<%BANNER%>

USF UNF



Florida dispatch
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00040
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: December 25, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00040
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text































eiooted to the Agricultural, Manufacturing and Industrial Interests of Florida and the South.


Vol. 1.--No. 40.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, December 25, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


and a plentifi
until the mos
A New Industry. planted. Th
Editors of The Florida Dispatch: most significa
It is a matter of surprise and congratulation silk culture ii
that we have in this community a group of ex- an immense
perienced silk-culturists. Some of them are so most cultured
well skilled that they deserve the designation sympathetic,
of experts. ing the "cold
Our attention has been directed to this mildly repelb
state of things through the enthusiasm demon- Col. Hillya
treated towards it by Col. M. B. Hillyard, of He is thus i
Mobile, Ala., a gentleman who is making the from Virgini
tour of the South, doing his utmost to develop organizing so
silk culture. He says the advantage that may develop silk
be made to accrue to our community by this meeting witl
advanced knowledge and experience in silk The apprecia
culture are almost incomputable, if they should advanced th
be promptly and wisely utilized. He informs ladies and ge
us that there is a thoroughness of experience, a As an eviden
nicety of knowledge he has seen hardly sur- during, he sh
passed anywhere; that instead of our needing in one mail,
to wait to experiment, or to have some one from Vanderbilt
a distance to teach us, we can take hold of silk Agricultural
culture with a firm and confident hand, and bama, and th
that failure is impossible to us. This gentle- of the latter,
man tells us that he has been somewhat em- tor S. D. Lee
barrassed at times to find parties competent to planted two
take charge of a cocoonery for the benefit of as a beginning
the various silk societies he has been concerned With such
in inaugurating, or endeavoring to inaugurate, the success ol
But here, he says, are a number of most ex- ing the ado
perienced experts, who can "run" a large co- feature of A|
coonery, and guarantee it against miscarriage. This gentle
If any one will reflect that the failure of a made a fea1
number of private ventures, or of a large ladies at the
number (organized as a society) in silk cul- No education
ture may involve the indefinite postponement cal sense), ca
of the business in that community, and that these, institute
the success of a large experiment educates a has often and
large number, profits many, kindles great en- scanned the
thusiasm, and probably makes silk culture, it ladies, and s(
will be seen how important it is to have one beneficent as
or more persons able to ensure the success of him almost t
large experiment. in every:town
Col. Hillyard thinks no town in the Soutl Only one che
has so many possibilities in silk culture as teaching mu
Jacksonville. The sentiment of silk culture is they could n
widely diffused, the knowledge of it is more the open do
extensive than in any town he has visited, respectable,
S(except in two or three instances, perhaps ), of drudgery.


il supply of food can be obtained
t approved mulberry trees can be
ese are three conditions that are
nt promises of a great future for
n this community. He says it is
satisfaction to find some of the
[ and influential citizens, not only
but enthusiastic, instead of hav-
Sshoulder" given him, and being
eadas ^4e nevalegs "(a k.." .
Lrd visits other points in our State.
far, of the round he is making,
a to Texas, agitating silk culture,
icieties, and doing what he can to
culture. He assures us that he is
h the most encouraging results.
Ition of his efforts by the most
inkers, and the most benevolent
ntlemen, is especially gratifying.
ce of the fruits his work is pro-
lowed us three letters, all received
from educational institutions-
University, Nashville, Tenn.; the
and Mechanical College, of Ala-
at of Missisippi. The President
the gallant and illustrious Sena-
a, writes him that he has already
hundred and fifty mulberry trees,
g.
i influential backing to his efforts
f Col. Hillyard is assured in mak-
ption of silk culture a regular
agricultural Colleges in the South.
nan expects to see silk culture
ture of the education of young
Female Seminaries of the South.
Comparable to this (in a practi-
,n be conferred on the pupils of
ions. Col. Hillyard says that he
I most deliberately and searchingly
whole field of opportunities for
ees no opening so attractive and
silk culture, Indeed, it seems to
he only field. Were even factories
, our ladies would not enter them.
ance in -a large number exists for
tsic or schools. If they would,
ot get in stores. Silk culture is
or to a competency; thoroughly
fascinating, and with no burthens


