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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00041
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: January 1, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00041
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text







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devoted to the ~ricultural, manufacturing and Industrial Interests of Florida and the$South.

Vol. 1.--No. 41. New Series.-Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fa. Price 5 cents.
* * * * * ^_ ** . . , > .. .. ,. ,,


Monday, January 1, 1883.


$2.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


STRAWBERRY "JAMES VICK."
This Represents One Plant Which Bore 2801
Berries.
We are indebted to CHAs. A. GREEN, ESQ.,
of." 'Green's Nursery," Clifton, Monroe County,
New York, for the above cut, and a descrip-
tion of the new Strawberry-James Vick-
the principal points of merit claimed for which
are:
(1) Fine quality, unusual vigor, and her-
maphrodite (or perfect) blossoms.




d .: o


(2) Color, form and firmness of berry, feet long nearly two bushels of berries were
which approach the ideal. No white tips, no gathered. '
coxcombs. The prices for tle James Vick are $2 per
Dozen, $10 per 100.,
(3) Ability to stand on the vines a week For further particulars, address MR. GREEN,
after ripening, without becoming soft, or rot- as above.
ting, or losing quality or much lustre. Instead Forida State Fair I
of softening it shrinks a trifle, and becomes .e Fair
firmer than when first ripe. Remember! the Pair opens in this city on
(4) Uniform ly arge size, and productive- Tuesday, the l$th of next month, (February)
ness unequalled by any other variety. Two and continues four days. For Premium List
hundred and eighty berries were counted on and all information, address Major A. J. Rus-
one average plant, and from one row about 100 SELL, Jacksonville, Florida.


I,





-------~-'






1-1_ THE FLORIDA D I S PATC H.
In I t


The Farmer's Calling.
That farming is as sure, stable, honorable
and remunerative a business as one can enter
upon has been asserted and proved over and
over again. It is true that other kinds of
business-trade, commerce, and some kinds of
manufacturing-that speculations of various
kinds---banking and joint-stock companies-
have, especially of late years, attracted much
attention, and have been popular with dash-
ing and ambitious young men; still, in the
experience of a few past years, the statistics of
business disasters and failures, the moral
wreck of character and the crash and ruin of
men who were reputed rich, have proven that
farming is an industry less fluctuating, less
depressed by hard times, less subject to fail-
ures--a pursuit in which temptation to dis-
honesty has had less influence and in which
men have pursued the even tenor of their way
with less anxiety and with less exposure to
financial ruin and wreck of moral character
than any other kind of business. That colos-
sal fortunes have been, here and there, now
and then, built up by speculation, sharp prac-
tices, gambling in stocks, spoliation of labor
and by indirect and direct robbery, we cannot
deny; but those fortunes, however large and
glittering, do not stand up to the public gaze
as monuments of honor, of patient industry,
of painstaking, honest labor, but they tower
rather as beacons, "warning men to beware of
the hidden rocks and treacherous quicksands
on which so many of life's voyages have been
wrecked. These fortunes have no solid founda-
tions to rest upon, and, when the floods come
and the winds blow they fall like the house
built upon the sand. Farming is a business
that rests on a sure foundation. It demands
honest work. It is not built up by the spolia-
tion of others. Its gains, though they may be
small, are legitimate and honorably earned.
There is more capital invested to-day in agri-
cultural pursuits than in all other industries
combined. It pays more for the support of
Government and receives less protection and
consideration from Government than any
other interest.
In looking at farming in the broad, full
light of practical utility, of safe investments,
of sure dividends and of the best public ser-
vice, we cannot help commending it, and urg-
ing it upon the young as a pursuit upon the
whole more satisfying, less hazardous, more
useful, honorable and remunerative than any
other business. It gives a scope to the intel-
lect, a play to the imagination, a range to the
affections, a field to the inventive powers, a
work for hand and heart which no other in-


dustry supplies.
But for any adequate realization of the ad-
vantages, the remunerations and the satisfac-
tions of farming, there must be among our
Patrons and farmers a high education, a better
culture and a larger appreciation of and devo-
tion to their own peculiar calling. They must
see and feel its importance in its financial, so-
cial, moral and industrial bearings, and pre-
pare themselves with as much zeal and earnest-
ness by careful experiment, close observation
and persevering study as those who propose to
enter the learned professions, or the paths of
science, or the study and the practice of the
arts.--Spirit of Kansas.

-The Louisville Courier-Journal pays the
press of this State the following handsome com-
pliment: "The Florida papers, as a rule, are
the cleanest, neatest and most carefully edited
papers in the South."


What Commercial Fertilizers Have Accom-
plished.
What the future of the fertilizer trade is to
be, time alone can determine. A very marked


I I


gone as missionaries to foreign lands, have car-
ried away from these New England farm lands
a portion of its original fertility.
Such a system, wherever pursued, must event-
ually result in barrenness and sterility. It is a
question of time only, when man can no longer
exist on a soil that is being constantly depleted.
Man's vision, unaided by experience and the
light of history, is extremely narrow. It is
not strange that the earth has not been better
cultivate and her fertilizing elements more
carefully conserved. It is nothing whatever
against the character of man that he should at
first live upon the spontaneous products of the


- ---- i --- ---


change in the condition of the agricultural in-
terests of New England has been brought about
through the introduction of artificial or manufac-
tured fertilizers into commercial circles. The
man who manufactures or deals in plant foods
to-day, holds a position in society as high as he
who buys and sells pork, flour or grain, and
the farmer who uses them has the means to
rise above a dependence upon the scanty wastes
of his stable and pig-sty. If he desires to do so,
he can work the land and raise any crop he
may choose, without becoming connected with
cattle husbandry at all.
If the village mechanic wishes to have a gar-
den where he can employ his morning and even-
ing hour, he can do so without keeping a pig
to furnish the needful fertilizer. The bag or
two of dry, pulverized material which his gro-
cer will bring him for a few dollars, will enable
him to dispense with both the odors and the
music of the pig for a whole year. If the man
with broken down health desires to spend a
portion of his time in pleasant weather, in the
cultivation of small fruits, or in the care of an
orchard, he can do so without also keeping a
stock of animals to be fed, watered, cleaned,
and otherwise cared for. The potash, bone, or
other fertilizing elements required, can all be
purchased in the open market, and brought to
him in any desired quantity, and on any day
of the year.
If the capitalist or speculator has a fancy to
try his hand at raising corn, potatoes, cotton,
sugar, or tobacco, on a large scale as a spcial-
ty, he has only to select his tract of suitable
land, hire competent overseers and workmen,
buy his seeds, tools and fertilizer, and go to
work. He can buy just as much fertilizer as
he has money or credit to exchange for it.
There is now practically no limit to the amount
of plant food in market more than of other
forms of merchandise. But the most notice-
able effect of the introduction of plant food
among the articles of every day trade is the
comparative independence it has brought to the
practical farmer of moderate means.
It is a sorry statement to make, but never-
theless true, that since the settlement of New
England, the farming land under the system by
which it has been managed, has been growing
year by year, a little poorer, a little nearer that
point where cultivation no longer yields a profit.
Every ox, every hog, every lamb and chicken
that has been fatted, every bushel of potatoes,
every pound of fruit, and every quart of milk
that has found its way to the seaport or river
towns where sewage is wasted, has drawn fer-
tility from these New England farms. Every
son and daughter who have grown up to years
of manhood and womanhood, to find a new
home at the West or the South, or who have


earth. The animals do the same. It is when
man arrives at that stage of intelligence that en-
ables him, in a large measure, to hold control
over the products of the earth, to say what
plants shall grow and what shall not, that he
begins to show a superiority over the brute.
The wolf hunts for his prey ; the buffalo roams
for his food; the birds migrate to escape the
inclemencies of winter. Man has followed the
example of the beast and the bird till he has
learned from experience and from the study of
nature's laws, that it is possible to establish a
permanent home, and to draw from the soil,
when properly handled, a sure and constant
maintenance.
Could our New England soil be cultivated
without unnecessary waste, it would be capable
of sustaining a population many times greater
than its present number., Contrive a way to,
turn the waters out of rivers and harbors, made
filthy and dangerous to the health by the mil-
lions of human beings occupying our cities,
back upon the wasted fields of the country, and
there would be little call to send men in ships
half round the world to scrape the roosting
places of wild birds, or to rake the bones from
foreign battle fields. This whole trade in com-.
mercial fertilizers is but an effort to replace, by
the easiest and cheapest means, the fertilizing
material we are daily and yearly sending to the
seas in our sewer pipes and street gutters. And
yet this is a sign of progress.
We are beginning to learn something of the
laws of plant growth, and of plant feeding. The
change in the common talk of common farmers
upon this subject has been very marked' within
the past few years. The commercial ferti)izeire
trade is indirectly bringing practical agricul-
ture u on a sounder basis. Farmers are grad-
ually learning something of the principles
which underlie their practice. Men are begin-
ning to work the soil as they work their raw
material. They are studying how to cut, and
how to use without waste; how to utilize the
odds and ends; in short, how properly ahd eco-
nomically, to adapt means to ends.-New Eng-
land Farmer.

Irish Potatoes in South Florida.
After having tried numerous experiments
and having had many failures, I think I have
established the fact, that potatoes can be grown
here at a profit and become one of the surest
crops we can raise. Our experiment in agri-
culture proves nothing, yet several consecutive
trials, all giving conclusive evidence towards
one method, determines me to believe that at
last I am able to tell "what I know about farm-
ing."
Without enumerating in detail many fail-
ures, which would be of no possible use to any
except the merest tyro, by telling "how not to
do it." the entire method can be briefly stated.


I


mono- -- -- -- -


First, then, I try and get my seed from Nova
Scotia or New England, using Early Rose, but
shall try St. Patrick's and Burbank's this year,
besides. This selecting seed from the North-
east may be of no possible consequence, but
with the seed grown in that section I have had
the best returns. The potatoes should be cut
to two eyes, about ten days or two weeks before
planting, and if land plaster (pulverized gyp-
sum) can be had, it will pay to sprinkle this
freely among the cut pieces to absorb moisture.
With rows three feet apart, seed dropped eigh-
teen inches apart in the drill, it takes just four
barrels for an acre.
Second-Fertilizer. After trying every kind,
but one, that is sold in this country, I have set-
tled on Forrester's special potato manure as the
best. I know that some writers, who are con-
sidered authority, deride special fertilizers for
special crops, but with me it pays. What if it






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


is "ringing the changes on the three main chem-
icals" employed, if potatoes have grown better
on its special than where any other mixture was
used. The experiment of substituting other
than that manipulated for each crop, I have
tried but two consecutive years, using tomato
for potato, and vice versa, &c., with several
brands of Forrester's; and at the risk of being
laughed at, must say that I believe in special
fertilizers. I raise produce as much for profit as
for information, and it pays one to follow the
directions.
Third-Soil. I prefer high pine land, as good
as I can get, but have had success on high white
sand, though except for experiment, I would
never plant such land; hammock I do not like,
as the crop keeps poorly after gathering, while
with a rotation of cow peas, sowed at the rate
of two bushels to the acre, and left to die on the
ground, I can make high pine land very rich.
Fourth, Plow the land thoroughly, and
mark off in rows three feet apart; and sprinkle
the fertilizer along the furrow. I mix thor-
oughly with the soil, by running a cultivator
along the row ; then furrow out about six inches
deep, and drop the seed in the bottom, covering
about two inches deep-usually giving the crop
two hoeings, the second and last having the
ground very slightly raised. The crop will ma-
ture in from 90 to 100 days, but can be left in the
ground until July. I prefer to plant from De-
cember 20th to January 10th, though any time
until March, will do.- W., in South Florida
Journal.

i

Devons Out of Fashion.
Not many years ago the Devons were the
fashionable animals, not only in this country,
but in England. They were regarded, as com-
bining more points of excellence than any
other breed. The number of Devons imported
into this country at an early day were far in
access of all others. They were found to an-
swer every purpose for which cattle was kept.
They had fine form and color, and were excel-
lent breeders. The fine red cattle found in
most of the New England States contain a
large percentage of Devon blood. The strong
teams that have drawn the logs from the pine-
woods of Maine were Devons. The quick-
stepping oxen that ploughed the hillside farms
of Massachusetts were Devons. The finely
fatted bullock that supplied the Boston market
with the choicest specimens of beef were
Devons. The steers that drew the first settlers
to the western prairies in "prairie schooners"
were Devons, and they made as good time as
horses. The cows that gave the milk that pro-
duced the butter and cheese which supplied the
Eastern States for more than half a century
were Devons. This oldest of all the established
breeds of cattle is still in existence, and in all
its purity and excellence. The animals are
still as beautiful in form and color as ever.


They still travel quickly, draw heavy loads,
give a large amount of milk, and furnish ex-
cellent beef.. They are probably better adapted
to the conditions and wants of the far west,
where the feed is scanty, the climate severe,
and considerable heavy teaming is required
than animals of any other breed. They are
simply out of fashion. They are as sure to
come into fashion again as the old styles of
bonnets.--Chicago Times.

THOROUGHBREDS.-All thoroughbred ani-
mals, whether horses, cows, sheep or hogs, have
one peculiarity in common, which is fineness of
bone. It is one of the surest indications and a
valuable quality, for such animals give but lit-
tle offal and waste, while the net is proportion-
ately larger than the tare, as compared with
coarser kinds,-Farm and Garden.


