
Jacksonville's business community.
Descriptive phrases such as, "window
to the community," "vital force to the busi-
ness school," and the "force that provides
our future direction," not only enhances
community belief in the BAC, but also
strengthens UNF's firm commitment to
academic excellence.
Established in 1986, the Business Ad-
visory Council originally consisted of eight
core members. Now, according to Julia
Taylor, former COBA community affairs
director and now UNF's interim director of
development, the council has expanded to
include 28 of Jacksonville's top business
leaders, all committed to helping UNF's
business college reach its goals.


Robert Tanner, SunBank of North Flor-
ida board chairman and chairman of the
Business Advisory Council, said his com-
pany is one that has a long term commitment
to UNF.
"We want to hire future UNF business
graduates. We are going to do our best to
help UNF's business school become the
best one around. Like all good things, we
have to be patient, but we know it is going to
work. UNF already has an excellent start."
SunBank of North Florida, like all
companies associated with the BAC, has a
high stake invested in the College of Busi-
ness Administration. After all, Jackson-
ville's future business leaders will be UNF's
future college graduates.
"We definitely want to put more em-
phasis on UNF students. We want people in
our firms to stay with us. We would rather
invest time in recruiting a large percentage
of qualified UNF students," Tanner said.


SunBank employs nearly 260 people in
Jacksonville, and 30 percent of its top man-
agement associates are UNF business school
graduates, said Ramona Egbert, SunBank
employment officer.
"We recruit from all the Florida univer-
sities-UNF, Jacksonville University, Flo-
rida State, all of them-plus walk-ins. With
30 percent of our management associates
coming from UNF, that's excellent," she
said.
Each year across the nation, college
students graduate from outstanding univer-
sities. However, recent studies reveal a
growing gap between courses taught at the
college level and courses really needed in
the business sector. University officials say
the formation of the business council helps
eliminate that problem for UNF's business
graduates and Jacksonville.
Establishing the business council has
constructed a bridge between the two sec-






SERVICE


tors, according to Dr. Edward Moses, for-
mer COBA dean. A key contribution of the
council is its ability to determine what the
business college needs and to convey those
needs directly to UNF.
"The BAC serves as a gateway for the
College. Its purpose is to help us get better,
which in return gives the business commu-
nity better prepared students," he said.
Emphasis for council membership ini-
tially was placed on large Jacksonville cor-
porations because of their expanded work
force, top executive leadership and men-
toring abilities. "When we were in the proc-


ity recruitment. The latter, according to
Vaunda Copeland, a COBA Margin of Ex-
cellence minority scholarship recipient, "is
a gift from heaven."
In June, she was awarded a four-year
scholarship, valued at almost $8,000. The
scholarship allows Copeland, who has a 3.4
grade point average, the opportunity to live
on campus and to concentrate solely on her
studies. She is certain the opportunity would
not have been possible without the scholar-
ship.
"You know, it doesn't bother me at all
that this is a minority scholarship. I realize


dents, the College of Business has to be
competitive in a constantly changing busi-
ness environment.
"The business council understands that
one way to hire outstanding business stu-
dents is to see that they receive a strong
business background," Moses added. "If in-
teraction between the business college and
the community exists, both parties benefit.
The advisory council helps us provide the
direction the business college should take.
They help us internally focus our curricu-
lum."
The internal focusing has already pro-


ess of forming an advisory council for the
College, we looked for a cross section of
representation. It was imperative for the
success of the BAC to get strength on our
council, and we got it!" Taylor said.
Council strength is not the only benefit
the business college received since estab-
lishing the joint venture. Through the BAC,
the business college also has established a
Business Affiliates Program.
The affiliates program focus is to pro-
vide additional capital from private sources
for the College. Established in June 1987,
the program has attracted nearly 30 area
businesses which seek a higher margin of
academic excellence for COBA through
their donations.
Money donated to the business school
through the program has assisted faculty
research, expanded course work for stu-
dents, provided scholarships, permitted in-
house service awards, and enhanced minor-


Julia Taylor


the important thing is that they care, and I'm
happy," she said.
The Raines High School graduate said
that without the Business Affiliates Pro-
gram, she would not have been able to stay
in the dorms while at school. "I was going
to attend UNF somehow, but it just would
have been so much harder," she said.
Upon graduation, Copeland, like many
business graduates, hopes to land a position
with an important Jacksonville corporation.
Hopefully, that business will be associated
with COBA.
Stressing UNF to the minority commu-
nity is an important item on the council's
agenda, Moses said.
"UNF, the business sector, and our com-
munity all will prosper. Students who are
academically prepared for the business world
definitely make better employees."
With an enrollment of almost 1,500 un-
dergraduate students and 484 graduate stu-


duced measurable results, says Tanner. "We
(the business community) are interested in
hiring local college graduates, and we want
them to have the strong business background
UNF is providing. It is essential."
Approximately 1,225 students have
graduated from UNF's graduate business
program since its inception. Statistics indi-
cate that nearly 85 percent of these gradu-
ates have chosen to live and work in Jackson-
ville.
The relationship between the business
community and the College of Business Ad-
ministration can only get better, Tanner
said.
"We are working hard to maintain a
two-way dialogue. We believe the relation-
ship between UNF, students and the com-
munity is stronger and better than ever be-
fore," he said.


ur. rowar rnoeas





PROFILE


Succeeding in a Silent World
Succeeding in a Silent World


By Tony Burke
Bob Anthony began the inter-
view with his usual warm greeting
and friendly handshake. "How are
you?" he said, his whispery, soft
voice pronouncing each word pre-
cisely.
"I'm fine. How is your work
these days?" I replied, conscious
that I was speaking slower than
usual and carefully mouthing each
word.
As we talked, my rate of speech
increased, and I became less aware
of how intently Anthony read my
gestures and facial expressions.
An hour later, the interview con-
cluded.
Dr. R<
Dr. Robert Anthony never
"heard" a word I said.
Few educators share Anthony's career
perspective. An associate professor of spe-
cial education at UNF and director of the
Deaf Services Center (DSC) of Jackson-
ville, a United Way agency, Anthony
knows intimately the obstacles and chal-
lenges facing educators, hearing impaired
people and the public.
Anthony has been deaf for 22 years,
the result of an automobile accident that
occurred during his sophomore year in col-
lege. Today, at age 43, the father of two
daughters stands as a champion to deaf and
hearing impaired residents of north Flor-
ida. His work through DSC directly bene-
fits more than 8,000 deaf residents of
Duval County and 10 times that number in
Florida's First Coast region.
Anthony completed his bachelor's de-
gree in secondary education at Western
Michigan, earning certification in history,
social studies and economics. He earned
master's and doctoral degrees in special
education and counseling from Michigan
State University, teaching there briefly be-
fore coming to UNF in 1978.
"Basically, I educated myself because
there was a lack of support services for
deaf students," he said. "It's better today,


