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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00043
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: January 15, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00043
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text





7 V _


1)xirstci~ ta thi A~ric'&tutntY, 4anuf ct'Qriflg nd


1.--Nb. 43.


indtistriall Intprxs-s cf Tloj.r da nd t-d Suau,


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


lMo~day, January 15, 1883.


Price 5 cents.


$2.00 per Year, in advance; postal.', free.


.i 1aT M- [1o with many immigrants who were induced to writing to me, to know where they can get re-
L' .: come to the State through his efforts, I feel sure liable printed matter on Florida. Information
Immigration Bureau-Florida--Taxes, Etc. that a more efficient officer, or one more thor- spread abroad in this way, and backed by the
oughly interested in the work could be foun d to integrity of the State. can but be an investment
iEW SMYNA, FLA., December, 1882. fill the place. that will many times repay the cost.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch: The salaries of the officers are small, and cer- W. S. H.
In the Florida Daily Times of August 11th, tainly are no great inducement to continue to M ..
in an article headed "Florida-Taxes," Mr. R. perform the arduous duties of the office. Letter from Brevard.
L. .Campbell says: "And what purpose does I see by the papers that there arrive in the LAG RANAE, FLA., December, 1882.
the Bureau of Immigration subserve except to Jacksonville office weekly, hundreds of letters Edito'rs of The Florida Dispatc ,
make printing jobs for the official organ, and from intended immigrants. To reply to all of I take much pleasure in complimenting the
to pry .salaries for useless labor ? Besides, all which is no light job, nor do I consider the work many valuable articles received from your in-
that business can now be very well left to Diss- a "useless labor." teresting paper. I regret, to report a short crp
ton and the other assignees of State lands." The State pamphlet, issued by the Commis- of oranges, notwithstanding the trees never
Now, Mr. Campbell's article is a good one and sioner, contains just the information that is were more promising. My impression is. that
most of his points are well put, and to my mind needed by those who are thinking of coming the next season will surpass, allanticipations,
worthy of serious consideration, but if he sees here, an;d it will be the means of bringing thou- without some. unjo.,qed-for mishap.
no more benefit to the State, from the Bureau of sands of energetic workers and a large amount We look forward to the puff of the "steam
Immigration, than is indicated by the above I of capital that never would come except for it. wagon," and the shrill whistle of the steamboat
quotation, I certainly think he has failed to It certainly seems to me that it would be poor on the "Titusville and Jacksonville Internal.
take note of what is going on around him. policy to leave all such work to private specu- Navigation Improvement," with high expeeta-
Since reading his article I have often wondered lators, who cannot reasonably be expected to do tion, of the rapid development of our loveliest
if there, can be a feeling among any considera- more than to merely forward their own inter- of all climates, and healthy beyond comparison.
ble.number of our people, that the expense of ests by putting before the public the attractions Yours, very truly, S. TWICIELL.
the institution is an "unnecessary expenditure," that their own property holds out to the would- F-
as he calls it. If so, by all means let us look be settler. Florida State Fair I
into the matter and post up, as our Legislature The statements of such parties are always Opens in this city on Taesday, February 13.
is now in session, and some action may betaken looked upon with more or less distrust, while Send to A. J. RUSSELL, Secretary, for Premium
that will seriously effect the future welfare of it is felt that any matter issued by the State Lists and Regulations.
the State. If it is of no benefit to us it should be must be near the truth, as every citizen- is to
done away with at once and that expense some extent responsible for their reliability, and "Mississippi Valley."
stopped, but if the investment is one of the best there are plenty of honest people here who We have already announced the Fourth An-
that the State ever made, as I honestly believe would immediately correct any statements cal- nual Meeting of the Mississippi Valley Horti-
it to be, then ts powers should be enlarged by culated to mislead. turai 1 Society,' which ope at o
mo .. ..u.,s..: appropriations, and in other That there is no danger of overdoing the cultural Society," which opens at Ne Orans
way:,) a.,, "aged so as to yield to us all the matter of spreading information regarding on the 21st of February, and c,.ti; until
-"good ,alt that similar Bureaus in other parts Florida, is shown by the crowds that gather the 24th. We hope Florida wilb be properly
of ith .nry have to the States that created around and question any one traveling in the represented at this meeting, and reget our own
an t th pppriati is so sinahat tate. Thenoo a hav Eroeansfrom this inability to be present. In a recent note to the

much1 tl.1 would contribute to it usefulness in this direction wi th longing eyes, and they ditor, the resident of the Asoaton
has to be iJft undone for the want of means to ought to be rienlerI. "Let us give them the PARKER EALE, Esq., of Cobden, Ill., says:
do(10 wi.. Wet, I ftr one, have daily evi..-ne information wanted, in la ger and more corn- "We shall hold a large and important meet-
that ,,: .r efficiency of' the present officers, prehensive State pamphlets, not only in Eng- ing, and should be much pleased to have a.
their intorc-. in the work, or good results' from lish, but German and Italian as well, and pro- good attendance from Florida. While Florida
their labors are lacking to make the institution vide a sufficient corps of officers to reply in is not in the Mississippi Valley, yet this need
ofin:,- value to fir Florida. I am not per- writing to all questions propounded that are not make difference in the practical value of our
soni a wanted with any of the officers of fully answered by the printed matter. Then meeting to your people, or of the interest we
the h ;av;'-':. seen ei-her of ,tI :i, have the Bureau and its work noticed repeat- should all feel in any c.ntrib;ti<.s you might
but (xi-n 1 .. .o-i .ue ediy in the leading newspapers of the world so 'nake to its success. There i indeed no geo-
with I a:-vi IdI convkr-n ions that no one need write, as a great number are grap .hil lii,.m to : .1>. .-, oitiy


Vol.






8QO THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Hints and Helps for Farmers.
The farm work has been very greatly im-
peded of late by the recent cold and rainy
weather. Especially has the saving of the
sweet potato crop been interfered with. Many
of the "banks" have been flooded, and their
contents damaged by heat and moisture. The
only remedy for a leaky or damaged bank is
to take it all to pieces and sort over the con-
tents, carefully throwing out all wet or partly
decayed tubers, and thoroughly drying the in-
side of the bank. Then build it up anew,
using fresh, dry straw or hay. By the way, it
occurs to me that some of our new-comers may
not be quite expert in the rather delicate op-
eration of
MAKING A POTATO BANK.
In the Southern States, where the sweet po-
tato is so largely raised, good cellars are gen-
erally few and far between. The "potato-
house" is an efficient substitute, but it is not
always convenient to provide one, and the
method most widely prevalent is the "bank."
It is made by preparing a circular floor on the
surface of the ground, with its centre about
ten inches higher than the circumference. On
this is laid a carpet of dry straw or hay or
pine leaves two or three inches thick. The
potatoes are piled on this in a sharp cone-
shaped pile, containing not exceeding fifty
bushels, The pile is covered with dry hay
three to six inches thick. Over this is put a
layer of corn stalks, set upright and meeting
at the top like the poles of an Indian wigwam.
The stalks should be laid as closely together
as possible. Over these is piled dry dirt from
three to ten inches thick almost to the top,
leaving a space above the top of the pile of
potatoes and up through the hay and stalks for
free ventilation. A board or a piece of bark
is laid over the orifice to keep out rain, but so
as not to interfere with the ventilation.
Potatoes secured carefully in this manner
will keep late into the Spring in fine condition;
but it is the practice, as soon as all danger of
frost is over, to take them out and pile in a
cool, dry place in some out-house, until wanted
for use or market.
THE WEEVIL QUESTION.
So many different theories exist about the
prevention of that pest-the weevil-that he
who will invent or discover a sure remedy will
be in danger of becoming sainted, alongside of
the man who discovers the remedy for hog
cholera. It is the practice in many sections to
put up the crop of corn "in the shuck," and
wet; the theory being that the slight heating
which will take place in the pile will kill the
vermin and its eggs. I am trying this plan
this year and if it is successful the readers of
THE DISPATCH may expect to hear of my
saintship in the course of a twelvemonth or
more.
THE GRINDSTONE.


The farm grindstone is one of the farmer's
most valued friends. It should be selected with
great care-not too hard nor too soft-and
without flaws or hard spots if possible to detect
them. By all means have the stone hung with
a short crank for a treadle. It will save many
an hour of man or boy labor turning the crank,
and enable the farmer to utilize many an odd
moment when alone, in keeping his various
tools in good order. A good edge or any cut-
ting tool will, in its lifetime, save its owner an
hundred fold its price in the greater ease and
rapidity with which its work can be performed.
FASTENING THE WINDOWS.
Most modern dwellings are fastened with
some kind of contrivance to prevent.the entry


of the enterprising burglar from the outside
by way of the windows. In cases where these
convenient devices are not easily obtained a
very simple and effective fastening can be pro-
vided by affixing an ordinary "button," simi-
lar in shape to those sometimes used for hold-
ing up the raised sash, but hung with the notch
downward on the strip which holds the sash in
place inside. If properly fitted, it rests paral-
lel with the strip when not in use, and is set by
a gentle push, fitting the notch over the inner
and upper edge of the sash. The screw which
fastens it should be driven tight enough to
prevent its movement by its own weight.

Agricultural Products for 1881 and 1882.
Here are some big figures, prepared by Mr.
Walker, the statician of the New York Pro-
duce Exchange, being an estimate of the agri-
cultural products of the United States for this
year, as compared with those of last year:
FOR THE YEAR 1882, IN BUSHELS.
Wheat......... .................... 510,000,000
Corn................................................ 1,800,000,000
Oats.............................................. 480,000,000
Barley........... 45,000,000
Rye.................. ......................... 20,000,000
Buckwheat.......................... 12,000,000
Potatoes............. ....................... 160,000,000
Cotton, bales......................... 6,500,000
FOR THE YEAR 1881, IN BUSHELS.
W heat................ ........................ 380,280,000
Cprn.............................................. 1,194,916,000
Oates............................. .................. 416,481,000
Barley.... ........... ..................... 41,161,330
Rye.................................. ........ 20,704,950
Buckwheat........... ...................... 14,617,535
Potatoes.......................................... 167,659,579
Cotton, bales.................................... 6,343,260

The Eration of the Soil.
Unquestionably one of the greatest modern
improvements in European and American ag-
riculture is draining. No one can have read
the many evidences of the astonishing results,
following the practice of drainage, that have ap-
peared from time to time in the columns of our
agricultural journals, without being convinced
that the matter is well worthy the attention of
every tiller of the soil.
But one of the causes that conspire to produce
those remarkably ameliorating effects that we
see upon drained ground, has been too much
overlooked. We can realize the importance of
getting rid of stagnant water and of promoting
warmth to the soil, which are two of the results
of drainage, but there is another influence at
work whose effects are still greater. This is
the influence of the air on the soil.
Some have wondered why ground that is not
swampy, common upland, should be so greatly
improved by drainage. The subject of the
present article, we think, will explain the rea-


son.
It has, indeed, been found that ALL clay soils
are greatly improved by drainage. A clay soil
seems to have, in a remarkable degree, power
to extract fertilizing properties from the air.
But only a small portion of the undrained clay
soil is exposed to the air. Its nature is to be-
come more and more compact, if uninfluenced
by any disturbing cause, and consequently the
air only comes in contact with the surface, ex-
cept in a very limited degree.
The astonishing crops which have been taken
from some fields that have been thoroughly sub-
soiled, offer a striking proof of the advantages
of letting in the air. A thorough loosening of
the ground to the depth of fourteen or sixteen
inches, exposes a great quantity of soil to the
atmosphere. Sub-soiling, indeed, is a very good
substitute for drainage of upland-only the
good effects of the former will be temporary


compared with the permanent benefits derived
from the latter.
When water percolates down through the
soil, in a drained field, air accompanies the
water in its passage. Besides, the loose, honey-
comb arrangement of the particles of the soil,
where drains have been laid, affords a constant
inlet to the air. But in addition to these meth-
ods of finding a way to the different particles
of soil, the tiles themselves afford an entrance
to an immense quantity of air. Hold a lighted
candle in summer time, at the outlet of a tile
drain, and it will be found that a steady cur-
rent of air is all the time setting inward. Many
thousand gallons of atmosphere are thus brought
in direct contact with the under soil, freighted
with rich ammonia and carrying moisture to
the roots of vegetables even in the dryest time.

"Some" Potatoes I
The Bartow Informant states that "Mr. P.
0. Keen, of Polk County, has recently dug
thirteen rows of sweet potatoes thirty yaids in
length, from which he measured 75 bushels of
potatoes. This is at the rate of 900 bushels to
the acre, and at 50 cents a bushel would be
worth $450 to the acre."
Very fair "crap," that 900 bushels; but just
listen to a blast "more loud and shrill," blown
through a late Floridian, by our old Granger
friend and correspondent, Col. 0. H. Kelley,
who writes from Carrabelle, James Island,
Florida, December 25, 1882:
"This season, on three-fourths of an acre,
worked up with a grub-hoe and after
planting only hoed once, Mr. William Smith
raised 300 bushels of sweet potatoes. Our
county surveyor measured the ground. One
hill produced thirteen and one-half pounds. He
estimated that had all the ground been in hills
twenty inches apart one way and four feet
the other, and each could produce at theisame
rate, an acre would yield, 500 bushels! How's
that for James Island soil ?"
Well-"not to put too fine a point" on that
"estimate," and venturing to Latinize a very
common and popular expression, we should say
that 1,500 bushels of potatoes per acre is "tau-
rian for high!" Next ?

Sorghum and its Seed.
The notable sugar tests instituted by Genetal Le
Due, followed by those at Rio Grande, N. J., at
Champaign, Ill., and elsewhere, have given great
encouragement to the practical saccharine poSsibili-
ties of sorghum; its exceptional worth for forage
has been referred to in our columns, especially by
Mr. A. B. Allen; certain millers anfd housekeepers
South and West have demonstrated the culinary
value of flour from its seed as a griddle-cake substi-
tute for buckwheat--without the eruptive, efflores-


cont cutaneous effect of that popular blood poison-
and now we have from Professor George H. Cook a
remarkable publication as to the importance of the
seed as a feed for stock. That modest, faithful
official-whose unassuming, helpful services these
many years have extended beyond the borders of his
own State--reports in Bulletin XXIV of the New
Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station certain facts
which, if verified by further experience, will tend
to make farmers all the more anxious to admit sor-
ghum to an honored place in their regular crop rota-
tion.
The director refers at the outset to certain data
more or less clearly established in regard to this neg-
lected member of the great grass family, particularly
its penetrating root-habit which enables it to find
food in the subsoil, and thus, it is claimed, thrive on
land superficially too poor for the surface-feeding
maize, and in consequence endure quite a severe
drouth without serious injury. He then says that
the average twenty or thirty bushels of seed of the
Amber variety per acre-with a possibility of fifty






THE--FLORIDA- DISPATCH-- 21


bushels--seems to be, when ground and freed from
hulls, not only entirely digestible and healthful for
dairy cows, and without any objectionable influence
on either the color, taste or chemical composition of
the milk, but produces a milk-producing power
barely seven per cent. lower than that of corn meal,
the great standby of the table. These conclusions
are based on a careful continuous test with three
members of the farm herd, and the interesting de-
tails are tabulated and explained with scientific pre-
cision.
The significance of the matter is Inade more ap-
parent by the statement-which we reprint with the
Professor's own emphasis of italic type-that "the
yield of Amber seed and stalk is about the same as
that of Indian corn ; but after the seeds are ripe and
hard the stalks are still green, and apparently suita-
ble for ensilage." Should the plant indeed be found
adapted in that stage of its growth to the latter pur-
pose, (and this question has already been submitted
to a not yet concluded experiment with twenty tons
.cut and brushed in silo), the same acre may thus be
made to yield, the same season, from ten to fifteen
tons of palatable, nutritious fodder and at least
twenty to thirty bushels of clean grain, almost iden-
tical in composition and equal in weight to shelled
corn, as appears from the foregoing, very closely ap-
proaching it in feeding value. Meanwhile it is per-
aps safe to extend congratulations to General Wm.
G. Le Due, the underrated modern Apostle of Sor-
ghum. If (there are several "ifs" yet, but fewer
than they were) this many-named semi-tropical plant
does not disappoint the recently encouraged great ex-
pectations, it will appear that the rejected ex-Com-
missioner of Agriculture builded better than he
knew.--New York 7'nibune.