Therefore, if the young ladies learn silk cul-
ture at the colleges, they will disseminate it in
their homes. They will induce their parents
to plant a few acres in mulberry trees, so that
when they graduate they will find the orchard
ready-grown for raising the silkworms. Then,
off of four or five acres they can make from
$1,000 to $1,500 per annum. If they are rich,
they will not need it, to be sure; but it would
be very reputable and fascinating to make it;
and Henry IV-the great Henry-of France,
conferred titles of nobility in his day on those
who raised silk. But failing circumstances
may come. "Riches take to themselves wings
and fly away," as witness the widely bereft and
impoverished South. If want comes, here is,
in silk culture, a sure resource against it.
They need not wait in anxiety and longing for
a chance to teach school or music. They need
not be nearly frantic for want of something to
do. Silk culture opens a flowery path for
them to tread, and it has no pernicious delu-
sions. We are confident that in this suggestion
of Col. Hillyard there is a promised land for
ladies. It is really the creation of a new realm
of industry for the most elegant cultured of
the sex. We earnestly commend the sugges-
tion to the most careful consideration of lady
educators. Col. Hillyard suggests that it can
be made a source of revenue to the colleges, if
they will plant a few acres in mulberry trees
and teach the ladies, by the use of the orchards
belonging to the college. This gentleman
says the fear, here and there felt, that there
will be no sale for the cocoons, is groundless.
To say nothing of other plans, the Woman's
Silk Culture Association of the United States
pledge to pay from 75 cents to $1.15 per pound
for cocoons. They act in a merely benevolent
capacity, and are doing much good. They
have headquarters at Philadelphia, Pa.
We trust that our ladies will organize a so-
ciety at once. Very soon they will have a fila-
ture. Then we shall have a manufactory. It
is an easy step. Then our bridal robes of pure
white-the natural color-will make a beauti-
ful industry to still further signalize the vast
progress Jacksonville is making in a most cul-
tured and elegant Testheticism.
Let us begin. Place aux d,,:::.


- ~--- I ~--- ~- --'- --' ---I


C1









THE FLORIDA ) DISPATCH .


otherwise. What we mean by the right man,"
is one who engages in the pursuit, con more;
who thoroughly understands fowls, their wants,
ways and peculiarities; who is painstaking,
patient and industrious: and who loves his
feathered dependents for their own sakes, and
not entirely for the profit he expects from
them.
2d. A dry, warm and airy locality is desira-
ble, as cold and dampness are highly unfavora-
ble to the health and productiveness of fowls.
3d. A good Incubator or Hatcher, capable
of producing from 75 to 85 per cent. of strong
chicks from all fertile eggs; and a large room
or house in which to keep the chicks warm


'Am


--


Raising Early Chickens for Northern Mar-
kets.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
While there are thousands of 'dollars invest-
ed in the cultivation of early vegetables for
Northern markets, the masses seem to lose
sight of the advantages this climate affords for
the successful raising of early chickens for the
same markets, and very few have any idea
what prices are obtained for the first "spring
chickens that go into market.
I have a letter now before me from a relia-
Sble commission house in New York, in which
they tell me that there should be no shipments
made to that market earlier than the last of
'February. Last spring the first shipments
sold readily at $1.50 per pair; then $1.25, and
dropped to $1.00 in April, for chicks that
would not weigh over one pound. These prices
were paid by dealers who killed and dressed
them, then sold to hotels and restaurants at
much higher prices. And at no time was the
market supplied.
Now, let me ask, how would a business of
this kind compare with that of raising early
vegetables ? In the first place, raising chickens
can be successfully managed on land that
would not "sprout cow peas." The amount of
money required to make a respectable beginning
would not buy a good mule. In three to four
months the chicks will be large enough to put
on the market, which is as soon as our earliest
vegetables can be marketed. The risk is
not near so great as that of raising vegetables,
either in the production or transportation. I
have seen a number of estimates as to the cost
of raising a chicken to be of frying size-or
about one pound-and none of them exceed
ten cents each. The freight on them from this
place to New York is not over $1 per hundred
pounds. There are chickens brought out here
from. New York, nearly every: trip of the
steamer, and they come through in splendid
condition. With the usual commission for
selling, I leave every one to make their own
calculation as to profits, and ask, "how does
this compare with raising early vegetables ?"
Yours, etc., R. W. PARRAMORE.
REMARKS.-Our correspondent has opened
up a very interesting subject, and given ex-
pression to some ideas which we have long enter-
tained. That the raising of spring chickens "
for the epicures of our large cities, can be
made a very profitable business, we cannot
doubt for a moment. We have given the mat-
ter a great deal of consideration, and arrived at
some conclusions, which wve will briefly set
forth:
1st. Only the right man can be successful in
raising poultry on a large scale, and the busi-
ness is not profitable, or worthy of attention,