Dairy Farming.
The scarcity and high price of butter this
season shows at once how profitable a part of
farming is the small dairy. There is not a
place or section in all this country where a
small dairy could be so easily, cheaply and
profitably connected with every little farm as
here in Polk County. Nine out of ten of our
farms have a piece of land just suited to the
raising of Bermuda grass; and on moderately
moist soil, two acres of this grass, with very
little help, will keen five cows and calves.
Then, by having a milk shed and lot on a
slightly elevated spot, where the calves would
be kept through the day, and the cows through
the night, a drain to run down over another
acre of ground and gradually fertilize it with-
out the labor of hauling, enough Guinea or
Para grass might be raised to make all the
green feed that would be needed in connection
with the Bermuda pasture to keep the five
cows in splendid condition all the time.
Five cows thus provided for would give an
average of ten gallons of milk per day; that
would supply any family in the State, make
five pounds of butter each day, and leave at
least six gallons sour milk for the poultry and
pigs; and this would keep fifty hens and three
hogs in good order all the time, making more
good bacon, and more of eggs and chickens,
than any one family could possibly use, and
would add greatly to the family income.
If it was generally known that a gallon of
milk has more of nutrition in it than three
pounds of meat, our people would not be so
indifferent about it. But it is also the very
best food for hens, and nothing fattens a hog
faster than sour milk.
The first cost of preparing to keep cattle in
the way we have suggested, would not be great,
and when once under way, no ten acres on
any farm would pay so well as the four we
have indicated. The milk cows may be selec-
ted out of the herd of any common cattle, but
if blooded stock was used the product would
be more than doubled. And every farmer
could find three or four shoats about his place
to put in the pen to drink the sour milk, and
in six months 1,000 pounds of pork would be
made even if the shoats were very poor at the
start. Then, let us figure up the result:
Ten gallons of milk would supply fully half
the food of any ordinary family, and one
pound of butter would supply the demands of
the household, and four pounds could be sold.
This, in one year, would be 1,460 pounds of
butter, and at 25 cents, which is a reasonable
average, $365 would be received. Eight head
of hogs could be fattened to weigh 2,000
pounds, or twenty could be made weigh the
same amount, and be ready for weekly market.


and besides supplying the lard for the family,
and some to spare, would net at least $200
more.
This plan contemplates the cutting of the
grass from the fertilized acre at each feed, and
carrying it to the cows at milking time, and
the composting of ill surplus fertilizers for the
preparation of a new lot to follow the other
when exhausted, and also the rotating of milk
cows, by turning out all as soon as dry, and
supplying their places with fresh ones. This
would be easy enough after the first year, as
the stock kept up could be controlled so as to
make them come in just as needed. The ar-
rangement would not affect the general stock
of hogs or cattle, as any one could leave all
they had in the range, except such as their
pasture and grass lots would supply.
It would take the time of a youth of fifteen,


or say half the time of a full hand, to attend
to the cattle, hogs, and poultry; and even sup-
posing that nothing was produced by the
poultry yard, and that the labor cost $100,
there would still be left $465 as additional in-
come, beside the general comfort and health of
the family.
The poultry yard would add $100 more, at
least, if well managed, besides supplying the
family.
Nearly all the fevers we have noticed in
children here may be attributed to diet, and a
good supply of wholesome milk would prevent
them.-Bartow Informant.

MILCH Cows.-Dr. VOELCKER recently
stated before a meeting of the British Dairy
Farmers' Association, that he found that food
given to a cow while in milk would be converted
into milk within six hours from the time it is
eaten, and that a rapid improvement in the
quality of the milk follows a change from
poorer to richer food. He also spoke very de-
cidedly in favor of soiling as against pasturing,
the latter being a most wasteful method of feed-
ing.



Profits of Grape Culture in California.
"The discovery of gold in California," says
the San Francisco Bulletin, "was not so import-
ant as the later discovery of the capacity of the
rough hill lands of this State for the produc-
tion of the best grapes ever grown outside of
Europe. It will come to this, that the best va-
rieties of grapes now grown anywhere in Europe
will be found in California. Indeed, some of
the best are found here to-day. There are vint-
iculturists who have been over the vineyards of
France and Spain. They know what is done
there and what can be done here. There is no
grape which flourishes in either of these coun-
tries which will not come to perfection in Cali-
fornia. Another use of one of the most prom-
inent grapes in California has as yet attracted
little attention. The Muscat has this year been
used extensively for canning purposes. It is a
table and raisin grape, and ranking high for
wine, although it produces the sweet wine
known as Muscat or Muscatel, and which finds
favor with many. These canned grapes will
yet have a prominent place in the market. Of
course, grapes of this size and quality will make
very handsome raisins. But if the grower can
get from $30 to $35 a ton for them he will be
likely to let them go without restoring them to
the raisin process. A great many car-loads of
the Muscat and Tokey have gone East this year,
and they have probably returned to the grower
not less than two cents a pound, in some in-
stances much more, or say a gross return of
$300 an acre."

THE American Agriculturist, for January,


1883, is an excellent number. Will try to find
room for a few extracts hereafter. The Agricul-
turist is $1.50 per year, but we will club with
it THE DISPATCH, sending both papers to one
address, during the year 1883, for only $2.50.
This is $1 less than the price of the two papers,
when taken singly

VICK'S GUIDE! If we had "time and space"
we should like to say a great deal about this
beautiful Floral Catatogue and Magazine; but
we must content ourselves by again advising
all our lady readers especially, to send for it.
Price, only 10 cents. James Vick, Rochester,
New York.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Rowley's Improved American Dominique
Fowls.
Our old Kansas friend thus relates the his-
tory of the fine breed of fowls which he may, we
think, justly claim to have originated. Cer-
tainly there is no comparison between the very
best "American Dominiques" of the "Standard"
and the large and magnificent fowls sent out
by Col. Rowley. His Dominiques," (as we
have before said), are simply extra fine
Plymouth Rocks, with rose 'combs; and, if
they have any fault, it is the tendency to grow
too large:
MOUND CITY, KANSAS, Nov. 28, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
As I have been requested by you, the Poul-
try Bulletin, and others to give a description
of how I brought to perfection Rowley's Im-
proved American Dominiques, (which I do not
consider quite perfect yet, though I consider
them within one notch of perfection), I will
tell you exactly how I did it. In the start I
will give a few words as to their origin, as I
saw them some seventy years ago, soon after
their import to America. They were about the
size of our best Plymouth Rocks, evenly col-
ored, well barred with dark bars across the
feathers, with yellow legs and beaks, and with
Ssplendidrose combs. They had been crossed
and recrossed with almost all kinds of our na-
tive fowls so long that they had become degen-
erated and nearly run out. My knowing of
their points, etc., thought I would try my skill
and see if I could breed them back to what
they were at first. Some thirteen years ago I
commenced by getting the best hen that I
could get, and a poor cock, the best that I
could pick up, and begun business. For about
five years my chicks hatched all colors, and
my progress was so discouraging that not more
*than one man in a thousand would have gone
on with the experiment. I have had breeders
write inme that they had tried to do it and
failed, yet I determined to accomplish my ob-
ject, and kept at it, picking out my best
marked and largest ones to breed from, throw-
ing out the culls and cooking and eating them.
After five years of hard study, patience and
Spans in culling and mating, they began to im-
i)prove. The longer I bred them the faster
they improved, and for the last four years I
have not had -anything hatch but Dominique
in color, and I have brought them up to their
original size; the cocks when full grown in
good condition weigh from nine and a half to
ten and a half pounds, hens from seven to nine
pounds; they are good layers and a splendid ta-
ble fowl; good foragers, hardy and docile, and I
have brought them to this point from the little,
run out, mongrel Dominique without crossing
with any other, except four years ago I put
* three Plymouth Rock hens with a Dominique


cock in order to get the cocks darker col-
ored, and in the Fall picked out of that cross
the nicest and best marked young cockerel,
with rose comb, and bred him back to my
IDominique hens. That is all the cross that I
have ever made; the balance of the work I
have accomplished by patience, close study,
mating, etc. My knowing just what they
originally were helped me to keep that point
in view and breed for it, and now I have them
of even color, and 'quite perfect. I have
now some half of my breeding stock of hens
perfect in color and nicely marked, and the
balance very good.
I have 'written, this that othei breeders may
know the time and trouble that I have spent
in perfecting Rowley's Improved American
Dominiqucs," and they will see that even $8 or


$10 per pair is less than they ought to be sold
for. I have only offered them for sale the two
past years. I have spent the rest of the time
and trouble without offering one for sale, for I
was determined to bring them to a point that
would breed true, and so well have I succeeded
that I sold a young cockerel two falls past, and
he was mated with a flock of native small hens
of most all colors, and the gentleman told me
since his chicks hatched that every single
chicken was Dominique color. That being the
case, I think the mongrel blood must have
been pretty thoroughly bred out of him. For
the benefit of others it might be well for dif-
ferent papers to copy this. Now, if this will
benefit any I am well paid for my trouble of
writing it. SETH ROWLEY, SR.

"Check Reins," and "Blinders."
All true lovers of that noble and indispensa-
ble animal, the horse, should combine to
put down such abominations as the check-
rein and blinders. The late Sir Arthur Helps
said that whenever he saw horses suffering
from tight check-reins, he knew that the" driv-
ers were unobservant, ignorant, pompous, or
cruel. Mr. E. F. Flower thus elucidates this
sentiment: Unobservant, or he would see that
his horses are suffering; ignorant, or he would
know that a horse loses much of his power of
draught, and cannot recover himself if he
stumbles; cruel, if observing and knowing he does
not remedy it; pompous, if he prefers his horses
should rear their heads on high and rattle
their trappings to being dealt with humanely
and reasonably.
An old friend of ours, living in Cambridge,
a great lover and a competent judge of horses,
called the other day. No one is more ready
to "talk horse," or can do it better. Said he:
" I keep three, and I have not used a check-
rein or blinder for many years."
Some use the rein with a moderate tension
as a help to recovery when the horse stumbles.
We believe the free play of muscles best for
man and beast. Suppose, friend, that you
stumble. Can you better save yourselves from
falling with no constraint of neck and limb;
or with head and arms held stiff?
Gov. HAOOoD, of South Carolina, in his
late message to the Legislature of that State,
gives words of encouragement to agriculture.
Being himself a practical and successful
farmer, there is no one who knows better the
needs and opportunities for improving the
farmer's condition. In alluding to the State


University at Columbia, he uses the following
language:
"The agricultural department should be so
developed as to materially aid in building up
the agricultural interests of the State. Not
only should the opportunity be given to the
rising generation of farmers to acquire the
scientific principles upon which their calling is
based, but the farmers themselves should have
the benefit of the experiments and tests of a
well-conducted experimental farm located in
their midst. Negotiations are now in progress
between the State Bureau of Agriculture and
the agricultural department of the College,
which will, if perfected, tend largely to bring
about this most desirable result. In order to
secure harmony of purpose and union and con-
centration of effort, the two departments will
be made to mutually assist and strengthen
each other. To this end the College will make


the analyses, researches and practical tests re-
quired by the Bureau of Agriculture, and the
results will be given to the public in the oc-
casional bulletins of the commissioner of agri-
culture. The report of the professor of agri-
culture will also be made a part of the annual
report of the bureau."
"Big Trees I"
Nearly all new beginners go in for "Big Trees"
-"some that will begin to bear right off." To
such readers we would say that in selecting
trees for transplanting, the largest are not the
best. Medium sized trees have better roots, are
easier handled, are less liable to injure from
transportation, start quicker and grow faster
than tall plants that have been drawn, up
weakly in thick nursery rows. Old trees have
wider spread roots, which are certain to be se-
verely abridged in the lifting. The tops must
then be pruned severely to correspond with the
destruction of the roots, so that there is nothing
gained in the way of size, and the check or "set
back', to old or larger trees is often fatal. We
see six, and even eight-year-old orange trees
offered as being desirable on account of size,
etc., but no experienced nurseryman could be
induced to handle such trees.
Plant small or medium sized trees, of healthy,
vigorous growth, and having plenty of roots,
and let the impatient "green horns" tussle with
the big trees !
GRAIN AND MEAT SPECULATORS.-In al-
luding to this class of "land sharks," an agricul-
tural exchange uses this strong language: "We
have in the larger cities a set of the most un-
principled swindlers and gamblers that ever in-
fested civilized society. They are the curse of
the age in which they live. The laws of supply
and demand have nothing to do in fixing prices.
It is all governed by a set of men whose only
aim is to take advantage of the necessities of
the people. It seems as if combinations now
control most of our products."
HAMILTON COLLEGE.-We return thanks
to our friend, Prof. EDWARD NORTH, for a
copy of the Seventy-first Annual Catalogue of
the Officers and Students of Hamilton College,
Clinton, New York, for 1882-'83. This Cata-
logue gives most gratifying evidence of the
prosperity of this time-honored College; and,
we are glad to see still among the names of the
Trustees and Faculty, many gentlemen long and
well-remembered for high character and schol-
arly accomplishments.
COTTON-SEED OIL AND MEAL.-The Cin-


- I --~C--- I II -I -- C- I -- I


cinnati Times-Star says: "Making cotton-seed
oil and cake is a comparatively new industry in
the South, but it is profitable and gives prom-
ise of wonderful development. In 1870 there
were only twenty-six mills in operation, in 1880
there were forty-five establishments. It is be-
lieved that in a few years the annual product
of these mills, which are now rapidly increasing
in number, will amount to $50,000,000."
-Unquestionably it is essential to the suc-
cess of farmers, as a class, that they be intelli-
gently educated in the way of doing business
and keeping a systematic account of all their
operations on the farm and elsewhere. Such a
training is just'as necessary for them as a legal
training is for the lawyer, a medical training
for the doctor or a commercial training for the
merchant.