Truck Farming in Leon.
The Palatka Herald says that truck farming
is taking the lead in Leon County, leaving cot-
ton in the background. The profits arising
from this business have demonstrated the fact
that the climate and soil for winter and spring
gardening in that section are better than cotton
or anything else. The practical question is
about to be solved in the introduction of Ger-
man laborers from the West. Capt. Dyke, of the
Floridian, has taken the lead in this immigration
enterprise. He has several German laborers on
his place two miles from Tallahassee, and has
one of the progressive farms, which, so far as
can be judged, will bring him handsome profits.
On this place we noticed six or seven acres in
beets, several in cabbages, and will have ten
acres in Irish potatoes, to say nothing of a fine
growing orchard of LeConte pear trees which
will begin to bear next season. Many others
are engaged in fruit and vegetable growing.
Irish potatoes from that section last season
brought in New York from $6 to $7 a barrel.
All this speaks well for the old hills around the
Capital, which, in a few years will rejoice and
Blossom as the rose. Go ahead, Middle Flor-
ida. It will rejoice us so much to see every sec-
tion in the State flourish.

FAAM LABORERS.--The Floridian says:
"Farmers are quite busy getting up hands for
jthe year 1883. There seems to be some diffi-
Sculty to procure suitable labor. There is no


discounting the fact that unless the farmer
changes his present mode of procedure and
adopts other and better plans of cultivating his
land, he will have to sell out (or be sold out)
and go West. The present labor system is in-
jurious to planters and laborers."

INCREASE IN ONE SEASON.-It is stated by
Bussinghault that a beet seed, weighing but
the fraction of a grain, has produced a beet in
one season weighing one hundred and sixty-
two thousand grains, or twenty-eight pounds.

The childhood shows the man, as morning
shows the day.-Milton.
If thou faint in the day of adversity, thy
strength is- small.-Proverb.
Man's inhumanity to man makes countless
thousands mourn.-Burns.


Promoting the Flow of Milk.
The following from the London Live


Slock


Journal is a good statement of some practical
points, suggesting the extent to which milking
qualities are dependent on treating and train.
ing:
A copious flow of milk, sustained through
many months, is a quality which has been pro-
duced by art in domestication. Wild cattle
rarely provide more than enough milk to rear
their own offspring, and the flow of it is of
comparatively short duration. Small in vol-
ume, the milk is rich in quality, but the lacteal
organs soon dry off again. This, of course, is
in harmony with the requirements of the young
animals in a wild state, and is a correlation of
the roving life and hap-hazard feeding of the
dams. More milk than the calf requires un-
der such conditions would be a waste of ma-
terial energy which nature does not encourage.
It would, moreover, be an act of encumberance
to the'mother. Wild cattle are neither good
milkers nor good fatteners, and in parts of
England where calves are allowed to run with
their dams generation after generation, the
breed of such animals is not famous for milk-
giving. Like that of the mare and ewe, the
milk is smaller in quantity, rich in quality and
short in duration. The desultory and irregu-
lar sucking of a calf, or foal, or lamb is not
conductive to the development of a large, flow
of milk. Hand-milking of similar character
has the same effect. Young people are allowed
to learn on cows which are going dry for calv-
ing, not those which are still in full flow. New
beginners soon dry up a cow's milk, and bad
milkers do the same.
Heavy milking properties, then, are artificial,
in the sense that they have been developed
under domestication, and by careful breeding
for a given end; yet, like many other qualities,
which are mere germs in nature, they become
hereditary by long usage.

"Salting" for a "Cow-Pen."
A writer in one of our old Southern agricul-
tural journals offers this cute" way of improv-
ing land. He says:
It perhaps has occurred but to few farmers
to employ the roving herds of summer at ma-
nure-making. It may be done thus:
Select a spot adjoining an outside fence, and
enclose it well on the three remaining sides.
Haul leaves from the woods, muck from the
ponds or swamps, or anything that will rot into
a good manure in ten to twelve months, and
spread over this lot three or four inches deep.
If there are not several trees in this lot, make
shelters for shade by placing poles upon forks,
putting a floor of rails across these poles, and
cover thickly with pine-tags. Enclose large
pieces of ground alum salt in boxes having a
hole in their tops large enough for cattle to get
their tongues in conveniently. Place these
boxes firmly upon posts about over the lot.
Make a gap in the outside fence that every-
body's cattle that come along may walk in. As
soon as they find out the salt, this lot will be-


come a grand congregating place for all the
cattle of the vicinity-a perfect camp-ground
of the bovine species. They will make the shel-
ters their resting place by day and night, and
will continue to come so long as the supply of
salt (which must be added to occasionally)
holds out. Of course they will drop their manure
here; and by winter you will have the satisfac-
tion of owning at least one lot that has been
well manured at small expense. So long as
cattle run at large, we think it right that some-
body should have the benefit of the manure if
they can get it.


~i~a ~~a~sP~,


-The ordinary teaching of our schools is
making the naturally more intelligent young
men fortune hunters. Let it be stopped in
every school, in every home. We are not in
want of presidents or governors; but we do
want farmers, artisans, workers, men. Cannot
the school committee, the teacher, and the pa-
rent devise some incentive to these ?-Ex-
change.

-The successful farmer is the leading one in
nine cases out of ten. It is only by reading
that one can keep up with the times in which
we live. It has been aptly said that an agri.
cultural community without books and papers
relating to farming is like a ship at sea without
rudder or compass.-South and West.


m--


The Rights of a Seven-Dollar Cow.
The representatives of the people have assembled
in the State Capitol, and will after a few days of
preliminary work, consider the wants of the State,
discuss those questions which are agitated, and pass
such laws are demanded by the people, or that will
give to the people the largest amount of good.
The most important measure for consideration is,
shall the seven-dollar cow have rights that every man
is bound to respect; that is, shall we be compelled
to fence a thousa.nd-dollar crop against a seven-dollar
cow, or shall we fence the cow ? The law at present
requires the orange grower, the truck raiser and the
farmer to help the stockman feed his seven-dollar
cow.
The law permitting cattle to run at large is unjust,
unconstitutional and a disgrace. Such a law may be
enacted by a Legislature. It may be supported' by
the people, but it is not a good law. Any law that
interferes with the property and prosperity of those
who are carrying on a legitimate business is in oppo-
sition to the spirit of our Government. No 4aw
should be sustained if it gives to one person more
power than another. No law should be sustained if
it permits one to tresspass on the rights of property
legitimately in the possession of another.
.Suppose a person has an acre of Burmuda grass,
and the crop is worth ten dollars. Has his neighbor
a right to let his seven-dollar cow go over and eat up
the crop, and thereby convert her into a seventeen-
dollar cow at his neighbor's expense? Under -the
present law, yes, but by every moral law
No!
Your neighbor has no .more right, morally, to let
his cow eat up your grass or tfuck, than he has to
roll out a barrel of flour without paying for it. If
there is a great moral principle involved, on which
side should be the law? Why, on the moral side,
because that is always the best for humanity.. Then,
if this be true, it should he the policy of the State to
remedy all laws that are adverse to the progress of
humanity Now let us examine the true state of
affairs. There is in this section one hundred men
who own groves containing from one hundred to five
thousand trees to one man who owns one hundred'
head of cattle. Who shall be protected ? the hun-
dred groves, or the hundred head of cattle; the pres-
ent law says the cattle. Let us come down to a more
equal illustration. Here are two men; one has one
hundred trees worth ten dollars each, the other one
hundred cows worth seven dollars each; the trees
can't go over and eat up the cows, so they are harm-
less; but the cows can go over and eat up the trees.
Now, who should be protected? The owners are
both citizens, and both may have an equal amount
of capital at stake. Why, a reasonable man would
say, whereas, the cows are a herd of prowling depre-
dators, they must be restrained. But the law says,
Mr. Horticulturist, Mr. Gardener, Mr. Farmer, fence
up your trees, your truck, your corn, or I (the law)
will come over and consume them; and thus the man
with a bunch of seven-dollar cows is made monarch
of all that ain't fenced.
Think on it, ponder on it, and the more you think
and reason and ponder, the more you will wonder
that such a law has ever existed. The stock business
of Putnam County don't amount to anything 'den
compared with its horticultural and agricultural in-
terest. The life and future prospects of this county
will, in a large measure, depend on the action of the
Legislature this winter on this important subject.
We ask the gentlemen of the Assembly to take hold
of the scrubs by the horns and throw them over the
fence.-Putnam County Journal.


_ _~ _~__


u


low


TUEFLRIA DSPTC


eel


m






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Milch Cows in Florida.
A new subl)scriber w:;itc-, us from near Cedar
Key, and asks:
"Do you think, Messrs. Editors, that cows
can be made to do as well; that is, yield as
much milk and butter hero, as at the North ?
We have one 'native' cow, ifor which we paid
$13, and she gives us, on ordinary range with
a little slopping, about three quarts of milk per
day. Can we not make her do a little better ?"
REPLY.--To your main question, we would
say that the climate of Florida is undoubtedly
more favorable to the well-being and produc-
tiveness of milch cows, than that of the more
Northern States ; and although we have never
fairly tested the matter, we cannot see why the
same regular and abundant feeding, and the
same care and attention here would not pro-
duce results as satisfactory, as there. We have
a great advantage over the North in being able
to raise an abundance of green, succulent
and milk-producing forage every day in the
year; and we trust that some experienced
dairyman of the North will come to Florida,
and give the matter a fair and thorough trial.
We read of large yields of milk from pet Jer-
seys in Mississippi, Georgia and other Southern
States, none of which have a climate so mild and
equable as Florida. The Tallahassee Flor-
idian also quite recently published some very
encouraging accounts of Dairying in Leon
County, and we are glad to see that the subject
is attracting much attention. The quality,
quantity and mode of feeding, as well as the
general handling and management of the cow,
has a great deal to do with the production of
milk and its quality; and these matters should
allbe carefully studied by any one who aims to
be^'successful in the business. There is, of
course, a great deal in the breed; but, while it
is possible to bring even a 'scrub" cow up to a
fair and remunerative state ofprod -t ivnress, by
high feeding and judicious care ; it i, still easier
to "run down" the very finest Jersey or Alder-
ney, in a very short time, by want of proper
care and attention. Thomson, an English
writer, in his work entitled "Experimental Re-
searches on the Food of Animnals," says that the
cow, if fed for two days on an insufficient quan-
tity of food as indicated by loss of weight, and
diminution of milk, will require at least double
that tiine to reach the condition from which it
deteriorated, and the reason of this is obvious,
because the partial starvation has caused it to
lose a portion of the substance of its body, which
requires a longer time to re-establish than to


pull down.
This rule, he says, is applicable to the dietary
of men as well as to inferior animals. An in-
crease of labor should always be accompanied
by an increase of food, both at sea and in prison.
A short walk, for one confined in a solitary
cell, calls for some augmentation of food. A
slight increase of temperature, or the irritating
influence of insects, will effectually diminish
the milk of a cow, and indicates the propriety
of increasing the amount of fodder.
During his experiments on feeding milch cows,
he found that the milk of one day was derived
from the food eaten the day previous, and that
it takes at least sixteen hours for the digestive


organs of the cow to fully take up all the nutri-
tive matter which she feeds upon.
As to rapidity and regularity in milking, we
notice that Mr. E. 0. Hannum, a very success-
fil dairyman, of Portage County, Ohio, a na-
tive of Berkshire, Mass., names the points of
his management as follows : Good cows, good
feed, good milking, good care and management
of the milk. He put- "good milking" in italics,
and remarks: "Each cow should have a steady
milker, be milked as fast as possible, and all
the milk drawn. I am satisfied that there is a
loss of one-third in many dairies, by the lazy-
hap-hazard way in which the cows are milked.
I have known persons to sit down in the milk-
ing-yard and go through with some long yarn,
and be from ten to twelity minutes milking one
cow, when it should be done in less than five."
With these general remarks and reflections,
we commend the whole matter to the careful
consideration of our correspondent and many
other readers who feel an interest in this very
important subject.-EDs.

"BRANCHING SORGHUM."

"Millo-Maize," Etc.
ALTOONA, FLA., December, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I send you by mail a sample head of grain
hlt I would like the correct name for, as I
wish to obtain seed for same, but do not know
what to write for. The sample sent is a little
above the average.
The ground on which it was raised was a
slight sink in good pine land, (no clay,) trees
"deadened" after the ground was ploughed, and
seed planted at once. No manure used; cul-
tivated three times-once with hoe and twice
with sweep-season quite dry; rows three feet
apart. Five weeks after sowing the seeds the
plants were two to two and one-half feet
high ; three cuttings were taken as green for-
age, except a part of a row left for seed,
which was thinned to ten inches in the ro{w;
the seed stalks grew five feet six inches. The
seed was planted July 5th, or abotit that date,
and matured seed in four months. The grain
from three average heads weighed four ounces.
This would give about 1,200 pounds of seed to
an acre after thinning to a stand one foot in
the drill, the thinnings being used as green for-
age. If the stalks with grain on them can be
cured,. I think the question of forage for this
section will be settled. Stock eat the grain in
preference to corn. Can you give me the rela-
tive value of the grain, pound for pound, as
compared with corn ? D. L. A.


REPLY.-As before stated, the seed-head was
from the "Millo-Maize" or "Branching Sor-
ghum"-many packages of which seed were
furnished by our friend, Dr. GEO. WV. DAvLS,
and sent out to our subscribers last spring. It
is, undoubtedly, a valuable plant, both for for-
age and grain, and deserves attention. The
"stalks with grain on them" cannot be cured
for hay or dry forage; and, if they could be,
they would not be of much value. The young
stalks are so succulent that it is very difficult
to cure them; though it can be done by very
thick seeding, cutting' when in tassel, and tying
in small bundles. Its chief value, we think is
for green forage, and it may be cut and fed out
safely at almost any stage of its growth, sprink-
ling over it a little salt, occasionally, to pre-
vent flatulency. The seed, we should rate at


about two-thirds the value of corn, as food for
animals and fowls. It is, also, said to produce
excellent batter-cakes, when ground into meal,
and to be valuable for other farm and domestic
purposes. We shall have more to say of this
plant hereafter; and we hope to have it dis-
cussed fully in THE DISPATCH by those to
whom we sent the Davis seed.-EDs.