obert Anthony


ficult. It helped that I already knew how to
approach the college 'game.' Plus, I had the
ability to speak and to use other learned
skills that made it easier than if I had been
born deaf.
"I had to read two to three times more
than anyone else. I missed a lot during class
discussion, but talked to my professors as
much as I could. Even so, it was tough. It
would be nice to hear voices or listen to
music again to find out it hasn't changed
much, but most of all, I miss the ease of
learning."
The accident forced Anthony to chart a
new course for his life. "Originally I'd
planned to pursue a degree in economics,
but I felt opportunities in that field would be
limited because I was deaf. I made a prag-
matic decision to get into special education.
I've never been sorry about that decision."
During his career, Anthony has taken a
major role in developing the local DSC and
guiding it to the forefront of the nation's
deaf service networks.
"Florida has a hearing-impaired popula-
tion in excess of one million. No other state
has a network of DSCs comparable to Flo-
rida's," he said.
The Jacksonville DSC helps train and


provides interpreters, disseminates
information to the deaf through a
newsletter, relays messages via
TDD (Telecommunication Devices
for the Deaf) and networks social
service agencies. Locally, many
governmental agencies and private
business have installed TDDs, de-
vices which resemble a cross be-
tween a typewriter and telephone
through which hearing-impaired
users can send and receive mes-
sages.
"We help people become tax
contributors, rather than tax users,"
he noted. But, he said, as more
people become aware of the DSC,
the demand for its services in-
creases.
Communication for Anthony is not the
problem most people would expect. "Some
people are easier to lip read than others, but
many sounds in the English language look
the same. It helps to know the person and be
familiar with his or her facial expressions.
"Because I read lips so well and can also
speak well, it masks the real impact of deaf-
ness. Many people have negative attitudes
about it. For instance, after I've given a talk,
someone says 'Gee, you earned three degrees
after you became deaf. Isn't that amazing?'
I don't think of what I've done as amazing.
Handicapped people should be expected to
succeed, given the appropriate opportunity.
"Essentially, I am able to succeed be-
cause I was able to accept my deafness with-
out devaluating myself. Most people who
become handicapped react by becoming shy
and socially inwardly directed."
But not Bob Anthony. One of his most
delightful qualities is his sense of humor.
"Many people are uncomfortable dealing
with handicapped people. I found that it
(humor) makes it easier for people to relate to
me," he said.
"By the way, thanks for listening," he
concluded with a grin.





SERVICE


A Teacher's



Best Friend


UNF FACULTY HAVE
BEST SELLERS


By Colette Ladbrook
wo University
of North Flor-
idaprofessors
have authored
a text book, a
best seller by .-- -
industry stan-
dards, with sales surpassing
40,000 copies.
The two men-Dr. Paul
Eggen and Dr. David Jacob-
sen -are professors of educa-
tion in UNF's College of Edu-
cation and Human Services
and, although different in ap-
pearance and manner, share
similar visions for teaching.
With offices conveniently located across
the hall from each other, the two-along with
a former faculty colleague, Dr. Don
Kauchak, now at the University of Utah-co-
authored the third edition of their textbook,
Methods for Teaching: A Skills Approach.
"We each know our strengths and try to
capitalize on each person's strength," Eggen
explained, "and then we put it all together."
The book focuses on public school class-
room teaching skills inspired and compiled
from the three authors' practical experi-
ences working directly with public schools
and from actual classroom teaching. The
book provides tools for teachers to plan and
implement productive material into class-
room environments and to assess student
progress.
All three editions have been published


by Charles Merrill and, to the authors'
pleasure, the text is used at about 140 uni-
versities and colleges, including Auburn,
UCLA, Michigan, North Carolina, Notre
Dame, Georgia State, Texas A&M and, ap-
propriately, UNF.
Both UNF education professors, who
are active in outdoor recreation, have one
similarity: they enjoy extensive travel
throughout the world. On a professional
level, Eggen has served as a consultant in
India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Africa.
"Trips are career highpoints," he said, point-
ing to a vivid poster representing one of his
educational adventures.
Jacobsen, who travels with his family,
has enjoyed leisurely journeys throughout
all of United States, Mexico, and part of the
Caribbean. "California has more natural


wonder and beauty; it's the
most striking state I've been
to," he said.
Founding faculty provide
stability to universities, and
...................... both Eggen and Jacobsen are
members of the initial UNF
faculty, unique pillars still
standing strong at the Uni-
versity. Eggen can remem-
ber driving to campus on
dusty roads, arriving to see a
couple of buildings standing
as lone educational sentinels
in the woods. "We do a good
job with our students here,"
he said. "I thoroughly enjoy
teaching and like work, though I'm not a
workaholic." In addition to being a co-au-
thor of Methodsfor Teaching, Eggen is the
senior author of Strategies for Teachers.
He also has written or co-written numerous
journal articles and given professional pres-
entations. "I write for my own growth and
to make a contribution to the teaching pro-
fession," he said.
Jacobsen has been a thoughtful, quiet
influence on UNF's development, espe-
cially within his college and the Division of
Curriculum and Instruction. He has written
three other textbooks in his discipline since
he began writing in 1970. Describing this
most recent achievement, Jacobsen said he
has received informal feedback from nu-
merous students who said they think the
book is "great, highly practical approach."


r.





BRIEFS


GYM,
TEAMS
CLOSER TO
REALITY

A new teaching gym-
nasium for UNF took a big step
toward reality in June when
the Florida Legislature ap-
proved money for its design
and planning. Funds for con-
struction are expected to be
allocated in the 1990-91
budget, said Dr. Tom Healy,
UNF's legislative liaison, and
construction is expected to take
another year.
Women's basketball and
volleyball teams and a men's
basketball team eventually will
add three new intercollegiate
sports to UNF's athletic pro-
gram after the gym is com-
pleted. The programs will be
implemented over a three-to-
five-year period, Healy said.
The gym will be located adja-
cent to the Aquatic Center,
across UNF Drive from the
main campus.


UNF OSPREY



SPORTS



TRACK GOLFERS
HIGHLIGHTS ADVANCE


The Osprey track and
field teams participated in more
than 10 events at the NAIA
national track and field compe-
tition in Azuza, Calif.
The Lady Ospreys, in their
best-ever performance, placed
19thout of76teams. Themen's
team had two Irish members,
Tony Ryan of Dublin and Cor-
mac O'Riordan of Country
Cork, receive Scholar Athlete
awards.


