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Title: Halyard
Uniform Title: Halyard
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: University of North Florida
Publisher: University of North Florida
Publication Date: April 9, 1975
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.269298 x -81.511602 ( Place of Publication )
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Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Bibliographic ID: NF00000234
Volume ID: VID00037
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Resource Identifier: notis - AAA3312

Full Text



Amended Singing Down to the Sea...


Constitution, the Photo Essay


Resolution Blues


Page 3 age Page 6








VOL. 2 NO. 11 UNIVERSITY OF NORTH FLORIDA JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA APRIL 9, 1975



Constitution


vote due Wed.
By WYNE LOUIS KARNATH A "FACULTY CAUCUS" had
Staff Wri Apter previously indicated faculty and
students must voande to either ratify student dissatisfaction with the
students must vote to either ratify present government, the General
or to reject the new university Assembly.
constitution. On this ballot the
university community must also T
choose, among the nominated The General Assembly was not m (
c andidates listed bnmEiot ed without its support in the debate,
temporary officers for a new form sitys Merwin. The rwinLoyal
of University government, in favor of re-vamping the
The new constitution was General Assembly." te
originally proposed May of last
year by Dr. Thomas M. Mongar Dr. Lassiter, chairperson and
chairman of the Department of Dr. Lassiter, chairs erson and
Political Science. He and his igissa tor of the Generd at
Committee, including Ward gen l assembly, commented at t3.
Hancock. Dr. Jane Decker, Dr. general assembly meetingApril 3.
Tom Merwin, Jim Green, and Dr. Lassiter felt that Thursday's
Donney Boseman, drafted d the meeting would probably be the
Donnelley Boseman, drafted the "last meeting of the general
new constitution. The action was assembly." He also urged Dr. Jerry Stern from the Department of English at Florida State
taken under the mandates of a cooperation with the new University wason campus Aprl 4 to speak to students Interested in
referendum and to make the constitution." International study. Stern has been a professor in the London and
responsive, says Merwin. continued on pg. 3



Budget is not enough -- York

By DREW BRUNSON THE STATEMENT, printed in some $252 million (5.3 percent)
Managing Editor "Legislative Report," accompan- below that level appropriated in
ied a summary of Governor 1974-75.
"The budget proposed by the Reubin Askew's 1975-76 budget "These proposed budgetary ( 1 H V~>rm rm
Governor will not permit us to recommendations concerning the reductions become even more U n U E
'catch up' or even 'keep up' with Educational and General Func- significant in view of the fact that 0
current inflationary pressure but, tion of the State University the current years budget contains
to the contrary, will result in our System. only one-half the total amount 1974-75 were funded for only a Askew recommended a 52
falling still farther behind." required for the State to assume portion of the year. These three reduction in OCO
This, according to E.T. York, "The level of General Revenue the employee's contribution to circumstance contribute to the (Operating Capital Outlay) except
chancellor designate of the State projected and recommended by the Florida Retirement System. In need foreflbstantial amounts of (Operating Capital Outlay) except
University System, is the the Governor is some $278 million addition, the State's employer additional resources to fund on an be 10.95 pere the reductont and he
situation facing Florida colleges (11 percent) below that budgeted social security matching pay- annual basis all of the current recommended the. funtnding of
and universities at the present in 1974-75. The recommended ments must be increased next positions including added social some 250 fewer academic
time. expenditures from all sources is year in accordance with changing security and other retirement positions.
costs.
IN A RECENT meeting the
TH sum mer sessionE GOVERNOR has also Board of Regents adopted several
SOpgU 1 recommended that no funds be new guidelines affecting the
allocated for salary improve- educational system in the state of
By STEPHEN W. HOLLAND vehemently opposed to it," he semester. He further added that ments, OPS funding should be Florida.
News Editor said. Florida State University and the reduced by 16.9 percent (except The BOR has decided to reduce
University of Florida did not fair in the areas of Instruction and first-time-in-college ceilings by 15
Seeking to gain more effective CARPENTER SAID THAT in as well last summer. Research where the reduction will percent, in order to affect a
use of State University facilities, addition to the BOR's comp- amount to some 25 percent). He $420,000 a year savings in
the Board of Regents has templation of summer sessions, Although the proposed Gover- also recommended that there be operating costs.
proposed to make it mandatory they are also studying the idea of nor's budget is some $278 million no funding for Consultants,
that all baccalaureate candidates adding an additional fee of $2.50 (11 per cent) below 1974-75 Fellowships, Faculty Develop- The BOR also decided that
attend at least one summer per semester hour during the figures and recommended ex- ment or Faculty Retraining. before a student may graduate he
session before they are permitted Fall, Winter and Spring semest- penditures from all sources in must attend at least one summer
to graduate. ers to be used for the Summer some $252 (5.3 per cent) below In the area of Operating term. This ruling is intended to
session. the 1974-75 figures, Carpenter Expenditures the Governor re- help acheive year-round utiliza-
President of the University of said that the finished budget will commended a 3.2 percent tion of university facilities.
North Florida Dr. Thomas G. UNF, said Carpenter, has an be determined by the State increase except for utility
Carpenter is opposed to manda- approximate 70 per cent Legislature. expenditures where the increase A meeting of the BOR was
tory summer sessions, "I am enrollment figure for the Summer continued I 2 will be approximately 31.7 scheduled for April 7 at Florida
CotfidO M percent. A&M University.





Page 2 April 9, 1975 THE HALYARD


Campus Briefs Photo a.


Faculty Notes copy
laws
Cashier hours
During the remainder of the Spring Quarter registration period, "r
the cashier area is scheduled to remain open until the following p
hours on the days indicated: P g .
8:30 p.m. -- April 9-10
6:30 p.m. -- April 21-24
Bookstore hours
The Bookstore will be open 830 a.m. to 12:00 noon on Friday and The laws regarding photocopy-
Saturday, April 11-12.Next week the store will return to its normal ing of copyrighted publications
four-day week. remain poorly defined, according
Sa to a copyrighted article in
Entertain ent hearings "Education U.S A,," a. newspa-
e er i of tht per published by the National
The Entertainment Subcommittee of the Student Activities School Public Relations Associa-
Committee will hold open hearing on April 10, 1975 at noon. tion.
Flinchum serves as press. By a 4-4 vote, the U.S.
moeSupreme Court early this year
Dr. Betty Flinchum, associate professor of Education, served as Supremeta Court e arly this year
"let stand a U S g Court of Claims
president of the Association for Research, Administration and decision allowing the National
Professional Councils and Societies at Washington D.C, and Institute of Heal t and the
Atlantic City, New Jersey. National Library of Medicine to
Roach included in Who's Who copy articles from medical
Roach incl oed in Who's Who journals," said the article.
William J. Roach, associate professor of Communications and The case was initiated-by The lower court said it was In the absence of a written
Journalism has been selected to be'iclded in the fifth editioof company, Williams and Wilkins, concerned "about reducing the opinion, no guidelines are yet
"Who's Who Public R which publishes scientific jour- flow of information," according to available on the legality of
Snails. The 1973 Court of Claims article. photocopying, now a widespread
inalet n paper published decision said that library copying The Supreme Court gave no practice in universities. The U.S.
constituted fairr use" of the written opinion regarding its Congress has been attempting for
rinsruor duatn ae a e publications, which does not decision. In cases of tie votes, the about a decade to update the
Roy Singletoir Jr. instructor rf, Educatior, we uihave a paper' entitle writers or publishers to lower court's decision automatic- copyright laws, which were
published in the ERIC system(Eduationa Reources Information compensationally is upheld written in 1909
Center) on "Instructional Packaging: TheEfficacy and Utility of the
Learning Module as a Major.Vehicle in Competency Based Teacher :-1
Education Progranis in Reading and Language Arts at the
University of North Florida." THE LEGISLATURE, esti- appropriate one lump sum rather
Perry atte" s workshop* mated Carpenter, would not than itemizing allocations. A
appropriate a budget until lump sum would give the SUS and
perhaps June. UNF would not UNF greater flexibility, in that it
Dr. Joseph M.Perry, chairman of the department of Econog d, o receive its allocations until July or allows funds to be used where it is
attended a workshop on economietric demand "modeling held on August, he said. felt they are needed.
Friday, March 14. Perry reported on work being done at UNF on a Of the potential lump sum
model measuring demand and supply of electricity in the state of Carpenter said, E.T. York, proposal Carpenter said, "It
Florida and participated in the development of a common model chancellor designate of the State would be a new ball game.
scenario which will permit the UNF model to mesh with other continued frm g.1 University System, purported Something I know we would
models being developed around the state, that the State Legislature may welcome."