644e


sof


-I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH I4-7

Books, Pamphlets, Etc. LAK E G EORGE NURSERIES,
Our friend and neighbor, Dr. B. KEH, O.,
formerly of New York, will please accept our W. W I-KTN cu c n 1R P ^i ^Trr
formerly of New York, i l please accept our Have on hand a LARGE and FINE Stock of all the Varieties of the CITRUS FRUITS
thanks for a number of medical and chemical (Budded) all well Rooted and Thrifty.
works of much interest and value for study and CALL ON OR ADDRESS
reference. w. w. IIAWKIlVlS & CO., 1PROPRIETORS,
THE HAND-BooK OF THE STATE OF MIss- Lalce George, lorda.
HE AND OF THE TATE MISS- CATALOGUE SENT FREE TO ANY ADDRESS to dec 31, 13
IssippI, (kindly sent us by Maj. E. G. WALL,
Commissioner of Immigration and Agricul- GEORGETOWN NURSERIES.
ture,) is a pamphlet of about 100 pages, very
clearly and forcibly setting forth the advan- Budded from tried and approved varieties, and
tages of our sister State, which are many and ORAN CE AND L EM ON TREES on good healthy stocks.
SAlso, JAPAN PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
various. Each county is briefly but accurately Florida. Address,
described, and an excellent map of the State .a.-.da. Ol-T '"U7" .A :w, Georgetown., F'lorida..
accompanies and forms a part of the pamphlet. to Feb20 'S3
Send for it to Maj. E. G. Wall, Commissioner, VIOl M
&c., Jackson, Mississippi. I I N U S Y U
BURPREE'S FARM ANNUAL, for 1883. For Orange Quotations.
the Southern States. W. Atlee Burpree & Co., FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE. 1
C *3 BROAWAY, NEW YORK, December 26, 1.S2.(
Philadelphia, Pa. Receipts of oranges at tils port in Florida Dispatch, JAPAN PERSIMMONS,
r ~~Line and Southern Express Conmpany, week end ing
LANDRETH1'S Rural Register, Almanac, and 2th inst., 12,62 packages. LE COINTE PEAR T'IEES,
PRICES.
CataiGgue, for 1883. D. Landreth & Sons, Floridas, $ .50to 5.00 per box. ANI) A F'ULL LINE ,OF NURSERY STOCK.
Messinas, $.00 to $3.-) per box.
Philadelphia. Palermos, $3.00 to $3.50 per box. -----
S.... Valencias, $5.50 to $8.00) per case.
Fair. Jamaicas, $3.50 to $5.75 per barrel. 0o orders by mail promptly attended to. 1.t
Orange County Fair. C. D. OWENS, General Agent.
We take pleasure in printing the following NEW YORK, December 29, 1882. H HS. ANFORD, PROPRIETOR,
Special Telegram to The Florida Dispatch:.
list of officers, &c., and urge a full representa- Receipts of oranges via Florida Dispatch Line and tojan 17 '83p THOMASVILLE, GA.
Southern Express Company this week, 12,629 packages. --------
tion, at the Fair, of the products of the sur- Selling from $4.00 to $1.50 per box. C. D. OWENS.
roundi(lg countieS : ,acksonville Wholesale Prices. q- &, .,
Orange County Fair Association. Fair at (errn/ed weekly, by JONS & BOWJEN, IWhole.(le iE ltLnd
Sanford, February 21, 22, 23, 24, 1883. Presi- FnIT- Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, a.ant
dent, T. J. Shine, Orlando; Vice-President, UAS- nulte..................................... 10 DOUBLE DAILY,
Dr. King Wyly, Fort Reid; Secretary, D. L. Golden C.........................................
Dr. C. C.HaskPowdered ................................ ............. CARRYING TIlE U. S. MAIL.
Way, Sanford; Treasurer Dr. C.C. Haskell,ut LoafTHE U. .............................................. MAIL.
Maitland ; Executive Committee, Judge Hay- .COFFEE, RiO-Fair.......................................
den, Sanford; Judge J. R. Mizell, Osceola; Col. Choice......................................... i ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.
J. R. Norton, Lake Eustis; W. H. Holden, avaes.............................................: REGULAR MAIL, .
Orlando; Loring A. Chase, W inter Park. En- ocha ..................... ..............
trees for premiums solicited from Sumter, Vo- Maracaibo.............................. 18 GEO. M. BIR), Capt. G. J. Mercer.
lusia and Brevard Counties. Any of above grades roasted to order H.B. PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
lusia and Brevard Counties. FLOUR-SnowDrop, best, patent....................... 7 5-i- 7 75 ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
N. A.patent.......................................... 7 2: 7 50 One of the above-named steamers will leave De Pary
t n Oreole, 2d best .... Whar........................f, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at 3
GUINEA COWS, and other communica- Pearl, 3d best........ 6 25(@k7 00 P. m., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
l' orange Co., No.I......................... 50 all intermediate landings.
tions of interest, in our llnext. Our1 list. of ME t)cTS- 0e on....... ...........101(4 .11 ROSA, ('apt. J. L. Amazeen.
lHamas (Merwin &,Sons) ........................ 11i FREI)ERI1CKD ]E BA RY, ('.apt. Leo. Vogel.
practical nd xp iencel or p nt is holders ........................................... ..12 EL A, Capt. J. S. Mattheson.
illreasing, and we give all such a hearty 'e i- Ho miNY-Pearl, per bbl ..................................... 4 75 One of theabove-named steamers will leave De Bary
g, a We gi a het MEAL-per bbl .................................. 4 75 Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Saturday, at
come. Let us have short, pithy, and pungent LARD-Refined in ails.............................. 3 4:30 p. m., and from S., F. and W. Railway wharf at 5 p.
BJU e a p e UTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice) ..............5 to 40 m., for Palatka, Sanford, Enterprise and all intermedi-
articles on all subjects worthy of the attention CHEESE-Full cream........................... ........at ka with Florida Southern Railoadlandings
of rural residents in Florida and the neighbor- TonAcco-Smokin-- the Boss Durham s for Ganesvlle and St. John's and Lake Eutis
ing States, and THE DISPATCH will give them "Thein Bul" Durham l Tpkge......... :i Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
a very wide circulation. "Sitting Bull" (genuine s ............ 75 Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
'i "Sitting Bull" (genuine) ............ 49 Daytona.
S"Sitting Bull" (genuine)b pkge.. 45 Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Plug-"Shell Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30 Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
-The foundation of every good government lb boxes.... ..................... Kisslmmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
..- t"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to lb., It Lake and Rock Lodge and Indian River.
is the famiily. The best and most prosperous boxes............................................... o Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
"Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 11 to New Smyrna anj Titueville.
' country is that whichll has the greatest nulnbher lt ., 17 1b boxes.... ........... o50 Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
0 ...Cirars-"Lonr Branch"a very pop- morning at 7 a. m., and Sanford at 7:30 a. m. and 9:(*1 a.


of ilappy firesides. ular brand, per thousand.... .. 27 00) m., making close connections with S., F. and W. Rail-
"Our X," choice cigar, easy smok'r 24 00 way for all points North, East and West.
"Our XX," a very coicesmoker... 26 00 AThrough bills of lading given to all points.
"Florida Boys," (we are State Agt,) ,35 00 The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
^','I'n ( 4 J r "4i ,~ SOAP AND STARCH--Colgate's 8 oz., per box.. 3 50) respect.
SPeerless, 8 oz., per box ............................ 3 50 For further information, apply at General Ticket
Starch, lump, per lb...... 6................ Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets.
HoPs, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS- W. B. WATSON, Manager.
METEOROLOG L REPOR. ops, per ............................................... 5@22 C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.
UETEhOROLOGIK.AL R]EPORT. Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 60Oc ...
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
OFFICE OF OB, SERVA TION, } doz. lb.................................................. 225 LeConte Pear kuttin s
SIGNAL SERVICE, U.S. A., JACKSONVILL, FLA. Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz.l. In. 2 25
Weather for week ending Deceimber 20, 1882. Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lbt..... 2 70
Royal BakingPowder, per doz. lb....... 1 50
Therm. Wind. ... COUNTRY P-RODIUCE. 20,000 LeConte Pear Cuttings for sale at $20.00 per thou-
for first grades.
S.. Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high sand, well packed and delivered at the Express Office,
S .=. 1 .^ POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new.......................... 3 75 4 Thomasville, Ga.
DATE CHICKENS, each.................................................. 2' 40 to jan 11 '83p R. N. McKINNON.
S ; S EGGS-Per doz..................................................... :M :1 -- --- -
Sa :-f. :'gtt^, ...-a jS HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, perlb., firstclass 1m A ... l" .. y
S^ .. = ^ C) ., I Country Dry Salted,per lb....................... 0.11 attenlt.i n E t" y 3
SButcher Dry Salted, per lb.................. U(f 10 .
;--- --- -- ---! i--- Damaged Hides.................................. 6 DR. R. BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
Saturday 23...... 29).98 1S;556 62.7, 81.01 0.00 S 31Fair Kip and Calf, 8lbs. and under................. 10 ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
Sunday 24.. 30.20 4 44 49-3 69.7 0.00 N 2 Clear. SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb......................... 35 now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs; all
Monday 25...... 20.6201) 55 5.4.7 8.7 0.58 NE 4 Cloudy. Deer Skins Salted, per lb............... 26@30 other domestic animals are benetitted by its use. This
Tuesday 26......1, 0.19 5954 .55.7 84.7) 0.49 iNE 6 Cloudy. FITRs -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win- being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
Wednesday 27 30.25 5,.511 53.3, 74.0! 0.00 N i Cloudy. ter.................. ................................ 1 50@4 00 food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
Thursday 28... 30.1958!49 53.31 70.7| 0.00 N 1 Cloudy. Raccoon, each........................................ 5@15 It is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONE DoL-
Friday 29,........ 30.05'53-4} 49.: 89.7i 0.50 N 2 Cloudy. Wild Cat, each..................................... 10@20 LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
-.-.-.- -......... ._..- -- ..'.. Fox, each.......................................... .... 5, 15 reference given on application to the proprietor.
Highest barometer 30.32, lowest 29.92. BEESWAX-per lb.............................................. 20 R. BACHMANN, M. D.,
Highest temperature 68, lowest 44. 1 WooL-Free from burs, per lb......................... 17@22 Jacksonville, Florida.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level. Burry, per lb................... 11@..15 Depot with PAINE BRos., 36 Bay Street.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A. GOAT SKINS-Each per ................................ 10 aug. 21 to feb. 21. '83.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


"Banana Land."
The Editor of the Bronson (Levy) Enter-
prise has been down to the "Ten Thousand
Islands," visiting the "Garden of Eden," and
here is his account of it:
A recent interview with Mr. John Jay Fer-
guson, commonly called "Alligator Ferguson,"
a hero of the "late unpleasantness," who lost
an arm at Chancellorsville on the day that
Stonewall Jackson met his fate, gives us the
following particulars:
Mr. Ferguson has lived in the neighborhood
of the Big Cypress for about five years, and
has been engaged in hunting alligators most of
the time, but two years ago concluded to settle
down, and started a banana plantation on one
of the Ten Thousand Islands," which has been
locally named the "Garden of Eden," while
not far away lies another islet, called by way
of contrast "Hell's Half Acre." The para-
disical island contains about thirty acres of
arable land, about four acres of which are in
bearing bananas, and more plants. The
bananas produced are of excellent quality, as we
can witness after testing them. The variety is
the French dwarf, ~ hioh Mr. Ferguson pre--
fers to any other. He states that he is picking
ripe bunches from plants set thirteen months
ago; and these bunches bear from a hundred
to a hundred and fifty delicious bananas of
good size.
The plants are set eight feet apart, giving.
680 to the acre, or 680 bunches bananas
bearing 100 to the bunch, low estimate. This
is 68,000 bananas to the acre-worth at one
cent apiece $680. Not a poor income from
one acre, considering the small outlay re-
quired; and besides the crop instead of need-
ing to be replanted every year, continually
renews and increases itself by throwing up
suckers-two or three of which may be al-
lowed to grow, each bearing a bunch of
bananas, while enough surplus slips are fur-
nished for enlarging the plantation.
Mr. Ferguson says this is the only locality
he has ever found where a man can go and
make a self-sustaining home in a year with
a' capital of $200 cash, and a hoe and axe
for tools. He speaks from experience, and
is a one-armed man at that. This halcyon re-
gion is one of perfect healthfulness, with no
chills and fever, and where one is always ready
for his hash-as Mr. Ferguson expresses it.
Of course it is somewhat out of the way at
present, but Mr. Ferguson has a little schooner,
the cabin of which holds about 150 bunches
of bananas, which he brings to market to
Cedar Key, returning with whatever stores
may be needed.
This "Garden of Eden" is described as situ-


ated about midway between the twenty-fifth
and twenty-sixth parallels of latitude, where
frost is unknown, and climate and vegetation
are distinctly tropical; it is seventy miles
southeast of the mouth of the Caloosahatchie
River, and thirty miles east of Cape Romano.
Ten miles to the eastward over the islands and
stretches of water the Everglades commence.
Mr. Ferguson states that the impression pre-
vailing in some quarters that much of the
region of the Everglades is susceptible of set-
tlement and cultivation is altogether unfounded.
Some one visiting that part at the height of
the dry season may have got that idea, but
with the heavy rains the country becomes sod-
den and submerged.
The natural forest and vegetable growth of
the Ten Thousand Islands is quite different
from that in more Northern portions of Flor-


ida. Among these are the r
wood, gumbo-limbo, wild
stopper and sea-grape whielh
ries. The tall, jointed, t
growing twenty or more feet
palm, but no palmetto, and
These islands not only suit tl
cocoa-palm, pine-apple, and p
cal fruits flourish here whe
fertile soil.
However, even this Garde;
drawbacks: perhaps may b
Half Acre for perfection. I
to confess that insect annm
mosquitoes and sandflies a
months or so in the year.
mosquito bar, made of thin c
was necessary to burn rags i
old cans, which he also show(
keep out the sand flies.
If one could civilize and
stinging insects, it is easy to
banana land might have cha.
cal portions of the Summer
most people prefer to enjoy t
tance from their native habit
The Palm. No. 4-
FEDERAL POINT, FLA.
Editors of The Florida Disp
The genus Sabal derives at
from being the most northern
of all the American palms.
ant member, Sabal Palmetto,
"cabbage palm," first appear
Cape Fear River, North Car
tude 34, becoming more
south; and along the shores o
ico, and in many parts of Flo
ing feature of the forest scene:
as a conspicuous emblem o
State of South Carolina, by r(
ance in the islands along the
sibly, too, in remembrance of
rendered during the Revol
Fort Moultrie, then a stocl
logs, in repelling a British fl(
to attack Charleston.
The trunk, ten to fifteen in
smooth and cylindrical at bot
up encased in the forked butt
petioles, mingled with coar
rises usually, in mature sj
height of fifty feet, but is
higher. It supports a dense
of foliage, the fresh and gr
recent growth rising upon the
leaves, which slowly drop as
leaves are three to six feel
strengthened half their leng
curved midrib, and deeply sli
slender ribbons, which tremb]
of every breeze. From the b
ions hang long white threads,
green of the leaf is variegate
expansion with a triangular
The flower spikes which sprin


leaves bear a great profusion
fragrant blossoms, highly reli
and the fruit, a round berry,
some years and in others failing
is sometimes eaten by people
voured by birds and small an
or cabbage is esteemed as a d
although the life of the tree n
to obtain it, and these two fac
account for its scarcity in ol
The leaves make an excellent
the days of the early settler,
for that purpose, many large
buildings being covered wit!
expanded leaf, finely shre(
bleached in the sun, is con
small baskets, mats, and a
fancy articles, and myriads of
been wantonly destroyed for