"Manuring Bananas."
A subscriber at Umatilla, Fla., writes:
"Your very interesting paper has twice pub-
lished an article on 'Manuring Bananas,' stat-
ing that by so doing they bore eight or more
fingers, and without, only from one to five.' Now,
as mine have 50 and 60, and one of my father's
has 80 fingers, on the common pine land, with-
out manure, we don't understand what is meant.
nW."
[Our correspondent did not read the articles
aright, we think. Turn to the pages again, and
see if there is not a slight mistake in the num-
ber of "fingers," after the manure was applied.
-EDs.]

Southern Plants and Flowers.
A traveling correspondent of the Indiana
Farmer, in a letter from Waynesboro, Springs,
Mississippi, says :
"There are two banana trees (?) growing out
in the flower garden here at the Springs. The
leaves of which are more than a yard in length
and half a yard in width. They are beautiful
and make a very tropical appearance out in
the open yard. Also a camellia or japonica tree
five or six feet high growing in the yard, now
in full bloom, bright rose and white marble col-
ored flowers, very large full bud. These shrubs -
grow out in the open air all winter here with"
out any protection. And here I find, too, that
rare and most delicious of all flowering shrubs,
the magnolia tree, which blooms in January or
February, full 6f little magnolia flowers u the
size of one's thumb and of perfect shape, of rich
cream color, with the delicidus odor 'of am ripe
banana. One of these little flowers carried
into a room will perfume the whole house. for'
several days. Mrs. Richardson, the owner of'
these Sprilngs, is a lady of ctlltue an4 fine taste,
and has bestowved much time and attention on
her flower garden. She has a fine collection of
lilies and other flowering bulbs, and a great
variety of beautiful flowering shrubs that one
seldom sees in the more northern climes. The
hyacinths so neatly arranged, bordering the
long winding walks, will soon be in full bloom."
[Tlhe Magnolia Fuscata or "Banana Shrub,"
does not bloom until March or April. It de-
serves a place in all collections of fine shrub-


bery. The Camellia is not, properly a "Japon-'
ica," any more than the Euonymus, the Ligus-
trum or any other tree or shrub from Japan.
-EDS.] ,

Familiar Quotations.

A gilded halo hovering around decay.-
Byron.
Nursing her wrath .to keep her warm.-
Burns.
His pity gave ere charity began.-Gold-
smith.
A little round, fat oily man of God.-Thom-
son.
They also serve, who only stand and wait.-
Milton.


s82


I ----u --I-I- I_ _ _


0=1


-LI~C n --~ I--- I I I I I -I I I I


m


~I








TH E .FLO R I D A D IS P A T C.H -


Beans fpr Shipping North.
J. C. LANI R-excellent -autthority--con-
tibutes the, following. to the Leesburg Ad-


SF.he}pas ~ season's experience hap taught me
that this can be made one of our most.profit-
.able crops. The early Valentine, (round)
called by some Refugee, has proved to be the
best market variety with me the past season.
The Germani Dwarf Wax is also a good market
bean, but. specks sooner than the Valentine.
They 'should be planted in this section from
December 20th to Januiary 15th. Plant in rows
two feet apart and one and a half bushels per
acre. Cotton-seed meal applied broadcast at
the rate of 1,000 or 1,500 pounds per acre a
month or so before planting, or 500 pounds of
some'good superphosphate in drill, at time of
planting, Will give good resulis-cover two
inches deep 'When beans are well up, work
*with hoe, dr awing dirt to them to prevent wind
blowing about to inuch. A sweep is all that
is necessary after this, but great care should be
taken not to work them while wet from dew or
rain -s ii causes them to rust; under favorable
circumstances they are ready for market from
forty to sixty days after germination. When
the pods are two-thirds grown they are ready
for market and should be picked at once as
they will not wait to be picked at leisure; pick
when dry, using buckets or baskets and not
sacks. I find that it is a good plan to allow the
beans to wait a few hours before picking. Ship
in bushel crates and see that each crate is
packed tight. They can be shipped as far west
as Cincinnati, but the Eastern markets have
been best so far, as beans have been grown but
little south of us, as yet, on account of trans-
portation being too slow to ship them success-
fully.

Analysis of the Orange, Lemon, Etc.
BREVARD, Co., FLA., December, 1882.
Editor. of The Florida Dispatch
Referring to the excellent article, "Intensive
Farminig," from the able hand of Mr. Furman,
of Georgia, wie of this tropical climate need the
Analysis of the Citrus family of fruits. Is it ask-
ing too much of your valued paper to give your
many readers in this region a perfect analysis
of the orange, lemon and lime trees, and their
fruit, in all their various conditions; and, the
component parts of a compost that will produce
the best results, particularly on pine land, and
oblige all ? Yours, truly, S. T.
[We shall endeavor to comply with the wishes
of our correspondent hereafter.-EDS.J

A thing of beauty is ajoy forever.-Keats.

To point a moral or adorn a tale.-Johnson.

Procrastination is the thief of time.-Young.


MEPEOROEOGAC 1C REPORT.
OFPFI E OF OBSERVATION, ,
SiGN LSRRVlICIE, U.S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. j
.Weatlie' for week ending January 12, 1883.
-T- "her. Wind. 2






Saturday 6........ 30.074 61 66.7 83.3| 1.29 SW i 8!Fair
SundaH y 7....... :30.0267 64' 65.7i 95.31 0.15 S 7Lt. rain
MVondav 8...... ,29.94; t69.64 (16:0i'88.0 0.10 8 9 Cloudy.
Tuesday 9...... 29.76 63 46 57.0 181.3- 0.00 W 17dCloudy
Wednesday 101 29.98156i39 47.3 '62.3 0.00 SW 14 Clear.
Thursday 11... 30.1753140 4781 42.3 0.00 W i12Clear.
Friday 12....... 30.4Z|4619j 38.31 67.: 0.00 1NE 4icar.
Highest barometer 30.51, lowest 29.61.
Highest temperature 74, lowest 29.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.


etfeoiolo i'reil Sumnar'.
... KEY WEST, FLA.; JnuarI 1, 1883.I
W Monthly mean actual barometer of. three telegraphic
observations, 30.055.
Monthly mean humidity, 83.8. .
Monthly mean dew point, 64. ,
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 7 a. mi., for'month, 10.9 miles, northeast.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 11 p. m., for month, 9.6 mile, northeast.
S "R. H. PAXTON.'
Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S. A.
CEDAR KEY, FLA. January 1, 1.83.
Monthly mean actual barometer, 30,132.
Monthly mean reduced barometer, 30.152.
Monthly mean temperature, 54.9.
Monthly range of temperature, 40.
Monthly mean humidity, 76.9 per cent.
Monthly mean dew point, 47.20.
Total rainfall, 3.23 inches.
Prevailing wind direction, as determined from the
three telegraphic observations, northeast.
.- FRED. W. MIXER,
Observer Signal Corps, U. S. A.

PUNTA RASSA, FLA., January 1, 1883.
Monthly range Of barometer, 0.682.
Mean of maximum temperature, 701.5.
Prevailing wind direction, northeast.
COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE.,
1871, 05.70 1872, 62.70; 1873, 65.20; 1874, 65.50; 1875, 66.60;
1876, 59.90; 177 64.10; 1878, 61.50; 1879, 70.2 ; 1880, 62.70;
1881, 67.7 ; 1882, 62.70.
NV. J. EVANS,
Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S. A.
PENSACOLA, FLA., January 1, 183.
Average barometer for month, 3 ).1')3.
Average temperature for month, 50.5.
Average dew point, 41.7.
Average humidity, per ceiit., sat unrationi 100, 7-.3.
Total rainfall for month, 6.12 inches.
Maximum hourly wind velocity, 31 miles.
Prevailing wind direction for month, north.
M. Mc'i i AI'.l.AN,
Obiser'ver Signal Corps, U. S. A.




Orange Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCII LINE,
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, January 9, 1883. f
Receipts of oranges at this port via Florida Dispatch
Line and Southern Express Company, week ending
9th inst. 5,100 packages.
PRICES.
Floridas, .3.00 to $t.25 perbox.
Messinias, 5.2.75 to $3.25 per box.
Palermos, 12.75 to $3.25 per box.
Valencias, -K5.511 to $7.75 per case.
Jamaicas, '3.0:i to $6.00 per barrel.
C. D. OWENS, General Agent.
NE]w YORK, January 12, 1883.
Special Telegram. to The Florida Dispat eh:
Receipts of oranges via Florida Dispatch Line Knd
Southern Express Company this week, 5,100 packages.
Selling from 3 1.00 to $5.00 per box. C. D. O \V l: Ns.
S eacksouville JVholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, JVholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, F a.
FRUITS-
SUGAi RS- Granulated .......................... ............... t
W white E x. C........................................ 9/
G olden C ............................................. 8
P ow dered..... ................................. 11
COFFEE, Rio-t Fair.. 9
G oo d ............................................. 10
Choice ........ ....... ... .... ......... ....... 11
FBest ............................................. 12

P eaberry ................................................ 18
M aracaibo ......... .... ........ ...... ............ 18

N A patent......................................... 7 25,', 50
P earl, 3d best........................................ 2 7 0
Orange Co., No. 1. .................... 6 50
Ham s (Merwin & Sons)........................ H1;
Sh would ers............................................. 12'
HOMINYX-Pearl, per bbl.................................... 4 50
MEAL-per bbl .............................. . 4 50
LARD-Refined in pails...................................... 13


BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)..................... 35 to 40
CHEESE- Full Cream ........................................... 15}"
H alf cream ........................:.............
ToBAxCCo-Smoking -"the Boss" Durham is 1
a n d ........ .............................. 32
"The Boss" Durham 1 ib pkae ......... 30
"Sitting Bull" 1). (genuine) ...... 50
'Sitting Bull" (genuine) s...... ..... 75
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) .......... 49
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) IIlI pkg'.. 45
Plug-"Shell Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30
lb b ox es............... .................. 5
"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to lb., 30 lb
b o x es .............. ................................. 36
"Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 14 to
lb., 17 lb boxes............................. 50
Cigars-"Long Branch"a very pop-
ular brand, per thousand......... 27 00
"Our X," choice cigar, easy smok'r 21 00
"Our XX," a very choice smoker.... 26 00
"Florida Boys," (we areState Agt,) i35 00
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box.. 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box............................ 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb.............................. 6.2c
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lbt ............................................... 15@ 22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 0)c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
d oz. 1 b.................................................. 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz lb...... 2 70


Royal Baking Powder, per doz. V lb......
COUNTRY PRODUCE. ,
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
oIbr first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new..........................
CH ICKENS, each.......................... ..............,...
E GGS- P er doz........ ............................................
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class
Country Dry Salted, per Ib.....................
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb....................
Dam aged H ides...... ...........................
Kip and Calf, 8Ibs. and under................
SKINS--Raw Deer Skins, per Ib.........................
Deer Skins Salted, per lb....
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
te r ....... .... ...................... ............
Raccoon, each...................... .......
W ild Cat, each .......................................
F o x ea ch ................................................
BEESW AX- per lb.................................................
WOOL--Free from burs, per lb.............................
Burry, per ach per ..........................................
GOAT SKINS-- Each per Ib ...................................


1 50


4 40@?4 60
20@40
34@35
13
9@11
10
35
26@30
150@4 00
10@20
5@15
20
17 22
10


For Sale.
Orange S,'dliinis-. and Small Trees with 1,2 and 3 year
old buds. All sizes of Sour Seedlings. Also
ORANGE LANDS
On the Bluffton property and in Orange Co. Fori partic-
ulars apply to
F. C. SOLLEE, Supt.,
tomar 10 '83p Bluffton, Volusia Co.. Fla,-


u THE South

.FARM MILLS
For Stock Feed or Meal.fog
n.0,00o Z"T" "CrE-
Write for Pamphlet,
Simpson 8 Gault Nfg Co.
Successors to STRAUB MILL d'o.
CINCINNATI. 0.
to jan 30, '83.

Lands in Middle and South Florida,
-ON THE-
TRANSIT,
FLORIDA SOUTHERN
and SOUTH FLORIDA
RAIL ROADS.
ITnAds 1or Orange Groves,
Iands for ''ruLcl Gardenling.i
At fair Prices and on IZe-asonuble Time.
Ve also offer
=ine B"ailId.ing- Sites
IN THE FLOURISHING TOWN OF SANFORD.

Sanford is rapidly Growing, and we have some
VERY CHOICE LOTS on
the Market.

Sanford has Churches, Schools, Railroads,
Car-shops, Telegraph, Telephone, Water
Works and all the advantages of an

For full particulars, address
JAMES E. INGRAHAM, Gen. Agt.,
Sanford, Orange Co., Fla.
In regard Lands in Middle Florida, address
JOHN E. LAMBETH, Local Agent,
nov20-t1f Gainesville, Fla.


[4-3;47.]
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
LAND OFFICE, 1
GAINESVILLE, FLA., January 3,1883.f
-NOTICE is hereby given that the following-named
Settler has filed notice of his intention to make,
final proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Cirpcit Court,
at Jacksonivlle, Florida, Saturday, February 17, 1883,
viz: George A. Hess, 1Homestead entry No. 10374, for the
lots 1 and 2, Section 15, Township 4 south, Range 27 east.
Hle names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of said land,
viz: Wm. H. Curry, of Mandarin, Fla.; John Ortagus,,
of Jacksonville, Fla.; Moses J. Brown, of Mandarin,
Fla.; James Watson, of Mandarin, Fla,
to feb 15 L. A BARNES, Register.

[4-347.]
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
LAND OFFICE, )
GAINESVILLE, FLA., January 9, 1883.1'
HInOTICE is hereby given that the following-named
N settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof will be
made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court, at
Jacksonville, Florida, on Thursday, March 1,1883, viz:
George Clark, Jacksonville, Fla., Homestead No, 4069,
for the lot No. 3 or Elz of SE'/, Section 31, Townshiip 2 s
R ange 27 e. "., I
He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of said land,
viz: Paul Palmer, Sam'l Anderson, Andrew Sessions,
Toby sessions, all of Jacksonville, Fla.
L. A. BARNES, Register
to feb 14, '83 U. S. Land Office.


1


i





3- ~THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


kept perfectly pliant by very moderate and fre-
quent application of the oils we have named.

The Turned Rule.
Less than three months ago the wreck of a
man staggered into the office of a weekly pa-
per in Eastern Michigan and asked for money
to buy whisky. Strangely enough the pub-
lisher was an old schoolmate. They were ap-
prentices in the same town. They worked side
by side as finished compositors. One had so-
briety and thrift-the other had a good heart
and an open hand. Twenty years made the
one rich and influential-the other a drunkard
who slept in the gutter as often as in a bed.