Weitsen to attend luncheon
Marty Weitsen, UNF state awards chairman, has been invited by Phi Beta La da w i s awa
Governor Reubin Askew toattend a luncheon on March 25 to honoraw a
Super Awards Winners. Phi Beta Lambda brought home Phi Beta Lambda, which means at 7:30 p.m., Building 9, Room
a,: trophy from the State PBL Future Business Leaders, is open 1421. Dr. William E. Wilkinson
Sinners to be notified contests held in Orlando in to all students interested in a will be the guest speaker on
l na tde March. business career. The next local Parliamentary Procedure.
The Academic Enrichment and Skills Center announced that In competition with chapters meeting is scheduled for April 9
because of the response from UNF students and because of the from all universities and junior
large number of entries which were received for the annual Writing colleges, Alpha Beta Beta
Contest winners will be notified by mail on or before April 30, 1975. Chapter (UNF) won second place
for chapter growth in member-
Gutknechtpaper published ship. Mrs. Barbara Fitzpatrick,
.c :e pthe local Treasurer, accepted the0
Dr. truce Gutknecht, associate professorof Education has had a trophy for the chapter at the
paper included in the ERIC system. Awards Banquet. Mrs. Donna fd
Lewis, chapter secretary, pre-a oo part-tim e jo
The paper, entitled "Basic Knowledge in Reading and Language sided as Mistress of Ceremonies
Arts Courses" has already ben published in the December 1974 at the Awards Banquet. Lewis isGood Pay ew Opportunities
issue of Research in Education. also a former officer in the *Good Pay SNew Opportunities
National PBL office. Fitzpatrick
H armon speaks on paradox and Nellie Boyd entered state *Career Training *Regular Promotions
competition in typewriting and
Dr. Gary L. Harmon, chairman of the department of language and are preparing for next years *Men and Women Eligible
literature, spoke twice recently on the program, "The Paradox of contests. :
Freedom." sponsored by the Florida Endowment for the THE TROPHY IS on display in
Humanities. The events were held at Jacksonville University's the office of Chapter Advisor, Dr. EARN $45 FOR ONE WEEKEND PER MONTH, AND TRAIN FOR
Swisher Auditorium and the Jacksonville Civic Auditorium Little Evelyn Brunson. A REWARDING CAREER IN THE TECHNICAL
Theatre. Harmon provided a humanist analysis of a dramatized SKILL OF YOUR CHOICE.
labor-management incident which occurred in Jacksonville in 1875. e aa Ldd LIdI

Young appointed assoc. ed. COLLEGE CAMPUS
REPRESENTATIVE AMERICA NEEDS US
Dr. Charles W. Young, accounting department, has been Needed to sell Brand Name
reappointed as an associate editor of "Financial Management" for Stereo Components to Students at "
his third consecutive one-year term. The magazine is the official lowest prices. Hi Commission, FOR MORE INFORMATION (No Obligation) CLIP AND MAIL TO:
journal of the Financial Management Association. NO Investment required. Serious I ARMY RESERVE OPPORTUNITIES, 4001 WEST DEVON AVE.
Tomlinson publishes paper Inquiries ONLY! FAD COM-. I RM. 106, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60646
PONENTS, INC. 20 Passaic Ave.
Fairfield, New Jersey 07006. NAME AGE__
Dr. William H. Tomlinson, management department, had his JERRY DIAMOND201-227-6814 ADDRESS
research paper. "Assessment of the National' Defense Executive Are you lonely? Need
Reserve," accepted by the National Technical Information Service Ar you lonely? Need a CITY STATE
of the U.S. Department of Commerce and the Defense companion whose playful, loving CIT
Document lion Center for publication.This report discusses the ned h e he ol T PHONEGO
recruitment, selection and training of management executives to fill weighs 9 b. Call Sylvia Freiman, IT PAYS TO GO TO MEETINGS "
government positions during national emergencies. i 737-5878.7 aftro 6:00.





THE HALYARD April 9, 1975 Page 3

continued from pg.1 t ad students at the bottom. the candidates from which you Student Govt. Assoc. a.m. to 8 p.m. for the two days of
Merwin stylized the new form as can choose on the 9th and 10th of A Ln A so the election.
a straight line, with faculty, April: MARILYN HARRISON ton
T a "* administration, students, and BILL MEDLIN THERE WILL BE two polling
atificati n career services on a more equal Career Service: LOWELL LORBEER places located on campus. Those
footing. Actually each of these The election procedure will whose names begin with A-M
divisions- is designed to be consist of a two-part ballot -- a may vote at the bookstore. Those
responsible for separate and RICHARD BEEMAN half sheet of paper, to either whose names begin with N-Z may
THE NEW CONSTITUTION is distinct areas of jurisdiction. MIKE VANDOLTEREN accept or reject the constitution as vote at a poll located in the central
structurally more liberal than the .Merwin and Mongar both feel KAREN KENT well as three color-coded ballots court-yard. Should the weather
general assembly, says Merwin. that this systme will facilitate Faculty: for each of the three divisions of become inclimate the polling
The General Assembly follows a cooperation and also be an faculty, career service, and place will be moved to the front of
more typical pyramid shaped augmentation to the college LEN LIPKIN student association. the administration building,
structure -- administration at the .atmosphere. The following are BILL MERWIN Polling hours will be from 9 Building 001.





Amended Constitution and Resolution

Approved by the Where not inconsistent with the policies, rules, regulations, laws, and
General Assembly statutes of the authorities cited above, the University subscribes to the 1966
IMPLEMET'rA L F:LTIONI March 13, 1975 Statement on Government of Colleges and Universities as jointly formulated and
adopted by the American Association of University Professors, the American
The Constitution shall be submitted for ratification to the members Council on Education, and the Association of Governing Boards of Universities
of the University community on the ninth and tenth days of April 1975. and Colleges; and to the Model Bill of Rights and Responsibilitiesl as developed
This election shall be conducted by the General Assembly Election Committee. by the Ccrnegie Commission on Higher Education and presented in Dissent and
There shall be two ballots: the General Ballot shall contain the question Disruption: Proposals for Consideration b the Campus
of ratification; the Association Ballots shall contain the nominees of the --t
General Assembly for t nporary Association officers who shall serve until
permanent officers have been elected. All nominations for temporary
officers shall be for the office of Association President. Ratification Article II
of the Constitution shall be by majority of valid General Ballots cast. Administration of the. University
Election of temporary officers shall be yy majority of the valid Association
Ballots cast by the potential member'b of each Association. The nominee in
each. Association receiving the highest number of votes shall be elected Section The esdent. The Presdent shall be the chief executive
temporary Association President; the nominee in each Association receivingbe the chief executive
the second highest number of votes shall be elected temporary Association officer of the University and shall be responsible for the entire administration,
Vice President. and supervision of the University, subject to the authorities cited in Article I.
The President shall lead in fostering and promoting education, research and
Within seven working days following ratification, the temporary service as the primary aims of the University., The President shall enforce the
President of each Association shall convene a meeting of the Association rules and regulations of the Board of Regents and hall interpret the proposals
for the purpose of electing a temporary Bylaw Committee of nine members. and actions of the University to the Board. The spe ific powers and duties of
Seven members of each Bylaw Committee shall be elected at largely Association the President ore designated in Chapter6, C-4,.Q of the A migistrative Cd
members for a term .of thirty days. The temporary President and Vice Presi- the resden re designated A ahcpteri 6 -4Q1 o..th Cn,. tiu As si n.
dent of each Association shall also serve as members of the Bylaw Committee; of the State of Florida. All actions of the Constituent Assbci4tio~s and
the Association President shall serve as chairperson of the Bylaw Committee. University Senate relating to general University policy shall be submitted to
Each Association shall have thirty days in which to draft and approve its the President for approval. The President, shall express approval or disapproval
bylaws. within ten working days,. or as soon thereafter as is possible, ,by means of a.
written executive order. The executive order shall. cbntain a statement as,to
Prior to implementation of the bylaws, each Association shall submit the basis for disapproval, and a copy shall be filed with the presiding officer.
a draft to a temporary review committee appointed by the President of the of the affected legislative body. The President, or a designee of the President,
University, which shall evaluate the bylaws for conformity with. this t e
Constitution, Board of Regents policies, and the laws of the State of shall communicate the reasons for any delay beyond ten working days to the
Florida. The Review Committee shall have seven members: two faculty, two presiding officer of the oafected legislative body.
student, two career service and one administrative and professional.
The Review Committee shall convene the meetings prescribed above in the The President shall be appointed by the Board of Regents. Upon the
event that the temporary officers fail to convene such meetings. rpsgnation, retirement, permanent incapacity, or death of the President, .a
S ... < ... ... "- .. special.committee of eleven members shall be consmtituted. The Associations
The Review Committee shall review the bylaws of any Association within s alcommttee o members sl e titute. Te Associatios
15 days of their receipt. The Review Committee may change the bylaws of any shall elect from among their members representatives as follows: six faculty,
Association to conform with the Constitution or return the bylaws of any three students, and one career service employee. Members of the Senate shall
Association for further revision. If the Review Committee fails to act elect one administrative -ad professional member to the committee. This
within the specified time period, the bylaws shall automatically take effect. Committee shall offer advice and recommendations concerning the selection of
Each Association shall have fifteen days after its bylaws take effect to a President to the Board of Regents,
elect permanent officers, standing committees, and delegates to the Senate.
The President shall be a voting member of all college faculties and shall:
If any Association fails to draft and adopt bylaws in the required be a non-voting ex officio member of all University councils and committees,
period, the Review Committee shall have fifteen days in which to draft bylaws' be xp t as povi ex offino member of all Univ sha ty councti and committees,
for that Association and submit them to the affected membership for except as provided herein. The President shall be a non-voting ex officio
ratification. If that Association fails to approve the bylaws, the Review member of all Associations and the Senate. The President shall have the power
Committee shall have fifteen days in which to submit them for ratification to appoint such committees and other groups as are deemed necessary to aid in
by the other Associations. the performance of the duties of the Office. Any power or duty of the President
may be delegated to.any member of the faculty or staff of the University. ,
When all members of the Senate have been elected and appointed, the
Senate shall be convened by the President of the University for the purpose Section 2. The Chief Academic Officer. he Chief Academic Officer
of electing members to the Judiciary Committee. The President shall serve shall he a voting member of all col and shall be a non-voting
as the presiding officer of the Senate until a Moderator has been appointed. shall be a voting member of all college faculties and shall be a on-voting
The Judiciary Committee shall have thirty days within which to draft the ex officio member fall University councils and committees concernedwith
bylaws of the Senate. The bylaws of the Senate shall take effect when academic matters, except as provided herein.
approved by the Senate and the Associations..
The Chief Academic Officer shall be appointed by the President and
Upon constitution of the University Senate, each legislative body confirmed by the Board of Regents. The college deans, department chairpersons,
shall review those portions of the Academic Plan and University policies, and the University faculty shall provide to the President annual evaluations of
priorities, regulations and practices relative to its function with all the Chief Academic Officer's performance as an administrator a dem
deliberate speed. the Chief Academic Officers performance as an administrator and academic
leader. When a vacancy occurs in the Chief Academic Office, the President
shall convene a meeting of the Faculty Associatlio for the purpose of providing
1Unless otherwise specified, "days" in this Resolution refers to information to the faculty and electing a representative Advisory Committee to
calendar days'. .. assist in the selection of a successor. After consideration of the requirements :
of the position to be filled, qualifications of the candidates for the position, -
and the Advisory Committee's recommendations, the President shall request
Appiuved by the confirmation of the appointment from the Board of Regents. This request shall
General Assembly be accompanied by the Advisory Committee's report.
March 13, 1975
Section 3. Other Administrative Officers. The President may appoint
other administrative officers with the confirmation of the Board of Regents. These
UNIVESITY CF C TH F RIDA NSTITUTIN officers shall have such powers and exercise such-duties as the President may
designate. Except as provided herein, the President shall constitute appropriate
advisory committees in the appointment of senior administrative officers.
Article I
Government of the University In the case of the absence, death, or Incapacitating illness of the President,
the senior administrative officer designated by the President and recorded with
the Board of Regents shall have the full powers and duties of the President until
The University of North Florida is a State supported institution of higher the Board of Regents appoints an acting President. A copy of the President's
education under the supervision and control of the Board of Regents of the State communication to the Board of Regents designating the order of succession shall
University System of Florida and the State Board of Education of Florida. The be filed with the Moderator of the Senate.
powers of the Board of Regents are specified in Chapters 239, 240, 241, and
243, Florida Statutes. The composition and responsibilities of the State Board of
Education are enumerated in Article IX, Sections 2 and 3, of the Florida Constitution Article III
and Chapters 229 and 240, Florida Statutes. The Provisions of this Constitution are Administration and Organization of Academic Units
subject to the policies, rules, and regulations of the Board of Regents and the State
Board of Education and to the laws and statutes of the State of Florida.
Section I. The Colleges. For purposes of academic administration the
This Constitution establishes the right of University officers, faculty, University shall be organized into Colleges which shall be the basic degree
students, administrative and professional staff, and career service personnel to
participate freely without fear of sanction in the governance of the University -
as provided for in this Constitution. Shall be reprinted in the University of North Florida Catalog.