RU -~IP1-- ~BY I I I I-Q~sl I PILI~LIIIL I IYB~ L- -- -RI L


g from among the often have a subterranean trunk eighteen inches.
i of small, white, long or more. The leaf is flabellate, quite flat,,
shed by the bees; very deeply cleft, with little or no midrib, color'
freely produced glaucous green, and petioles smooth and un-
ig almost entirely, armed.
but eagerly de- Besides the three native varieties described'
imals. The bud above, there are others growing in the West
delicious esculent, Indies, Mexico and South America. They dc
nust be sacrificed not appear to have been very accurately or mi.
~s combined will nutely described and classified by botanists
d neighborhoods. hence it is impossible to speak of them with cer-
t thatch, and in tainty, but their hardy and robust constitutions
s were much used render them well worth trying in Florida.
and substantial Charles Kingsley speaks of one species, the
h them. The un- carat palm, growing in Trinidad to upwards of
d and afterward a hundred feet in height, as being peculiarly
verted into hats, conspicuous and imposing, and one of the most
great variety of numerous on the Island. It must differ essen..
stately trees have tially from ours, or the people of the West In-
this trifling ob- dies would not send to Florida for palmetto


edsQa


mastic, poison dog- ject, merely because it was easier to fell than
lime, sea-ash, the climb them. The timber is of a soft, spongy
bear edible ber- character, but very durable, especially when im-
Lriangular cactus, mersed in salt water, and being free from the at-
high, the cabbage- tacks of the teredo, or ship-worm, is frequently
no oak or pine. selected for building wharves in places where
he banana, but the this creature, so destructive to most kinds of
perhaps most tropi- wood, abounds. Sometimes the new settler builds
n planted in the his cabin entirely of Palmetto, using logs for
the walls, leaves for the roof, and leaf-stems for
n of Eden has its flooring. For variety in landscape gardening,
e too near Hell's and for lining avenues, the Palmetto is well
-r. Ferguson had adapted, and when the dead leaves are kept
)yance, especially smoothly pruned away, it presents a neat and
Lre bad for three trim appearance. It is regarded with marked
He exhibited his curiosity by many of our Northern visitors, as
.otton, but said it being the first specimen of the palm tribe they
inside the bar in have seen. The common belief is that it grows
ed us, in order to slowly, but in a favorable soil it really gains
rapidly, and I have carefully noticed a young
domesticate the tree, six inches in diameter at the bulb when
imagine that this transplanted, that in twelve years made a no-
rms over less tropi- ble trunk, thicker than a flour barrel and meas-
State. As it is, during ten feet from the ground to the top of the
he fruits some dis- bud. As to its hardiness, I need only say that
at. during our severest -winters, I have never seen
it injured, like the dwarf palmetto, the terminal
-Sabal. buds of which, after an unusually hard freeze
, Dec. 19, 1882. are sometimes, though rarely, found to bei
atch: stricken through and killed. The last men-
i especial interest tioned, called Sabalserrulata, or "saw palmetto,"
y and the hardiest from its serrated petioles, is another native palm
Its most import- very common from the Carolinas southward. It
familiarly called has'a creeping trunk, three to twelve feet long,
-s at the mouth of which occasionally in rich bottoms leaves the
olina, about lati- ground and assumes an erect position. These
numerous further arborescent specimens, although in appearance
f the Gulf of Mex- thrifty and vigorous, often are so slightly rooted
rida forms a strik- as to be easily overturned by a smart kick.
ry. It was adopted Vast tracts in the Southern seaboard States are
n the seal of the covered with "saw palmettoes," rendering the/
eason of its abund- breaking up of the soil for agriculture a matte~
sea-coast and, pos- of no small difficulty. The leaves are employed
the signal service for the same purposes as those of the large pal-
utionary war by metto, and as they can be had in inexhaustible
;ade of palmetto quantities, may yet prove of great value in the
eet from sailing in manufacture of a variety of useful articles, par-
ticularly m]attre.ses and paper stock, for which
ches in diameter, latter purpose they are excellent, making a
ttom, and, higher most durable and tenacious paper. The fruit
s of old decaying is a small oval drupe, sometimes eaten, though
se matted fibres, not generally relished and is abundantly pro-
pecimens, to the duced only in occasional seasons. The trunk,
sometimes much when burned, is found to be exceedingly rich
spherical crown in potash, a singular circumstance, as the sandy,
een upper part of pine soils, where they usually grow are said to
brown and dead be very deficient in that salt. On the sea-
they decay. The coast there would seem to be two vaf-ieties of
t long, flabellate, S. serrulata, one with dark green and the other
gth by a sharply with glaucous leaves, but I do not think that
it at the ends into botanists have ever distinguished them.
le under the touch Another variety, Sabal Adansonii or "blue
asis of these divis- palmetto"" is found growing in swamps and
and the bluish light sandy hammocks. It is entirely stemless,
d at the point of or rather as it grows, the stem slowly extends
yellowish blotch, downward instead of upward, so that old plants|






T IE FLO RIDA D I S PAT C .


NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION. BR ADLEY'S
!AT GAINESVILL(, FL., I eteier, 1S. We have prepared this Fertilizer
I especially for the culture of the or--
OTICE is hereby given that Ihli follow-ig-litnael set- range tree, and from the results al-
tier has tiled notice of his intention llto make linil I ready obtained from its use on the
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof will. be orange groves of Florida, we feel
made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court, at justified in claiming that it cannot
Jacksonville, Florida, on Thursday. February 1, 1883, be surpassed, if equalled, by any
yis: Henry Christopher, New Berlin, Florida, Home- other fertilizer.
stead 5927. for the Island No. 5, "T I nsh ip i south, Range it is, composed of the purest and
S east. highest grade materials combined
He names the following witnesses to prove his contin- in such proportions as to fui dish all
uous residence upon, and cultivation of said land, viz : the elements of plant-foodl in prop-
Charles Mervin, of New Berlin, Fla.; Charles Willey, ot er quantities and in the best form
New Berlin, Fla.; Commodore Porter, of New Berlin, to promote a rapid and strong
Fla.; Alvin McNoil, of Chaccoville, Fla. I growth of the wood and insure an
L. A. BARNES, f abundant yield of fine fruit.
to feb 1, '83 U. S. Land Oftfce Register. I A sufficient proportion of its
phosphoric acid, being readily sol-
uble in cold water, is iinuediately
Sor atA e available as food for the young
Orange S lis and Small Trs witl 1, 2 year oolets f the tre, while a cnsid-
,rageSe and lTrees year crable portion, beinr present il the
old buds. All sizes of Sour Sed linis. Also form of pure ground bone, undis-
ORANGE L ND T solved by acid, becomes entirely
(AN ..GELANIDS I soluble in the soil only by the ac-
On the Bluffton property and in Orange Co. For partic- tion of the elements of nature in
ulars apply to due course of time. Thus this all
F. C. S I iEE, Supt., iiinportant food is (no)t soon ex-
tomar 10 '83p Bluftlton, Volusia Co.. Fla. lausted by t tree, or washed into
the ground by heavy rains, but is

-Ma of MarJi. 1 C0O1 I spnFlo aum n


RANGE TREE


Oe1.


FERTILIZER.
throughout the season n.
The nitrogen and potash also are
furnished iIn the most nutritious
forms and approved propi( rations i
for this crop.
After giving this Fertilizer a
thonrugh trialof thliree years on or-
ange trees in Florida, we intro-|
duced it last season quite exten-
sively throughout the State. and,
the results have even exceeded our
11mo.I sanguine expectations. \.
have yet to hear of single instran .-
where the most satisfactory retiurji
have not been derived.
\We have nothing to say alout thlie
fertilizers manufactured or sold by
other parties, as we believe, with an
esti;l,1i-.d r reputationn of twenty-
Iwo years in the I ;iirl',i '!i or
high grade :rti. ir, woe c(n Sti (l
U1])1 oii rov,'i l ,ii[i l, wihioUt,'all-
ing the attelti( I()In r.lhe pub)liic to
tlle record of any of o" i l' mco l.ti- i1
tors. or to the value of tleir ianu-i
hicture as compared with tl.at of
our own. Our fertilizers iari all an-
alyzed, 'lihen nullin factured, )by
competent chemists, and none arn,
shipped to market until They are I
.known to be up to the standard.


--I Y-


J. W. IlIItNXELL A. T. WILLIAML-, i nIl tMS-trrss of ili C:1(llebri-ted
Showing all lands subject to Homnestead entry, also va-
cant State, Railroad, Disston and Reed lands, all post-of- < rsc.e-tr's ilosl-m ate,
tices, railroad stations etc. Adopted by Board of County i
Conummnissioner. as the official map. Price, in pocket
form,82. Price, on rollers for office, S3. Sent postpaid, the Standard Fertilizer for all Field and Garden Crops, and e-pecially ailate(d to the wants of tht
on receipt of price. (tton Crop.
F. A. SALOMONSON, General Agent, ?otton J)o).
to mar 17, '81 Ocala, Marion Co., Fla. fMAIN FFICE, 7 KILtY STRiEETS OSTON, JANACHUETTj.

O. YV. IW lolr'n vll 1 &, Co., Agents foir State of Florida,

toOctA, 49 W BAY-S-T., .JA(,KS)NVIL. I,'(Ii..

ARRANTE Garde_ eldand Flower-%I M IT&Ij
hole~mrsand DeaeIets l9


to Jan 9, 83

Queen TE South

FARM MILLS
For Stock Feed or Meal for
Family use.
2-0,000 =o = 7SS-
Write for Pamphlet.
Simpson & Gault Mfg Co.
Successors to STRAUB MILL CO.
CINCINNATI, 0.


IVholeKa1le D83ll o K ;l(.rS. ill


Foreign and Domestic Fruits



SCOMMIS--)ION MERCHANTS FOR THE SA LE OF


Florida Oranges; an t Lmot


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


S ---- --


4WCORRESI
] i iREFERENCES.-
sept 4, tf.
L FRANK W. MUMBY.

MU(

I 1.S79.
I F. WV. MUMBY & CO.


PONDENCE SOLICITED.
-First National Bank, Jacksonville, Florida. Union National Bank, Chicago, Illinois,


JNO. N. C. RTOCKTON.


RAYMOND D. KNIGHT


VIBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


SScct'('ESsOR TO -

IMPOTDI'l'lt AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


1S70.
JNO. S. DIIlGGS & CO.


t Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have t largest i d st a t ,(lotcom'plete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto ('ups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, D1)inner and C('hamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamlps
and Chandeliers, Fanio Vase Lamps in Majolica, Falence, Kiteo, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. 'Tlhe American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CE'LEB 'l:ATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.


;" ': -. THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
".... .. The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
Bitf ..,.,.! -. .. ble, 'CompuIt and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
',. ,'..l.' 4 from those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
Kieffer Pear. Jap. Persimmon. LeConte Pear. for list of assorted packages.
] 0 0 Cuttings and Trees FOR SALE. More E \AT ILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
I O)O0 trees in orchard than any five growers K IH
of the LFCONTE PEAR. Apply to head quarters. MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT
WV. WV. TI 'O-IPSO'N, Prop'r., 'T JACKONVILLE FLORIDA.
LeConte Nursery, ,it ,ill e, Ga.' 13 E T A ST. JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
SEND FOR ( CATALO(-UE. to febI 1, '83-p to July 5, '83. (Mention thi. t ispe)


to Jan I 30, '88.



















to sept 10' 83


I I-L -- -_---O U- 40P I - --- L(PR IIYIIYTYeU P LI rM.-S&~l~lXI IIW ~IYII


-- --


__ ___ ___ ____ _I~-r-r-


- L -- II -u - I __1 -I -- I r --


'I








-SNe THE FLO R DA DISPATCH.


i APES COMPLETE AND SPECIAL MANURES




range Trees, Fruits and Vegetables.

A fl7t auoe'enf oi priiit fght different brands, kept in stock at Warehouse in jacksonviile, Fla., also MThe J -I Jes 1re Ground Bone, Dry Ground Fish,
Pota.'h, alts, ete, for ipromnpt shipment or delivery at all times. Circulars containing guaranteed analysis and composition of The Mapes Mauures, prices, full directions
for use a: wel I a, s from- .v1 known Truckers and growers of Oranges, etc., giving their practical experience in using the Mapes Manures may be had of


THE F .PES FORMULA & PERUVIAN GUANO 00.,,:


158 Front Street, New York.


TYSEN & SMITH, Our Forwarding Agents,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Some Practical Results in Florida, Season 1882.
Ir. R. i. M ARVIN, Orange City, Fla., November 9th, 1882, reports. (roops--Oranges, Lemons, Limets and other semi-tropical Fruits, 800 trees on ten acres, ranging in age
t)om one' t. ix years, used fort-lizers as follows: 1 applied The Mape Or'i.: Tree Maatire from two pounds to the smallest, to fifteen pounds to the largest tree, twice a
- ear, ir Dece(,iber and Juo:t to. iin else being used, and I am putting in now at the rate of three tons per year and increasing a half ton each year. The Mapes Orange
Trei i;utiiir: war scattered ,r,-o). det, L and raked in. Trees are now growing finely, thrifty and clean ; soil is a sandy, pine upland, season dry.
Remnark s-"When i i p-rehae d this grove, the six acres of largo trees had been sadly neglected. They were stunted, starved and covered all over with the scale insect, in
fait, were in a dying condition having as many dead branches as alive. I used various fertilizers the first six months without discovering much benefit, when a year ago I
tdet-ermined to try The- Maes (r,.,, -Tree Manure. During the past year the trees have cleaned off, put on a heavy new growth and averaged at least one-third larger. They
are in ta ftine growing condition now, the sap SB. -,'i", ; -ly, *I, ut! well plead wi.h : !h rsvus/t.. and having laid in a stock of The Mapes Orange Tree Manure intend to continue
using it isthefuture. I :nam aelluinted with the principest..veetable chemistry and biology, enough, at least, to form a correct opinion of the quality of a fertilizer and
the needs of a member of the citrus family." ..
C. CODRiNGTON & CO., Editors of the Florida ,-ri"/it -i.-, ih-Lan;ud, Fbi., November 12th, 1882, writes, "There are many fine groves in this section of all ags;, ma-
nurcd with Th 3Mapes' .-I ,'tit--r.,." "The Mapes Orng( Tnree Ma i -rc is fast gaining in fivr.-'

Cabbages, Tomatoes, Watermelons, Turnips and Potatoes.
. t R-- Ki " r i,1, F a..i i -e 1-6 h, w i l-'s : I am i'. 0-( t Ii -t- on e :sotme of t Ie; poorest lands of the State of Florida, and have kept correct account of
... ; tss< -<-- t, s es 1 -.'; .- ,d Sp t e .u u o it, nd send yo e the .,ilov. ,, which you are at, liberty to use if you think best: I used last fatl on 1,000
.- b--, (n- 1 o )I -- i ':' i-nre for light, oils 4,-ti!, in anid realized therefrom $75. On 300 hills of tomatoes I used, this spring, $2.50
wort i tI) .- sf:l it, -r*-t iiZ. t and sold tie(refro'ii '. OnC. .500 hills of watrnme-loni s I used one barret of the s.tit.- braid of Mapes Manure and netted therefrom $54. I used 55
-,It! on .itt"-.' f- ruit.';r t unips atil sold $20 worth. On Irih I .;, ;.. the reSult was mow t 'ri.'.-.- :;. My crop h : .on far ahead of all my neighbors, and I
1 < .;i itrtvi a liont-- .1 ;i. -- for tin Mitp .; Man, ure if i could totlo -elo-t -it, l r'-.l to feb 27 '3