M maintaining the Ospreys
winning record, the UNF golf
team commanded the greens
during the 1989 season.
Winning the NAIA District
25 tournament, the team made
its way to the NAIA National
Tournament at Saginaw Valley
State (Mich.) University where
it placed fifth overall. John
Brooks of Ponte Vedra Beach,
Fla., and Mats Nilsson of
Helsingborg, Sweden, receiving
All-American titles.


BASEBALL
STRIKES UP
WINNERS



P^


W rapping up UNF's
second baseball season, the
Ospreys won thehonorofhosting
theNAIADistrict25 tournament.
This year's pitching staff helped
bring the Ospreys to the top of the
district and into Area V playoffs.
Afterbattlingwithaweekofrain,
theOspreys overcame opponents
to take the No. 2 Area V
tournament position, giving the
teaman at-large berth inthe NAIA
World Series in Lewiston, Idaho,
where they finished a strong third
place.


TENNIS TEAMS NET

NAIA AWARDS


ATHLETIC STAFF

SWEEPS AWARDS


UNF's talented men's and
women's tennis teams took the
Ospreys to the top, winning the
NAIA District 25 titles and
competing with the best at the
NAIA national tournament in
Kansas City, Mo.
National recognition for the
UNF teams began when Louis
Lamontagne of Quebec City,
Canada, and Marie Farrar of
Sarnia, Canada, were named
NAIA Scholar Athletes for 1989.
Farrar also received the Arthur
Ashe Award, a national honor
for sportsmanship in tennis. The


award was the third in five years
for UNF tennis athletes.
To further bolster UNF's
national caliber, Page Bates of
Inlet, S.C., was named the NAIA
National Tennis Rookie of the
Year.
The Lady Ospreys ended their
tournament placing fifth, with
Lori Webster of Boynton Beach,
Fla., and Jo Wilkins of Bristol,
England, taking second in the
doubles finals. The men's team
placed sixth after suffering with
injuries throughout the
tournament.


G reat coaches, combined
with great athletes, equal an
outstanding NAIA program.
That quality was reflected in
honors won by each coach and
UNF's athletics director.
Dr. Tom Healy was named
the NAIA District 25 Athletic
Director of the Year at the an-
nual District spring meeting on
May 22 at Jekyll Island, Ga.
Head Baseball Coach Dusty
Rhodes received, for the second
year, the District's Baseball
Coach of the Year award for


1989. In tennis, Head Coach
Leo Vorwerk was named the
District 25 Men's Tennis Coach
of the Year. Head Cross Coun-
try/Track and Field Coach Bob
Symons earned the 1989 Dis-
trict 25 Coach of the Year Award
for men's and women's pro-
grams in those sports. Rounding
out the honors, Head Golf Coach
Duncan Hall was named the 1989
District 25 Golf Coach of the
Year.



















































A two-year, $237,615
grant from the U.S. Department
of Education will be used to
evaluate a model drug abuse
education program for elemen-
tary and secondary school per-
sonnel. The program is titled
"Alcohol and Drug Education
Prevention Training," or
ADEPT.
UNF education students will
receive special training in sub-
stance abuse issues. Teachers
and other school personnel in a
19-county area of northeast Flor-
ida also will be offered a range of
training opportunities under the
grant terms. Teachers may com-


BRIEFS


WHAT A


BIRTHDAY


GIFT!


Dr. Richard de R. and Kitty Kip

The UNF Foundation, Inc.,
received the initial installment
of a $100,000 gift to endow a
professorship in the College of
Business Administration of
honor Kathryn Magee Kip in
July.
Dr. Richard de R. Kip, UNF
professor emeritus of insurance,
will donate the endowment over
the next four years. The first in-
stallment of $20,000 was his gift
to his wife to commemorate her
85th birthday.
When fully funded, the Kip
endowment will qualify for
$50,000 in state Major Gift Pro-
gram matching funds.
The Kathryn Magee Kip
Professorship in Financial Serv-
ices will enable the College to
enhance its financial services
program which integrates basic
principles in accounting, finance,
insurance, investments, real es-
tate and taxes.


Julia Taylor, interim direc-
tor of development, said, "The
program should develop the
skills of students who wish to
work in personal financial coun-
seling and planning and help
them earn professional status as
Chartered Financial Consultant
(ChFC), Certified Financial
Planner (CFP) or similar desig-
nations.
Interest earned from the en-
dowment will be used to im-
prove program curriculum and
to supplement faculty salaries,
she said. By the time the endow-
ment is paid in full, it will earn
about $12,000 yearly in interest,
Taylor said.
Dr. Kip was a charter mem-
ber of the business faculty. He
also taught at Florida State Uni-
versity for more than 15 years,
retiring in 1983 after a 47-year
career in higher education.


EXECUTIVE

ASSISTANT

NAMED


Dr. Diane Gillespie, for-
mer general director of excep-
tional student education for the
Duval School System, has been
appointed executive assistant to
President Adam W. Herbert.
Gillespie most recently
served as chief of the Bureau of
Education for Exceptional Stu-
dents, Division of Public
Schools, Florida Department of
Education (DOE) in Tallahas-
see.
"I am extremely pleased that
Dr. Gillespie has accepted an
appointment to this important
position which is vital to the
efficient operation of the Office
of the President at UNF," Dr.
Herbert said in announcing
Gillespie's appointment. "Dr.


Gillespie possesses exceptional
credentials and significant expe-
rience as an educational admin-
istrator and as a teacher at both
the public school and post-sec-
ondary levels. I look forward to
the many contributions she will
make to UNF generally and to
my office specifically."
Gillespie began her duties in
July.


plete academic credit courses or
in- service training workshops,
using the credits to extend their
teaching certification.
"Because elementary and
secondary school teachers, coun-
selors and principals spend sig-
nificant amounts of time daily
with youth, they are often the
first to be aware of changes in
behavior which indicate a young-
ster's being at risk for addictive
substance abuse," said Dr. Joan
Farrell, College of Health dean,
who announced the grant.
"These 'front line' personnel are
responsible for helping students
make social choices."