Page 4 April 9, 1975 THE HALYARD




Implementation Resolution......

granting units of the University. Colleges may be established, altered, or Senate, B) a Career Service Association, C) a Faculty Association, and
abolished by the board of Regents. The normal procedures prior to such action D) a Student Government Association. Each legislative body shall have exclusive
by the Board shall include a recommendation by the President, who shall consult jurisdiction over specifically enumerated concerns. No legislative body shall
with the Constituent Associations. The Colleges may contain departments or delegate its enumerated concerns to any external person, committee, Association,
other units necessary to conduct their programs. or other legislative body. Reciprocity and equitable representation of interests in
the composition of the committees of the Associations shall be provided for, except
as herein designated. There shall be no more than twelve voting members on any
^Each College shall be administered by a Dean who shall be a member of one committee.
the faculty of the College and the presiding officer of the College faculty. The
duties of the Dean shall include: general administrative supervision of the Each Association shall practice direct rule, unless two-thirds of its members
College programs; promotion, direction, and support of the education, research, voting choose a form of representative rule. Associations that adopt representative
and service activities of the College; recommendation to the Chief Academic rule shall apportion representatives among the chosen constituent units on the basis
Officer concerning faculty appointments, promotions, and the award of tenure; of population.
preparation of College budget requests and administration of the approved budget;
and encouragement of the spirit of learning within the College-. The Dean may Each Association shall annually elect a President and Vice President from
have such associate and ass' tant deans as are necessary to assist in the performance among its members. Permanent and temporary officers shall perform such duties
of the responsibilities of the office. as each Association designates in its bylaws. The bylaws of each legislative
body shall provide for the removal by election of officers, committee members,
Each Dean shall be nominated by the Chief Academic Officer, appointed and delegates who fail to execute faithfully the duties of their offices. Legis-
by the President, and confirmed by the Board of Regents. Department Chair- lative bodies shall fill all vacancies promptly through election or appointment
persons in the College and the College faculty shall provide to the Chief Academic in the affected body for the unexpired term of the office or position. Elected
Officer detailed annual evaluations of the Dean's performance as an administrator officers, delegates, and committee members shall serve no more than two con-
and academic leader. The Chief Academic Officer'i recommendations regarding secutlve terms in the same position.
reappointment shall be accompanied by all evaluations.-" When a vacancy occurs
in the. .Dan's office, thie Chief Academic Officer shall convene a meeting of No person shall be a member of more than one Association. Each legis-
the Colle(q faculty for the purpose of providing information to the faculty and ltive body shall be the judge of membership where questions of eligibility arise.
o electing an advisory committee to.ossist in the selection of a successor. After An officer designated by each legislative body shall receive motions, resolutions,
consideration of the requirements ,of the position to be filled, qualifications of and proposals from its members, and shall place all such matters on its legislative
the candidates for the position, and the Advisory Committee's recommendations, calendar in the order that they ore received. Legislative calendars shall serve
the Chief Academic Officer shall recommend to the President a candidate for as a partial agenda for the regular meetings of all legislative bodies. Items may
appointment to the posrlon. The recommendation shall be accompanied by the be removed from the: calendar by a majority of the: members voting for such removal
S Advisoy Committee'sreort. for any reason including immediate action by the body or referral to the appropriate
committee. The agenda for regular meetings of legislative bodies shall include the
SEach College faculty shall exercise control over the academic affair of its reports of standing committees in alphabetical order. Standing and special committees
College subject to the approval of the Faulty Assoclation, the President, and the shall deal expeditiously with all matters they receive and shall promptly report their
Board of ~egents. The Collegqe-faculty hUllb determine the arrangement and recommendations to the Jppropriate legislative body. Prior notice shall be given
S content -qf the curriculum; establish requirements.for graduation and the degrees of all meetings. Legislative bodies shall not allow the use of proxy votes.
to be conferred; and recommend to the President the granting of degrees to those
students who have completed specified requirements. Section 2. University Senate.i--The University Senate shall be concerned
With long range planning and University advancement; University goals, priorities,
Each College faculty shall include all person -holding regular faculty appoint- and practices; community and public relations; public events, graduation cere-
ments and participating jn the instruction, research, or service programs of the monies,-and campus speakers; orientation and registration; administrative organi-
College. The President of the University and the Chief Academic Officer shall zation, programs, and services; University rights and responsibilities, and appeals
be ex officio members of each College faculty. from University academic regulations; and the evaluation of University programs.
SAny evaluation by the Senate of administrative, academic, or student programs shall
Section 2. The Departments. The Department shall be the fundamental unit have the status of an advisory opinion to the relevant Associations and the units
of ocademic organization for instruction, research, and service. Other units which involved. Senate decisions regarding these concerns, approved by the President of
may be designated as components of a Colege by-the Fculty Association shall also the University, shall become the organization, goals, priorities, practices, and
be regarded as Departments. Departments may be established, altered, transferred policies of the University. The President shall not approve Senate actions or decisons
R *.mro iiBm o0-ez-oAI miof -iiA6Jb.' Th Inormal which ednflict with the approved actions or decisions of the Associations. The
1... I isi e - he llA include a recmmenda4n by Senate shall neither veto, interfere with, nor review the legislative deliberations
the President, who shal conflt with the Faculty Associatfor : and decisions of the Associations, except as provided herein.