Harness-Oiling Leather, Etc.
Harness and horse-gear generally is expen-
sive in this country, and there is great loss from
carelessness and neglect. To begin with, every
part of the harness should fit. It should be
kept clean and soft. Frequently the collar
becomes covered with a compound of dirt and
sweat, which makes it uneven, and should be
looked after as often as necessary. When the
harness gets wet, hang it on several pins instead
of one, so that it will not curl out of shape when
drying. Always grease or oil after wetting,
and before it is quite dry, if you would preserve
the leather and make the harness easy for the
animal. A harness that is cared for will last
three or four times as long as one that is neg-
lected. Use neat's-foot oil, and always keep a
greasy woolen cloth to wipe and rub harness
with.
Leather is seldom injured by being wet, if
hung up to dry, instead of being left in a mass
on the floor or in a corner, where the drying is
so slow as to create mould. For general use
harness should be fairly oiled, and for this pur-
pose pure neat's-foot oil should be used, and
this should be rubbed in while the leather is
moist, but not wet. The harness should be
wrapped up in a wet cloth one 'day before the
application of neat's-foot oil; this should be
rubbed on smartly with a brush for a sufficient
length of time, to insure its entrance into the
leather, rather than leave it upon its immedi-
ate surface. If the leather is positively dry,
this substance cannot enter, and, therefore, the
necessity of its being moist and pliant at the
time of application. Varnish should never be
applied; it fills pores, and prevents the nec-
essary access of air, causing the leather to be-
come crisp and rigid, and in a short space of
time it is rendered tender, causing it to crack,
break, &c. Before applying any oily substance
to leather, all dirt should be thoroughly re-
moved from its surface, and no other material
than lampblack should ever be mixed with oil,
where it is necessary to blacken the leather.
Shoe blacking is sometimes used, and always
with injurious effect; it frequently contains
sulphuric acid, which, when brought in contact
with leather, rapidly destroys it. When the
leather is very dry, as with boots and shoes,
the injury from this cause is not so great. Vege-
table oils should never be applied to harness of
any kind, for after a while they harden the
leather and destroy its usefulness. Leather cur-
tains should never be varnished, but always


The one had made use of what God had given
him, but the other had deliberately made him-
self a wreck. The meeting called up a host of
recollections, and the contrast between their
situations was so great that the old drunkard
was sobered as he realized. He was offered
work, but he had become too broken. The
stick and the rule were no longer for him. He
was offered a temporary home, but he looked
at his rags and felt his shame for the first time
in months. When money was handed him he
waved it back and said: I shall not want it.
I ask, in the name of olden days as a fellow-
craftsman, one little favor." "It shall be
granted." When I am dead then turn a rule
for me and give me a single line."
The promise was made, and the old wreck
floated out again on the current of life, borne
here and there and feeling that death was to
be the end. Yesterday a copy of the weekly
reached the Free Press with proof that the edi-
tor had fulfilled his promise. He had turned
a rule for the poor wreck, and had given him
a line: "Died, September 27, 1882, George
White." That was all, but in that line was
such a sermon as no man on earth could- de-
liver. For every word there was a year of
woe and degradation. For every letter there
were tears and heartaches and promises and
failures.-Free Press.

PauNING.-The Shellac Varnish, about
which R. A. C. inquires, is made thus: "Take
a quart of alcohol and dissolve it in as much
gum shellac as will make a liquid of the consist-
enice of paint, apply this to the wound with a
common painter's brush; always paring the
wound smoothly first with the knife. The liquid
becomes perfectly hard, adheres closely, ex-
cludes the air perfectly, and is affected by no
changes of weather; while at the same time its
thinness offers no resistance to the lip of new
bark that gradually closes over the wound. If
the composition is kept in a well-corked bottle,
sufficiently wide-mouthed to admit the brush,
it will always be ready for use and suited to
the want of the moment."

BURNING OUT STUMPS.-A little excava-
tion should be made under the stump, between
two of the large roots, some combustible mate-
rial put in, and then set on fire. Previous to
this, however, some dry materials should be
piled around the root, above the surface of the
ground, and covered over with a compact layer
of earth, forming a sort of coal pit. It has been
found, upon experiment, that the stumps will
burn in this way a number of days, with a sort
of subterranean fire; and when the turf falls
in, nearly all of the root is found consumed
below and above the surface of the ground.
The hole left by the consumed stump will be
found to contain a quantity of ashes, charred
wood, burnt earth, &c., all valuable fertilizers


"FLORIDA, ITS PEOPLE AND PRODUCTIONS."
-The Rev. J. F. Richmond, of Sumter County,
Florida, has an article in the Northern Method-
ist Review on the above subject. Zion's Herald,
in noticing the article, says: "'Florida, its
People and Productions,' are portrayed by Rev.
J. F. Richmond. The climate and fruits are
set forth in colors so glowing that the reader is
in danger of being allured from our vigorous
North to those balmy groves where Jack Frost
is a stranger. Hopeful indeed is the future of
this winter sanitarium of our country, with its
improving schools, enterprising immigrants,
extended railroads, projected ship canals,
gigantic schemes for draining its swamps, and
its English and American land companies mak-
ing the wilderness bloom with orange groves.
We hope the reviewer is not deceived when he
asserts that 'Florida is eminently a place of free
thought, free speech, free ballot, and affords, in
all respects, as much protection to opinion,
property, and life as any State of correspond-
ing population.' "

TRAINING LIMA BEANS.-A Baltimore cor-
respondent of the Gardener's Monthly says that
though the following is but a small hint, yet by
it Lima beans may be gathered full two weeks
before the usual time, and so, perhaps, may be
useful. Instead of.having long and stout poles
only as is usual, I tie on lateral slender rods
with a willow band, horizontally, and so train
the vines, much in fact as you would do a grape
vine. It takes but a few minutes to give my
small plot of plants a tendency to run on the
lateral poles, and I am well awarded by their
extra earliness. I cannot explain why they
should be earlier than when they run on up-
right poles; but such is the fact, and you may
have it for what it is worth.

"No FENCE!"-A correspondent of the
Putnam County Journal says: "I see several
correspondents of the county are agitating the
'no fence law.' I would say, agitate it still
more, if for no other reason than to put a stop
to the indiscriminate burning of the woods in
the spring, endangering very valuable property
for the sake of a few scrubby cattle and razor-
back swine."

WE suffer for the offences of our progeni-
tors; our descendants will suffer for ours.
The self-justifying ancestor may asseverate that
his surfeits of viands and wines, and his indul-
gences in narcotics, do him no harm; but three
generations afterward, delirium and gout will
shriek out their denials in his great-grand-
children.-Horace Mann.

To MEND IRON POTS.-Mix finely sifted
lime with some white of an egg, till a thin
kind of paste is formed, then add some iron
filings. Apply this to the fractures, and the
vessel will be found nearly as sound as ever.


-To cure chapped hands, take common
starch and rub into a fine smooth powder, put
it in a clean tin box, and every time the hands
are removed from dish water or hot suds, rinse
them carefully in clean water, and while they
are damp, rub a pinch of the starch over them,
covering the whole surface.
-" It should be laid down as a general rule,
that no land ought to be sub-soil plowed un-
less it has been previously drained; for, where
the sub-soil is so porous naturally as not to re-
quire draining, neither will it require sub-
soiling."
Like angel's visits, few and far between.-
Campbell.
Even his failing leaned to virtue's side.-
Goldsmith.


-a part of which may be thrown out for use
elsewhere, and the crater or hole then filled up
to the level with fresh turf or earth.

-The Dalmatian Insect Powder is said to
be superior to Persian Insect powder. It is
composed of the pulverized blossoms of an im-
ported plant that is death to insects and all the
lower forms of animal life; and, at the same
time, is not in the slightest degree obnoxious
to the human species.

FAILINGS.-The finest composition of human
nature, as well as the finest China, may have
flaws in it, though the pattern may be of the
highest value#





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


return in cash, while his less fortunate brother a
of the Hyperborea'n regions awaits a coming t
gloomy autumn; and now, when this is done, if
he is a THRIFTY, industrious poor man, and has
planted his acre or more of orange trees, he
gathers the golden fruit and off to market, I
and returns with GOLDEN results, and now is
the time to commence again where he started i1
just a year ago, thus counting to profit every l
month, day, almost every hour in the year, until r
presently he ceases to be a poor man, but has a i
home and place that would make the eyes of
the Cultivator glisten with envy as he gazed e
upon his domicile. a
Now, Messrs. Editors, if the Cultivator had si
written lazy man instead of "poor man," his ir
assertion might have worn the semblance of
truth, and then he might have written the same
of his own State and of Florida. ec
The Cultivator's ignorance or want of truth J
is equally displayed in his fling at our white b


Malicious Lying.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., January 6, 1883.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Please insert the following clipping, furnished
by a friend, and taken from the American Cul-
tivator of the 28th of October last, in order that
your vast legion of readers may see how mali-
ciously and ignorantly some of the journals may
slander-and misrepresent a State and a people,
in either case equally culpable and deserving
the execration of all honest men :
"Although constantly represented as a poor
man's land, Florida is the last of the States to
which a small capitalist ought to go. He can-
not live upon the land till the orange trees bear.
If he goes into business, he must 'first take a
county and town license. If he works as a
laborer, his, pay will be low and precarious;
and besides, he cannot work for himself and
others at the same time. He must live on scanty
fare, in an unhealthy climate, and must be sub-
jected to annoyances that he ought not to en-
dure and dare not resent. His children will
grow up in ignorance, and his life, and the lives
of his family, will for many years be cankered
by anxiety and cares such as he would not
know elsewhere. There are plenty of people
ready to tell him a different story. Land spec-
ulators and their agents, and all who have land
to sell, will assure him of the honesty of the
several companies and of the pamphlets pub-
lished by them. These men have the utmost
faith in public credulity. One of them assures
us that white sand 'has good fertilizing quali-
ties;' and elsewhere he asserts that the poorest
lands need no fertilizing."
In the first place it is false, because no poor
man, woman or child need fear of freezing to
death in this land of sunshine and cheer, and is,
therefore, relieved of the expensive necessity t
of providing against a winter of eight or nine 1
months in the year, when the face of the earth
is wrapped in snow and ice and zero the famil- 1
iar mark of temperature on the ever-consulted
thermometer, but on the contrary, when this
gloomy state of things sets in, in the region in C
which the Cultivator is published and our friend l
resides, the poor man can begin to turn the soil t
for market truck, and in midwinter ship his t
ve tables to markets where thawing out is a s
thing catalogued in the far future. While this I
is perfecting he can plant another spare acre in I
berries, which, by February are ready to ship, f
and supply his less fortunate brothers of the f
North and West, and at good round prices.
Now, when these are done, the poor man can (
get his acres down in corn and in rice, in sweet t
and Irish potatoes, and in midsummer, when t
these are but springing from the earth where
the Cultivator lives, the poor man either houses v
food for his faithful mule or horse or cattle, or s
sends to the mills and receives a midsummer a


THos. T. RUSSELL. s

LILY OF THE VALLEY IN WINTER.-The s
Lily of the Valley'may be forced into bloom r
n winter as readily as the Hyacinth. Select h
large, healthy clumbs, and put them in good F
ich soil, and then place in a warm room, giv-
ng sufficient water to prevent drying, but not
enough to cause a decay of roots. A box will tf
answer, if pots cannot be obtained, and we are o
ure that those who are fond of house plants 1
n winter, will be pleased with this little gem l1
hen in bloom; for its fragrance is so pow- tI
rful as to be almost offensive in a close room. o
ames Vick, Rochester, N. Y., can send the B
ulbs per mail. 9 e0


sand; he does not know that the sand of Flor-
ida is largely composed of decomposed and cal-
cined shell; that if a ton of it were submitted to
the furnace it would not produce a piece of
glass as big as the crown of his hat; that it is
soil instead of sand gravel, and that "cow-
pened" a little it will produce sugar cane eight,
ten and twelve feet high to the amount of $150
to $200 per acre, something impossible where
the Cultivator resides.
But enough, Messrs. Editors. Let the poor
man come and bring with him but half the en-
ergy expended by men in the rich valleys of
the Connecticut, the Ohio and the Mississippi,
cultivate the soil as men do in these favored !
regions, and he will soon cease to be a poor
man and join the rest of us in thanks to the
benificent Creator for such a land and such a
climinate as that of Florida.
The probabilities are that the Cultivator in
describing the land agents who represent Flor-
ida, and for whom she is by no means responsi-
sible, has described its own condition, whetted
by an impromptu envy it doubtless has, or is
interested in lands elsewhere, now covered with
snow and ice which it would like to work off on
human credulity, but Florida in all her blessed-
ness lies a MORDECAI AT ITS GATE. Hence its
spleen. A. J. RUSSELL.

Where is the Frost Line?
BROWN'S WHARF, EAST PALATKA, FLA.,
December 29, 1882. j
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I am now managing the "Brown Grove,"
and I am happy to say that the recent cold wave
of Saturday night and Sunday, the 17th of De-
cember, did not injure the orange trees in the
least. The fruit is perfect in every respect, as
there is no indication of its being affected. Th.e
thermometer did not go lower than 290 in the
most exposed places. The cold seems to have
been more severe in the counties south and west
of Putnam. We would now respectfully ask
of the oldest inhabitant, "Where is the frost
line?" I have lived in Florida some forty-
;hree years, and have never been able to find ]
the frost line, although, I must confess, that
Kouth of Cape Canaveral, frost not often is seen.
[ lived on Lake Worth some two years, and on
Lndian River part of the time, and I have seen
rost as far down as these places. The great ]
reeze of February, 1835, did not do much dam-
ige to the orange and other fruit trees south of
Dape Canaveral, but every vestage of orange
rees was killed north of that cape. The orange 1
ree, when the sap is down, can stand very se-
rere cold weather, but when the sap is up, it is s
,ery sensitive to cold. Property on the east
ide of the St. John's River ought to be worth a
Lt least 100 per cent. more than other localities, t
s Ihe river is a natural protection, as the colder
he weather, the warmer the water in the river. T


.L1


Z


M


*


We hope our orange-growers will experi-
nent on the best way of keeping the fruit at
rome for a considerable period after it is
)icked.-Fernandina Mirror.

OYSTERS.-A medical authority states that
he oyster contains fourteen per cent. of flesh-
orming material, which is about the amount
obtained from eggs. It has but five per cen.t.
ess of muscle-making matter and two per cent.
ess of fat than lean beef. It seems surprising
hat among the thousands of species of shell-
sh only a very few kinds are eaten, such as
ysters, clams, periwinkles, cockles and mussels.
3ut two or three species are known to be pois-
nous.


]
]
]


]



E
I



]


Asparagus in Florida.
ORANGE CO., FLA., December, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Having heard a gentleman who had traveled
extensively through this State say that aspar-
agus will not grow in Florida, I desire to know
of you, or your numerous readers whether such
is the fact. I doubt it, of course, as I have
heard of no edible plant but that will grow
here, under proper condition and flourish.
M.
REPLY.-The. "ludicrosity" of our respected
correspondent's query almost upsets our edito-
rial gravity. The Asparagus officinalis is a
"hardy, perennial, maritime plant." It is in-
digenous to the shores of various countries of
Europe and Asia, and has been naturalized in
all countries within the temperate zone. A
sandy soil, slightly moist, and well enriched
with manure, is imst favorable .to its perfect
growthS; and though not indigenous or native
to this continent or State, it grows beautifully
in Florida, wherever it is properly planted and
cared for. It is only a few years since it was
gravely asked if Irish potatoes, or strawberries
or cabbages .would grow in Florida (!)-and
now--for further particulars, see the New York
market weekly reports.-EDS.