NEW GRANT

AIMS AT DRUGS






BRIEFS


STUDENT WINS

NATIONAL COMPETITION


ACCLAIMED JAZZ

EDUCATOR JOINS

MUSIC FACULTY


Mike Johnston receives congratulations
from President Herbert


He stood in front of the
room with sweaty palms and
trembling fingertips. Michael
Johnston slowly lifted his trum-
pet, warm from the heat of his
lips. Immediately, smooth and
mellow tones emanated from
the instrument, filling the small
room.
Little did he know that less
than one song away, he would
win the International Trumpet
Guild competition, judged by
the best musicians worldwide.
Johnston, a UNF student
jazz trumpeter and one of only
four musicians selected from
an international field of college
musicians, participated in the
contest at the University of
California-Los Angeles in Au-
gust.
Winning may have come as
a surprise to Johnston, but ac-
cording to Bruce Silva, UNF
music professor, Johnston is one
of the best students he has ever
taught. "Mike has a natural ear
formusic. He is gifted, talented
and, more important, he be-
lieves in practicing and getting
better."
A native of Denver, Colo.,
Johnston is no stranger to
nerves, sweat or fear. After
entering UNF as a freshman in
1987, he was named Outstand-
ing Soloist at the Mile High
Jazz Festival in Denver and
Outstanding Trumpet Soloist at


the World of Music Festival in
San Diego, Calif. He also has
played back-up for such groups
as the Temptations and the
O'Jay's.
According to Johnston, each
performer was required to play
fourjazz renditions, three selec-
tions of their own choosing and
one required selection. "A lotof
time and effort went into mak-
ing my music selections, so you
can imagine my surprise when,
earlier in the morning, one of
the instructors (who was also a
competition judge) played
'Body and Soul.' That was the
song I selected!"
Although the competition
judge (in Johnston's opinion)
outplayed him, the UNF trum-
peter managed to impress Cu-
ban trumpeter Anturo Sando-
val, whom music critics hail as
one of the best in the world;
New York studio player Marvin
Stamn; and L.A. studio player
Warren Luening enough to take
home $400 and the title.
After winning a major mu-
sic competition, one he was
afraid to enter, Johnston says he
can't relax. One day, he says, in
his dream of dreams, he simply
wants to teach and maybe play a
little music as a full-time pro-
fessor.
"I love to play. I don't say
I'm that good, but other people
seem to think so."


A lto saxophonist Bunky
Green, an innovator on the Chi-
cago jazz scene since the '60s,
joined UNF's American Music
program this fall. Green came
from Chicago State University
where he was a professor of
music and director of jazz stud-
ies.
Green is described in the
Encyclopedia of Jazz in the Six-
ties as "one of the most consis-
tently swinging performers in
this class (the Charlie Parker in-
fluence) to have come to promi-
nence in the 1960s."
"We are excited to welcome
a musician of Bunky Green's
caliber to our faculty," said
Bowie. "His presence will add
significant depth to our pro-
gram."
A honors graduate of Chi-
cago State University, Green


holds a master's degree from
Northwestern University. A
much sought-after soloist/clini-
cian, Green has appeared at jazz
festivals throughout the United
States and Europe. He was the
first to coordinate and teach
improvisation clinics at the
famous Montreux Jazz Festival
in Switzerland, the Detroit-
Montreux Jazz Festival and the
first American jazz educator to
teach at the Chodziez Jazz Camp
in Chodziez, Poland.
President-elect of the Na-
tional Association of Jazz Edu-
cators, the largest association of
jazz educators in the world,
Green has some 20 albums to his
credit. He has played with Clark
Terry, Alvin Jones, Cannonball
Adderley, Miles Davis, Charlie
Mingus and other jazz greats.





BRIEFS


A neA honor, piingram
for LINF' bhest -tudenJLn i being
prepared for [he 19~r- I I i 1ol0
ye.ar. Dr Dale Clittord onl the
College f An.r & SjcinceL \ill
ser.e as dlreLtor 'i- the honoSr,
prouramn The proposed pro-
orain \ 1ll ofer talented ltudenrt
in all mn.jors the chance for a
mentor experience \\lth their
ma or profe.or anid the oppor-
tunflit to hike part in holinor


%'elminrs ilnh enlllnlllent [lm-
ted to 2(1. In addition. honor.
t[uJents ill hjie prioliT reg-
i- i nation and honors decsi ;naiion
on ir.an'Lnrpt, and diploma,..
"\\e are proud to eiNtablih
the Honor, programa" ,,aid Cif-t
ford. 'The educational oppr-
tunities thLih program v. ill offer
should pro.e to be an ee\ip-
liOnidl e\xl-rience for our ,ru-
dents "


Entering freshmen %% ill be
admilled to the program if they
gTaduate in the top 11r perLnill
of their high schoI cl.,iasse \. l
SAT sLore, of 1151) or WCT
.'.ore,, of 27. Students at the
sophomoree or junior lel el must
ha. e a GP \ :'o 3.5 and.'or other
evidence of Honors potential
The Honors Colloquium is
a special, one ciedit course for


all honors Siudents.m11eeinl bhi-
weekl\. The heart of the hon-
ors program. in the major. w ill
be the opportunni tdodra thesis
or ,i i.il prole. in 1 c'oopera-
inon a ih.a t.ii ult\ mnltor. Stu-
dlents who meel the require-
ment, and ho maintain a 3.-4
iuniulati\ e a erage 'A ill iecei\ e
the designation honors in the
major on diploma- and r.an-
scripts.


UNF SELECTED

FOR BARRON'S BOOK


UNF RAISES

COLLEGE AWARENESS

THROUGH "CAP"


,dew..


U WV,
NF has been selected as
one of the least costly four-year
institutions being considered for
inclusion in a new book to be
published by Barron's Educa-
tional Series entitled "The Bar-
ron's 300: Best College Buys."
The new volume will draw
on insights from deans of admis-
sion, deans of students and stu-
dents themselves in order to
capture, most accurately, what
makes each college an educa-
tional value. While cost is a key


factor in deciding whether or not
to include a specific institution
in this book, prices will be
viewed relative to other qualita-
tive measures such as schools of
similar selectivity or those of-
fering similar academic pro-
grams. The volume will present
students and parents with a vari-
ety of choices available to fresh-
men of varying ability levels.


A almost 50 highly moti-
vated students from Duval
County schools took part in an
eight-week summer study, work,
and residential program de-
signed to raise interest in college
life and providing part-time work
at UNF.
This year's College Aware-
ness Program (CAP) took place
June 19-Aug. 10 under the super-
vision of the College of Busi-
ness Administration.
Participating students were
in the 10th, 1 1th, or 12th grades,
had a high grade point average,
and had financial need. The
College, the Duval County
School Board, and the Private
Industry Council of Jacksonville


co-sponsored CAP, providing
all necessary funding, transpor-
tation, instructors, and housing
for the program.
CAP students took a one-
credit class during their morn-
ings at UNF. During the after-
noons, students worked on cam-
pus in a number of academic,
administrative and student serv-
ices offices.
During the fifth and sixth
weeks of the program, CAP stu-
dents lived on campus in order to
experience college life firsthand.
Dr. Steve Shapiro, professor of
economics and program coordi-
nator, said residential living is
what makes UNF's CAP pro-
gram unique.