40


The third year the compost cost $7.25 per acre,
or a total of $471, but the crop went up from
eight, without manure, to forty-seven, giving a
gain in value of $1,950.00, and a clear profit
of over the unmanured land of nearly $1,500.
Are not these figures enough to convince any
one that the immediate returns from such a
manure is highly remunerative ? But the im-
mediate return is not all; when I began with
my sixty-five acres, $5 an acre would have been
a high price for the land; to-day I would not
take for it $100 per acre, and it is improving
with every crop.
Now to give you the formula upon which
my compost is made: Take thirty bushels well


628


and dry during the late fall and winter, will be
found absolutely indispensable for all who go
largely into the business: as our Florida fowls,
intended for the Northern market, must be
hatched in the fall and winter,.so as to reach
the proper broiling size and go into the market
as spring chickens," during March, April and
May.
4th. To have an abundance of eggs during
the fall months, in order to produce these
spring chickens from October until Febru-
ary, a large flock of very early pullets, must be
raised each year, and these must have the best
food and care possible, or there will be no eggs
for the Incubator.
It is useless, at this late day, to question the
value of an Incubator, or the feasibility of rais-
ing Chickens by hand." It has been suc-
cessfully done for thousands of years, and our
correspondent, A. C. IhAWKINs, of Lancaster,
Mass., could hardly keep up his stock of eight
thousand Plymouth Rocks, without the many
"steam hens which do the work of hatching
for him.
We shall not presume to say which is the
best Incubator in market; nor shall we attempt
to point out the "very best breed of fowls for
profit. We only desire to emphasize the posi-
tions of our correspondent, and to say an en-
couraging word for an industry to which Flor-
ida seems especially adapted. We solicit the
views and opini ons of other readers, and shall
return to the subject hereafter.-EDS.

Chicken Cholera.
The following remedy for chicken cholera is
highly spoken of by one who has used it:
Raw onions and a little ginger mixed with
the food and fed occasionally.
Our experienced old friend, Col. SETH ROw-
LEY, of Mound City, Kansas, says that drink-
ing foul and stagnant water produces cholera
in poultry, and remarks:
"Give your fowls plenty of fresh water daily,
and good food, and you need have no fear of
the 'chicken ,cholera.' "

Poultry Raising.
INCUBATO RS-" MOTHERS,". &c.-The New
York Times in answering the questions of a
subscriber, discourses after this fashion in re-
gard to the subject opened up in, THE Drs-
PATCH of last week:
Eggs can be hatched more certainly in an
incubator and reared with an artificial mother


--`--


the mesh of the netting so that they hang down
to the bottom of the box; and the young chicks
nestle among these and keep warm. The box
should be round and without corners into
which the chicks could crowd and smother
each other. If the mother is sufficiently warm
the chicks will not crowd together, but it is
best to have small ones holding not more than
twenty or twenty-five, rather than a large one
holding more. It is well, too, to have the
woolen covering only in the centre, so that the
chicks will not crowd to the sides. A cheese-
box is the best thing to make a mother of.
Raising chicks artificially might be made a
very profitable business in a town as well as
the country.



"Itigh Farming" in Georgia.
The "Intensive" System, as set fort by Hon.
F. C. FURMAN, of Baldwin County, Georgia,
before the State Agricultural Society:
CONCLUDED ED FROM LAST WEEK.)
This additional twenty acres I planted this
year first in oats and then in corn and peas; on
it I have made five hundred bushels of oats, and
will gather from it four hundred bushels of corn
and one hundred bushels of peas. All the ex-
pense of making this is included in the $2,300,
so to get a fair estimate of the profits we must
add the value of this to the profit already
brought forward.
Say profit already brought down........................... 2,50 00
500 bushels oats at 60 cents...................................... 30 00
400 bushels corn at 75 cents................................... 300 00
100 bushels peas at 75 cents................................... 75 00
Total profit.................. .......... .............. ............. 2,725 CO
Giving a total of nearly $3,000 profit on my
two-horse farm. All of the work on this was
done by two ordinary mules, with the excep-
tion of eighteen days ploughing of one ani-
mal, and assistance from my carriage horses in
hauling out my compost, which could have
been avoided by starting a little earlier in its
distribution.
Now let us figure a little and see how the
compost pays. Two thousand pounds of my
mixture costs, if you have to buy the cotton
seed that are used in it, $7.25, the first year,
therefore, 500 pounds to the acre, cost $1.80
per acre, or on the sixty-five acres, $111.00;
but the crop rose from eight to twelve bales, or
an increase in value of $200.00, giving a profit
from the use of the manure of $83.00. The sec-
ond year, using 1,000 pounds to the acre, we have
a cost of $3.60 per acre, or on the sixty-five
acres, $234.00 but the crop increased from
eight to twenty-three, an increase in value of
$750.00, giving as profit on the manure, $516.00.