Each Department shall be administered by a Chairperson who shall have The University Senate shall have thirty-five members: the President and
general dmnistrative responsibility for Its programs. The duties of the Vice President of each Association; eight delegates elected by each Association
Department Chairperson shall include: providing leadership in the development from among its members; and five administrative and professional staff who are
and evaluation of Instruction, research, and service programs; conducting periodic not members of an Association, appointed by the President of the University.
evaluations of Department faculty. in accordance with Department, College, and Student members shall be elected for one year terms; all others shall be elected
University policies; insuring compliance with. University policies, in regard to for tw6,year terms. The President of the University, the Chief Academic Officer,
faculty participation in matters of app0oient;m promotion and. tenure; recommend- the Chief Business Officer, and the Chief Student Officer of the University shall
ing to the College Dean appointments, salary adjustments, promotions, and the be non-voting ex officio members. The Moderator of the Senate, who shall
award of tenure; preporng and administering the Department budget; and super-' preside over meetings, shall be nominated by -the President of the University and
vising personnel and departmental affairs. : confirmed by the Senate for a term of one year. The Moderator shall be a non-
voting member, except in case of tie, and shall not serve as a voting member
The Departmenft Charperson shall be nominated by the Dean of the College, of any Senate Committee.
and appointed by the Chief Academic Offi.efi' The Department faculty shall
provide to the College Dean detailed evaluations annually of the Department The Senate shall elect seven standing committees-and such special and
Chairperson's performance as an administrator and aoadednic leader. The Dean's appellate committees as its members deem appropriate. Elections shall occur
recommendation regarding reappointment shall be accompanied by the faculty annually except in the case of the Judiciary Committee. The standing committees
evaluations. When a vacancy occurs in the Chairperson's office, the Dean shall of the Senate shall include: A) Academic Appeals; B) Administrative Organ-
convene a'mieting of the Department faculty forth -purpose of providing inform- ization and Services; C) Community Relations; D) Judiciary; E) Planning,
ationo o the fai6ult6 nd Ilecting anr. Advia'ry "Committee to assist in the selection Goals, and Advancement; F) Program Evaluation; and G) Public Events,
of a successoP Afte ti6 f'fe tquirements. o position Orientation, and Graduation. The composition of committees, except as provided
filled, qcutfifcatons of 'te ca,daiates for the position, and the Advisory Committee's herein,, shall be set forth in the bylaws of the Senate.
recommendations, th6 Dd shaollecbA:oir ppoointment to the Chief AciAifnlc
Officer. 'n;4P ono~ i nd6lcl~n_ Od l bl r'kmlpanied by the Advisory Committee's A) The Academic Appeals Committee shall review student appeals from
Report. University admission requirements, academic suspension and probation regulations,
,Theo e c D rte.... l o ..L .. .. .... -h .. and re-admission policies, and shall hear requests for variance from University- .,
The f6ilty of each- 'Dpar rnent shall :consist of those who hold the rank of wide degree requirements.
professodrasoiociate professor assistant professor, or instructor and regularly parti-
cipote in the teaching, riearch, 'or service programs of the Department. 'The B) The Administrative Organization and Services Committee shall evaluate
faculty of each Deportment shall be responsible for conducting Department programs, and recommend policies regarding the general administrative organization of the
Section 3. Divisions. Division constitute academic nit which conduct University and the support services not within the jurisdiction of the Associations..
specialized program thn the jurisdlFtion of the Co1lege. Divisions 'shall C) The Community Relations Committee shall evaluate and recommend policies
not be divided into deprtm s. and practices regarding interpretation to the community of the objectives and achieve-
;- ments of the University. The Committee shall be concerned- with fostering cooperation
Division may be established, altered, 'or abolished by the Boardof Regents. and understandinU between the University and the community. -.
The normal procedures prior to such action by the Board shall include a recommend-
ation by the President, who shall consult with the Constituent Associations. 'D) The Judiciary Committee shall hear all cases of interpretation arising
under this Constitution, the bylaws of the Associations and the Senate, and all
Each Division shall be administered by a Chairpers6n who shall be a member
of the faculty of the Division and the presiding officer of the Division faculty,. cases rising under the Modei Bill of Rights and Responsibilities.1 The decisions
The authorities, duties, and responsibilities of the Division, the Division Chairperson, of the Committee shall not be subject to approval of the full Senate and shall be
and the Division faculty shall be the same.as those specified for the Colleges, binding. The proceedings of the Committee shall conform to:the appellate practices -
Department Chairpersons, and'the Department faculty in Section .I and Secition 2 of the Board of- Regents and- the Courts of the State. of Florida and the United States.

.of this Article. Each decision of the Committee shall include a written opinion reflecting the basis
for the decision. All such decisions shall be delivered promptly to the presiding
i cLe IV officers of all legislative bodies and the President of the University as well as the
SL" t Article IV of affected parties. All lff" acted parties bhnll be entitled to counsel of their choice.
Legislative Organization of'the University All hearings of t1,e Committee shall be private unless one of the parties requests
otherwise.

Section i. Legislative Bodies. All legislative powers of the University The Judiciary Committee of the Senate shall have seven members. The Senate
shall be vested in e-gverning Constituent Associations and a University Senote shall elect one cr,:eer service, one facutty,, one administrative and professional, and
with limited powers. There shall be four legislative bodies: A) a University o une tudent ..presen':.ive from among its membership to the Committee biennially.





THE HALYARD April 9, 1975 Page 5



Amended Constitution and

Additionally, each Association shall directly elect one representative annually
to the Committee from among its membership. Vacancies on the Committee shall E) The Instruction, Research, and Service Committee shall review and
be filled promptly by the appropriate legislative body for the duration of the recommend policies regarding undergraduate and graduate degree requirements,
unexpired term. academic programs and priorities, major changes in the University curriculum,
E) The Planning, Goals, and Advancement Committee shall review and program evaluation, organization of academic units, grading practices, teaching
recommend plans for University growth, development, advancement, goals, and methods, sponsored research, public service programs, continuing education, and
priorities. the instruction and research budget.

F) The Program Evaluation Committee shall evaluate academiic, staff, and F) The Promotion and Tenure Committee shall review the nominations of
S rrm t mmtt t m t College Deans for faculty promotion and tenure and shall submit its recommenda-
student programs. tions to the Chief Academic Officer of the University.
G) The Public Events, Orientation, and Graduation Committee shall review
and recommend policies regarding public events, scheduling of space for public Section 5. Student ovrnmn
events, and the invitation and compensation of campus speakers. The Committee As section sh Sal dent government .Asociation. The Student Government
shall also review and recommend policies regarding the orientation of new members the evalussociation and establishment of student programs; student activity and service fee;lubs
of the University community, student recruitment, registration of students, and the the evaluation and estabishment of student programs; student activities, clubs and
conduct of graduation ceremonies, selection of commencement speakers, and nomi- organizations, pub ri nbctons, and services; student morale, welfare, and conduct;
nation of candidates for honorary degree. student compensation, fringe benefits, and working conditions; student financial aid,
tion of candidates for honorary degree. health, and childcare services; student recognition and awards; intramural and
Section 3. Career Service Association. The Career Service Association shall extramural athletics; and such other activities as may pertain directly to students.
be concerned with staff evaluation, prom 3. Careerociati, a oyoal, Decisions regarding these matters reached by the Association shall be forwarded to
be concerned with staff evaluation, promotion, and employment status; staff morale, the Chief Student Officer who shall transmit them to the President of the University
cooperation, and ethics; Staff compensation, fringe b neflts, and working conditions; with recommendations. Upon approval of the President, these decisions shall become
and such other activities as directly affect the staff. Decisions regarding these the polices nd patisUp of the Uni y. dent, t
matters reached by the Association shall be forwarded to the Chief Business Officer the policies nd practices of the Unversty.
who shall transmit them to the University President with recommendations. Upon All part-time and ulltime undrgrduate and graduate tu except
approval of the President and other authoritative bodies, these decisions shall become members of the faculty and staff taking cd rses under the tee' W er Policy, shall
the policies and practices of the University. be members of the Student Government Association. The Association shall elett
Persons whohave achieved permanent stat in career service positionsfour standing committees annually and such special and appellate committees as it
All persons who&have achieved permanent status in career service positions shall deem appropriate. The standing committees of the Association shall include:.
shall be members of the Association. The Association shall elect three standing A) Activities and Organiza tiohn; B) Progrc mand Budget; C) Student Aall in;cde:
committees annually and such special committees as it shall deem appropriate. The and and) Programnd Budget ) Student irRelations
standing committees.,shall include: A) Development and Training Programs,
B) Staff Affairs, and C) Staff Relations. The composition of the committees shallTe
bThe compositton-of the committees shall be set forth in the bylaws of the
be set forlh in the Association bylaws. The Chief Business Cfficer or a designee Association, except as provided herein. The Faculty and Career Service Associations
shall serve as a non-voting ex officio member of all standing committees of the shall each elect one voting representative annually to all the standing committees
Association. The Faculty and Student Associations shall each elect one voting *o the Student Governmenti rerssciat The Faul y Assocatlon shall anncommittee
member annually to all standing committees of the Career Service Association, except ofct two additional voting mbc to. the ogra Association shall Committee. nnu
in the case of the Staff Relations Committee which shall have no outside representation. Caee twoervie Assoiation shall annall elet o aiolod Bdg e t Committee. The
Career Service Association shall annually elect two additional voting members to
A) The Development and Training Programs Committee shall review and the Student Affairs Committee. The Chief Student Officer or a designee shall
recommend policies regarding professional development and educational opportunities serve as a non-voting ex officio member of all standing committees of the Association.
for members of the Associations
A) The Activities and Organizations Committee shall review and recommend
B) The Staff Affairs Committee shall review policies set forth by the University policies regarding organization, recognition, and funding of student orgonizaotons,
and the State Department of Administration, Division of Personnel. The concerns ad shall foster communication and coordination among clubs and organizations. The
of this Committee shall include: classification, promotion and employment status; Co ttee shall also be concerned with the authoration and funding of student
compensation, fringe benefits, and working conditions. I nd ntramur -extrmurl athletics.