B RIEFS


NEW ARTS &

SCIENCE DEAN

APPOINTED


FACULTY &

STUDENTS
WIN AWARDS &

STUDY ABROAD


Dr. fesa Adams

D r. Afesa M. Adams has
been appointed as UNF's new
dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences. Adams began her new
post during the summer, suc-
ceeding Dr. Richard Weiner, who
had served as interim dean since
April 1987.
"The university is extremely
fortunate to have a scholar and


administrator of Adams' caliber
join our faculty," President
Adam W. Herbert said.
Adams came to UNF from
the University of Utah, where
she served as associate vice
president of academic affairs.
She previously taught at the
University of Florida.


The National Endowment
for the Humanities (NEH) made
recent grants to three UNF
scholars. History's Dr. Andrew
Buchwalter and Language and
Literature's Dr. Lawrence Car-
penter were award recipients,
researching their respective pa-
pers, "Hegel and the Priority of
the Right over the Good" and
"Creation Cycle Myths in Low-
land Ecuadorian Quichua:
Form, Content, and Change."
Mark Byington, a UNFjun-
ior, won a NEH Younger
Scholar Award to research his
paper on "Ancient Japanese-
Korean Relations and the Sig-
nificance of the Ancient Walled
Town of Mimana."
Drs. Buchwalter and Car-
penter were two of ten Florida


scholars chosen to receive
$3,500 to conduct full-time re-
search on humanities topics.
They were among 1,369 appli-
cants nationwide, only 223 re-
ceived awards.
Byington received $2,220
and was one of the 91 college
students and 66 high school
students selected from a nation-
wide pool of 742 applicants.
Also, Dr. Carpenter and 10
UNF students visited Quinto,
Ecuador, and other Ecuadorian
locations this summer, for an
on-site study observing various
indigenous ethnic groups in the
Ecuadorian Andes and upper
Amazon basin.
Participating students were
eligible for three semester hours
of undergraduate credit.


NEW BUSINESS

DEAN TAKES


REINS

D r. Edward A. Johnson,
former dean of the College and
Graduate School of Business Ad-
ministration at the University of
Colorado, has been appointed
dean of the College of Business
Administration at UNF.
"UNF is fortunate to have
attracted to its faculty the former
dean of one of the nation's major
colleges of business," said Presi-
dent Adam W. Herbert in an-
nouncing the appointment.


Johnson earned his doctorate
in management from Michigan
State University. Prior to his
service at Colorado, he served as
dean of the M. J. Neely School of
Business at Texas Christian
University and as dean of the
College of Business at the Roch-
ester (N.Y.) Institute of Tech-
nology.
He also served as director of
business graduate programs at
West Virginia University.


DORM OPENS
OPPORTUNITY


M any UNF students
who graduate in the Class of
1993 will experience the feel of
a new home. "Osprey Hall, the
new student housing hall,
opened August 26," said Ray
Szaltis, interim director of resi-
dential life. Designed to house
a maximum 250, 235 moved in
during the first weekend, with
others still on a waiting list.
UNF is one of the few Flor-
ida universities to build a new
dorm facility this year.
Located next to the Osprey
cafeteria overlooking Candy
Cane Lake, Osprey Hall facili-
ties offer more traditional dorm
living arrangement than the


current apartment units. Living
space on each floor of the three-
story building, is separated into
halves by lounge areas. Those
areas provide students space to
entertain guests and for relax-
ing. Each floor has enough
rooms and bathroom facilities
to accommodate 80 students.
Each of the living areas will also
have a resident assistant acting
as a resource person and some-
one to help build a community
atmosphere among the residents.
UNF began new food plans
for housing residents too, offer-
ing two flexible plans, said
Szaltis.
























1 9 7 3
JANE M. TRAYLOR (BAE) does
business as Jane Traylor Enterprise,
doing commission sales of directo-
ries, notebooks, etc. throughout
North Florida.


1 9 7 4
RICHARD CARLBERG (MBA/
BBA'76) is employed by the City of
Jacksonville as senior analyst,
computer systems.
BONNIE BOOTH (BA/MAC'76)
uses her psychology training in St.
John's River Hospital.
PHILIP N. SPOFFORD, Jr. (BBA)
is owner of West Inn Lounge, Inc.
JUDSON WILHELM (MED) is
employed at Green Cove Springs by
Clay County public schools.
EMORY S. COPPEDGE (BAE/
MED'76) teaches and coaches at
Fletcher senior high.
CONNIE BAREFIELD (BA)
writes from Lilbum, Ga., that her
daughter, who was three years old
when Connie began UNF, starts
college this fall. Connie works in the
office of a small manufacturing
plant.
DANIEL TRUE ANDREWS
(BBA) was re-elected for a second
four-year term as county judge, tenth
judicial circuit. Bartow, Polk county,
Fla. He resides in Lakeland.
GERALD W. OUTRIGHT (BBA/
MBA'81) is vice president, corporate
lending, for Southeast Bank.


1 9 7 5
BARRY L. YORK (BA) is a
member of the President's Club at
Pro-Chem, a distributor of industrial
cleaning chemicals.
LINDA STERNER (BA) has been
promoted to vice president of First
Wachovia Information Services at
the First National Bank of Atlanta.
She is active in American Business
Women's Association, in her church
and with Girl Scouts. She lives in
Norcross, Ga.
JAMES V. KNUTZEN (MBA)
owns James Knutzen & Associates, a
CPA firm.
RUTH E. HACKENSON (BAE/
MED'80) has retired from teaching,
but continues to tutor students.
WILLIAM T. BAISDEN (BBA) is
assigned to the Florida Air Guard.


PHILIP N. JOHNSON (MBA) is
associated with Brown, Cantrell,
Moody & Johnson. real estate
appraisers and consultants.
PRUDENCE (KITTY) DOYLE
(BAE/MED'77) is a specialist in
exceptional education for Duval
County School Board.
WILLIAM H. STEEDLY (BBA) is
controller for Moore Pipe and
Sprinkler company.