1 I _ _ _
--- --- --------------- --
_1 __ I I L __ I 1-- L -- ~ -- 1 I I --- I L_ I


than under a hen. Every fertile egg can be
hatched and no chick lost by accident, if suf-
ficient care is given. It is nothing more than
a question of maintaining a regular heat of
100a, not varying more than 2' or 3' each
way, and of giving the eggs an airing for half
an hour once a day, and also of keeping the
chicks warm and fed properly until they are
strong enough to go alone. Hot water or
steam is the best source of heat, because it can
be regulated with precision by very simple
ventilation. A very simple and effective in-
cubator is made upon this principle, in which
a certain quantity of boiling water is renewed
every twelve hours, and no other attention is
required. The artificial mother consists of a
shallow box six inches deep, having the top of
strong wire netting, upon which rests a shallow
tin or copper box, which is kept supplied with
hot water. Strips of flannel are fastened to






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 2,
i.,.,,.. .,.c- -rr I I ~I 1 I-- --- -


rotted stable manure or well rotted organic
matter, as leaves, muck, etc., and scatter it
about three inches.thick upon a piece of ground
so situated that the water will not stand on it,
but shed it off in every direction. The thirty
bushels will weigh about 900 pounds; take 200
pounds of good acid phosphate, which cost me
$22.50 per ton, delivered, making the 200
pounds cost $2.25, and 100 pounds kainit,
which cost me, by the ton, $14.00, delivered, or
75 cents for 100 pounds, and mix the acid phos-
phate and kainit thoroughly, and scatter evenly
Son the manure. Take next thirty bushels of
green cotton seed and distribute evenly over
the pile, and wet them thoroughly; they will
weigh 900.pounds ; take again 200 pounds acid
phosphate and 700 pounds kainit, mix, and
spread over the seed, begin again on the ma-
nure and keep on it this way, building up
your heap layer by layer until you get it as
hig1', convenient, then cover with. six inches
of rice earth from fence corners, and leave at
least six weeks; when ready to haul to the field
cut with a spade or Ipick-axe square down and
mix as thoroughly as possible. Now we have
thirty bushels of manure, weighing 900 pounds,
and 300 pounds of chemicals inthe first layer,
and thirty bushels of cotton seed, weighing 900
pounds, and 300 pounds of chemicals in the
second layer, and these two layers combined
form the perfect compost. You perceive that
the weight is 2,400 pounds. Value at cost is:
0 bushels cotton seed, 121 cents................................. 3 75
400 pounds acid phosphate......................:..................... 4 50
200 pounds kainit............................. .......................... 1 40
Stable manure nominal. -
Total................. ............... ........... .............. ..........$9 65
Or for 2,400 pounds a total value of $9.65.
This mixture makes practically a perfect ma-
nure for cotton and a splendid application fr
corn. To have a perfect manure for cotton,
t we need: Phosphoric acid, ammonia, humus,
potash, lime, magnesia, soda and silica.
Now, commercial fertilizers furnish us three
of these oply, .phosphoric acid, ammonia and
potash, and for a long time no potash was used
in their composition. Hence, don't you see
what an imperfect manure for cotton the best of
these commercial fertilizers must be ? Now, my
pompost contains every element needed :
Acid phosphate gives phosphoric acid alnd
lime.
Stall' manure or organic matter gives am-
monia and humus.
Cotton seed gives ammonia, potash and hu-
tnmus.
Kainit gives potash, lime, magnesia and
soda.
Silica is always present in the soil, is practi-
cally in inexhaustible quantities; so we have
in my.ompost everything essential supplied.
You aill readilj perceive in this formula the
vast importance o kainit, containing as it does,
nearly one-third of its bulk of salt, it is a great
'conservator'of moisture: I have found it1 com-
binod with humus; a specific against nist in cot-
ton, and owing to its contents of sulphate of