C) The Staff Relations Committee shall review and recommend policies and ) The Program and Budget Committee shall annually hear requests for the
procedures regarding issues of morale, ethics, and cooperation. creation and abolition of student programs, evaluate funded programs, hold budget
So hearings for authorized programs, prepare the activity and service fee budget, and
S .. present its bud, t, recommendations to the Association. The Association may, in
Section 4. Faculty Association. The Faculty Association shall be concerned Itts byrealloceatoe authority tohe Program and Budget Committee to moke
with faculty appointment, retention, and development; academic programs, organi- limed reallocations once the activity and service fee budget has been adopted.
nation, and standards; academic services and continuing education; faculty grievances C) The Student Affair Committee shall prepare and submit an annual
and advancement; and such other matters as may pertain directly to the University he Student Affairs ott h e ssoiatin t ha also r
instruction, service, and research programs. Decisions regarding these matters reached evaluation of the Office of Student Affairs to the Association. It shall also review
by the Faculty Association shall be forwarded to the Chief Academic Officer who and recommend policies regarding student compensation, fringe benefits, working
shal transmit them to the resident with recommendations. When approved by the conditions, student financial aid, health, and childcare services. The Student
shal! transmit them to the President with recommendations. When approved by the Affairs Committee shall be consulted prior to and regarding the appointment of
President, the decisions shall become the policies, practices, and regulations of the a profsioionald staff In the Office of nt Affairs.
University. all professional staff in the Office of Student Affaifs.

All persons holding reguolr faculty appointments and participating in the D) The Student Relations Committee shall review and recommend policies
instruction, research, or service programs of the University; all assistant, associate, tables and student honor court to be concernrds. The Committee shall academic
and full librarians, and the University Registrar shall be members of the Faculty tbisgrhty of students. mbhip on t honor court to be e retd icted to
Association. The Faculty Association shall elect six standing committees annually ite ty of s student er si on te ono cot sa e esticte to
and such special and appellate committees as it shall deem appropriate. The he members of e entGovernment aton
standing committees of the Faculty Association shall include: A) Academic Standards;Article V
B) Academic Support Services; C) Faculty Affairs;' D) Faculty Grievance; Article V
E) Instruction, Research, and Service; and F) Promotion and Tenure. Amendments

The composition of committees shall be determined by the members of the This Constitution may be amended by the majority of the members of each
Faculty Association and set forth in its bylaws, except as provided herein. The Asociation voting. Any Association, but not the Senate, may initiate constitu-
Career Service and Student Government Associations shall each elect one voting tional amendments. If all Associations foil t concur in the approval of the
representative annually to each of the stndffig committees of the 'Faculty AsC ciation; amendment, the amendment nall take effect only when two thirds of the members
except the Faculty Grievance and Promotion and Tenure committees, which shall have voting of any two Associations approve it. All propose to amend the Contiltution
no outside representation. The Student Government Association shall elect tw o and bylaws shol lbe mbde available to th legislative bodies empowered to amend
additional voting members annually to the following committees: Instruction, Reser; -, ther at least two weeks prior to consideration.
and Service; Academic Standards; and Academic Support Services. Either the Chiefts to this Constitution must be pprovd by the rsidet of the
Academic Officer of the University or a designee shall serve as a non-voting ex Univerity and the Board of Regents. Constitution must approved by the resident of e
officio member of all standing committees, except the Faculty Grievance Committee. y aton of the resideand the Board of Regents. The Cons n theay be of administrative
by action of the President or the Board of Regents. 'In the case of odministrative
A) The Academic Standards Committee shall review anmd recommend regulations writennt the President shall inform the Associations and th Senate of such action
concerning admission and readmission of students to the University, suspension of by writtenorder containing th reasons for the action.
students, academic loads, withdrawal from courses and from the University, awards wn bylaws o
of credit, award of ocodemic honors, and maintenance of academic idegriy Each Asoclation may amend its own bylows by a majority of the members voting.
of credit, award of academic hon, andmaintenance of acdemponthe recommendation of the Senate, th bylaws of the Senate may be oaended
B) The Academic Support Services Committee shall review and recommend by th con currenllce of a majority of the members of two Associations voting. No
policies, regulations, and practices regarding academic and career advisement, oc andnt t blo of th Sente.
library development, instructional media, computer support, cooperative education,
and academic enrichment.

C) The Faculty Affairs Committee shall review and recommend policies Article VI
regarding faculty appointments, evaluation, promotion, tenure, termination, discipline, .Implmn on
salaries, working conditions, accounting of faculty activities, fringe benefits, .
professional development, outside employment, released time, ethics, and affirmative The G mbly hal nil onstion
action. The Gerera.. Assembly she l.f f titon until this Constitution has
been rotified d the Association bylawr'hve keen approved. This Constitution
D) The Faculty Grievance Committee shall hear cases as prescribed in the shall be submitted for ratification to the. neubersf the University community
Rules of Procedure Governing Facuty Grievances of the State University Systehe. no later than April 14, 1975. Ratificatton qhell be by majority of valid ballots
cast. After ratification this Constitutio~nttl^ ht t"the status of Interim Articles
of Governance until approved by the BoiMrd of Refints.
1Shall be reprinted in the University of North Florida Catalog. ''

2As specified in the State Department of Administration, Division of Persnonel, I
Rules and Regulations. All currently enrolled students nd regular members of the staff and faculty.
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Page 8 April 9, 1975 THE HALYARD




Venture:A journeyinto the unknown
























"Once I completed my general Pachori, assistant professor of a majority of students reveals that
education I had hoped that I Literature, some of his students Venture courses are not really
would be able to concentrate on put in more time and effort and taught differently from traditional This "depth" article on
my career instead of wasting my actually turn in better papers than courses. the Venture program at
time." in his major courses. UU UNF was completed by
Dr. Gary Harmon, Literature students working as a
"Venture courses are a must The UNF catalog states, "The Department head, states, "Some team in last quarter's
for an overall, well-rounded student may find himself reading Venture courses cannot be taught Depth Reporting course.
education." a number of books, articles, differently, such as literature The team included Ricky
essays, newspapers, or the like; courses in which the format is the Crews, Ellyn Davenport,
"The number of hours of or he may be experiencing films, same as traditional literature Joyce Johnson, Mike
Venture studies should be events, field trips or visiting courses." Malone and Steve
reduced from 35 to 20 hours." consultants in a portion of the Senappe.
course. Such experience contrast The Venture course program
THESE STATEMENTS repre- with courses that normally use was the idea of Dr. Willard Ash,
sent the range of students' traditional texts. In fact, Dean of the College of Arts and
comments in an intensive study of textbooks normally will not be Sciences. According to Ash, while
UNF's unique Venture studies used in Venture courses." he was head of the Mathamatics The way in which the Venture Venture courses, along with the
program. The results of the study Department at the University of program is set up, the idea for a procedure of offering new
were varied, with two-thirds of An overwhelming majority of West Florida he felt that many of particular course originates with courses, were set up by the
those polled feeling the Venture students felt the time required for his students needed to broaden the instructor. The instructor Venture Course Committee.
program is worthwhile. -study in Venture courses was the themselves more. clears the idea with his Natural Sciences department
same as in other courses. department head, then with Ash. head, Dr. Ed Helay, heads this
The study, conducted by However, more than one-third of ASH DEVISED a program of The course can then be offered. committee.
students in a7 Depth Reporting the surveyed students responded evolving elective studies that Concerning the first two years
class here, involved interviews that grading is harder in Venture would be relative to the times and The idea for one Venture of education, Healy said that the
with students, faculty and courses than in traditional offer study outside of a student's course, Genetics and Society, was courses were just introduction
administrators concerned with courses. field without them having to originated by a group of students. and not in-depth enough. "Most
the program, as well as a survey compete with majors. courses are survey, Venture
of 200 current students in the ANOTHER VIEW expressed by THE EVALUATION policies of courses are not just survey," said
Venture program. This study was Healy.
compared with two previous polls
taken for the Dean's office by the According to Dr. James
Venture Course Committee. SCrooks, Assistant Dean of the
(uULe LL vL a~ ~College of Arts and Sciences, a
Polls conducted by the Venture Venture II program is now in the
Course Committee over the past planning stages.
two years dealt mainly with a /
particular course rather than the Based on your own experience,/s grading generally easier or harder in a Venture course? IN THIS PROGRAM students
program as asawhole. : would have the option of taking a
Easier 62 more in-depth Venture course
THE DEPTH Reporting class Harder 77 that would involve team teaching
survey found a difference of Same 61 of two or more instructors. These
opinion between what the faculty new Venture courses would last
and students feel the -Venture Do you think the time required for study in Venture courses is two quarters and be worth 15
program should be. Many credit hours.
students seem to think Venture About the same as other courses 109 An appeal to the National
courses should not require. as Less than other course 39 Endowment for the Humanities,
much time and effort as More than other courses 52 an organization that grants
traditional. courses, and that ,the money to individuals and schools
grading should be easier. This Are Venture courses you have taken really different from non-Ventue courses in approach used by for the study of humanities, has
could be due to the fact that F's in instructors? been made for funds for the
Venture courses are not recorded Venture II program. If the appeal
and D's are recorded only upon Yes 89 is met, the program could be
the request of the student. No 111 offered as soon as the fall quarter
1975.
One student, Katherine Staub, Do you feel the required number of credit ,hrs (30) of Venture studies is: The Depth Reporting class
stated that Venture courses survey found a majority of the
demand as much time as other Too much 116 students polled would be willing
courses. "This tends to frustrate Too little .7. to take the Venture II courses.
people when they feel they should About right 77
be dedicating the majority of their THE INVESTIGATION found
time to their major coursework," Would you be willing to take a Venture course that lasted 2 quarters for 15 hours? that discrepancies exist between
said Staub. Yes 109 faculty and students as to course
es 109 workload, grading and the
Another student, Ronnie Smith No 91 approach used by the instructors.
said that some Venture courses A wide margin of students feel
tend to be too technical. "They Do you feel the Venture Studies program in general is worthwhile? that too many credit hours in
are confusing to the non-major," Venture studies are required.
he said. Yes 138 However, the majority of those
No 62 students polled felt that the
"I DON'T THINK Venture overall program was worthwhile.
studies are supposed to be taught What college are you in?
as a crip course. You're here to As one student put it, "Just
learn," Dr. Gerald Stine of the Business 26 like any other course, it depends
Natural Sciences Department Arts & Sciences 159 on the instructor as to whether or
said. According to Dr. Satya Education 12 not it will be beneficial."
Other 3
^_________________________________