1 9 7 6
JULIA P. MCAFEE (MAC) is a
Jungian analyst in private practice at
Jacksonville Beach.
RALPH A. GOSLIN (BA) retired a
second time. His first career was
U.S. Navy. The second was with the
Duval County School Board. Now
he's taking life easy and getting
involved with Navigational Anthro-
pology of Northeast
DONALD H. BARNES (MBA) is
sales engineer for Westinghouse
Electric Corporation.
W. AUSTIN SMITH (MBA)
celebrated 23 years with Belcher and
Associates. He is branch manager of
the utility plant electrical equipment
supplier.
REGINA McCLINTOCK (BFA) is
sole proprietor of McClintock
Graphic Design in Sarasota. She
recently received a Gold Addy
Award as art director for a series of
black and white ads produced for
RDS Data Group Inc.
THOMAS J. CARMODY (MBA)
is in network distribution for
Southern Bell.
WALTER D. KIRK (BA) is an
agent for New York Life Insurance
Company.
MICHAEL J. BONO (BBA) says
that life is treating him well. He and
Joyce are settled in their new home.
and Mike has moved his State Farm
Insurance agency toMonument
Road.
LOUISE H. AXELBERG (BA/
MSH'85) is employed as a biofeed-
back therapist at North Florida
Center for Headache.
LORRAINE MONTANYE (BA)
tutors illiterates four afternoons a
week, using Learn to Read's
Laucbach method.
DAVID O. RIGDON (BBA) is
assistant general manager of
SeaLand Intermodal at CSX.


PATRICIA J. POWELL (BA) is
senior classification and compensa-
tion person in the
ERIN W. BRAMLETT (MED) is a
reading consultant for Educational
Development Services.
LEROY E. MILLER, III (BBA/
MBA'87) is a self-employed CPA
with offices on San Mateo Avenue.

1 9 7 7
WILLIAM J. SCHILLING (MBA)
recently joined I.D.S./Adatech which
services doctors' offices, etc.
BILLY G. HEISLER (BBA) is
manager of Dixie Egg company.
JOSEPH E. SMYTH (BA) is
currently working for the State of
Florida Department of Natural
Resources, Division of Recreation
and Parks, as manager of Oscar
Scherer state recreation area in
Osprey.
O. JAY GARRARD (MBA) moved
the office of Jay Garrard CPA's St.
Augustine Road.
R. SCOTT PREACHER (MBA) is
employed by the Internal Revenue
Service as a CPA.
CHRISTOPHER KALKINES
(BA/MA'82) is a Navy lieutenant,
having completed officer indoctrina-
tion school at the Naval Education
and Training Center, Newport, R.I.
DAVID P. GOODMAN, Jr. (BBA)
is employed by North Jacksonville
Baptist church as administrative assis-
tant. He says his newly built home
and 3-year-old daughter Lauren keep
him busy.
DONNA L. SELF (BA) has been
promoted to manager of the Regency
Square branch of Southeast bank.
WALTER PROPER (BA) was a
training consultant to the Peace
volunteer for three years in Morocco.
He earned a Master of International
Administration in 1988. He is
currently self-employed as a consult-
ant.
KARL J. STESNEY (BBA) has a
new position as controller and head of
accounting at American Norit Co.,
Inc., which manufactures and sells
activated carbon.
ELIZABETH BRADFIELD
(BAE) is self-employed, having a
studio where she teaches piano.
LARRY J. WEAS (MAC) is now
assistant vice president in training and
development at CSX.


1 9 7 8
PAMELA J. DODGE (BA) is a nurse
at St. Vincent's Medical Center's con-
solidated staffing.
ED MILLER (MBA) has a chartered
financial consultant designation, as
well as real estate agent and broker's
licenses. He is representing O'Malley
Real Estate in Jacksonville Beach as a
broker/salesman.
LEE DRAPER (BBA) is now a
partner in Bishop and Draper, CPA,
firm.
KENNETH R. MILLER (MBA) is a
partner in Touche Ross & Company,
in charge of the tax department.
BARBARA K. WILLIAMS (BA) is
employed by Prudential Insurance
Company, in employee benefits and
disability.
BOBBY L. JACKSON (MACC) is
controller of Jacksonville Shipyards,
Inc.
LLEWELLYN N. SADLER(MED)
is employed by Duval County School
Board as principal of Love Grove ele-
mentary school.
CLARICE V. ADKINS (BA) is
office manager of Murphco of Florida,
the corporate office of Holiday Inns.
JOHN R. MELLOY (MBA) is self-
employed as a C.P.A.


1 9 7 9
SHARON WEAVER (MSH) is a
popular speaker in this region on the
subjects of substance abuse, preven-
tion, and treatment. She is an assistant
professor in the Divison of Health
Science, College of Health, and
director of the Center for Alcohol &
Drug Studies at UNF.
MARY (JUNE) ST. JOHN (BBA)
has been appointed assistant vice-
president/cash management for Bamett
Banks. Inc.
DANNY FOYE (BBA) is chief of
classification and compensation for the
personnel department of the City of
Jacksonville.
ROBERT A. BOSMAN (BBA) and
wife Cynthia now have two children.
He is marketing representative at
Steuart Petroleum Co.
MAXINE B. HORNE (BAE) teaches
special education at Kirby Smith
junior high school.
ROGER A. GAPINSKI (BA) is
employed by Castleton Beverage
Corp. as a chemist/manager of
analytical research.


IAJL CCLAS kSNOT!ES








KENNETH L. FLEMING (BA) is
employed by Independent Life Insur-
ance company as systems performance
specialist.
MELVIN W. YOST (MBA) is
assistant controller for Blue Cross &
Blue Shield of Florida.


1 9 8 0
WILLIAM B. HAMILTON III (BT)
and Rachael Pickus were married in
March. He is employed by Memtec
N.A. Inc. and resides in Sanford.
PAMELA A. PAPPAS (MBA) is
employed by First Union bank as
commercial portfolio services
administrator, analyzing commercial
loans.
LUCILLE G. HEINE (MED) is
director of Tree Hill. a conservation
park in Arlington.
WILLIAM H. GRANT III (BBA) is
an attorney practicing in Orange Park,
having received his law degree from
the University of Florida College of
Law.
CHARLES A. WILKERSON
(MBA) is division chief of the
engineering department of Jackson-
ville Electric Authority.
DAVID L. McLINTOCK
(BA) owns Phoenix Auto Repair.
PATRICIA W. PETERSEN (MSH/
MBA '85) owns Corporate Leadership
Development. Inc. a human resource
development consulting firm.
GUY M. JENNINGS (MBA) is vice
president and manager for Watson
Realty Corp. and is a state instructor
for the Florida Real Estate Institute.
EDITH B. HUNT (BBA) Is
employed by State Farm Insurance
company as a supervisor.
JEROME RICHEY (MBA) is vice
president of Southeast Bank,
managing the Orange Park branch.
ERNESTINE C. HOLTSINGER
(BBA) is now employed at Blue
Cross/Blue Shield as a reimbursement
specialist. Baby Megan is a year old.
JOSEPH W. BRINKLEY
(MBABBA '82) is a general manager
of construction services
at Haskell Company. He recently
passed the C.P.A. exam.
WILHELMINA WATSON
(BA) is employed at Baptist Medical
Center.
WILLIAM J. KESSLER (BBA) is
self-employed as a CPA, with offices
on Southpoint Drive.
JAMES D. DURBIN (BBA) is
employed by Gulf Life Insurance
Company as an accountant.
vself-employed accountant with a
contract with Hulin, Accounting, Inc.
JEAN E. JONES (BBA) is a self
employed accountant with a contact
with Hulin Accounting, Inc.