COUNTY,


D)ECE X1 BEIL 1, 1882. "
The town of DeLand is located five miles east of our landing on the St. John's River, where all river steamboats pass; very near the geomraphicol center, north
and south, of Volusia County, and almost in the center of the
GREAT ORANGE BELT
This place is about twenty-five miles from the Atlantic Ocean, and is almost constantly favored with a tempered
SEA BREEZE
id from i elevation abIove lth river, its location among the pines, and its isolation from all standing water, it is peculiarly adapted to the necessities of invalids. This
belt of land is about twenty miles long, and averages about five miles wide. Our lands are
UNSUJRPASED IN FERTILITY
by any pine lands in the St-ate. In our 'vi!.,, which is only six ct-n (id, Le h. ea
FINE SCHOOL BUILDING
used also ior C'hu.-ch &wrvices. A J.apt' .( Church is now built, c-tin- d -;.f, arnlshld and paid for. A Methodist Church is nearly finished and the Episcopalians are'
preparing to) build The P byi'terinsli hold service every otlier Sun;. in the chool-ihoue. VWe hve daily mails, and now have six General Merchandise Stores, carry-
mlg some of the la gest and best stocks in South Florida; also two Drug Stores, a Millinery and Notion Store, a Furniture Store, Bakery and Confectionery Store, two Liv-
ery and Feod tabless Jewelry Store, the Volus;' l County Bank, a Bardware Store nearly completed, a Masonic Lodge, four Saw Mills within two miles, and a Blacksmith
and Wagon Shop. Arrangements are being made for a High School to be established the coming season.
THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURIST
a large eight-page weekly, is published here, and is a valuable paper for those desiring information about Florida. We have a Bell Telephone line'in successful operation
between our village and our landing on the St. John',, River, and a railr ,,(1 from our landing via DeLand to the Atlantic coast is chartered with a land grant of 8,840 acres
per mile. The Palatka and Indian River Railroad which is now being built, will pass through DeLand, and will be completed, as far as DeLand, by next whliter. Ourheo-
tels and boarding houses afford good fare at reasonable prices:. P. senvers v-wl find a conveyance atDeLand landing on the arrival of the up mail boat dqily,' and dfar-
riage will be sent upon order, by telephonaI., t oitlher times. For tle inflortnuIt on of invalids we will add, that several good physicians are settled in our midtcultivating
oranges as a buisin-ess, but a!'o rding excellent mi.n dical aid wihen required. The population now, in and near DeLand city, that trade there, 800 to 1,200. ;
The cRih;,ate is ,.m i-t'opi("al. ange of thermometer last four years-lowest, 2i degrees; highest, in the shade. 101 degrees. Weather-Fall, Winterand.Sprint dry
and ileasant, with occasional rain Summer, sunshine and rain alternate. Soil--sandy, uderlaii with clay in many places, covered with a growth of wild grass. 1Wter
Sn wills 20 to 40 feet deep, usually soft and good. Surfatce-genitly undulating. Timber--Yellow Pine, 80 to 100 feet high. Average product of Orange Trees in full beating,
1 000. A r,'age prive of fruit in grove, $1.50 per 100. Number of trees per acre, 50 to 75. Extra good care and culture of course produces better results. Best months for
planting Orange trees, January and February, June and July. Other "roducts--Sweet Potatoes, Cotton, Sugar Cane, Corn, Pine-Apples, Bananas, Melons, Pears, etc.
Good .Board 1$7 to $10 per week; $1.50 to $2.00 per day. In.gardening excellent results have beQn obtained in a small way; and this business will be developed with added
experience and better transportation facilities. No cases of yellow fever, cholera, sunstroke or other epidemic or prevailing fatal diseases have been known here, add all
climatic conditions are most favorable to health and longevity. Many settlers from the north and northwest are coming in, and our orange belt will soon be thickly set-
tied.
A CHAIN OF LAKES
norl west of us affords protection from frost so perfectly that the extreme cold of December 29, 1880, did not injure our orange trees or fruit.
We are offering these choice lands to actual settlers at from $15 to $50 per acre. Village lots and improved property for sale also. For further particulars, call on or ad-
dress .7. Y. FARCE, DeLand, Volusia Co., Florida, or H. A De LA ND, Fairport, Monroe Co., .N. Y. to mch27'83

CHAS. H. DORSETT, s.
M, ,z aM M 0 on


(X -, S. ON .EAI ER 1 N

Florida Products,

ORANGES, SYRUP, EAR.kY VEGETA-.
BLES, HIDES, SKINS-, .f'C.


W. N. JUSTICE,

Wholesale hCoumitson er vaant,
No. 313 wNorth Water Street, rhilladelplia.

,i-ECIA CITIES: FLORID.. FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.


rc Large snipmeits rn-nJtti'd on day of sale, small shipments weekly.
.....................


tonov27 83p


Prompt attention given to aln busi-ess. iveeountSL z --
and chc g -.n as soon as good are close out. earig O ange Grove WI T i rs a new town nge
'- '-,ils v.-iil be fit kii:1T '-,! -pli-':-o -. ea an e r-ve County Florida, eighteen
1 miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
156 ( D3 "y 5t 'ec t, FOR SALE. with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful lakes.
d- -. o WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
SAV A T INAH O A Located 2 niles from rpminent findingg or: S. Northerners, is the main idea. For Pampl!ets and
SAVAJNAH, : (r-ORGI*A. John's River. 200 trees in full bearing, 400trees not yet Maps giving particulars, address
to mch 3 '83 bearing, in fine condition, good neighborhood, churches,
Ssclool, post and express offices. Owner would prefer CHAPMAN & CHASE,
to sell one-half, has other business, would sell the whole CHARPM/AN & C7 S ,
RT ICH selling our Robber Stiams and Music, if desirsd y ,p-i-.' Foi-er particulars address with TE PARK ORANGE FLA.
Samples fVe. I.. P. Ei ; ,B .,. I" *s-.,, O. stamp T. F. DRUDY, TER AK.,
lo imay20-'83 to mch 3 8- Emporia, F.la. to apr 4, '83 p


DE LAND,


%mo


VOLUZ';.~


0 .. OLO-R.IDA.







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


F


SNOW-DO PATENTLo


Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 3x Cents per Pound,

"01 IoEm1 O=0MT 10E.':

No. 3a West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
tf

Ijna d .Ag9en2ts, Ijagnd :0B yers a~nd Land 0-xnrers,
And Everyone Interested in Florida Lands
Can be supplied with
TOWNSHIP MAPS
M..de from United S1atc. Si v.y .- :ile two inches to the mile-with i '.-:,t,'.php ,y -t,,idA! .,.. f5r every
township in EAST and SOUTH FLORIDA, delivered or sent -y main, for 50 : t. each.
(Postage SttmOps Taken.)
Dis0e ou.t to De e r s.
LXTI.PI.._N'Ar.ATIO, CAl4J) sent with every Map, showing vacant h, nds and : .n- to apply for
themn, to purchase..
Specl zal -2 ap S of 'otie-i, C(i-. an~1d towns made to order.
,..zzitte.t'uat7i, De:- -i- t,* i" ihy.
My long connection witIi the Florida L:..A and Improvement C CHASE) is a guarantee of satisfactory work. Correspondence-s :i' .
Address T. T. T. E'TEJES, Civil Engineer an:i D!-ti. -:inn,
Office with Florida Land and Improvement Co., cor. Pine and Forsyth-St&.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. oct23tf

ESTABLIHEED 1866.
GEo 1E & 0..
WA 0-U4 4W q


G. L. LAWRENCE & CO.,


COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


FOR THE SALE OF'


Oranges and all Florida Produee,


234 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK.


QUICK SA]EBS, I1ON1EST UETUUNS and
:P.RO;M.jP"T R< 1TT^A NCl;.1


REFER, BY PERIM'STON TO

Hon. S. B. CONoVER, Tallahassee; D. GREENLEAF, EsQ., Jack-,onvillk;
to jan. 30, '83 p. MESSRS. GOULD & Co., Jacksonville.
-.5 CSAH.M NILE .A HL,


A. S. CON-E, A. MANVILLE, A. A. HILl,
President and Business ,3minger. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer.

SAN I1L"LEt MUoS ESiE
RITake Georg-e, w oyi*-i.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate.

ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3, just out, free on application. 7 ,: 3, $3


0 o l, ,.. lL.AV,


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR

ACER'S DRY HOP YEAST CAKES, 60c. PER DOZ.

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


to feb 5, '83


LLPS.EY & C I r TC f "IS
Archer, Alachua Co,, L- :i


PLYMO UT _ROrH.
The great, (eman1d for I- .. h. ,
scu re ti o tincv of Mr. A. C. HAWhINS w,
o~ihls t, 'V.-' -v X,'(i: hZ n 3 su] ", Irir (KPI s*,i- !

d'.ro f1 ron) lis ,',Tt o .- < i.t
ons alwso a"e'.,ff. )r t
AM..ER V ." PO Th i. .

I l 0"11 .'; ;' ., : 1

a'o..-. No )II- should o i' v E '
iiitont so;: .good POULTRtY PAPER.
IR. W. _A.tA1M:OJ:K,
to feb 12, '83 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.



THE PIONEER NiUOiSERY ofFLO1J1DA i
OWNE IN11LIiD:D.' ACRES IN STOCK.
THE SWEET ORA. (E A ,PECIALT Y
Catalogueo sent fre? on as i i ,*: Address
L. \. FA;.I'T,IL',
to fob 20, JS .a:.!<,'v ;.! l. "

FOR. SALE.
LANDS on the east side of Lake Harris, Su.n i
county. We the undersigned offer the property de-
scribed below, situated at and around Elsrani,., at
great bargains. For further information apply or adi-
dress
W. P. COUPER,
D. E. LOWELL, Esperai..', Fla.
W. N., JACKSON.)
1.) 90 acres land at Esperance, 1 mile lake ': int; fir- '
class willow-oak pine landd. several ne bu.i.ldii y.L o '
be bought fil lots.
(2.) 80 acres, same location, 30 acres hammock; fine
building site, 80 feet above the lake, with Y mile lake
front; 10 acres cleared; 500 trees in grove, part bearing,
Price $6,000.
(3.) 40 acres, about20 acres hammock, full view of the
lake; good land. Price $700.
(4.) 40 acres fine, high land; view of the lake; one
mile from Esperance. Price $600.
(5.) 75 acres, 20 acres cleared and fenced; 600 trees in
grove; pine-apples, etc. Splendid location; 4 mile
lake front; 2 miles from Esperance. There is on 1ihe0
place a comfortable dwelling, with a sufficiency of out-i
houses. Price $6,000. Terms easy.
(6.) 40 acres good pine land, V mile from Lake Ha rris
25 acres fenced; 17 acres set to orange, lemon and lime
trees. Lemons, limes, guavas, pine-apples, bananas,
grapes, &c., in bearing; comfortable house and out build-
ing. Terms to suit an actual settler. Price $3,000.
(7.) 120 acres good pine land, /480o mile from La k
Harris, in lots to suit purchasers, $20 per acre.
20 acres first-rate pine land, overlooking Lake Ha rris
$25 per acre.
(8.) 15 acres on Lake Harris, with lake front, good
view of the lake; nice building site-; acres of ham-
mock and two of pine; cleared. Price -'500.
(9.) 160 acres, to 3 mile from Lake tT Li, good
pine land, in lots to suit purchasers. Price $10 per acre.
(10.) 80 acres of land beautifully situated, with a'co-fi-
manding view of the lake; 6 or 7 mn. imi r :.-. t bl:u i1 :,,
sites; V4 mile lake front; 10 acres splendid hammock,
balance-No. 1 pine land, mile from F., prance. Price
$20 per acre.
P. S.-Land will be divided if i.est ry.
(11.) 80 acres land l mile from he !ake, No. -p:r
land; handsome location; view of the lake; tm ni
fromEsperanee. Price $10 to $35 p-er acre in 5 or ae1
lots.
Groves will be set and cared for on a bove 1o s at r,.
enable rates. The party n .:; l: i, hr I.".: ,- ,
,cr.l years' experience _twI i. L .-n.wi i t ol _. .. !
t,o fUi h '-, ':


rDCAT A_ *. } EVERY DRUGGIST IN T.lHE STi'ATE
WILL BE SUPPLIED.
Itkils Ants, Roaches, Mice and Rats. Notii:. .
before offered has half the m ierit. A, n-n'.:, i n
Jacksonville will supply you.
CONE WILLIAMS,
oct 30-tf- [P. 0. Box 126. j _c].::i- Nv 1 'FIL.

TIfFE AI CLIET NJLU -.'- 2
Grow a general assortment of FRUIT T'R C 1 wIt i
,ome Or.n-ri riitl Trees. Sbh rubt lt vy,
Vines, &c. Our stock of
ORANGE TREEhS
i s g o o d ,t -i' S v t. S e e d ,ii ie _.t i d i} ;1.- i, ,i ';o r1 ', -, '
s.,:r an, sweet .,ock -. oine S,000
LECONTE AND OTHER PE i Te1
one and two-year-old-fine.
A large number of JAPAN PLUM TREFi. v. t t'
hundred ol the famous
JAPANESE PERSIMMON
on native stocks, &c.
ORANGE and PEAR GROVES made to order and
cultivated by the year for non-residents.
SEND FOR PRICE LIST to


IIIIIIE~lll.BIlpL~aY~ -rra~arrar -;rrw~m~*gym-


Gen eral Comm issiOn M e r c ant s,
95 SOUTH WATER STREET, CHICAGO.

FLORIDA ORANGES AND VEGETABLES A SPECIAL
REFERENCES:-National Bank of Illinois, First National Baink, Commerciat A.,i-,-c.s, or an-" Wil, ;O.-1' .
Grocer in CHICAGO.
Stencils fiurnished by J. C. LANIER,
to apl 8, '81 LESH1 ilG, FLORIDA.