Keeping Oranges.
The recent cold weather has called, the atten-
tion of orange-growers to the importance of as-
certaining how the fruit can be best preserved
at home for a sufficient period after gathering
to avoid glutting the market. It is self-evident
that if, in consequence of the risk of injurious
frosts, the larger part of the immense orange
crop of Florida is gathered and thrown into
market in the months of November and De-
cember, the markets will be overstocked and
prices depressed to a ruinous extent.
The desirable point to ascertain is how to re-
tain the fruit in the sound condition for one or
two months, so that it can be gradually shipped
to meet the demand and sold at remunerative
prices.
In most localities in Florida cellars are out
of the question, and lofts, even in the winter
;eason, may prove too warm. We should sup-
pose, however, that storehouses set up from the
ground and with ventilated slides along the
ides next to the floor and provided with ven-
ilator caps in a high-pitched roof, would create
dry atmosphere favorable to the preserva-
ion of the fruit in shallow bins or boxes.
We have seen it stated, by General Sanford,
we believe, that in Italy the fruit was not
hipped for several weeks after it was gathered,
md we know that it is subjected to a voyage of
several weeks before it reaches this country.


im






3 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


JACKSONVILLE, JANUAlRY 15, 1883.

D. Redmond, D. H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.
Subscription $2.00 per annim, in advance.
RIA'0TES OF ADVE i iJIINI G,
PAID IN ADVANCE.
SQUAlRES. 1 TIME.: 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEA
One ...................... $150 $ 3 $ 7 00 $12 00 2200
Two........... ........... 250 6 001 12 00 22 00 40 00
Three ... ......... 3 50 900 16 00 30 00 5500
our .... .......... 500 10 00 2100 36 00 9
Five ................. ....... 00' 13 00 22 00 40 o0X 78 00
Eight.... 10 001 17 00 36 00 60 00 140 00
Sixteen........ ... 19 00 300 00 60 00! 9)6 00 10 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTITSING (seven words to line) 20 cents
per line.
CIR CULA TION.
This' paper has the largest circulation of any
paper (daily or weekly) published in Florida,
with a very large circulation in Georgia and the
Southern States; also has subscribers in every
State in 1the Union, with many in .foreign coun-
tries.
SPECIAL NO TI(CE.
Persons are warne(0 d (igi< paying 'ub.lscrip-
tions to any one calling hi..,-lf our Agent, as
we have 'no regular canvaessing (agent.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA
FR UIT GRO WERS' ASSO CIA TION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
THE FLOIDA DI)ISPATCH AND
1Regular Club
Price. Rate.
American Agriculturist.................$1.50 $2.00 $2.25
Atlantic Mo.nthly Magazine.......... 4.00 2.00 4.75
Country Gentleman..................... 2.50 2.00 3.50
Detroit Free Press........................ 2.00 2.00 3.50
Eclectic Magazine...................... 5.00 2.00 5.25
Florida Agriculturist.................. 2.00 2.00 2.75
Florida W eekly Union..................2.00 2.00 3.00
Florida Weekly Times ............ 1.00 2.00 2.25
Fa-mily Story Paper............... 3.00 2.00 3.75
Fireside Cormpanion..................... 3.00 2.00 3.75
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly.. 4:00 2.00 4.75
Frank Leslio~sTll: Chimney Corner. 4.00 2.00 4.75
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly..... 3.00 2.00 4.75
Frank Leslie's Sunday Maga.ine... 3.00 2.00 4.75
Harper's Illustrated Weekly......... 4.00 2.00 4.75
Harper's Illustrated Bazar........ 4.00 2.00 4.75
Harper's Illustrated Young People. 1.50 2.00 2.75
Harper's Monthly Maagazine ......... 0 2.00 4.75
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine.... 3.00 2.00 3.75
Nebraska Farmer..................... 1.00 2.00 2.75
North American Review............. 5.00 2.00 5.75
New York Weekly Sun............ 1.00 2.00 2.75
New York Weekly Herald......... 1.00 2.00 2.75
New York Weekly Tribune......... 2.00 2.00 2.75
New York Weekly Times.......... 1.00 2.00 2.25
New York Weekly World.......... 1.00 2.00 2.25
New York Ledger..................... 3.00 2.00 3.75
New York Weekly................... 2.00 2.00 .75
Popular Science Monthly............. 5.00 2.00 5.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times......... 2.00 2.00 2.75
Rural Califormiian............ ....... 1.50 2.00 2.00
Southern Cultivator................... 1.50 2.00 2.75


Scientific American.... ......... 3.00 2.00 4.25
Saturday eight ................ ....... 3.00 2.00 3.75
Savannali Weekly 1 ws.......... 2. 00 2.00 3.75
The Century' Monthly Magazine
(Scribner's)......................... 4.00 2.00 5.00
Waverly Magaziee...................... 5.00 2.00 5.75
The above, are among the very best publications,
although we are able to club with others. Write us
for terms with any other paper or periodical, not in
this list, and we shall cheerfully quote club rates.
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money, Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASI-IMEAID BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

"WILD COTTON."-The letter of W. S. A.,
of Monroe County, Florida, will appear in our
next.
STATE FAIR !-We return (somewhat tardy)
thanks to the worthy Secretary, Major A. J.
RUSSELL, for complimentary tickets to the ap-
proaching Florida Fair.


Orange and Apple Stocks.
A friend thinks that orange seedling stocks
for budding cannot be raised here as cheaply as
apple stocks are at the North. We (do not see
why; but in our estimate of their value we
rated them higher than apple stocks. The lat-
ter are offered at from $2.50 to $6 per thou-
sand at Green's Nurseries, Clifton, M.onroe
County, New York.

The State Garden.
A subscriber in Orange County seems quite
charmed with the very able summing-up of
Florida's capabilities, lately printed in THE
DISPATCH, from the pen of our friend, Dr. C.
J. KENWORTHY. He (the subscriber) moves
"that the late paper of Dr. Kenworthy be copied
into all the newspapers of Florida, and also
published in pamphlet form, in long-primer
type, that all, may see and read it." He wants
New York and Chicago capitalists to take hold
of the matter, and help "develop the great fruit
resources ofI Florida," etc. To all which, we
say-A'1me1n _!

New Publications.
"Vennor's Weather Almanac, for 1883"-
from Geo. Hughes, Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
"Burpree's Farm Annual," 1883. W. Atlee
Burpree, Philadelphia, Pa.
"Popular Songs and Ballads." No. 1. A
collection of one hundred songs, words and
music; embracing Jubilee Melodies; Irish and
Scotch Ballads; Popular Concert Pieces, &c.
Price 25 cents. Patten Publishing Company,
49 Barclay Street, New York.
. "The Mobile Register Illustrated Annual
for 1883." A very beautiful little Almanac,
with illuminated cover and fifty illustrations on
wood, chiefly by Darley, Moran, Schell, Whit-
ney, Woodward and other celebrated Ameri-
can artists. In addition to letter-press descrip-
tions of the pictured scenery, etc., we find an
excellent practical chapter from our valued
confrere, Prof. J. P. Stelle, entitled "What to
Plant, When to Plant, and How to Cultivate."
The "Annual" is worth sending for. Address
John L. Rapier & Co., Publishers, Mobile,
Alabama.
"Canadian Horticulturist," $1 per year. D.
W. Beadle, St. Catharines, Ontario.

Answers to Inquiries.
H. W. L., New Orleans.-The Hand-Book
alluded to will be sold at about $1.50. Cassava
seed wanted by H. W. Lawrence, New Orleans.
J. B.,.P.-See DISPATCH of November 6,


page 518, also, the last number, for January
8, page 663, for hints and directions respecting
young orange trees for stocks.
GEO. J. N.-For what special purpose do
you desire the "fertilizers," for which you ask
a formula? We have already given several
articles on "muck," but will comply with your
request if you will be a little more explicit.
NON-HATCHING EGGS.-W. A. W.-Write
Mr. Hawkins and state facts. He will do the
fair thing and duplicate your eggs, doubtless.
"EGY.PTIAN CORN."-The White variety,
alluded to by "A. J. C." is, probably, our
"Branching Sorghum" again; or probably,
white "Dhoura corn." Send us a sample head,
per mail, so that we can determine the matter.


"READER," Cincinnati, O.-Send for "Chap-
man's Southern Flora." New edition now in
press. Reply to your other query hereafter.
GOATS !-Who ,can, supply,-a good milch
goat? A subscriber at Maitland, ('J. L.")
desires to procure. one) and ,asks cost, etc.
F. L. S.-You may use the cotton seed and
stable manure together, equal parts; but the
muck should be well dried before composting,
and the stable manure and lime do not go well
together. When your mu&k is dry, add to it
from one-sixth to one-third of lime-mix thor-
oughly-and then add one-eighth or one- tenth
of bone dust, and intermix again, adding a lit-
tle coarse salt. Let the mass stand a few days
before using, and keep it covered, if possible.


to feb 9, '88.



Merchants' Iine,
DOUBLE DAILY,
CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.

ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL, STEAMERS.
REGULAR MAIL,

GEO. M. BIRD, Capt. G. J. Mercier,
H. B. PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave .iDe. B ry
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily, except Sunday, at 3
p. m.jfor PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
all intermediate landings. ..
ROSA, Capt. J. L. Amazeen.
FREDERICK DE BARY, Capti Leo. Vogel. :
WELAKA, Capt. J. S. Mattheson.
One of the above-named steamers will leave' D Bary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Satur^Qy, at
1:30 p. m., and from S., F. and W. Railway wharf at 5 p.
m., for Palatka, Sanford, Enterprise and all intermedi-
ate landings
Connects at Palatka with Florida Southerfi Railroad
for Gainesville and Ocala.
Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
on the Upper Oeklawaha.
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Daytona.
Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
New Smyrna and Titusville.
Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
morning at 7 a. m., and Sanford at 7:30 a. m. and 9:00 a.
m., making close connections with S., F. and W. Rail-
way forall points North, East and West.
eThrough bills of lading given to all points.
The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
respect.
For further information, apply at General Ticket
Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets.
W. B. WATSON, Manager.
C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.


,_ __


- --


I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


IMJ of llmarion llty,, Florifa, BRADLEY'S ORANGE
-BY-- wVe i'have prepared this Fertilizer
especially for the culture of the or-
J. W. IMHlNLL & A. T. WILLIAMS, ange tree, and front the results al-
Sh owinIg all lands subject to Tm; d.liat: entry, also va- ready obtained from its use on the
.**: Sate, Railroad, )Disston and Ieed lands, all post-ol- orange groves of Floridla, we feel
lices, railroad stations etc. Adopted by Board of County justified in. claiming that it cannot,
(omlissioners as thle official m.ap. Price,, in pocket be surpassed, if equalled, by any
form,,2. Price, on1 rollers for office, $3. Sent postpaid, other fertilizer.
oni receipt of price. It is composed of the purest .and
F. A. SL),h3 NSON (General Agent, highest grade materials, combined
to mar 17, 8.3 cala, iharion Co., Fla. in such proportions as to furnish all 1
Slthe elements of plant-food in prop-
__ ___" er quantities and in the best .form i
SIto promote a rapid and strong
El -growth of the wood and insure ai
S.t2iiLO,(-<, abunda-nt yield of fine fruit.
uA suliceient proportion of ts
A.OF0oploiSorie nid, being readily sol-
uble in cold water, is immediately
available as food for the young
'. \! rootlets of thie tree, while a consid-
SLZ, irn Z i erable portion, being present inl the
fbrm of pure ground bone, undis- -_____
N Horticulturist, Seedsiman andl solved by acid, becomes .cntirel )-
S, l'L, Tr. soluble in the soil only by the ac-
S.tion of the elements of nature in
I My nw catalogue oi.l due course of time. Thus this all
closely printed ages--il- important food is not soon ex-
lstrated-will b, sc-nt hausted by the tree, or washed into m
Gec f'one ( rlcit( "-cC 1 o c the ground by heavy rains, but is .
sal.. Adriess, supplied in abundant quantities g




I II M .-.,I..f.it1e.rv of


to sept 10 '83


FLORIDAA LANDS.


Parties wishing to 1 Buy Lands.
Parti,,s wishing to Sell Lands.
Parties wisi hiint t< Ltocate Iil iom st ..ilt .
Parties wishing to make Cash Entries of Govern-
iment Lands.
Parties wishingl to< Loan Mivy.
Parties wishing t(o BPorrow Money.
Parties wishing to Invest Money,
Should call on or address

W.B. CLARKSON & CO.,
SO WVest 1 ay S-trcet,
P. 0. Box 852. (dec i tf) .1 At( CK N V I LLE.

IF IL O III 1 1) A


slm irro icai FrIIt F1M mO1viii go,
AND
MAN U FAC(TURING CONFECTIONERS,
Post-Office BIox 45,
JA('KSONVILLE, FLA.


Our full line of fine goods are now ready for shipment
embracing the follow w i g :
Or'ege Mitrnu'alide, P.r.' /' Si'''p'oo (/i'rapes,
,,',,lS ,,,'r ,y/ G,' c Jely, Gu a Jelly, Gly Gari',
,Io',,,lau/,:, ','. Presercd Fig'i, Quince Jelly,
Quince Iarluuwild, Sioeet Pickied Peaches.
Our goods are first-class in every respect, put up in
neat, attractive and merchanta.ble packages and ready
for shipment to all parts of tlhe United States and the
Canadas. Our object is to give to the best trade a per-
fectly pure article, and every package bearing our trade-
mark can be relied upon as st rict ly pure goods. Tothose
who are selling our goods it is unnecessary to commend
them, but to those who are not we beg to say, we are
packing the best goods manufaetured. A trial order is
solicited. Price list sent on application.
, We offer every variety of 'ine CaIndies known
to the trade, and if a first-class strictly pure article is de-
sired at reasonable prices, send for price list.
WARROCIiK & CO.,
nov27 tf JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
If you want to become a telegraph operator send twen-
ty-live cents to C. E. JONES & BRo., Cinicinnati, Ohio, for
best illustrated instruction book. cow to July20-S3


BradJley's Plhospl) ate,"
the Standmard Fertilizer for all Field and Garden Crops, and especially adapted to. the wants iof the
Cotton Crop.
iLALIN OFFICE, 217 KILRY STREET, BOSTON, ILMASSACH USETTS.
For further particulars and painphlets giving testimonials from some of the best orange growers in the
State, address,


0. W. B-ron-vell & Co., Agents for State of Florida,
491 W. BAY-ST., JA( KSON'VILLE, FLOIIDA.


to oct( 'S8.


WVholesale Dealers ill



Foreign and Domestic Fruits.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS FOR THE SALE OF


Florida Oraniges and Lemons,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


1-CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
kLIAREFERiENCES.- First National.Bank, Jacksonville, Florida. Union National Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
sept 4, tf.