1 9 8 1
KENNETH R. SCHROFF (MBA) is
employed by the U.S. Postal Service.
He is a member of the Florida Bar,
having received his Juris Doctorate
from the University of Florida.


LILLIAN A. WORTHINGTON
(BBA/MBA '85) is a senior account
executive at Clark Parker associates
Inc., developers of commercial and
residential real estate.
SUSAN RUSSELL (MED) is
director of St. John's Presbyterian
kindergarten.
EDWARD BATEH (BBA) is
receiving manager for Pioneer Paper
& Plastic Company.
JANET L. BALLANTINE (BBA) is
employed by the Internal Revenue
Service as a revenue reviewer.
MARK W. SMITH (BBA) is
president of Zetabait Company, which
manufactures soft plastic fishing
tackle.
PAUL WHEELER (BA) is
employed by CSX in the rating and
billing department.
CAROLYN COLLEY (BBA/
MACC) is self-employed as a CPA in
Jacksonville Beach.
GARY F. WALL (BS) is a software
programmer for Winn Dixie head-
quarters.
CATHERINE M. STUPSKI (BBA)
has been promoted to assistant vice
president in charge of accounting at
National Farmer's Union Life
Insurance company. Her new son was
named Eric Karl. She has a new
house, too.
WILLIAM R. PARVIN (BBA) is
shift manager at American Heritage
Life Insurance company.


1 9 8 2
MITZI GAY KEELER (BBA) and
Captain Gary S. Steve were married in
Feburary and are now residing in
Colorado Springs, Colo.
KIM ROBINSON (BA) and Jamie
Giddens were married in May, 1988.
He accepted a position as marketing
representative for Perdue Frederick
company and now lives in Coconut
Creek.
MARI F. TERBRUEGGEN (BBA)
has been promoted to departmental
vice president on the staff of the Pru-
dential's corporate headquarters in
Newark, N.J. She will serve as
quality service officer.
JANET B. METCAIF (BA) is
employed by the Duval County
School Board at Middleburg high
school.
PATRICIA P. CORBE (BBA)
accepted the position of senior
accountant with Blue Cross/Blue
Shield of Florida. She has a Certified
Management in Accounting certificate
and is past president of the Jackson-
ville
MICHAEL R. RITCH (BBA) is
associated with Ralston and Company
CPA firm.
NEAL A. WATSON (BA) is
employed by the Florida AirNational
Guard at Jacksonville International
airport.
JOHN H. BRADY (MBA/MPH '83)
is employed at St. John's River
Community College.
VALERIE S. GRAY (BA) is
employed at Terminal Paper Bag
Company in Yulee.


NORMAN A. HOWARD (MAC)
announces he has retired.
PAT MOORE (BBA) is sales
manager at William H. Coleman, Inc.,
organizing trade shows and tourism
industry projects. Her two-year son.
Spencer, is her greatest accomplish-
ment, she says.


1 9 8 3
JUANITA A. WOOD (BBA) and
Commander David A. Chaney were
married in February in Palm Beach.
DOROTHY W. POLLREISZ
(BBA) is director of Systems Integrity
as the Naval Supply Center-Jackson-
ville. As supply systems analyst, she
designs new systems for the total
Naval system.
LYNNE B. GORDON (BBA) is an
underwriter of Life Insurance policies
for Prudential Insurance company.
Her daughter, born last November,
was named Caitlyn.
EMILY D. CHRISTOFOLI (MED)
was selected by the National Endow-
ment for the Humanities to be
Florida's NEH/Reader's Digest
Teacher Scholar for 1989. This pays
for a full year of intensive research on
a subject related to her teaching. She
has taught at Episcopal high school for
twenty years, and was a Rockfeller
Foundation Fellow in 1987.
GARY L. OLBERDING (MBA) is a
senior supervisor at CSX.
ANTHONY EDMONSTON (BBA)
is North Region vice president in
charge of mortgage production for
Florida National Bank. He and Julia
Beuerlien were married last fall and
honeymooned in Ireland.
JOHN F. CROWELL (BBA/MBA
'87) has retired from the Naval
Hospital at NAS Jacksonville.
LYNNE ASHEMEAD (BBA) is
manager of corporate travel at CSX.
FRANK J. SMITHERMAN, Jr.
(BBA) is operations manager for
Owens and Minor, a surgical supplies
firm.
MARY R. TODD (BBA) is an ac-
countant with the Hamilton Group.


1984
1 9 8 4
NANCY DIANE BLANKENSHIP
(BSN) and Michael J. Archer were
married last March. She is employed
at Baptist Medical Center as a regis-
tered nurse.
TERREL L. FORMICO (MBA) is
vice president of First Union National
Bank, manager of commercial
banking support, loan operations and
automatic process.
MARY E. BATTENBERG (BSH/
MSH'86) and G. Thomas Thornton
were married recently. She is presi-
dent of Independent Rehabilitation
Management, Inc.
VICTORIA M. LAMBERT (BA) is
currently employed as a legal assistant
to the legal department of Transmark
U.S.A., Inc., a holding company with
a variety of businesses, including
insurance companies, retail clothing


manufacturers, a small commuter
airline and the sale of business forms.
DAVID H. HONIG (MBA) and
Miriam Ginzburg were married last
March in San Juan. P.R. He is
employed as assistant to the president
of Parts House, Inc.
JAMES E. SPEED (BBA), self-
employed, is representing Perdue
Frederick Pharmaceuticals.
LOUIS GRUNINGER IV (BBA) is
payroll supervisor of accounting at
Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Florida.
WILLIAM C. VANLAW (BBA) is a
financial consultant in Merrill
Lynch's downtown office.