magnesia, it is invaluable in the power that it
possesses in the compost heap of fixing the am-
monia as a sulphate and thereby preventing its
escape. I regard its discovery in the bosom of
the earth at Leopold Hall, in Germany, along
with that of the phosphate beds at Charleston,
which occurred almost simultaneously, as the
greatest boon that a kind providence has be-
stowed upon the agricultural community;in the
last century.
Now, gentlemen, let us take it for granted
that upon the plan I suggest, before planting
your crop, you have made your compost heap,
,and put into your ground more than your crop
will take out, then one cause for the deteriore-
ration of your land has certainly been removed.
The scientific trouble is gone but the mechani-
cal difficulty remains.
Shall I say what that is? Do you not all
recognize it ? It is the fearful loss of the top


soil with its valuable elements of fertility,
caused by our tropical washing rains and the
shallow system of culture to which we are driven
in the cultivation of our standard crops, corn
and cotton. For this evil, which is a great one,
three remedies suggest themselves. One is a
proper system of hill-side ditching, a system in
which the dirt is thrown on the upper side of
the ditch so that it may catch the washings and
in time, as it were, terrace the field.
Another is to be found in deep preparation
of your lands for your crops, breaking your
land deeper each year as you are able to in-
crease the quantity of humus in it, so that there
will be no danger in bringing too much clay
on the top at any one time. This will increase
the absorptive power of the soil and render it
less liable to suffer from drouth or to wash.
For this purpose I would recommend some good
sulky turn-plow-one that can be set accu-
rately and relied upon to turn the land a given
depth whether it be soft or hard.
The other and most important remedy is to
be found in a rotation in succession of crops
keeping the soil.thereby full of rootlets and or-
ganic matter all the time, causing it to hold to-
gether, and preventing washing. For example
-plant your field in the fall with oats-you all
know from the time the oats come fairly up un-
til they are cut they will prevent washing.
Now, as soon as your oats are cut, lay off
your land in rows seven feet wide, as follows :
Take a turn-plow and lay off each way, leaving
a ridge from four to six inches wide in the mid-
dle unbroken. Break this out with two shovel
furrows; put from 500 to 1,000 pounds to the
acre, of a good ammoniated fertilizer, in the
bottom of this furrow and cover with a little
dirt, to pr e81 et the fertilizer coming in' direct
contact with yodr seed, with a seooter furrow
from the side, then sow your seed by hand us-
ing a plenty, from three to' four bushels -per
acre, and cover with a harrow or forked plow.
You will get a stand in a few days; the stuAb-
ble in the ground will prevent washing until it
rots. Your cotton at that season (almost the
first of June) will grow very rapidly, Now,
when you give your cotton the last sweeping,
drill peas in the middle of each rvw, and apply
with them about 200 pounds of ash element 'to
the acre. Your peas will grow off rapidly, will
in their turn prevent washing, will not inter-'
fere with the opening or picking of 4our cotton,
will protect the lower bolls against dirt, and.
will give you a magnificent coat of humus as a
manure for your land.
In t1e history of the world the fact is well
attested that no people who are so fortunate as
to be able to raise two food crops in one year,
can be kept long in subjection. To this fact is:
due the wonderful recuperative power^, e hib-
ited under the most unfavpordble circumstances
by the people of France. The French can
raise but two crops a year, but we excel France,
we can raise three with almost a dertaintv of


success. Nature has done everything'foir us in
this favored clime. It only remains now for
us to embrace the opportunities she so freely of-
fers, and an era of unexampled prosperity cer-
tainly awaits us.
There is one trouble that has often struck
me, as applicable to the farmers of this country ;
they are not deficient in energy, but they don't
think enough.
Now, above all, I would recommend to our
farmers to read, think, study and experiment
for themselves.
As a rule, we work too hard and think too
little.
.Some one has said: "Work is the engine
which draws the car to success." Now, if I
were an artist I would draw for you a picture
of a huge car labeled success, drawn by a won-
erful engine entitled work-but the picture
would not be complete without a skilled engi-