FRANK W. MUMBY.


JNO. N. C. STOCKTON.


RAYMOND D. KNIGHT


1879.
1'. AW. MITIYlllY & CO.


-- SUCCESSORS TO

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica, Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. T'he American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using thle Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WVEST 3BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to July 5, '83. (Mention this paper)


S97


TREE


FERTILIZER.
111 throughout the season.
TI, nitrogen and potash also are
furnished in the most nutritious
forms and approved proportions
for this Irop.
After giving this Ferltilizer a
lthoroughtrial of three years on or-
ange trees in Florida, we intro.-
duce it iast' season quite exten-
sively throughout the State, and
the result t have even exceeded our
(most sanllguine expectaltion,-. WXe
have yet to hear of a single instance
w Pil the most sait isli tory returns
have not been derived.
\', 1 have nothing to say about the
fertilizers l anl n1' ici u nt.re or sold by
other parties, i as \- believe, with an
established reputation of twenty-
two years in the mlanutacture of
lhigh grade fertilizers, we can stand
upon our own Ido" iInj, \\'it iiout call-
ing the attention of the public to
Ihe record of any of our co( mpeti-
tors. or to tlie value of their lianu-
lactures ais compared w1itih that of
our own). Our fertilizers are all an-
alyzed, when manufactured, by
com'(petent clhemlists, and none are
sliipped to market until they ai e
known to be up to the standard.


the Celebratted


MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


mlftw I L - -I II -I 1( s I I I I L ~ --I


- .II I -MV


Or







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


THE MAPES COMPLETE AND SPECIAL MANURES
F 0 ()I,


Orange Trees, Fruits and Vegetables.

A full assortment comprising eight different brands, kept in stock at Warehouse in Jacksonville, Fla., also The Mapes Pure Ground Bone, Dr Grod Fish,
Potash, Salts, etc., for prompt shipment or delivery at all times. Ciroulars containing guaranteed analysis and composition of The Mapes Mauures, prices, full directions
for use as well as reports from well known Truckers and growers of Oranges, etc., giving their practical experience in using the Mapes Manures may be had of

THE MAPES FORMULA & PERUVIAN GUANO CO., TYSEN & SMITH, Our Forwarding Agents,

158 Front Street, New York. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Some Practical Results in Florida, Season 1882.
Dr. R. J. MARVIN, Orange City, Fla., November 9th, 1882 reports: Crops-Oranges, Lemons, Limes and other semi-tropical Pruitsf 800 trees oa ten acres, ranging in age
Irom one to six years, used fertilizers as follows: I applied The Mapes Orange Tree Manure from two pounds to the smallest, to fifteen pounds to the largest tree, twice a
year, in December and June, nothing else being used, and I am putting in now at the rate of three tons per year and increasing a half ton each year. The Mapes Orange
;Tree Manure was scattered broadcast and raked in. Trees are now growing finely, thrifty and clean; soil is a sandy, pine upland, season dry.
Remarks-"When I purchased this grove, the six acres of large trees had been sadly neglected. They were stunted, starved and covered all over with the scale insect, in
fact were in a dying condition having as many dead branches as alive. I used various fertilizers the first six months without discovering much benefit, when a year ago I
determined to try The Mapes Orange Tree Manure. During the past year the trees have cleaned off, put on a heavy new growth and averaged at least one-third larger. They
are in a fine growing condition now, the sap flowing freely, I am well pleased with the results and having laid in a stock of The Mapes Orange Tree Manure intend to continue
using it in the future. I am acquainted with the principles of vegetable chemistry and biology, enough, at least, to form a correct opinion of the quality of a fertilizer and
the needs of a member of the citrus family."
C. CODRINGTON & CO., Editors of the Florida Agriculturist, DeLand, Fla., November 12th, 1882, writes, "There are many fine groves in this section of all ages, ma-
nured with The Mapes Fertilizers." "The Mapes Orange Tree Manure is fast gaining in favor.'

Cabbages, Tomatoes, Watermelons, Turnips and Potatoes.
H. G. LEEK, Mandarin, Fla., June 16th 1882, writes: I am unfortunately located on some of the poorest lands of the State of Florida, and have kept correct account of
the results of using the Mapes Complete and Special Manures on it, and send you the following, which you are at liberty to use if you think best: I used last fall on 1,000
plants of cabbage one barrel of the Mapes Complete Manure for light soils (vegetable manure) and realized therefrom $75. On 300 hills of tomatoes I used, this spring, $2.50
worth of the same fertilizer and sold therefrom $51. On 500 hills of watermelons I used one barrel of the same brand of Mapes Manure and netted therefrom $54. I used 55
pounds on a small patch of rutabagar turnips and sold $20 worth. On Irish Potatoes the result was most surprising. My crop has been far ahead of all my neighbors, and I
would travel a long distance for the Mapes Manure if I could not get it otherwise. to feb 27 '83
DESCRIPTION OF


DE LAND, VOLUSIA COUNTY, .FLORIDA.
ID)EC:EM3BER 1, 1882.
The town of DeLand is located five miles east ot our landing on the St. John's River, where all river steamboats pass; very near the geographical center, north
and south, of Volusia County, and almost in the center of the
GREAT ORANGE BELT
This place is about twenty-five miles from the Atlantic Ocean, and is almost constantly favored with a tempered
SEA BREEZE
and from its elevation above the river, its location among the pines, and its isolation from all standing water, it is peculiarly adapted to the necessities of invalids. This
belt of land is about twenty miles long, and averages about five miles wide. Our lands are
UNSURPASSED IN FERTILITY
by any pine lands in the State. In our village, which is only six years old, we have a
FINE SCHOOL BUILDING
used also for Church Services. A Baptist Church is now built, costing $1,000, furnished and paid for. A Methodist Church is nearly finished and the Episcopalians are
preparing to build. The Presbyterians hold service every other Sunday in the school-house. We have daily mails, and now have six General Merchandise Stores, carry-
ing some of the largest and best stocks in South Florida; also two Drug Stores, a Millinery and Notion Store, a Furniture Store, Bakery and Confectionery Store, two Liv-
ery and Feed Stables, Jewelry Store, the Volusia County Bank, a Hardware Store nearly completed, a Masonic Lodge, four Saw Mills within two miles, and a Blacksmith
and Wagon Shop. Arrangements are being made for a High School to be established the coming season.
THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURIST
a large eight-page weekly, is published here, and is a valuable paper for those desiring information about Florida. We have a Bell Telephone line in successful operation
between our village and our landing on the St. John's River, and a railroad from our landing via DeLand to the Atlantic coast is chartered with a land grant of 8,840 acres
per mile. The Palatka and Indian River Railroad which is now being built, will pass through DeLand, and will be completed, as far as DeLand, by next winter. Our ho-
tels and boarding houses afford good fare at reasonable prices. Passengers will find a conveyance at DeLand landing on the arrival of the up mail boat daily, and a car-
riage will be sent upon order, by telephone, at other times. For the information of invalids we will add, that several good physicians are settled in our midst, cultivating
oranges as a business, but affording excellent medical aid when required. The population now, in and near DeLand city, that trade there, 800 to 1,200.
The climate is semi-tropical. Range of thermometer last four years-lowest, 26 degrees; highest, in the shade, 101 degrees. Weather-Fall, Winter and Spring dry
and pleasant, with occasional rain; Summer, sunshine and rain alternate. Soil-sandy, underlaid with clay in many places, covered with a growth of wild grass. Water
in wells 20 to 40 feet deep, usually soft and good. Surface-gently undulating. Timber-Yellow Pine, 80 to 100 feet high. Average product of Orange Trees in full bearing,
1,000. A refage price of fruit in grove, $1.50 per 100. Number of trees per acre, 50 to 75. Extra good care and culture of course produces better results. Best months for
planting Orange trees, January and February, June and July. Other products-Sweet Potatoes, Cotton, Sugar Cane, Corn, Pine-Apples, Bananas, Melons, Pears, etc.
Good Board $7 to $10 per week; $1.50 to $2.00 per day. In gardening excellent results have been obtained in a small way, and this business will be developed with added
experience and better transportation facilities. No cases of yellow fever, cholera, sunstroke or other epidemic or prevailing fatal diseases have been known here, and all
climatic conditions are most favorable to health and longevity. Many settlers from the north and northwest are coming in, and our orange belt will soon be thickly set-
tled.
A CHAIN OF LAKES
northwest of us affords protection from frost so perfectly that the extreme cold of December 29, 1880, did not injure our orange trees or fruit.
We are offering these choice lands to actual settlers at from $15 to $50 per acre. Village lots and improved property for sale also. For further particulars, call on or ad-
dress ,T. YT. PARCE, DeLand, Volusia Co., Florida, or If. A. DeLAiD, Fairport, Monroe Co., N. Y. to mch27'83


CHAS. H. DORSETT, A.- 1_ S oC3A.I-Ss-
COMMISSION DEALER IN W. N. JUSTICE,

Florida Products Wholesale Commission merchant,
l id rNo. 313 1NTorth Water Street, Philadelphila.

ORANGES, SYRUP, EARLY VEGETA- SPECIALTIES: FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.
BLES, HIDES, SKINS, ETC.
Large shipments remitted on day of sale, small shipments weekly. tonov27 83p
Prompt attention given to all business. Account Sales
and check given as soon as goods are closed out. Bearing Orange Grove i A T is a new town in Orange
Stencils will be furnished on application. ro e WINTER PA County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
156 Bay Street, FOR SALE. with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA. Located 2y miles from prominent landing on St. Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
"to ich 38 John's River. 200 trees in full bearing, 400 trees not yet Maps giving particulars, address
to mnch 3 '83 bearing, in fine condition, good neighborhood, churches,
schools, post and express offices. Owner would prefer A
to sell one-half, has other business, would sell the whole CHAPMAN & C
GET RICH selling our Rubber Stamps and Music. If desired by purchaser. For particulars address with
Samples free. L. P. Bissell & Co., Cleveland, 0. stamp T. F. DRUDY, WINTER PARK, ORANGE Co., FLA.
to may20-'83 to mch 3 p Emporia, Fla. to apr 4, '83 p


688


I .


t


__






THE FLORID.A DISPATCH. e,
I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ii- "* -* *n.. ., m.. ,-.nnnnmn. ..| n- |- ,nun nn n^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ -- - - - ^ -- -


WHOLE SALE GLRO;CERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


AGER'S DRY HOP YEAST CAKES, 60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

Pl=irst Eanads o2a F in=est QiXality

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 3x Cents per Pound,

SE3 PT 031T OE-M.


No. 38 West Bay Street,
tf


- - Jacksonville, Florida.


La d. .sA.genits, Le.ald. uiyers an dl LTaid 0-azers,
And Everyone Interested in Florida Lands
Can be supplied with
TOWNSHIP MAPS
Made from United States Surveys-scale two inches to the mile-with topography complete, for every
township in EAST and SOUTH FLORIDA, delivered, or sent by mail, for 50 cents each.
(Postage Stamps Taken.)
1Discounit to Dealers.
EXP3LANA'TION CARD sent with every Map, showing vacant lands and where to apply for
them to purchase.
Speci al V1VaSps of Counties, Cities and towns made to order.
.A.rchitectural Designs a specialty.
My long connection with the Florida Land and Improvement Company (DISSTON PUR-
CHASE) is a guarantee of satisfactory work. Correspondence solicited.
Address T". 7. T-'EVE.7 ES, Civil Engineer and Draughtsman,
Office with Florida Land and Improvement Co., cor. Pine and Forsyth-Sts.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. oct 23tf

ESTABLISHED 1866.

m1. GEOBGE d Co.,

General Com m mission M merchants,
95 SOUTH WATER STREET, CHICAGO.

FLORIDA ORANGES AND VEGETABLES A SPECIALTY.


BEFERENCES :-National Bank of Illinois, First National Bank, Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale
Grocer in CHICAGO.
Stencils furnished by J. C. LANIER,
to apl 8, '83. LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


G. L. LAWRENCE & CO., COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


FOR THE SALE OF


Oranges and all Florida Produce,


234 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK.


QUICK SALES, HONEST RETURNS and
PIROIM JT RIEMITTAINCES..


REFER BY PERMISSION TO

1on. S. B. CONOVER, Tallahassee; D. GREENLEAF, ESQ., Jacksonville;
to jan. 30, '83 p. MESSRS. GOULD & Co., Jacksonville.

F. S. CONE, A.H. MANVILLE E. A. HILL,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer.

MAANViLLE NIUJSERIES,
Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate.

ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3,just out, free on application. to apr 17, '83


FLORIDA DISCOVERlIY.
NIECAT. EVERY DRUGGIST IN THE STATE
WILL BE SUPPLIED.
It kills Ants, Roaches, Mice and Rats. Nothing ever
before offered has half the merit. Any Druggist in
Jacksonville will supply you.
CONE WILLIAMS,
Manufacturer and Proprietor,
to oct 29, '83 [P. 0. Box 126.] JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

THE ARCHER 1NURVSERIJES
Grow a general assortment of FRUIT TREES, with
some Ornamental Trees, Shrubbery,
Vines, &c. Our stock of
ORANGE TREES
is good; both Sweet Seedlings and Budded sorts on both
sour and sweet stocks. Some 8,000
LECONTE AND OTHER PEAR TREES,
one and two-year-old-fine.
A large number of JAPAN PLUM TREES, withla few
hundred of the famous
JAPANESE PERSIMMON
on native stocks, &c.
ORANGE and PEAR GROVES made to order and
cultivated by the year for non-residents.
SEND FOR PRICE LIST to
LIPSEY & CHRISTIE,
to feb 5, '83 Archer, Alachua Co., Florida.


PLYMOUTH ROCKS.
The great demand for these fowls have induced me to
secure the agency of Mr. A. C. HAWKINS for the sale
of his stock, which has no superior. I can sell
FOWLSC OR EGGS,
direct from his enormous establishment, at his prices.
I am also agent for the
AMER CAN POULTRY YARD
-AND THE-
POULTRY WORLD,
and on receipt of stamp I will send sample copy to any
address. No one should undertake to RAISE POULTRY
without some good POULTRY PAPER.
]. W. PAUIMnAMCOR]E,
to feb 12, '83 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


Holey iMOO Nlr8Trios,
THE PIONEER NURSERY of FLORIDA.
ONE HUNDRED ACRES IN STOCK.
THE SWEET ORANGE A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue sent free on application. Address
L. A. HARDER,
to feb 20, '83 Jacksonville, Fla.