1 9 8 5
ELLA FARSHING (MED) is a
licensed therapist with a private
practice in Mandarin. She recently
instructed courses in Teen Parenting
in cooperation with the Children's
Home Society and Florida Commu-
nity College at Jacksonville.
ROGER T. GOBLER (BA) is
executive vice president of Shelly
Middlebrooks and O'Leary.
MARGARET J. MOMBERG
(BBA) is a management associate
with Barnett Bank.
KIMBERLY BOYETTE (BSN) and
Gregory M. Correla were married
recently. She is employed as a nurse
at Baptist Medical Center.
TERRY R. KROEMER (MACC) is
senior accountant for Smoak, Davis,
and Nixon, CPATs.
JACQUELINE OWENS (BBA) and
Jeffery Sims were married last April.
She is employed by Southeast Bank of
Gainesville where they reside.
GREGORY KUSTERMAN (BBA)
is employed by H.C. Warner, Inc. in
Charlotte, N.C.
JAY MOONEY (BA) administrative
assistant to U.S. Representative
Charles Bennett. He has been elected
director of the Southeast Region Ad-
ministrative Assistants association.
JASON BOYD BURNETT (BBA)
won a Rotary International Fellowship
and studied law at the University of
Exeter, England, in 1986-87. A
member of Florida State Law School
class of 1988, he is presently a law
clerk under Judge Proctor. He was
Student Government president at UNF
in 1984-85.
BRUCE A. NORDSTROM (BBA) is
district representative of World Omni
Financial Corp.
NANCY G. PRICKETT (BBA) is a
computer graphics specialist at
Images, Inc.
LINDA G. WILSON (BAE) is
employed at San Jose Episcopal Day
School.


1 9 8 6
TODD A. MARTINEZ (BBA) is
employed as an accounting supervisor
by the State Farm Insurance Co.
LT. JENNIFER L. VEDRAL (BSN)
is serving in the U.S. Navy Nurse








Corps at Long Beach, California
Naval Hospital. In April, she was
married to Lt. John D. Baron.
DON D. ROBERTS (BBA) is
employed by First Union National
Bank of Florida as a manager.
EILEEN M. BROWER (BBA) and
ROBERT W. KAVANAGH ('86
BBA) were married in April. She is
employed by Women's Health
Specialists. He is employed by R. J.
Reynolds.
EVERETT W. COPPINS, JR. (BA)
is assistant manager of Walmart's
103rd street store.
DIANE P. SOHA (BBA) is
employed at North Florida Cardiovas-
cular and Thoracic group.
LISA VIRGINIA LAMB (BBA) and
Terry W. Rountree were married last
winter. She is an underwriter for
State Farm Insurance in the
commerical division.
PATRICIA A. KENDRICK (BBA)
has been promoted to associate
manager in the individual insurance
administration department for the
Prudential Insurance company. She
and husband Darryl named their first
daughter Ashlyn Brianna.
PHILLIPPE A. DUPONT (BS) has
changed positions. He is now with
Professional Data Base Systems.
PATRICIA M. GIONET (BA) does
interviews for food stamp recipients
for Hea
Ith and Rehabilitative Services.
JAMES M. ROBINSON (MBA) is
employed by England, Thims, and
Miller, Inc.
LAURIE L. JOHNSTONE (BBA) is
employed by Champion International,
Corp., a forest products industry.
SCOTT L. VINING (BBA) works
for Coppers and Lybrand, CPAs.
MICHAEL L. WILSON (BBA) is
employed by Deloite, Haskins, and
Sells.



1 9 8 7
VALERIE TRISTANI (BA) is now
Mrs. Arthur Thompson III. She is
employed at the Naval Aviation Depot.
CATHERINE M. HUETHER (BBA)
is marketing consultant for P.I.E.
Trucking company.
LINDA SWEAT (BA) is now
employed as a corporate customer
service representative for Florida
National Bank.
RENEE E. HERRINGTON (BS) and
John A. Edwards were married last
March. She is employed by Aetna
Casualty and Surety company.
STACY A. SKIPPER (BBA) passed
the November 1988 CPA exam. She is
employed by KPMG Peat Marwick.
KENNETH A. THOMAS (BA) is
weekend sports producer at station
WJKS.
RONALD FORGHAM (BBA) is
now sales and marketing manager for
Blue Crystal, Inc. of Fort Pierce, which
produces cube and block ice for central
Florida.


JAY D. WIKE (BBA) is employed
by Ploff Truck Lines, Inc.
JAMES C. PUGH (BA) is an
administrative assistant for the City of
Jacksonville.
ROBERT D. GRIDGES (BBA) is
now a CPA. He is with KPMG Peat
Marwick.
BARBARA F. VITSKY (MBA) is
house services manager at the
Traveler's Network.
FAYE LASRIS (BAE) is now Mrs.
Richard Ganson. living in Winston-
Salem, N.C. She is employed by First
Wachovia.
ROBERT M. DICICCO (BBA) is an
auditor/investigator with the auditor
general of the State of Florida.
BRUCE E. ARMEL (BBA) and
Jennifer Ingersoll were married in
April. He is employed by American
Heritage Life Insurance company.
OSCAR M. ABRAJANO (BA) is
employed by Aetna Life and Casualty
company.



1 9 8 8
VIRGINIA ANNE WRIGHT
(MED) and Dr. Larry W. Neidigh
were married last April.
FRANK T. KAISER (BBA) has been
commissioned ensign in the U.S.
Navy having graduated from Officer
Candidate School at Naval Education
Training Center in Newport, R.I.
BRENDA KAY MEADOWS (BA)
and Joseph Max Harbin were married
in March.
KEVIN W. ISGETTE (BBA)
residein Atlanta, where he is
employed by Bank South.
BRENT T. FREI (BA) is editor of
The National Culinary Review, a
national monthly magazine published
by the American Culinary Federation,
based in St. Augustine.
ELIZABETH ANN GOETTEL
(BS) was married recently to Mattew
W. Johnson. She is employed by
CSX, Inc., as a computer program-
mer.
LINDA LOUISE BROADFOOT
(BA) and Jay W. Shoots were married
in March. She is a registered nurse at
Baptist Medical Center. She is also
an artist photographer.
ROBERT WATTS (BA) accepted a
position as research assistant with the
Chamber of Commerce of Jackson-
ville. He had worked at the Chamber
part time while pursuing his degree.
RICHARD E. BITTNER (BBA) is
employed by Roadway Package
System as a coordinator.
EDITH MCEACHERN (BBA) was
married to Joe Aldrich last December.
She is a health underwriter for State
Farm Insurance company.























































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