I


:Pirst =a~bcls oxi Fixlesoot Qwaality-~







;5 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
--o-
SAVAINNAH, GA., Deceinbyr 30, 1882.
--THE STEAMSHIPS 01' THEr--
MERCHANTS AND MINERS TRANS-
1 "r~y^\T~nn A mrvl /X' T/r ^ i- i SVATT- A -XTXIT"


A. L. I'GGINS, Agent,
Long Dock, Baltimore, Md. ;30-tr

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA
WAYCROS. sHORT LINE i.


tw L ;lt y, l Capt. Hiedige.............. .......................................... TLIlIrsid1ay, JanuLary m 1thm m Out3 p. mi.
(ity of tolulmbus, Capt. Wright..... ........................... Thursday, January 25th, at 7:30 p. m.
Gate, City, Capt. HIedge.......................................'Thursday, February Ist, at 1:00 p. in.
City of C<,hn.ius, Capt. Wright........................................ Thursday, February 8th, at 6:30 p. n.
(Gae City, Capt. Hedge .................. ... .. .................................T'rhursday, February 15th, at 1:30 p.m.
City of C',li. i Capt. Wright............................. ........Thursday, February 22d, at 7:00 a. m.
a-e City. Capt. 1ed e ................... .......................... ....... Thursday, M arch 1st, at 12:00 m .
City oif Colu'mb'us, Capt. 1 Wright. ..................... ....................Thursday, March 8th, at 5:30 p. m.
T O)UGHI FIRT-(CLASH CABIN PASSAGE SAME AS TO NEW YORK.
RICIHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents, Savannah, Ga.
GEO. W. HAINEM, Agent S., F. and WV. Ry., Agent, Jacksonville.
F. N'. NICI". .;1. N & C)O.. General Agenits, Bosion. 44-tf


F A ; Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6th, 1SS2, A-, V N A DT PH EPHIT
Trainswill leave and ai'ive at Jacksonville as d ,,IAAVANNAI AND PILADELPIIA.'-
low JackSTEAonLXMSIHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
Fast Mail. Daily. Jack'lle Ex. Daily. EXCUtRSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
Leave-- Leave-- 'be received for -pas.s'is e b the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
Jacksonvilie at 9:30 an. i. Jacksonville at.. 5:45 p mn adelphia at SA. t ICRI(E as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Arrive- Arrive- Philadelphia f anirs 1or January are appointed to sail as :'li :
Jacksonville at.. 5:00 p m Jacksonville ait.. 7:30 a in FRIOM F 'iAI > .;1 1.1uI TA 0 A OM .SA VAN.NVAIi :
C'Sllahan at....l 10:15 a I Jesup at J a .............. p n JUNIATA ....... ....... ... .... thursday, January.......... J UNIATA .........Tuesdiy, Ja ...........................
W across at...... 12:05 p Brunswick a.. 5:31 a JUNIATA .................. .. tur January ....... J NIATA.........Saturday, Jan............................................
Live Oak at ........ 6:45 p Macon at.... 7:00 a n CITY OF ACON ....................Saturday, anuary... C TY F 1 \ N ........Saturday, Jan..............................
New Branford.. 8:30 p m Thom a ville at ... :50 a 1A il)AN ........Satur ay, an...........................................
Savannah at ...... :40 p m Albany at.......11:15 a t Subject to change without notice.
Charleston at..... :1X) p i Montoer)'y at. 8:00 p im l l'hs ''!apidan takes no plss,'i ,.r.&
Thomasvilleat ... (:5p in Nw 'rlasat .... 9:20 a m I\V IL. JAMES, WM. tLrTE & ON,
Albany at ...........10:50 I) n Loulisville at...... 11-tf Agenlt, 13 S. Third St.. Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.
Montgomery at.. 6:45 a m Cincinnati at...... 7:00 a m _._-
New Orleans al..10:00 p min Chicago at.......... 7:00 p im nll. . . . .. . .. .
Nashville a .l........ 7:01 p im t. Louis at........ 7:00 p n [ES' TAB L I 11 ED 1 8 6 6 .]
Washington at... 9:40p im New York at..... 3:50 p mi
New York at...... b150 pm a
enaumn alaceSleeptngCcrs on thi. Train fromBE TS R COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Jackd6nv1lle to Cincinnati via Atlanta and Cincinnati ROBERTS & BR *,
.9oathern Railroad; to Montgormery via Albany and
Eufaula, aud to Chicago via Montgomery and Louis- FLORIDA FRUIT AND PRODUCE A SPECIALTY
vlle.
Passengers arriving by this train for Palatka and the
steam er at the tI-ailroadt w'larf.
Night Express--Daily. OUR M3OTTO : Quick S'le< amd Prompt ftrfn.i,
Aerrve .Tksonvi tle at.......................11.....:. p nt
Arrive Jacksonvisle at .... .... .:...:.11 to jan 13 WVe ask a trial. STENCIL PLATES'FREE.
Arrive Savannah ait.......... ......................... 7:00 a m
Arrive Charlestoii at ........................................ 12:30 p ..
Arrive W ashington at.......................................... 1:00 p ni n a
S at............................................ The savannah ano o. a annah Ga.,
A r riv'i i A lla nta a t......................... .......................... 12 :1 0( p n. i o
Arrive CincinnaU at............................................. 7:00 p m ) In 1 0 l,
Arrive C.icagoi at...................................................p rters a d of sigb. rade Ur-
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train for Say- tilizers, 0ffer for Sale ZIeir
annah, Charleston and Washington.
lssAengers taking the night express can got into the t
keeping cars i at 9 o'clock p. im. e i Fiz r
A new Restaurant has been opened at Waycross, andl
abundant time vwi be allowed for meals by all passen- A strictly first-class Manure prepared specially for Florida Oranges.
ger trains.
Connecting at Savannah witih s-teaaiemrs fr New Tork,
nPhilade 'i1ia, Bo an andBaltinor mers "OT. 0 7%:71T," for Florida M.rk.:'t Gardeners andl Farmers, is highly am-
Tork, Philadelphia and Baltimore. niOlliated.
Through Tickets sold to all poilits by Rail and Steatm-
shipconnection,(l Baggage checked through. Also Also ENGLISH ACID PHOSPHATE for composting. Pure dissolved Bone. KAINIT,
tleeplg Car berths and seclowts secured at tCoi)pany's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay-street, and at Depot COTTON SEED MEAL, pure BIRD GUANO,
Ticket Office. (GEO. W. IHAINEIS, Ageut.ED MEAL, pure BIRD GUANO,
JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gcn'l F. an P. Ag't. [] MURIATE OF POTASH, &c.
N 00 HO)SE (( acres hanmock andpino Each .sack bears the Inspection Tag oj' the State of Georgia, which shows that it has passed
ed land, orange trees In grove wll under the rigid inspection laws of that State, and is a guarantee that the Guano is what the
advanced, few bearing. Price 11,09. RaWre clmul for
new settler. Analysis on the sack represents. No other brands in this State furnish Such a reliable guar
W. W. DEWHURIST, antee of their merits to the purchaser.
St. -Augusliai', Fia.
N. B.-Letters will not bc answered unless stamp is Send for Circular. ) D rA.T,
enclosed. to feb 20, 1 to may20-83 Jacksonville, Fla., General Agent for Florida.


'Ar


- - --- - I m mw


- r,- -- I---- -~- --


JAN.. 13. tEST & CO. Agents,
114 Bay-St., Savannah, Ga.


me


fia


i








I


!


-U IUI oUIoB VI IOcean Steamship Company.
are appointed to sail from BALTIMORE for SAVAN- Steamship ompan

WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY, SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORB every SAVANNAH, January, 1838.
TUESDAY AND FRIDAY The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
s follows: CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. Catharine ..................... .............Wednesday, January 3-1:30 p. m.
Wm. Lawrence, Tueday, Jany 2, at 1:00 o'clock p.in CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson............................................................... Saturday, January 6-4:00 p. m.
George Appodence, FriTuesday, Jan'y at :00 o'clock p. m. TALLAHASSEE, Capt. Fisher ............................................. ........................Wednesday, January 10-8:00 a. m.
Win. Crane Tueday, Jan'y 5, at 7:30 o'clock a. m. OHATTAHOOCHfEE, Capt. Daggett.............................................................. ...... Saturday, January 13-9:30 a. m.
Win. Lawrence, Friday, Jan'y 12. at10:00 o'clock a. CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. Catharine ........................................... .........Wednesday, January 17-1:00 p. m.
Johiis. Lawrence, TuFrieday, Jany 162. at 10:00 o'clock a. m. CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson.............................. .....................................Saturday, January 20-4:00 p. m.
JohnsHopkns,Tueday, Jan'y 16, at 3:00 o'clock p. in. TALLAHASSEE, Capt Fisher................... ........................Wednesday, January 2--7:30 a. m.
Wm. Crane, Friday, Jan'y 19, at 3:00 o'clock p. m. CIATTAHOOCIEE, Capt. Pagett .....aturday, January 7-9:00 .
n. Lawrence, Tuesday, Jany 23, at 7:30 o'clock am. CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. atharinc........................... ..................................Wednesday, January 31-12:00 m.
Johns'Hopkins, Friday, Jan'y 2, at 1:00 o'clock a. Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Win. Crane, TuesFriday, Jan 3, at 12:00 o'clock in. Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Win. Lawrence. Friday, Feb'y 2, at 2:09 o'clock p. in. Ficit rcccivcdtcevery (lay from 7a.. m. to 6p. n.,at Pier 35, N. it.
Johnso TsFreiyt received every day from 7 a,. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.i
WmJohn HoCrpkins, Tueday, Feb'y at 8:30o'clock p. . YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
W ance, iday, Feby 1, at 1:00 o'clock. Agent of Line, and C. R.of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
on. ,areince, Tesdy, Feb'y 13 at 1:00o'clock .In. It.IETi', General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
Johns Hopkins, Friday, Feh'y 16, at 2:0 o'clock p. i. -I. CHRISTIAN, G en'l S soliciting Agent. C.D. OWENS,
n esday, Feb' at o'clock 12-2 Gen1 Ag't Sav'li, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.
Win. Lawrence, Friday, Feb'y at9:00o'clockt,.... . .. .. .
Johns Hopains, Tuesday, Feb'y 27, at 11:00 o'clock Qa. Mi.
Chbin Passaue, e5.C0; Second Cabin, '12.i0; Round N
(lays. Boston and Savannah Steamship Company,
Trip (Cabin), .00. he Cor'pa.iiy reserve the righ t iof an S v na 0 e 11 11 o
chlangin j the steamers (nd( sailing days.
For i he accommodation of the G(eorginand Florida ONLY DIRECT LINE.
FRUIT AND VIEGCtTA.... SHIPP"dRr
FITiT AN Vs E ETA BEEl Shll Ethreb., ''ranelitl1ucii't a.nd extra iindl i::g avoided. Cars unloaded at wharf in Savnnah. Unsurpassed passenger
this compikn.y li. a0iAi'iged a special schedule, thereby 1'(."innioditi0 .
perishable lfreigct i. anspied ( t1he principal 'Te la' au fi-' -i Iron Steamships sail from Boston every Thursday at 3 o'clock, and from Central Rail-
points inrthe Wl.IT and OLHWI by rai i1*,rol VWhparf, .:s;ivalinnai, as follows:
By this route shippers are assured that their gx ds Gate City, Capt. Fledge....................................................... Thursday, December 21st, at 3:30 p. m.
will receive careful landliIn, and quick dispatch. City of Columibus. Capt. Wright .................................'....Thursday, December 28th, at 8:30 a. m.
Rates of freiglit by this route will be found in a' other Gate City, Capt. Hedge................. ............................ Thursday, January 4th, at 3:00 p. m.
cotum n. City of Columbus, Capt. W right......................................... Thursday, January 11th, at 8:00 p. m.
f-,."n+ pr-1,, _, e. ge..--, .. ............................ uru....... iT r i.... ao p. n .


J -------~






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. g


____ a o_ ...
NewYork.......................... 50 l100 60 l201 65 )1 20P 490;$50 65 2
Philadelphia.............................. 50 1 00 601 120H 65 1 20G 90 150 65 5
Baltimore................................... e50 1 00 60 1 20j (5 1 20 90 1 50 65 L 2
Boston via New.York......... 73 1 45 88 1 1 6 1 1 sI 1 70
Providence via New York........ 65 1 30 75 1 50 i 821 ,5 107 1 55


F. B. PA.PYA. Genera! Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
SJAS. L TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Svannah, Ga.
CEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. & W. Railwfy, Jieksonville, Fla.
D.. ETLIOTT, General A.e\nt Floridla Pi<}'ih Lin," .Tki^.S' vl-, Fla.


THROUGH TARIFF ON OANGES ONLY.
VIA THE FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, AND ITS CONNECTIONS.
I :3T EFFE"l:V= "0 OTT 2,E0VE:TEMM 2 .-th, 18S.