FOR SALE.
LANDS on the east side of Lake Harris, Sumter
county. We the undersigned offer the property de-
scribed below, situated at and around Esperance, at
great bargains. For further information apply or ad-
dress
W. P. COUPER, )
D. E. LOWELL, Esperance, Fla.
W. N. JACKSON.)
(1.) 90 acres land at Esperance, 1 mile lake front; first-
class willow-oak pine land; several fine building sites;
good elevation. Price $35 per acre. The above tract can
be bought in lots.
(2.) 80 acres, same location, 30 acres hammock; fine
building site, 80 feet above the lake, with 1 mile lake
front; 10 acres cleared; 500 trees in grove, part bearing.
Price $6,000.
(3.) 40 acres, about 20 acres hammock, full view of the
lake; good land. Price $700.
(4.) 40 acres fine, high land* view of the lake; one
mile from Esperance. Price $600.
(5.) 75 acres, 20 acres cleared and fenced; 600 trees in


grove; pine-apples, etc. Splendid location; 4 mile
ake front; 2 miles from Esperanoe. There is on the
place a comfortable dwelling, with a sufficiency of out-
houses. Price $6,000. Terms easy.
(6.) 40 acres good pine land, 4 mile from Lake Harris;
25 acres fenced; 17 acres set to orange, lemon and lime
trees. Lemons, limes, guavas, pine-apples, bananas,
grapes, &c., in bearing; comfortable house and out build-
ing. Terms to suit an actual settler. Price $3,000.
(7.) 120 acres good pine land, 14 to V mile from Lake
Harris, in lots to suit purchasers, $20 per acre.
20 acres first-rate pine land, overlooking Lake Harris,
$25 per acre.
(8.) 15 acres on Lake Harris, with lake front good
view of the lake; nice building site; 3 acres of ham-
mock and two of pine; cleared. Price $500.
(9.) 160 acres, to mile from Lake Harris, good
pine land, in lots to suit purchasers. Price $10 per acre.
(10.) 80 acres of land beautifully situated, with a com-
manding view of the lake; 6 or 7 magnificent building
sites; Y4 mile lake front; 10 acres splendid hammock,
balance No. 1 pine land, 1 mile from Esperance. Price
$20 per acre.
P. S.-Land will be divided if necessary.
(11.) 80 acres land Y mile from the lake, No. 1 pine
land; handsome location; view of the lake; %/ mile
from Esperance. Price $10 to $15 per acre in 5 or 10 acre
lots.
Groves will be set and cared for on above lots at reas-
onable rates. The party making the offer has had sev-
eral years' experience in the management of groves.
to feb20-83


-----------


--- -- -- ------ -- __.I- -- -- I -- --- ----- --lr -,- I


m


M"Wl







' THE FLORID, A DISPATCH


VIA
WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.


ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6th, 1882,
Trains will leave and arrive at Jacksonville as fol-
lows ;
Fast Mail. Daily. Jack'lle Ex. Daily.
Leave- Leave-
Jacksonville at 9:30 a. in. Jacksonville at.. 5:45 p m
Arrive- Arrive-
Jacksonville at.. 5:00 p in Jacksonville at.. 7:30 a in
Callahan at.....10:15 a in Jesup at..............11:25 p min
Waycross at........ 12:05 p in Brunswick at...... 5:34 a m
Live Oak at ........ 6:45p m Macon at............ 7:90 a in
New Branlrd.. 8:30 p min Thomasville at... 6:50 a m
Savannah at...... 3:40 p in Albany at........... 1dl:15 a in
Charleston at..... 9:00 p m Montgomery at.. 8:00 p in
Thomasville at... 6:55 p m New Orleans at... 9:20 a m
Albany at...........10:30 p I Louisville at ......
Montgomery at,.. 0.45 a mi Cincinnati at..... 7:00 a m
SNew Orleans at..10:00 p) m Chicago at........... 7:00 p in
Nashville at........ 7:00 p in St. Louis at......... 7:00 p m
Washington at... 9:10 p min New York at...... 3:50 p mn
New York at...... 0:50 p m
Pullman Pala,- Sleeping Cars on this Train from
Jacksonville to Cincinnati via Atlanta and Cincinnati
Southern Railroad; to Montgomery via Albany and
Eufaula, and to Chicago via Montgomery and Louis-
ville.
Passengers arriving by this train for Palatka and the
Florida Southern Railroad, make close connection with
steamer at the Railroad wharf.
Night Express-Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at..................... ................ ...11:20 p m
Arrive Jacksonville at.........................................11:05 p min
Arrive Savannah at........................................... 7:00 a m
Arrive Charleston at.................... ....................... 12:30 p in
Arrive Washington at............................... 1:00 p m
Arrive New York at..............9:30 p m
A rrive A tlanta at.................................................. 12:10 p m
A rrive Cincinnati at............................ ............... 7:00 p m
Arrive Chicago at.................................................. ---
Arrive St. Louis at.... .................... ...................
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train for Sav-
annah, Charleston and Washington.
Passengers taking the night express can get into the
sleeping cars at 9 o'clock p. iii.
A new Restaurant has been opened at Waycross, and
abundant time will be allowed for meals by all passen-
ger trains.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Phlladelphi amld Baltimniore.
'Throtgh Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office In Astor's Building, 84 Bay-street, and at Depot
Ticket Office. GEO. W. HAkINES, Agent.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l F.and P. Ag't. [*]

Attention. oul1try Cezn..
DR. R. BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs. all
other domestic animals are benefitted by its use. this
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
It, is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONE DOL-
LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to the proprietor.
R. BACHMANN, M. D.
Jacksonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., 36 Bay Street.
aug. 21 to feb. 21. '83.


. .- I


Subject to change without notice.
Ak-rThe "Rapidan takes n passengers.
WM. L. JAMES,
41 -tf Agent, J13 S. Third St., Philadelphia.


WM. HUNEL4t aavaONn
Agents at Savann N.


The Savannah Guano o.,f avanna, Ga.,
Importers anld.t Va 3:a.iafaotNUerS of :ig -i r ade er-
tilizers, ffer fo r Sale Thezir

CGolden Fruit Fertilizer,.
A strictly first-class Manure prepared specially for Florida Oranges.

"OTTI0*J 0 17" ," for Florida Market Gardeners and Farmers, is highly anm-
moniated.

Also ENGLISH ACID PHOSPHATE for composting. Pure dissolved Bone. KAINIT,
COTTON SEED MEAL, pure BIRD GUANO,
MURIATE OF POTASH, &c.
Each sack bears the Inspection Tag of the State of 'Georgia;, which shd :it IA d pasd
under the rigid inspection laws of that State, and is a guarantee that the Guano is what the
Analysis on the sack represents. No other brands in this State furnish such a reliable guar-
antee of their merits to the purchaser.
Send for Circular. 0. D. DTTlO -3T,
to may20-83 Jacksonville, Fla:, Oneral Agent for Florida.

7 INCINNATI, NEW ORLEANS AND W. H. PILLOW'S S
C TEXAS PACIFIC RAILWAY.
CINCINNATI SOUTHERN. 8TRAWH RRY A
GENERAL PASSENGER AND FREIGHT DEPT., R
CINCINNATI, OHIo, December 16, 1882. A
L. R. Tuttle, Resident Agent Cincinnati Southern Railway, -AND-
Jacksonville, Florida: :
Inform all shippers that car-load lots of Fruit and Veg-
etables, when in hoist cars or Cincinnati Southern re- FRUIT AND VEGETABLE REPACK-
frigerator cars and consigned via ING AND COMMISSION HOUSE,
CINCINNATI SOUTHERN RAILWAY, ING AND COMMISSION HOUSE,
will be forwarded to destination beyond Cincinnati, Orange Trees, LeConte PearTees, a
WITHOUT BREAK OF BULK. LeConte Pear.Tres, a
E. P. WILSON, BASKETS General N rsery Stock

to jan 24, '83 General Freight and Passenger Agent. STRAWBERIY BASKETS IN ANY QUANTITY.
S- -STORE IN-
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS- ASTOR'S BLOCK,
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO- Packing House at Waycross Wharf, Jacksonville,
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT. Florida. mayl2 '83.


I


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-0-
SAVANNAH, GA,, Decembyr 30, 1882.
-THE STEAMSHIPS OF THE-
MERCHANTS AND MINERS TRANS-
PORTATION COMPANY ,
are appointed to sail from BALTIMORE for SAVAN-
NAH every
WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE every
TUESDAY AND FRIDAY
as follows:
Wm. Lawrence, Tuesday, Jan'y 2, at 1:00 o'clock p. m.
George Appold, Friday, Jan'y 5, at 3:00 o'clock p. in.
Wm. Crane, Tuesday, Jan'y 9, at 7:30 o'clock a. m.
Win. Lawrence, Friday, Jan'y 12. at 10:00 o'clock a. m.
Johns Hopkins, Tuesday, Jan'y 16, at 1:00 o'clock p. m.
Win. Crane, Friday, Jan'y 19, at 3:00 o'clock p. inm.
Wm. Lawrence, Tuesday, Jan'y 23, at 7:30 o'clock a. m.
Johns Hopkins, Friday, Jan'y 26, at 9:00 o'clock a. m.
Wm. Crane, Tuesday, Jan'y 30, at 12:00 o'clock m.
Wmin. Lawrence, Friday, Feb'y 2, at 2:00 o'clock p m.
Johns Hopkins, Tuesday, Feb'y 6, at 4-30 o'clock p. m.
Wm. Crane, Friday, Feb'y 9, at 8:00 o'clock a. m.
Win. Lawrence, Tuesday, Feb'y 13, at 11:00 o'clock a. m.
Johns Hopkins, Friday, Feb'y 16, at 2:00 o'clock p. m.
Win. Crane Tuesday, Feb'y 4 at 4:30 o'clock p.:m.
Wm. Lawrence, Fridayi Feb'y 0, at 9:00 o'clock a. m.
Johns HopKins, Tuesday,. Feb'y 27,' at 11:00 o'clock a. m.
Cabin Passage, $15.00; SeCOnd Cabin, 912.60; Round
Trip (Cabin),$825.00. The Company reserve the right of
changing the steamers and sailing days.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this com pany has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTH WEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their, goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. 13. WEST & CO. Agents,
114 Bay-St., Savannah, Ga.
A. L. HUGGINS, Agent,
Long Dock, Baltimore, Md. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY


Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.
SAVANNAH, January, *188' .
The Magnificent, Ne- Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. Catharine...... ............................................... Wednesday, January 3-1:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson......... .......................................................... Saturday, January 6-1:00 p. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Capt. Fisher......... ...................................................Wednesday, January 10-8:00 a. m.
CHATTAHOOCHEE, Capt. Daggett.... .................................................Saturday, January 13-9:30 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. Catharine.... ............................................Wednesday, January 17-1:00 p. m.
11TY OF AU .USTA, Ca pa Nickerson ................. ....... .... ..........Saturday, January 20-:00 p. in.
IALLAAASSEE Cpt. lfgr. .............. ... ... ............. 0 ................................Wedn day, January 24-7:30 a. m.
CHATTAHOOCIEE, Capt. Daggett..........................................Saturday, January 27-9:00 a. in.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. Catharine...............................................................Wednesday, January 31-12:00 m.
Through Bills of Lading add Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia; Savannah Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORRE # AgenA, 8avainah, Ga.
Agentof Line, and C. R. B. ofG Oa., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida, & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.


Boston and SavannahlSteamship CQOzpany,
ONLY DIRECT LINE.
Transhipment and extra handling v oi ed.Y tars unloaded at whnrf ntavannah. Unsurpassed passenger
accommodations.
The a4ggiticent pew on Steamnips sail from Boston every Thlp sday aU o'cpq* 4dd,fro CO$a l RI1-
road Whrf, Savannah ,f fo6los ..
Gate City, Capt. Hedge...... .................Thursday, December 21st, at 3:30 p. m.
City of Columbus, Capt. Wright........... ..................... Thursday, December 28th, at 8:30 a.-m.
Gate City, Cat. edge.................:......,,.........Thursdly, Jaagury4 at p. g,
City of Columbs, Capt. Wright..... ............. ...............Thursday, January llth, at 8:00 p. m.
Gate.ity, Capt. iedge....................................... ........:.... huisda3,JanuaIyylH City of Colunmbu, Capt. Wright............................. ......T.hurtday, Janf6a y25:, a_ r.
Gate City, Capt. Hedge............................... ............ .... ..Thursday, February 1st, at 1:00 p. m.
City of Columbus, Capt. Wright......... ....................... ...T day February 8th, at 6:30 p. m.
Gate City, Capt. Hedge..................................... ..............Thursday, February 15th, at 1:30 p. m.
City of Columbus, Capt. Wright.......................................Thursday, February 22d, at 7:00 a. m.
Gate City, Capt. Hedge .................. ...... ....Thursday, March 1st, at 12:00 m.
City of Columbus, Capt. Wright......................................Thursday, March 8th, at 5i30 p. in.
THROUGH FIRST-CLASS CABIN PASSAGE SAME AS TO NEW YORK.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents, Savannah, Gh.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. and W. Ry., Agent, Jacksonville.
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., General Agents, Boston. 44-tf

Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.
-SAVANNAH AND PHILADELPHIA.-P
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New-York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for January are appointed to sail as follows:
FROM PHILADELPHIA: iFROM SAVANNAH :
JUNIATA........... ................Thursday, January......... JUNIATA.........Tuesday, Jan.............................................
J UNIATA ............................. Saturday, January......... JUNIATA.........Saturday, Jan...... ...............................
CITY OF MACON....................... Saturday, January.........I CITY OF MACON.........Saturday, Jan..............................
RAPIDAN.......Saturday, Jan.............................................






STiE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 03


TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON. To make rates from Stations on Tropical Railroad south of Ocala add 5 cents
FROM -- per box and 10 cents per barrel to rates from stations on Transit Railroad.
Per Boxm Per Bbl. 1 Per Box. 1 Per Bbl. Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
Jacksonville......................................... 25 $ 50 35 60 For Boston every Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
Landings on St. Johns River.............. 35 70 i 40 75 Tuesday and Friday.
Stations on Florida Transit R. R.......... 45 75 50 80
. Tampa and Manatee .....70 1 05 75 o 1 10 1 fPo ake through,rates from points tributary to the above, add the rates for
Stations 6n the Fla. Cen. &IWest'n R'y 40" I 75 50 85 transportation lines connecting to above rates.
-- ....... I -. .. . The dimensions of the Standard Box for Oranges are 12x12x27 inches, and the
In Connection with the Atlantic Coast Line. weight is estimated at 80 pounds.
I The Standard Barrel 'is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
From LFrom ] From From a From Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
Jackson- St. Johns I Transit and F.C. & W.I The Car-load is estimated at 20;000 pounds, or 250 Standard Boxes. Excess of this
TOville. River. R. R. IManatee amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destina-
TO '-_ ___- tion and to one consignee.
I 1 Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of
01 $40, 1 shipments will be an absolute requirement. It is clearly understood between the
P., p. p PQ p P shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
-ltim |--' --- --0 -- -- 75-- 1 5 loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
Baltimore...........................60 $120 70 $1 40 80 $1 50$1 05 1 80 75 145 must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence may be located.
Philadelphia..........................60 1 20 70 1 40 80 1 50 1 05 1 80 75 45 The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to
New York....... ..... 60 1120 70 1 40 80 1 50' 1 05 1 80 75 1 45 which Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be issued only by the
Boston ................... 1 .65 I 1301 75- 150 85 60 1 10 1 90 80 1 55 Agents of this Companyat Jacksonville and Callahan and the Agents of the DeBary
Providence.................. ............ 65 130 75 150 85 1 60 1 10 1 90 80 1 5 Merchants Line andBaya's Mail Line fromSt. John'sRiver Landings guaranteeing
To all rail points, and Via Atlantic CoastLine. Shipments daily. rates from those points only.
... The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points
In Connection with direct Steamers of the Boston and Savan- will not be subject to correction by this Line.
nah SteamshipCo mnpaIy. Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
P pau In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion
..I.o Fo Fo -- in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill.
From L Fromn Froma a From Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point.
lJackson-I St. Jhns Transit and F. C. with cost of transfer added.
I clne. St. Riv, s Trn Malnteen F. C. & W Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
TO i--- I Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be charged in addition the single package
Si rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.
SSI 1, I 53 0" ^. 0 o0 -- Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of
-a .4 --W I :] . the agents of the Line.
Boston ................... .. 150 00 601 65 120 Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further informa-
Boston.:......... ........... ..... ...... 5 2 6 12 90 50 65 :1 tion, it' needed, apply to
,,,-o'.. vanan- rcH. YON(.E, Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N River, N. Y.
In Connection ith S^teamships direct from Savannah. Gen. W. L. JAMES, Ag-ent, 25 S'outh Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. IUGGINS
Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H. RING, Agent Boston and
SFrom From From Savannah Steamship Line, 18 T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. &
From L'd'gs on Florida! Tampa From W. Railway, 211 Washington St., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W.
Jackson- St. Johns Transit and F. C. &W iRailway, 315 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway,
T ville. River. R.R. i Manatee. 43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Pier 41
TO South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
i !1 W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
;L4 IL P4 i A I, I P F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
New York................................ 50 1$1 00| 60 1 2001 65 |1$ 201 90$ 50 '! 65 1 25 TAS T TAY ot Genenn Freght"
ladolphia 26JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent,Savannah,Ga.
Philadelphia............................... 50 | 1 00 60 1 2W! 65 1 20 901 1 50 65 1 1 25
Baltimore............................ 150 1 00 60 1 2, ( 6 1 2o 90 1 50 65 1 2.5 G W TAIF An l f
Boston via New York........ 7 1 4 3 1 88 1 65 1 13 1 95 88 1 70 ., F. & ailway, Jacksonville, la.17
Providence via New York...I.. 65 30 75 I 1 ,54 82 1 5 1 07 1 80 8() 1 55 1). I1. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.