______ THE HALYARD Ari 9. W75 P"-
The Halyard
Editor and General Manager... Assoc. Prof. W.J. Roach 00 0
Executive Editor... Ron Feinberg
Managing Editor... Drew Brunson
Editorial Page Editor Frank Stanfield


Ratify the 'TOGAT
ET AATMST -I N

Constitution eTAE AT THuNr1
CARTON* o G "RaOU4 tioAOt49
We are still opposed to those sections of the
proposed constitution which we criticized in our
last issue. However, our representatives in the
General Assembly have endorsed the document,
which will soon be presented to the university O.
community for final ratification.I T O F
By this time, it would be better to accept the j
constitution as it is than to prolong the GA's N O
existence. Last month there was still time for the
GA to send the document back to the Constitution
Committee for the necessary changes to protect
student interests, but now UNF should expedite Gov. Askew -More lht less 1
the transition to a new government. Gv.A" .kew--Mr

THE GOVERNMENT described in the Draft
Constitution will be a major improvement over By DREW BRUNSON The Governor also recom- the faculty in e State University
the General Assembly, even for students. The Managing Editor mended that OPS (Other Personal System may have trouble keeping
e Services) be reduced by 16.9 abreast of the latest develop- S
separation of powers provided by the percent except where the ments in their fields."
establishment of constituent associations should It is difficult to understand Instruction and Research Func- In fact the quality of education
ensure both protection of rights and efficiency of why, when budget cuts are tion is concerned. There the offered by Florida schools may
necessary, it is the academic budget will be reduced by so ie diminish since Askew also
operations. With one exception, no group will be programs which are the first to be 25 percent. recommended abolishing 250
allowed to vote on matters beyond their proper affected. Why should the areas directly present positions.
Judging from Governor As- involved with the educational WHEN THE GOVERNOR is
concern, kew's budget recommendations function of the university be hit so considering the budge t for the
for 1975-76, he is more concerned hard? Education is, after all, the educational system in Florida he
Once it is implemented, the constitution must with having enough money to pay basic reason why students attend shouldfirst consider the quality of
Sthe utility bills than he is about a university. the education that the State will
be amended immediately to eliminate voting the quality of education in the The Governor cut back even be able to offer under that
faculty representation from the students' state of Florida. further on the educational budget. That is probably the most
Program and Budget Committee. Students have IN HIS RECOMMENDED function of the universities by important consideration which
the s e measure of elf- BUDGET Askew suggested that recommending no funding, for could be made since education is
eight to the same measure of selfrule no funds be allocated for salary Consultants, Fellowships, Faculty the most important aspect of
guaranteed to faculty and career service increases for any category .of. Development or Faculty Retrain- today's society.
personnel, personnel. ing. Dr. -"'.T. York, --chcet or
Certainly, with the current THIS SEEMS TO MEAN THAT designate of the SUS stated that
economic crisis the budget must no one can be brought in to help ''...it is obvious that extremely
The philosophy underlying the GA Was be reduced in some way, but to improve an academic program (to serious problems will face every
laudable, but the system has proven unworkable state flatly that there will be no the detriment of the students), no university in the system unless
in practice. It was hoped that a spirit of salary increases while also stating student can receive support to the level of funding recommend-
Sthat funds for utilities will be continue advanced work, the ed in the Governors budget can
cooperativeness would be fostered by bringing increased by 31.7 percent over universities won't be able to grow be substantially improved in the
together all segments of the university 1974-75 expenditures seems since there will be no funds legislative process.'
community into single govenig body. tead, incongruous.. available for faculty growth and The question is -' Will it?
community into single governing body. Instead, ic ruus.
the body has provided a convenient vehicle for Long hair:
special-interest cliques to impede its functions by i
such tactics as prolonging senseless debates over on tofem in sm
irrelevant issues. I II O lI

UNF STUDENTS have often been criticized for By DOUG SHAVER "The Feminine Mystique," the On can hardly ride in a car with
Production Manager manifesto of contemporary fem- the windows down. It cani even be
their apathy toward the GA, as manifested by, for inism. Then came the 1964 Civil a nuisance in bed. All these
example, their poor attendance record at Sometime last year, columnist Rights Act, giving women equal problems get even worse in hot
assembly meetings. This apparent lack of Max Rafferty--the fogyest of old rights under federal laws.' weather.
S et fogies--jubilantly announced that ONE VEXING problem, how- Therefore, the more radical
'interest has been used as an argument against long hair for men was on its way ever, has frustrated the feminists -feminists decided that. since they
establishing a student government.. out. A few weeks ago the from the time of Susan B. hadtoputupwith childbearing,
Times-Union published an article Anthony. Most of them have at least we men couldiput up with
on the local trend toward shorter realized that there is no way they the hassle of long hair.
Perhaps these students have not been so hair styles for men. will be able to compel men to get The Beatles--po6"t'lunsuspect-
uninterested as they have been frustrated. They This trend, although tech- pregnant and have babies, and in~ fellows--were :'their first
may well have decided that tie GA was next tO nically a victory for Us Men this bothers the hell out of them. dupes. Then they infiltrated the
may well have decided that the useless as a means for enacting policies which an unfortunate concession to human reproduction is grossly men with talk of freedom and
would have served their interests well. The radical feminism. You see, the unfair to the female. Women individuality. Finally, .they ap-
proposed Student Government Association is male rong-hair movement was sociologists have tried, I suppose, pealed, to our patriotism and
proposed Student ove ment Association IS really a plot perpetratdon us by to prove that the situation is a religion, reminding us that people
certain to be a more useful body for meeting the Women's Liberation Move- cultural phenomenon created by like Benjamin Franklin and Jesus
student needs, meant. male chauvinists; but so far they had long hair, too.
THIS IS NO coincidence that have: failed.: .No amount of MANY OF US fell for it,
men started letting their hair and- consciousness-raising is going to thinking we were doing our own
FOR THAT MATTER, each constituent beards. grow during the same change this difference in thing. Actually, we were paying
association will provide a more efficient means of period that Women's Liberation male-female roles, for our refusal to bear children.
became a. national issue. D hi th ha
serving those who will be represented therein. You may remember that it all Well, the Women's Libe Doesthis mean, then, that we
rationists had to compensate should start getting haircuts
Delay tactics and power struggles will not be started with the Beatles, or so we somehow. So in the early sixties again? Certainly not. The
have been ledto believe. Ed somehow. So, intheearly sixties again? 'Certainly not. The
precluded, but let us hope that each body will Sullivan presented them to this they discovered something else Women's Liberationists would
find it easier to deal with troublemakers of its country in late 1963. Many of men had been getting away with: like nothing better than for us to
.were shocked at theirtresses, but short hair... admit' that we are unable or
wn kind. were shocked at their tresses bu unwilling to endure the trouble of
somehow the idea slowly caught AS ANY woman can tell you, having long hair.
on, first among the Flower long hair, however beautiful, can
We reiterate our demand for an immediate People, then later among many of be a terrible hassle. It is more Let other mer support the
amendment to take the faculty's hands out of the us Establishment types. trouble to keep clean than short barbers if they wish,. I shall leave
No one seems to have noticed hair. On a windy day it blows in my hair the way it is. The tactical.
students' treasury; but with that reservation, we that 1963 was the same year in one's face--no matter which victory may be the women's, but
urge the ratification of this constitution. which Betty Friedan published direction the wind comes from. the moral victoryis mine.