FRO FROM In Connection with Steamships of M. & T. Co., of Savannah,
JACKSONVILLE AND JACKSONVILLE AND
CALLAHAN JUNCTION 4 CALLAHAN JUNCTION ; Via Baltimore.
TO p A PL TO4 P T
--:::-.--- -. -- ro
Macon ............................... 35 8 70 $61 25 MaIdisona ....d..................... 75 1 50125 00 From Landingsl From From
Augusta................................. 0 0 70 0 Jefersonville, Ind .................75 1 50 125 00 Jacks n- on Flord
Chattanooga. Tenn........... 501 00 87 50 Evansville, Ind............75.... 801 560132500 St. Johns Transit
Columbus, Ga............. ......... 0 80 7000 Cairo, Ill.................................75 1 50125 00 .r
Montgomery, Ala..................40 80 7000 Indianapolis ...........................801 60130 00
Mobilettan ........................501100 8750 Terre Hauteo.............................. 80 1 60 130 00 TO"
Chattanooga, Tenni...........50 00 87.501Columbus, Ohio....................801 60.130 00..
New Orleans................... 601 20105 00 St. Louis ............. ............ 85 1 70 140 00 9 A 4
Nashville, Tenn.....................601 20 105 00 Chicago.................................... 851 70 14000
Memphis, Tenn 61 20105 00' Peoria, Ill................................ 85 1 70 140 00 _
H ncider io ...|.......70140115 00 Doeto ............................0 .......1......................
HendersonKy ....... ......70i140115 00 T et o....................90 1.80.150000 P ing e 7..............................0 1 0 1 i 5 1 1 35
Columbus, KyK..... ....7...01 40 115 00 1Miwaukee ................. 1 010 00 Washington.............................. 60 1 70 1 201 80 10 10.5 1 50 65 125
Hickman, Ky.......................... 7011 40 115 00
M I TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON. To make rates from Stations on Tropical Railroad south of Oala add 5 cents
n .FRO.M Ie er B per box and 10 cents per barrel to rates from stations on Transit Railroad.
r o. PerBbl Per B r B. Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
Lanings on St. Johns River.... I 7 I For Boston every Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
Landings ont7 40
Stations on Florida Transit R. R. ...... 45 75 50 80 Tuesday and Friday.
Tampa and Manatee....................1 70 1 05 75 1 10 To make through rates from points tributary to the above, add the rates for
Stations on the Fla. Cen. &lWest'n R'y', 40 75 50 1 85 transportation lines connecting to above rates.
S The dimensions of the Standard Box for Oranges are 12x12x27 inches, and the
In Connection with the Atlantic Coast Line. weight is estimated at 80 pounds.
.......... The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.

ville. River. R. R. Manatee amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destina-
TO M. . _._ tion and to one consignee.
SPrepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of
I 0 Sp P; P shipments will be an absolute requirement. It is clearly understood between the
______PI____ I 4 shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
Balt-imor n -- l loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
BPhiltim 60 1 70 1 40 80 31 50 I1 i 0 $1 801 75145 must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence may be located.
Philadelphia............................. 60 1 20! 70 1 4011 80 1501 ,1 5 180 75 145
New York.................. 60 1 20i 70 0 1 1 50' 1 0 1 80 75 1 45 The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to
Boston.................................... 65 130 75 5 85 1 0 1 10 1 90 801 45 which Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be issued only bythe
Providence................................ 15 130 75 1 50 85 I60 1 10 1 90 80 1 Agents of this Company at Jacksonville and Callahan and the Agents of the DeBary
To all rail points, and via Atlantic CoastLine. Shipments daily, rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points
In Connection with direct Steamers of the Boston and Savan-. will not be subject to correction by this Line.
nah Steamship Company. Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion
From From Front in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill.
From Ld'gs on Florida Tampa From Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
Jackson- St. Johns Transit and F. C. & W with cost of transfer added.
Sville. River. R. R. Manatee. Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
TOI --- Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be charged in addition the single package
S. i |, ; rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.
!j -_ _ _, 0 1 J 1 i'! Stencils, ippi., ',.il^ ind. information furnished on application to any of
_______________________;j -' i I_' the a-eiul'. of ol 'itLli-.
Boston .............. ......5 1 00 6. 201 61 5 31 2-O -1 6 5 5- '1 ay2. Pts of 's iing subject to change without previous notice. For further informa-
.. .t.... tion, iti needed, apply to
T H. tiOm 7Wit te hi7 H. HYON ;:: Aent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N River, N. Y.
In Co1iect-dion w h Steamnships (Ir iWe. irom nTV 8 n;ilV GIn.W.L. J.. E;, I.:nt. 25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS
.g_______ ___'.. .'Lr,'i ',s; ant Mtinmr' Line, Baltimore. VWM. I. RING. Agent Boston and
T, | From- -From- Front S v ah on hip Line, 18T YWharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S.,F. &
From NL'd'gs on.1 Florida Tampa From WV. Rtailwvay, 211 Wa.hington st., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Ae-nt S., F. & W.
Jackson- St. Johnsi, Transit and F. C. &W. Railway. 313 Bro val.ay, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, AgentS., F. & W. Railway,
ville. I River. I R.R. Manatee. 1l3 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S.,F. & W Rollway, Pier 41
TO 'P | uth T,.r. Ave., Philadelphia, oIr to Oi'her or rh- o.i'-.gnl.
| r1 h -^ i -' I i1 C !q '-0i; 4 W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent., Jaksonville.


I


I.,


=now


____


41,


-Mom mm W11~~JIP~~4 ~ LLlnIP~wgmt Now=~P~We---


Jill.slo~pElynrranm;rx~fiJ~r~i~p~m~ay3~ -


I

i'I


L<


i








THE FLORI) A DISPATCH


0P;L, W ii 11' Ii' R 0I.S Nm= S
ni is i th most hardy variety of the orange yet intro-
ciureid e'i FYlorida. It will probably stand the climate i aS I
a- itr novrths Charleston, on. theI Atlantic coast, with- F w T S` u S "AK S,
., :':';,io. Tree thornless. and a very early bearOr;
l'oi. :;,hles- and of fine quality (kid-glove variety.) GjLUES BRUST ES
ornn-,ti buds and grown buds, not exceeding one foot S ES,
thi', i1.00 each. Buds from one to two feet, $2.00
;i d fri.om t,.vo to three feet, $3.00 each, properly Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
; {<, <^.,I delivered in Jacksonville. A few dormant
I,.,s f < Sweetf, frort 2 cents to 31.00 each.
\.dl:;,s A. F. STYLES, GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
S, 8'3 p Jacksonville, Fla. BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,

JOIN Sand and Emery Papers, &c.
J. 4ML TIGERS^ COL NOIlY.T AET-r FtR


(!LE MORE. VWA E COUNTY, GA.
M N rn New York Citv; 10 MilFI fr)omn

,n pIlanit ait ,l soiam crops cvery montt
S'' ; ood water, pl k t of 's in t hi.' woods foil
', :ini b); ail the 'm round : very profita-
S. Frms of4" a ri.s each at $1 to $3 per
e,: '. per 100 feet, delivered at the depot:
per ,000; will build a house with 4 rooms, (
i ioors, 0 windows, cement flue for chimney, well
i-. a i 'urbed, for 8150, on easy terms. Labor of ail
S ,'..ed at fair wages; board at Mrs. Bainbridge's
$20^'. 1, per month.
V .. earners, truckers, stock and fruit-growers.
',i ; litl crate of veetables delivered in New York
', i; 50' conts; per b;rir.-l, I,in with quick dispatch.
A 'unibr of o t ',,-n d Western families now here
ar, 0i -im e well; no stones, no underbrush, no winter,cli-
I i i>,.;. .i:-i ftl nd perfectly healthy allthe year round.
Li!;( i s inor cleared, bit near the depot- some cleared
lard ifron 3 to $10 per acre. All kinds of grain, vegeta-
les, i,, i--, fruit, and stock, do well. Our farmer.-s are
oUt of debt, some lending money.
Any number of acres, for colonizing or grazing, at $1to
i.3 per, acre; 40 acres, with house complete, for $250;
EASY THR Ril.
('oino :) S 1 o, y s rmsielf or address


PRA FTT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,



Sworthk, I- / '.// (1:' 2?(10 ongma'nlT
\t 1,eU 'Y Pt Pint8.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar 25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

D. G. AMBLER. J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as


J. M..STIGER, AMBLER'S BAN K.
't im n ,. .Glenmore. Ware County Ga. T' IANSA'TS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
, -. -"-- -- ------ --T,--- ), Deposits received, I)iscounts made and Exchange
COLON EY, TALBOTT & CO., Bought and Sld on MOST FAVORABLE 'TERMS.
Collections imade and Proceeds priomlptly remitted.
',. ,, .,Q 4 (r 4 A .y:"-"rit' "c ,',,r,'tep,,ide,,tIls I--l p.:i,:,e,;* fi ''rai,. rs National Bank,
.i.a..-l Ev statete; e-n.ts,\'" .-itliontal Bank, Savannah, Ga.
l t'.,eicit. correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
SM* *>rian & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
JAK 1.-4'N VILL, FLA. YTonrk, amnd other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
iave lands in every county In the Orange Belt, at from Crediit apr 10-tf
1 to Ii0r r acre. Orange grot'em; from $oo000 to ,00. ------- -
(Go,.rni.ent lands in every part of the Orange Belt. 0. L. KEENE,
i 'au gurIIntee all of our property.
strawb)erry plants. MILLINERY,' FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
We have 200),000 best varieties for sale low. NOTIONS,
Or-ange T1fees. a ,r 4riteIAd


We have 30'0,000 trees, all ages, for sale, at from 10 cents
to V: per tree, as to age.

COLONY, TALBOTT & CO.
Sep0 .. f

071 7 A I 1

TROPICAL HOUSE,
I ~-AT-I


INDIAN RIVER, - FLORIDA,
1. DE1;ER,
O) W NE A. N I) PR OP 1 ETO R.
S'lhii 11i's'- i^ ent ralv located it Rockledge, in the
I lr-tIimed irndian IRiver region of Florida, and possesses
: i1 the advantages of Climate, Health and Pleasure of
1 itis niwly <1 \ *lpet region of South Florida.
SSalt Waier ,tlnng, tes, isli :i, Oysters Hunting, Rocky
i,,r,-. .sipe) S.;erv, itg.tlitir with the finest Oranges,
: i:,;;I>i, Pit't-Ait pl'bs and Guiiivas, are som0e of the ad-
, ,i.a,,es to be found in this favored locality.
Take steamer from Sanford to Lake Poinmett, called
i O'kiedge Landing; three miles e;t'.ia;e riin.r. Di-
--ti'' 1 nectl Ins r- in the House r d,, w nhs tetim iors.
17".i' C: $xI.r5 PR i' A I [.
; .r '\! ('!t(en". myiade b1). ,"A( -k or [on:h. to war !0, K3.




I have plaite-1 m miy i.mal- 1fo, stae mIne of the m'(;st die-
.iIa'ie f'lrms in thi-; loca lity. ic.ng withlii arn hour's
i %iv of ihoe city upon a iitiiiul Iroad of .aiard smiell, it
Sssses al i of te ; I'.; h e of a suburban climae.
(be tract 'oinprises ( WA)"ires ivjth a foilt iof one ilei
S po)x thle White Bluffr Road which is tlh1 handaonene-Ce
dIriv in this vicility. The land is adapted to the cul-
Lure of any of the Southern products, besides having a,
fine range for cattle. The present owner is now supply-
ing the butchers with beef fattened upon this range.
Tho improvements consist of a cottage residence, valua-
ble barn, stables, servant's houses, etc. The whole tract
ih under good fence. Besides a large vegetable crop
raised last year, this farm well nigh supplied the Savan-
nah market with the best Strawberries raised in the vi-
' inity.
'Tblhs n,, property can be bought al. n barrgain as the
,,'r is .'oip,-iPntd to chMange his business. Address
C.. Ii, ; J)R m'ETT,
Rtm I tet state Dealer, 1;:i l.iy si t,.- t,
Sio ji' ;, 't\ Savasnnah, Ga.


AND A FINE LINE OF


(7 West Bay Street, C'orner Laura,


FLORIDA.


J A I'K ;,NV" I "LLE, .
to fob 20, '8 3

-. BI3A3T,


Commission Merchant,
AND DEALER IN
Florida Oranges and Lemons.
74 W i-STi BA.Y STRET i-;'r.
N. Y. Depot, MAXFIELD & Co., 67 and (d Park Place; Mag-
azineand Packing House, mWaycross R.R.Whart~.
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT FOR
THE BANGOR BOX MATERIAL, HOOPS, Etc.
Have a large quantity of Manilla Wrapping
Papers, at Lowest Market rates.
Send in your orde,'s' for BOX MATERIAL. Cnm
ship pro)a,,ptlyb while f'',i-.Is are light. Have 'rseat
diffic-uilty im gtti an it Itra; i p 'mti duringg the busy
smts n. It[to larmlc 25 '83

jICH'iD H. MARKS'



0IIANW GOUINY bANSD AHNGY,
SAINfFO1D, IgLOLRIDA,
Agent in Orange County for

FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y,
BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission.
ALSO ORANGE', T' ES.
EXAmImEi DED' -i-. RATES LOAIS, ETC.-
June 12-t.f


'ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
0
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST.'JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
to April 23, '83

ELLIS & 1cCLLTRE,


Archiitects aniqCivil M EBCT ,r

Plans, Specifications and Estimates for Buildings of
all kinds. Water Supply, Drainage, Sewerage, Bridges]
Roofs, Etc. P. 0. Box 784. Room No. 12 Palmetto Block,
Bay Street. to Feb. 7, 83



An Orange Grove or Orange Lands, in a healthy, beauti-
ful country,

Entirely Free from Frost,

where you have the finest

FISHING,
OYSTERS,
SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME
of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a new country. Address me with stamp,
at Anclote, Hillsborough County, Florida.
I can sell you five acres, or five thousand acres, as you
desire.
to aug20, '83 __ .f I.MA 3IS.

FOR SALE.
AN IMPROVED PLACE on the south side of Lake
Harris, in Sumter County, Fla., about a mile from Ya-
laha. It contains 225 acres of the finest first-class high
hammock, about 50 acres cleared. There are two bold,
never-failing brooks running through the place, from
which an unlimited supply of water can be had, mak-
ing the raising of vegetables a certainty. The place has
// mile lake front; the residence is a large Southern
style house-six large rooms, store-room and kitchen at-
tached; there are 500 old orange trees from 7 to 10 years
old, budded with choice varieties; also, 700 trees from 4
to 6 years old; lime and lemon trees in bearing. There
is on the place, probably, the finest guava grove in
South Florida. The estimated yield in 1881 was 500 bush-
els. This property is one of the most valuable and in-
viting tracts of land in this State. The quality of the
soil, besides growing orange trees, will make it, with the
advantages of irrigation, and remarkable protection
from frost, peculiarly profitable for vegetable growing.
It can be divided into 3 tracts sufficiently large for every
purpose. Daily communication at Yalaha by mail boat
connecting with St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railway.
Only the non-residence of the owner induces its sale.
Price, $15,000. Terms easy. Address
W. N. JACKSON.
to feb 20-86 Esperance, Fla.

LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

In lots to suit, in the town of Satsuma, Putnam County,
Florida. Send for circular to
VWHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,
JACKSONVILLE,
june 26-tf FLORIDA..


FLORIDA LANDS.


Parties wishing to Buy Lands.
Parties wvishing to Sell Landls.
Parties wishing to Locate Homesteads.
Parties wishing to make Cash Entries of Govern-
ment Lands.
Parties wishing to Loan Money.
Parties wishing to Borrow Money.
Parties wishing to Invest Money,
Should call on or address

W. B. CLARKSON & CO.,
56 West Bay Street,
P. O. Box 852. (dec 4 tf) JACKSONVILLE.

FOR SALE.
126 acre:, beautifully situated on Lake Tohopekaliga, a
_,w miles soutI h of Kissimmee City, good for Oranges and
.,.* i ;, / .elect and cirab $30 peracre. Ad-
: ** .' i oisatcli oice. to dec 26 82


I-W\1mUIV-R~OP. -n~ u~Ulr~L~CILI*~?~-I~YLP~I~MI~)nOT ---" I-- ICI YIILI n~-~- --~:11~WII1UY*~5CI11 'M IIIMIIICilPIID~I*IRU~.~NIP~LP6111~LAlhU ~YPUOn ~--Y~C "~C~ ~P.O- ~- --






T HE F L R I D A D S PA TC H


46-'Send for circular.