1


r


-- ~- *-l;n10LIO113L411c. --t____ I-~aL_ -- ~-~-r~----r Il,___m am- --_-cr-- ---L1 ~mc~o~u I- ~-~-~C~-r~--- ~ --~a0~_1- --~------ -lrYJIL~,,.--arrr~n~r~i~R~ I


TwIIOIeGI TARIFF ON ORAORNGS ONLY.
VIA THE FLORIDA :DISPATCH LINE, AND ITS CONNECTIONS.
1I:" C EF. ECT q T7rMZVI.CmEEI' 2'.:t29, p.Iee2.


-~---~~-~-- -- 1--~- ------~-1-~- ---~-T----- -


S FROM 0 ; 4 FROM In Connection with Steamships of M. & M. T. Co., of Savannah,
JACKSONVILLE AND | JACKSONVILLE AND o L &
CALLAHAN JUNCTION CALLAHAN JUNCTION Via Baltimore.
TO TO
--.. ....n______ -.. From
McO ...... .. .... 35 .70 $61 25 Madison, Ind................... 75 1 50125 00 r From From
Augusta.............................. ..... 40 0 7000 Jeffersonville, Ind.............;...75 1 50 125 00 From Landings From F
Atlantas....................................40 80 7000 Evansvlle,nd...................... 751502500 00villeJ St .Jhns Transit a i
Columbus, Ga. ....... .....40 80 70 00 Cairo, Ill................................. 75 1 750125 00 MaTtee i
Montgomery, Ala..................40 80 7000 Indianapolis................. 8016013000TO River. R. Manatee.
Mobile .............................. 501 00 8750 Terre Haute....................... 80o60 3000. i 1


Bostonm........................................55117000. 40 $13.1107
Chattanooga, Tenn...................501 00 8750 Columbus, Ohio..................... 80160130 00 i !I 0 0
New Orleans............................ 601 20105 00 St. Louis................................8517014000 0 ..! ^ ..
Nashville, Tenn..................... 60120105J00 .Chicago...............................8 870 140 00 &
Memphis, Tenn....................... 60 1 20 105 00 iPeoria, Ill.............................185,1 70 140 00 Boston......................... i I ^ t i 1 6
Louisville, Ky.........................70140 115 00...... ... .................. 90|1 80 150 00 Bo.ton 6' 5 1" 6 1301 70 $1 30 95 $1 60, 70 1 35
Cincinnati, Ohio.....................770114 40i1l5 0 Toledo...................................... 90 1 80 15000 65 301 70 1. 30 1 7 1
Henderson,Ky............ 70 40115 Detroit.........,.......................... 918015000 !rw dence .. I 1 10' 60 1.2 8 1 30 9 0 1 70 6 1 25
Columbus, Ky......................... 701 401115 00 Milwaukee............. ...... 901 80 15000 Washington ........................60 100 70120- 80 20 1 05- 150, 65 125
H ickm an,JKy...................... 701 40i115 00,1. ; .....-.. . . .....9..0..18.








THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


SPECIAL OFFE L
FOR T ITIE NEEXT 15 D1)A-Y.
EACH 10 100
PEACH-Peen-To, 2 to 3 fet .................. 20c .80 $16
Honey, 3 to 4 feet ................ 20 1.80 16(
Pignets, late, 3 to4 feet ........... 20 1.)80 10
PEAR-LeConte, 2 to 3 feet.................... 35 2.0 20
LeConte, 3to 4 feet.......................... 5 .00 35
QUINCE-Chinese, 2 to 3 feet.............. .........
PERSIMMON-Japanese, named............ 50 4.00 ...
unnamed......... 40 3.0) ...
SItalian ............... 5.........
GUAVA-Cattley's, red........................... 25 ".0 IS
yellow .. ............. 50 ....
Com m on.................................... 20 ) 1.80 ...
BANANA-Hart's Choice.......................... 5) 4.00 ...
Cavendishii.... ................ ... 50 4.00 ..
FIGS-Brown Turkey............................... 20 1.80
GRAPES-Scuppernong............................ 15 1.00 S
Tenderpulp................................ 15 1.00,
Thom as...................................... 15 1.00 ...
SAPPODILLA......................... 30 2.50 ...
TA M A RI N DI ............................................... 2- 2.00 ....
COFFEE A R A BICA .................................... l.00 ..... ...
C O CO A N U T ........................ ... ..................... 2.00 ...... ...
CAYENNE CERRY.................................. 35 3.00
ORANGE, SATSUITMA................................. 75 (.00 ...
PAW PAW Melon Fruit.............................. 5 1.50 ....
Flower Seeds, 6 best varieties, 50c.
Order at once, as these prices are from 15 to 50 per
cent. below the regular Catalogue price. This advertise-
ment will not appear again, and offers are only good 14
dJays from date. ARNOLD PUETZ.
Jacksonville, Fla., January 15.-It


WANTED IMMEDIATELY!

A BOOKBINDER AND PRIIEMANI
APPLY AT
ASHII1EAD BROTHERS.

WANTED.
A Competent Farm Hand or Laborer, German or Swede
preferred, to do the plowing, hoeing and general work.
in orange grove and small farm. 'Must be steady and
willing. Address, stating wages wanted, and particu-
lars, ORANGE GROWER,
Itp San Mateo, Fla.

McCARTNEY HEDGE ROSE PLANTS
FOR SA-LE.
A few thousand more of this desirable Evergreen
HEDGE PLANT.
It should be set as early as possible-January or Febru-
ary, better than later. Also, Umbrellan Trees.
Address, M. O'NEILL,
to feb 8, '83-p Fairbanks, Fla.


1,O00 BOXES


FLORIDA ORTIINGrES,
Will be given away in Premiums to subscribers.
For Particulars, address

HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
TAVARES, ORANGE CO., FLORIDA.
to feb 1


LOCAL ADVERTISEMENTS.
0R1A\NG1E, LECONTE PEAR TREES, and General
Nursery Stock. Best quality. Lowest prices.
W. H. PILLOW,
jan 1-tf Jacksonville, Fla.
IMPORTANT BOOK.-Apeliminary Report on Scale
Insects with Remedies for their destruction, by Prof. IIH.
G. IlUintNARi, price 25 (cents.
FLORIDA I)BR.EEZES, by Mrs. Ellen Call Long, of
Florida, will soon be published by ASHMEAI) BR"OS.,
and will have a large sale. Advance orders solicited.
FLORIIDA I LLUSTRX .--10,0{0 copies of which
have just been issued by us, consists of ti)" imperial size
colored views in a handsome cloth case, il lustrating th ,
di 1-eren t s et ions of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind eVer pub-
lished on Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00.
Every one interested in Florida should have a copy.
Address, ASHMEA1) BROS.,
t(" Jacksonville, Fla.
iBLOOMFlIELD'S IHIATSTIIATEII) HISTORICAL
GUTI)E OF ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA, with
man, for tourists, invalids and iimmi'irants. For sale
by all booksellers and newsdealers in tI e Slate, or sent
to any address for 5) cents by X OOMFIE
to aprl5-'.S3 St. Augustine, Fla.
LAW. BLANKS.-A full line for Justices of the Peace,
Circuit Conyts, etc. Deeds, Mortgages, etc., are printed
and published by ASHIMEND BROS., Jacksonville, Fla.,
Write for a catalogue. tif
TO ADVERTISERS.-Large circulation: For the
next two months THE FLORIDA DISPATCH will is-
suc front 8,0(X) to 10,000 copies every week; about 40,00)
a month.
Merchants and others should take advantage of this
and advertise liberally.
For advertising rates see editorial page. tf
ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange wra)s from
ASIHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla. For prices see
adi vertn isen I. tf


MAXWELL, ANDERSON & CO.,
SAN MATEO, .FIA.


to mar 18 '83p


GEORG ETOWi NUSEBRIES.
S, ----0 ---- y" ;..-:. .'- ,
OR A C ANDLEMON TREES Budded from tried and approved varieties, and
ORANGE AND LEMON TREES on good healthy stocks.
Also, JAPAN "PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees, su ble to
Florida. Address, .. f\ .
A-Al-:03 T77'.eZ Q-erot~-wt~7;., ylorida.-
.,toFeb 20 '83
S:1 0 I HOUSE, 60 acres hammock and pine
Po s PoPql I P Plr I I AN $800 land, 300 orange rees in grove w.ell
IU IUi 1 UlliJ advanced, few bearing. Frice '$1,0T.4 Rare chance' for
Still on hand and for sale. About 10,000 of those fa- ow settler
mous LECONTE, and a few hundred of KEIFFER'S W. W. DEWHURST,
HYBRID Pear Trees. Apply to St. Augustine, Fla.
L. L. VARNEDOE & SONS, N. B.-Letters will not be answered unless stamp is.
I to mar 21, '83 TJIOMASVILL..E, GA. enclosed. to feb20, '83


69-=


'm "


I I i .-


leg eaftL_ __ _~__ _


ASHMEAD BROTHERSi.-
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE,- FLA:, ... i : .

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
PRI.NTER.S AND BINDERS:
AND DEALERS IN



VWe ha ve the most complete Book Bindery in the State. Can Rule. Number or Pa.ge.n 2 PelTrfor tity .i I .it V
Blanks and Blank Books manufactured to order for Railroids, Steambats 1 otels, 'n'ii
and Corporations. The ruling of difficult jobsft'speciality. ,
.IVTE PUBLISH

A 20-page Weekly Agricultural Journal, at only $i.00 per yxta-r, .
Devoted to Southern Agriculture, Fruit Growin g, Market Gar1uin1(g, etc.
This p;iper has the largest circulation of any published in Florida. Spcdimefi copiee. Write for a copy.


Itis generally conceded we do the Fines' Jo.b Printing in thi State. We lvc all the rniol)ern :macht,wry aid all
new type. Can print the smallest Visiting Card to the largest size Poster.
Printing of Piamnphlets a specialty. Prices on application.


FLORIIDA: FOR TOURISTS. INVALIDS ORIANG(E CULTURE &N CALI,'O NI ,-
AND SETTLEIRS (Barbotlu, Profusely Il- A. T. Garey, (eloth ............. ...... '... t co i
lustrated).:..................................Price $1 50 A MANUAL of GARDENINGCii-I IRI)A ..i. 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE (Whitner)................................. ......Price 150
AND HISTORY (Lanier).......... Pr...-:' 0CO.......T........Price 75
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper Price 10 I COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA -Sectional-
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA........Price 2 50 the best)......... ................................. ..... Price 1 25
GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE. ....... ............Price 25 NEW AND ACCURATE M1AP OF ST.
TOUtRISTS ANDI INVALIDS REFERENCE JOHN'S RIVER ............................., Price 25
BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL..............Price 75 McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST -OFLA LW3 .-
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMER- OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra)..Price 6 00
ICA.............................................................Price 25 INDEX TO THE DECISrONS OF THE SU-
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition) PREME COURT OF FLORIDA......... ...Pr.....ice 3 00
enlarged and improved...............................Price 50 NOTES FROM SUNLAND, ON THE MAN-
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edi- ATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OF SOUTH
tion, enlarged and improved).....................Price 1 00 FLORIDA. Its Climate, Soil, .aid Pro-
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashinead,..Price 1 00 dIuuctions, (By Samuel C. Upham).... ....Paer 5
HISTORY OF ST. AUGUSTINE-Dewhurst............ 1.25 I FLORIDA AS A PERMANENT-HOME,.......Price ..0
G ID)E TO ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA-Bloomfield............................ .............................................. 5
Ajiy of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
TIE'WS oF r LO, inDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price.)
In Book IFoornm, Containing 1 Views Eaclh.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size).................. 25c Souvenir of Jacksonville, (large size)................... 50c
Scenes ,and Charticters of the Sunny South, (small Souvenir of St. Augustine, (large size)........... .... 50c
size)............................................................................ 25c Stereoscopic V iew s, per doz ................................. ..........$1 50

10,000 copies of which have just been issued by us, consisting of twenty imperial size colored views in a hand-
some cloth case, illustrating the different sections of the State of Florida.-
This is the'hanlsomest work of the kind ever published in Florida. 'Price byanail, postage fre, S.0.'Ivyryo.te
interested in Florida should have a copy. .

WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen....................Price 50 MORTGAGES, per dozen.................................Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen................Price 50 NOTARIA-L SEAL.PRESSES, made to order.Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law fllanlas foor Lawyers, .Ttices of th i lPace, Circuit Courts, etc. Price-list
mailed on application.
I I E S TA .
Are manultectured right in our establishment, in the best manner, and it short- ottre.g ,
ORANGE WRAPS. (Full count-480< sheets to the ream.) 10x10, 14c. per ream;
11x11, 17c. per ream; 12x12, lc. per ream.


SAN -MATEO IN RSEB-I



This well known Nursery is now open for orders for all the lest vnrietie 6of) "-


Budded Orange and Lemon Trees!

On Sweet and Sour Stocks. Also a choice line of Ornamental Trees, Evergreens, FIloweling Plants arid Shrubs.
A specially fine lot of Japan Plums. .