Page 10 April 9, 1975 THE HALYARD


Guy and Wells to sing UNF blues
Blues is coming to UNF this Saturday. Buddy Guy and Junior
Wells, with their band, and Johnny Shines, will appear in a free,
open-air concert at 8:00 p.m. The concert,sponsored by the UNF
Arts Council and funded by Student Activities, will be in the
courtyard near the bookstore.
Buddy Guy and Junior Wells are two of the foremost practitioners
of contemporary Chicago blues. They cut their musical teeth in the
clubs of Southside Chicago, and they still play these clubs when
they are not on the road; but their audience is now world-wide. They
have toured Europe many times (in 1970, memorably, with the
Rolling Stones). Each has led a band on an extended African tour.
They recently returned from a series of engagements in Japan and
Australia. Within the United States, they have been booked on
college campuses from coast to coast, in all the major rock emporia, s
and at every important blues festival. ,a '
THE BLUES CAREER of Johnny Shines, who was born in 1915.,
goes back to the early 1930s. In 1933 or 1934 he first met the
now-legendary bluesman, Robert Johnson, in West Helena,
Arkansas; and for about three years he "ran with" Johnson. Their
travels took them throughout the Delta region of Mississippi and to George "Buddy" Guy was born in Lettsworth, Louisiana in 1936.
Chicago, New York, Texas, Kentucky, Indiana, and Windsor, He grew up listening to the music of Lightnin' Hopkins, T-Bone
Ontario. Walker, John Lee Hooker, Guitar Slim, and Slim Harpo. His older
S moved to Chicago e was sister helped him make his first guitar from a wooden box and the
After Johnson's death, Shines moved to Chicago. He was one of wire from a screen door. Buddy laughs now whenhe thinks back to Deadline for the
the first blues artists to record following World War II; he cut a that first guitar and says, "I could make some pretty good sounds
number of'pote-worthy sides for the J.O.B. and Chess labels in the out of that screen wire, but it cut my fingers all to hell!"
early 1960s, Though his roots are in the past, Shines is anything but
a relic or a museum piece. Over the years his music has grown and In 1957 Buddy moved to Chicago; and within a week he was
developed, participating in and helping to shape the form of opening the show for B.B. King. For eight years he was a studio next issue of
contemporary blues. He has recorded albums in England, France session man for Chess Records. He backed virtually all of the best
and Germany, as well as for many American lables (e.g., Vanguard, bluesmen during the 1960s: Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, Little
Testament, and Polydor). Walter, Sonny Boy Williamson, and countless others. In recent
years, having established himself as one of the premier blues the HALYARD
Depending upon whose account you believe, Amos Wells, Jr., guitarists, he has led his own band.
was born in Memphis, Tennessee, or on a farm in Mississippi or
near Helena, Arkansas; and he grew up near Marion, Arkansas; or
in Mississippi, or in Memphis. All accounts agree that Junior Wells OF BUDDY GUY and Junior Wells, B.B. King has said, "They're
was born in 1934; some say he moved to Chicago when he-was 12, the young guys who are gonna have to carry on." Together with
some when he was 14. From that point on, however, the record is Johnny Shines, they'll be carrying on at UNF this Saturday night.
clear. Bring a blanket; bring a friend; come and. hear.
AN APPRENTICESHIP in the blues bars of Chicago's South and RICHARD BIZOT
West sides led to a position as featured harmonica player with
Muddy Waters' band, which he held for many years. He struck out
on his own in the early 1960s. He has recorded for Chief, Profile, 0
U.S.A., and some of the other small labels in Chicago that specialize
in 45s. He has cut albums for Vanguard, Mercury, Delmark, and T h e S ill
Atlantic. Some of his better known songs are "Up in Heah,"
"Messin' with the Kid," and "Come on in This House."


Letters ASsEAASLY. .G- -Q! NTNT ORGANIIAtIo 6OTE
SIONS WAS,' .. \oTeR 4TorRisT mE
NEVER wit AT SH ouuv. SE AT A A
CQE: Lobby for quality educations Yo ca -

Editors Note: According to education in Tallahassee. Repre- ..... Re Sr A M* It
sources located in Gainesville the sentatives of the CQE have @l l, VE T
CQE is a serious attempt by a already contacted the Secretary of O TE
group of students at the State, the Commissioner of
University of Florida to create a Education and several Repre-
viable lobbying power dedicated sentatives and Senators in -
to serving the student interest in Tallahassee. IM
the state of Florida by working for o $ 0 tt
quality education in the state The primary goal of the
universities. Committee for the upcoming
legislative session will be the
April 1. 1975 upgrading of the State University
System libraries specifically the
This is an open letter to all bill introduced by Rep. Sid Martin All of us need and want personal relationships in which we
Florida residents concerned with (D-Hawt.'trne) for a block experience INTIMACY--i.e., shared experience of each other's
the state educational system-. allocation of $2,000,000 to the interior life. We long to find another with whom we can be
libraries. Additionally. the COE ourselves, a relationship free of game-playing, a moment of being
will be lobbying for any proposals aas one with another human being.
The Committee for Quality which support "quality" higher Ar
Education A E) has been educctiion. At the same time, we are all afraid of intimacy--of meetin
sta blished in order to inform the another person without the protective barriers we've built to hide
citi/ns tand their elected of ficiala and guard our real selves. It is a frightening experience to be
oif hi cosilin of education i Thiis Committee realizes that to( defenseless, vulnerable, exposed. And it can be painful to see
Hortida. Originally formed as a achieve these goals, the citizens another as he/she really is, not necessarily in the image in which we
a ctio uth cks within the Stated of Florida must be maude aware of ehave created him/her.
Unicr,,ity System, the CQF has alld of thm bcnctits which a SO WE LIVE in perpetual tension, both yearning for intimacy and
n me alt eesd to commit the State of quality educational system can fleeing from it. We are like the surf on the shore--reaching out for
Florida to quality education. offer society The CQE. therefore, closeness with someone until we almost find it, then running away,
ido ill attempt to inform Floridians aao e only to reach out again.
about the deteriorating character
of the Stat Universit Syvstem. I see evidences of an urgent desire for intimacy emerging
University of Florida President throughout our society, with a strength greater than at any other
Robert 0. Marston gave as an time in my experience. It is seen in popular movements like
example of the situation the fact It would be appreciated if all transactional analysis, encounter groups, marathons. It is evident in
4hat since 1968. the University of interested persons would contact dgA A mainline churches in marriage enrichment seminars, growth
Florida Stud ent Body has the CE at: groups, fellowships. It is a part of women's (and men's) refusal to
increased by 7.000 students (from continue to be dealt with in teams of role stereotypes. It motivates
18.000 to 25.000) while the demands of minority groups to be treated as persons rather than as
number of faculty members has Committee for Quality Education faceless "ethnics." It influences young adults who have decided not
onf" increased by 21 (trom 1.379 700-207 S.W. 16th Avenue to play the "dating game."
to 1.400)d Gainesville. Florida 32601 By Robert T. Thomason
Campus Minister Perhaps, in our day, we need and want intimacy desperately
enough to overcome our fears of the personal risks involved. And
JAMES R. BALIOUGH perhaps we will be able to find the kind of life Martin Buber was
At the present. the CQE has six PAUl. MOORE talking about when he said that "all real living is meeting."
registered lobbyists who will be JOtlN BARIC
lobbying on behalf of higher JAMES L. MASON, JR.




THE HALYARD April 9, 1975 Page 11



Students receive merit awards

By nMKE MALONE The Small Business Institute
program, sponsored by the Small
Stdens f te Cege Business Administration, calls
Students from the College of upons the resources of pro
Business Admdinistration who gressive schools of business to
participated during the winter furnish management- assistance
term in the Small Business counseling to members of the ..
Institute's management assist- small business mmunity. t
ance counseling, received Cer- community
tificates of Merit in appreciation UNF is just one of over 300
for the counseling services they universities and colleges par-
provided to the business iiin in te o
community. ticipating in the program.
The presentation of awards "By providing small business
March 12 by W.E. Gilbert, with the type of management
assistant district director for assistance they need to survive,
management assistance of the they are able to cut costs and seek
Small Business Administration, new markets," said Lowell Salter,
marked the conclusion of associate professor of marketing
counseling for 22 Jacksonville at UNF. Dr. Salter is also project
area small businesses. director of the program.


Analog computers make Caddies economical!?