(to mar. 3, '83)p


PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIP.


sA Sugar Mills, nubJer aad LeatPer elting,
-eam a0s- FiOthinE, P i09' RirberandL

FLORIDA FRUITS AND V/EGET BLES, Agricultural Implem s all K s,
AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS AZARD'S POWI)ER.
....e BARBED FENCE WIRE.
n1. WEST SIXTH STREET, CINCINNATI."T) O. AGENTS. FOR S. L. ALLEN & CO.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
REFERENCES: Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale Grocer in CINCINNATI. I sennd tor price List and Catalogue, iV
STENCILS FURNISHED BY ~ Z0. 0- L.a.TE1 to i 83 ... .


to apl 8, '83. LEESBURG, FLORIDA.
0A TFM SFLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
&M-WO 9 AND GEN'L COMMISSION MERCHANTS
NO. 41 SOUTH DELAWARE 8*'TSREE1T,
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.
REFERENCES:
INGRAM FLETCHER, of FLETCHER & SHARPE, ol.in' .s, and Meridian National Bank.
ctt Stencils Furnishied on Applieation. 9
oct-16,tf

DISSTON PURCHASE---4,OOOOOO ACRES!


THE FLORIDA

LAND AND IMPROVEMENT
COMPANY

Offer from October 1, 1882, till May 1, 1883,

ALL THEIR LANDS


At Government Price of


$1.25 per


Acre


IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES.
These lands include all varieties of upland and lowland, and are adapted to Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Pine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar-Cane, Early Vegetables, etc., and are chiefly in the counties of
St.Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Orange, Sumter, Levy, Hernando, Hillsborough,
Polk, Manatee and Monroe.
The following are reserved and for sale at. graded prices:
"Gulf Coast Reserve," 268 000 acres, M. R. M ARKS, Agent, Anclote, Fla.
"Timber Reserve," 100,000 acres, comprising choice tracts of Pine and Cypress, chiefly in St. Johns and
Volusia Counties. Address
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT CO.,
to mar 24 '83 Jalcksonvillc ... a.
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BA E CO.,
FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Soutlbern :Fr~uit aid ~Tegetables a Specoialty.
3a26 and 3 8 North Delawrvre Avenute, Ph i:tdtelphia.
to Jan 6, '83


A. N. DBOOBBINS & ISOM.,


Gn, LOcksmiths and Qsfocil C fPpS
24 LAURA STREET,
. ACso0 V11 1EF - FIXOI1lIA,
Gunsmithing done in all its branches.
GU IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address-
to june 12'83, (1P. 0. B -ox 833.)




.The agent of the "Royal Mail Line to the N.:h'r-
lands,!' and of the "Florio Italian Line," in Jackson-
ville, offers his services to reliable parties in seoa. oJ(
competent labor for their
Groves or Gardens,
to try to induce people from
Northern and ?,o uthlierni Emurope
to come to Florida.
AIe-Corrospondence solicited&
C(I II. "yVANI3DE EIN I'T,
(Care Florida Land and Imp't Co.,


sept 4, '82, if. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
$~0,000 (ASI-I
Can be invested to great advantage in the
ROCI~ LEI0D3GE IOME GEOVJE
of 15 acres, 700 bearing trees in the beautiful and noted
ROCK LEDGE HAMMOCK on the great Indian River
with its fish, oysters, green turtle and ducks. I will sell
the grove for
TWO-THIRDB ITS ACTUAL VALUE.
Numbers of visitors say it is the most beauliftil and de-
sirable property in the State,.
Having purchased Jupiter Island, 100 milesouth, I
propose to make a specialty of
COCOANTITS, PINE-APPLES,
and the more tender tropical fruits.
C. B. MAGRUDER.
tofeb 5 '83 lb k.;! Ledge, Floridoa.


CTE;AN FINE POULTRY Y.
CAN MAKE MONEY 1 Y USD;ING,
**nTnR ES E R ^R y ,i 'tSEVEN BREEDING PENS OF THE FOLLOWING

PRE' PARED ESPECIALLY FOR : TWo yaxds PLYMOUTH ROCKS, two yards each
WHITE and !ROWN LiIR.R.N,

Vegetables, Orange TreesHITE GAME
AND ALL We are booking
BE B W T. OPEO AE. f ". TS.'- sa *orders now for EGOS. and
W_1 guarantee fifty per cent. better results
-- BY ---< I \ Y : than from Eggs received from the North. Send for ck1-
CEO. B. FORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York. uN.C. BIRD,MontiAello.FAl aeJnval
-- 0-
THESE MANURES ARE PREPARED FROM CONCNTRATE CHEMICALS : ARE, FREE FROM i'h: BI. Ui BAR & CO.,
Do not Breed Vermini or Inseots irl the Soil. JACXFONVI~VLE, 'LA.,
They have been used on FLORIDA LANDS for Years, and produce; W,.drfu Rc;,,it. \Vl>e(holesle and teil Deaiers in
.i..or oe by OrE. n Bor asIi
Bantiorcl, oran-ge ~ouintyi, Florltla. I 3. 5


jii~i~I~LbYPI~-~~(lc* UII~P~S~R~YI1 1~M~)~JLIL~Vl~n~~P-ir~d~LPYllr I~CVR-~.~:


Wk


AMME!


- -L--- II~-----~ I ~C~Y-~e -~~~I--_ I-------


-- --I ~--- ~-~~ ~'---T------,---- ------------~-'-


S5


:7







58 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


LOCAL ADVERTISEMENTS.
ORANGE, LECONTE PEAR TREES, and General
Nursery Stock. Best quality. Lowest pri s.
W. H. PILOV.
jan l-tf Jacksonville, Fla.
FOR SALE.-Baw Mill and Machinery, capacity 10, 0\
feet per day. Will be sold at a bargain to settle an estate.
to jan 11 '83 GEO. R. FOSTEH, Agent.
IMPORTANT BOOK.-A preliminary Report on Scale
Insects with Remedies for their destruction, by Prof. II.
G. HUBBARD, price 25 cents.
FLORIDA BREEZES, by Mrs. Ellen Call Long, of
Florida, will soon be published by ASH MEAD BROS.,
and will have a large sale. Advance orders solicited.
FLORIDA ILLUSTitATiD.--O,100 copies of which
have just been issued by us, consists of 2 imperial size
col')red views'in a handsome cloth cased, illust:rating the
different sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever pub-
lished on Florida. Price by mail, postage free, *.i.00.
Every one interested in Florida should have a copy.
Address, ASHMEAD HROS.,
tf Jacksonville, Fla.
IBLOOMFIELD'S I LcslR',{TIATE l) ISTOlIC( L
GUIDE OF ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA, with
map. for tourists, invalids and immigrants. For sale
by all booksellers and newsdealers in the State, or sent
to any address for 5) cents by
MAX BLOOM F I ELD,
to ap)rl-'833 St. Augustine, Fla.


3,000 BARRELS POTATOES.



lHlOICE MIlIIKAN liARLY ROSEi, FOR SEED ANlD TABLE 1U81.
To arrive during NOVEMBER and DECEMBER. Also general stock of SEE'JT SEEDS for Gardeners, and
SPECIAL FERTILIZERS for POTATOES AND CABBAGES.

FIFTY TONS TOBACCO S TEAMS.
These stems are claimed by WESTEIN GARDENERS to be a sure specific for the Il.S .S (l. th destroy Cub-
bage. Full stock
H3ONE 3IEAL, COTTO "N-S1EI!) I~ kL, IIUJLTL ASI-, ETC.
J. E.aHART,
to jan 6, -. J CKSONVI LLE, FLORIDA.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STIIEET, .IACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS


LAW BLANKS.--A full line for Justices of the IPeace. PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
Circuit Courts, etc. Deeds, Mortgages etc., are printed
and published by ASHMEAD BROA., Jacksonville, Fla., AND DEALERS IN
Write eor a catalogue. t TO S A D tANT ARTILES.
TO ADVERTISERS.-Large circulation: For the
next two months THE FLORIDA DISPATCH will is-
sue from 8,(100 to 10,000X copies every week; about 40, a month. the have the most complete Book Bindery in the State. Can Rule. Number or Page and Perforate any job sent us.
Merchants anl others should take advantage of this Blanks and Blank Books manufactured to order for Railroads, Steamboats, Hotels, Banks
andFor advertising berates see elly itorial pae. tf and corporations. The ruling of difficult jobs a speciality.
ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange wraps from WE PUBLISH
ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla. For prices see T HwI. P OID A I S A\H
advertisement. _______tf A LF jRX ""Nork "aJD3WJ I^ SIP 7
A 20-page Weekly Agricultural Journal, at only $2.00 per year,
SW H. P I L L O W' S Devoted to Southern Agriculture, Fruit Growing, Market Gardening, etc.
TRhAHiRRYB 0 IIIPPTIN A iN 6Y This paper has the largest circulation of any published in Florida. Specimen copies free. Write for a copy,
IF'IEl k- "---w" .... -..

FRUIT AND VEGETABLE REPACK- It is generally conceded we do the Finest Job Printing in the State. We have all the modern machinery and all
ING AND COMMISSION HOUSE, new type. Can print the smallest Visiting Card to the largest size Poster.
Orange Trees, l iiii *&mLflpLuLs a p -cpt im y.. iiccs on, appiscaalon.
LeConte Pear Trees, and ------
General Nursery Stock ,IST Of "=C=S 02 T T "rA..
STRAWBERRY BASKETS IN ANY QUANTITY.
SFLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS. INVALIDS ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA. by
.-h--TOR:E IN-- 2AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely II- A. T. Garey, (cloth)............................... ....Price 1 25
ASTOR'S BLOCK lustrated)............................... .........Price $1 50 A MANUAL of GARDENING in FLORIDA
P o u H t FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY,. CLIMATE (W hitner).................................................... Price 50
Packing House at Waycross Wharf, Jacksonville, AND HISTORY (Lanier).............................Price 1 50 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA........................Price 75
Florida. mayl2 '83. GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper Price 10 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-
....... FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA........Price 2 501 the best)......... .....Price 1 25
---- .. GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE....................Price 25 NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST.
INCINNATI, NEW ORLEANS AND TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE JOHN'S RIVER....:............................... rice 25
TEXAS PACIFIC RAILWAY. BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL....................Price 75 McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS
\ SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMER- OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra)..Price 0 00
CINCINNATI SOUTHERN ICA.........................................................Price 25 INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SU-
CINCINNATI SOUTHERN-. DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition) PREME COURT OF FLORIDA..................Price 3 00
GENERAL PASSENGER AND FREIGHT DFpr., ) enlarged and improved...........................Price 50 NOTES FROM SUNLAND ON THE MAN-
CINCINNATI, OHio, Decemtnber 16,1 82.. MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edi- ATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OFSOUTH
L. R. Tu,. Rosiden ,1 t (I n.iti & ?.D rr. ?,'iv. tion, enlarged and improved).................. Price 1 00 FLORID'A. Its Climate, Soil, and Pro-
Jkvole, JForidaa r 7 ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead,..Price 1 00 ductions (By Samuel C. Upham)............ Paper .25
.nork.mal iper, o f an IIHISTORY OF ST. AUGUSTINE-Dewhurst............ L5 IFLORIDA AS A PERMANENT HOME,......Price .10
Inform all shippers that car-load lots of Fruit and Veg- GUIDE TO ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA-Bloomfield........................................................................
tables, when in hoist cars or Cincinnati Southern re- Any of the above books Iailed on receipt of price.
frigerator cars and consigned via
GINCINNATI SOUTHERN RAILWAY, 07r1 7 O7v'. F"^O.03""--"F.,,M o
will be forwarded to destination beyond Cincinnati, (Sent by mail, potae. free, on receipt of price.)
WITHOUT BREAK OF BULK. In Book Fo-irn, Contuining 1U Vievvs EaUch.
E. I'. WILSON, Souvenir of Florida,. (small size)....................... 2c Souvenir of Jacksonville, (large size
to.jan 21, General Freight and Passenger Agent. Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small Souvenir of t. Augustine, (large size)..................... 50c
... .. size)......................................................... .................. 25c Stereoscopic V iew s, per doz.......................................... 00
Lands in Middle and South Florida, PLZjOaRZDA. ILLJsT"T. A.' ED.
-ON THE- 10,000 copies of which have just been issued ny us, consisting of twenty imperial size colored views in a hand-
some cloth case, illustrating the different sections of the State of Florida.
SRANSIT This is the handsomest work of the kind ever published in Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00. Every one
FLORIDA SOUTHERN interested in Florida should have a copy.


and SOUTH FLORIDA
RAIL ROADS.
L.,a.nds for Orange Groves,
LJands for Truck Gardening.
At fair Prices and on Reasonable Time.
We also offer
:i ne :M1lllzding Sites
IN THE FLOURISHING TOWN OF SANFORD.

Sanford is rapidly Growing, and we have some
VERY CHOICE LOTS on
the Market.

Sanford has Churches, Schools, Railroads-,
Car-shops, Telegraph, Telephone, Water
Works and all the advantages of an

For full particulars, address
JAMES E. INGRAtlAM, Gen. Agt.,
Sanford, Orange Co., Fla.
In regard Lands in Middle Florida, address
JOHN E. LAMBETH, Local Agent,
nov20-tf Gainesville, Fla.


WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen....... ........Price 50 1 MORTGAGES per dozen..................................Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen...........Price 50 NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order.Price $ 00O
We publish a full line of Law Btanks for Lawyers, Juastices of thf Peace, Circuit Courts, etc. Price-list
mailed on application.
R U B B ER S TAMPIS .
Are manufactured right in our establishment, in the best manner, and at short notice.
ORANGE WRAPS. (Full count-480 sheets to the ream.) 10x10, 14c. per ream;:
11x11, 17c. per ream; 12x12, 19c. per ream.

SAN T0ATEO NIUSElI ES



This well known Nursery is now open for orders for all the best varieties of

Budded Orange and Lemon Trees!

On Sweet and Sour Stocks. Also a choice line of Orhamental Trees, Evergret'ns, Floweting -Ph1nts and shrubss.
A specially fine lot of Japan Plums.

MAXWELL, ANDERSON & CO.,
to mar 18 '83p SAN MATEO, FLA.