Etby FRANK E. STA IELD Now, instead of wasteful family car. such asmirrors and radio fillup driver tbe more economical with
Editorial Page Editor carburetors, GM engineers claim After being shown how to avoid the options list. throttle.
that the small computer can, after setting off the built in burglar Two of the most important
later. h ad t o happen sooner or weighing various sensor variables alarm system, I sank down into options are the fuel injection unit,
complete with analog computers (such as air temperature and the soft leather upholstery and and the fuel monitor :device--a What is the actual impact that
comptleat th e of g m te, throttle position) efficiently acti- strapped in. As I turned the key in separate and unrelated system to fuel injection will have on
a len a i ate the air an d fuel ales to the ignition, a long line of "idiot the fuel injection unit. The fel automobile driving? Eldorado has
nyy. inject a concise air and fuel lights" flashed across the dash, monitor gives the drive an the largest sized engine of any
Recently the Cadillac Division mixture into the engine for hiring. Shades of the year 2001, I thought instrument light indication as to domestic automobile--500 cubic
of General Motors produced its GM is proud of coming out with to myself. whether or not fuel is being inches. The engine is powerful
first electronic fuel inje ion what the ho e ma b a posiblconsumed efficiently. When the without fuel injection, and is even
engines. The engines have begun wat they hope may ea posse The options that the car was green light is on, the driver is more potent with it while driving
to appear as options in some cars answer to sctroict, government loaded down with were mind-bog- driving efficiently, but as soon as the car is seemed as if it would
manufactured after February pollution control, and at the same gling, automatic climate control; rapid accelerations or some other take off like an airplane if the
1975. The new system will replace time making large cars more automatic cruise control (automa- wasteful fuel usage occurs, a accelerator wa pushed towards
conventional carburetors with air economical to drive. ne tic pilot--all you have to do is yellow light comes on and the the floor.
valves and electronic fuel metering company spokesman claims that steer); automatic light control
valves. te ege for the Edoradv o tt p (turns headlights on and off April 15, 22
used for a test drive, went up automatically, as well as serving
Fuel injection is not new, race from 13 to 15 miles per gallon. as an automatic dimmer); digital .
cars and xperimetal aircraft for clock; outsider theRrmomN_
example, have utilized the "Whefii'showed up for the test remote cok trol trunk release;
example e-, Tele s 8:3 AMremote control trunk release; Ua14-h a angs
concept in the past, but Cadillac's drive I realized just how out of my vacuum operated remote control
system will be unique because it class this machine really is for door locks; rear window defogger;
will be operated by a small me. Like most other students that power antenna; remote control Budget hearings for 1975-76 will be held by the Student Activities
computer about the size of a I know, $12,500 is more than the outside mirror adjusters; and Committee on April 15, 17 and 22.
Kleenex box. family budget can stand for a even more common-place gadgets
All budget requests must be made to SAC in writing three days
Prior to the day of the hearing. The Chairperson of the SAC will
schedule requests on each meeting date andawill notify each party of
S U nivhis or her agenda time.
Your University Bank Each department or person requesting Activity and Service fee
monies is asked to appear before the SAC at the scheduled time.
Any department or person appearing before the committee is also
asked to furnish 15 copies of their proposed budget to the
Complete Banking iechairperson of the SAC three days prior to their appearance.

Checking -Saving- Loans YOU teeste
COINS STAMPS
-SUPPLIES- *

Open 9 AM to 3 PM Mon.-Thurs. COME AND SEE ARLINGTON'S NEW HOBBY STORE
9 AM to6 PM Fri. ARLINGTON STAMP rt COIN CO.
S 1332 Univ. Blvd. N. Phone 743-1776 *

Drive-In Tellers: 8:30 AM to 4 PM Mon.-Thurs. Plastics
8:30 AM to 6:30 PM Fri. Do it yourself supplies
Plexiglass o____s
AvAcrylic Sheets
Rods Tubes
Atlantic University Bank Cements tc.
Custom Fabrication
An Equal Opportunity Employer You design it we make it
Bong Supplies
Corner Beach Blvd. and St. John's Bluff Rd. K & I Plastics

-Phone 641-7010 582 Nixon Street 387-0439
Weekdays 8 5 Sat. 8 12
Member FDIC 10% discount with this ad & $5 purchase




Page 12 April 9, 1975 THE HALYARD


Projects nearly ready for use

SThe Student Activities Depart- 'will be used for student and
meant with full support and faculty recreation. Included in
cooperation from the General this undertaking are all weather
Assembly is funding and air conditioning, a 43 foot square
developing two new projects to work-out area, equipment storage
further the social well being of the area, showers and locker rooms.
student body. Students at UNF
will be entitled to full use of both The initiaters of the shower/!
the new child care center and the locker room project have, says
new field house, with shower and Student Office Coordinator Rei-
locker room facilities. Students singer, taken their time in
are urged to use these facilities as contracting the building, waiting -
they become available for usage. for the "right price." The
building is designed so as to be
SThe new child care center will both economical and utilitarian.
operate from May 19 to June Also pending in the project are a :.
13th. The newly appointed soft ball field and hand-ball court, I
director, Everett Malcolm III, is says Reisinger. .- -
X accepting applications for a pilot
: program of 20 children. Appli-
cations will be accepted through As fast as buildings go up on
April 21. Interested parents the UNF campus, it may seem to
should visit theRcenter, near the casual observer to be
visitors parking 3, from 9 A.M. to somewhat- surrealistic. The-
4 P.M. Hours will be 8:30 to 1:15 shower/locker room facilities
f: M.W.F. and 9:00 A.M. to 12:15 were built before a name could be
P.M. T.TH. thought of. Students interested in
initiating programs of physical
THE FIELD HOUSE, shower/ fitness should contact Allen or
Locker room, directed by Ronny Reisinger, and if by chance youi V X
: Allen, is a new facility primarily can think of a suitable name, this j
funded by Student Activities. It also will be appreciated. NIX j.3j. --. ...-*




UFF completes draft of agreement with BOR


By STEPHEN W. HOLLAND ization as a bargaining agent. sents UFF commitment to include "Blue-Cross, Blue-
News Editor UFF is vying with other collective providing favorable working Shield" coverage with major
bargaining agents, particularly conditions, good fringe benefits, medical for 12 months per year;
The United Faculty of Florida the American Association of decent salaries and in general, In-Service Protection Benefits
State Collective Bargaining Com- University Professors to become meeting the concern of most ranging from Life Insurance to
mittee has completed a working the recognized bargaining agent faculty for improving the disability payments, Relocation
draft of a proposed agreement for professors of the SUS. University system." Expenses, Increasing Benefits as
between the Board of Regents well as a program for Early
and UFF. retirement.
Dr. Steven M. Delue, Assistant
Professor of Political Science and Atricle XIII, "Benefits for All
CB -Law (Ch~ 74- 10 aides nt f the University of Members Of The Bargaining
the i1N f tot atarlcf i Tie l-IyM, rrida chapter of UFF 'Unit," is considered by Delue to The "Working draftI consists
30 per cent of the State University said; "This contract is a tentative be a viable part of the "Working of 15 articles ranging from
System Faculty sign cards document subject to revision by Draft" which offers a uniformed "Agreement Protocol" to
designating a specific organ- the membership, but it repre- package of health' benefits to "Compensation."




Why we're Supporting Halyard

SEditor and General ManagerCasbeer
-- Assoc. Prof. W.J. oah Marcus Casbeer, dean of
Records, says that UNF is in its
So Executive Editor -- Ron Feinberg growth pattern. Enrollment from
Managing Editor -- Drew Brunson year to year is on the rise.
Enrollment, from quarter to
News Editor Stephen W. Holland Enrollment from quarter however follows a

Editorial Page Editor -- Frank Stanfild different and quite unique
pattern.
o Interim President of S(A. aProduction Manaer -- Doug Svr quarter is the Winter quarter,
For Interim President of SGA falling off in Spring but not quite
Business Manager -- David Bozik to the level of enrollment for the
Fu time undergraduate student Advrtng M er -- A Wright previous Fall, says Casbeer.
Ful-time undergraduate student erExcepting Universities in a
"first year" situation, Dean
f .Active in the community Published every other week by Casbeer knows of no other school
cy the members of the communi- that follows this pattern. The
cationss classes at the Univer- general pattern is a steady
-former co-chairperson of League of sity of North Florida for all decrease after the fall term.
*mn VotersEducation Committee* members of the university Casbeer said the reasons for
Sna community. Opinions ex- this unusual happen-stance are
'chairperson 6f ERA petition drive pressed in this newspaper are "anybody's guess," but may be
a not necessarily the opinions of partically caused by UNF's
S-legislative task force coordinator for NOW the university or its officials. "seasoned" student body, the
-Mayor's Commission on goals and Offices lo:ated in Building 3, graduation process at FJC which
SRoom 2401 at the University of keeps many new students out for
priorities for human services North Florida, St. John's Bluff spring, and the fact that UNF is
S: Road South, P.O. Box 17074, still a fairly new institution.
SHard-working, Competent Jacksonville, Florida 32216. Casbeer added thl:at enrollment
a C Telephone: (904) 646-2650. for this quarter is not yet
r* tabulated, but if present trends
and Experienced hold, it is expected to fall between
Sthe 3,930 figure of last fall and
CONNIE RAYL PAMELA NEIL TERRY MOTHERSHED last quarter's "peak" of 4,239:
a BURT JORA N ARCHESTER NEIL GARY CXK UNF is currently offering two
RBARA ADANSON IIP MOBELY DIANE Thisl publile document was new programs -- an M.A. in
SBARBARA ADANSON PILIP MOBELY DIANE promulgated at an estimated Health and Physical Education as
REEDE STOCKTON TONI MOBLEY DONNELLY BOZEMAN cost oflle per copy to inform well as an .M.A. in Counseling.
students, faculty, career The M.A. in counseling is a
TRINA WHARON TIM R(M-H BARBARA MAZER serice, and administralve particular thriving program, says
and professional staff ab~iht Casbeer.
HOKE SMITH activities affecting the univer- A new project planned for next
-,sity community. fall is the Industrial Technoiogy
s~ycoiuunty.Division.,




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