neer in the cab, with his hand on the lever and
eye looking ever ahead, and upon his brow I
would inscribe in characters of living fire, the
word Thought.
Let us determine to-day, then, gentlemen,
that we will no longer run in the old groove,
and plant as our fathers did because they were
our fathers. The world never stands still. The
circumstances that surround our fathers no
longer envelop us. Times have changed and
we must wake up to that change, or we will be
left in the race. We have a glorious country
-glorious in its climate-glorious in its soil,
and hallowed to us by those tender and endear-
ing associations that ever cluster around the
name of home. Let us resolve that we will
make it a home that we shall be proud to leave
as an heritage for our children. Then shall
the waste places be made to blosson as the rose
-then will it be our glorious mission to restore
Georgia to' Georgians, redeemed, regenerate
and disenthralled, and for our reward it shall be
that generations yet unborn shall arise and
call uis'blessed.
IRISH POTATOES.-Very careful experiments
in New York this season show that the flat cul-
ture of potatoes produces the finest tubers and
the largest yields. The best results followed
the Dutch method of planting, which consists in
keeping the surface of the ground level, plant-
ing a single eye in a place, covering it six inches
deep, and allowing but a single stalk to grow
in a hill, which are a foot apart each way.
FLORIDA AND CALIFORNIA.-The River-
side (Cal.) Press and Horticulturist, speaking
of the.Manville Nursery Catalogue and of va-
rieties of citrus, says: "Whly do not some of
our, enterprising nurserymen import more va-
rieties from Florida? They have several
lepnoiis that ought to be tried here, and possibly
some oranges."
SWOOD-HvOsEs.-No home, even in "Sunny
Florida," is complete, without a wood-house,
and wood sufficient for the winter should be
stored at the beginning of cold weather. In the
spring it should be refilled for summer use. We
would not be understood to say that the wood
should be. prepared during the pleasant
weather. This could be done at odd times dur-
ing the winter, but a sufficiency should be
stored in a dry place convenient to the kitchen
at the beginning of winter to last until spring,
and in the spring to last until winter again, as
it will save the good housewife many extra
steps and greatly enlighten her kitchen duties,
as she would never have any trouble about
regulating her fire.


KAINIT.-The ordinary Kainit, or German
potash salts, contains, about 95 per cent. of
sulphate of potash, 14 per cent of sulphate of
magnesia, 12 per cent of chloride of magnesia,
33 per.cent. of common salt, 15 per cent. of
moisture and slight traces of other minerals.
The amount of pure potash contained in it is
about 12 per cent. From 300 to 400 pounds
is a fair application for an acre of land.

-Time is linked to eternity. The present
world is the threshold to the next. As is the
seed to the fruit, as is the egg to the chick and
the chick to the fowl, so is infancy to child-
hood and childhood to manhood. As man
passes the threshold so he enters the house.
In our journey here through life, we pick up
what we esteem as treasures, and which we
must carry forever, unless rejected as worth-
less before we pass the threshold of time.


Ilr,_ __ ,i








830~~~~~ TH LRD IPTH


I ~


may be seen pAftecting the labor of the peas-
-ant and beautifying the landscape. The pre-
ceding suggestions include all the advantages
of an important and indispensable industry, as
regards adaptation and cheapness-style and
economy, that will be sought and occupied
throughout the semi-tropical districts of Florida.
DR. J. L. RICHARDSON.

WE are pained to learn from the Charleston
News that our old-time friend and correspond-
ent, in ante-bellum days, COL. R. J. GAGE, of
Union County, South Carolina, died at his
home in that County, on the last day of No.
member. COL. GA GE was a leading agricultu-
rist, and an able contributor to many of our
best Southern rural papers.


Fencing in Florida.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
As the pine timber of Florida, which is the
common growth, possesses but little durability,
it proves a troublesome and expensive means of
defense and protection, not lasting more than
eight or ten years until it must be entirely re-
placed. The possibility of adopting something
more economical, permanent and ornamental is
a consideration of very great importance. The
barbed-wire fence has been suggested and tried
to some extent, without giving the satisfaction
desired. It is subject to several serious objec-
tions which must in some way be met and the
deficiencies supplied before it can meet with
popular favor, and be brought into common
use. In the first place, it has been used with
pine posts, which form the most objectionable
feature of the ordinary fence, and which have
to be renewed at short intervals.
In the second place, the wire is no protection
against dogs, hogs, and smaller depredators,
This is true to a considerable extent as to barbed
wire, which is also very objectionable on account
of its liability to wound and lacerate valuable
stock. More recently there has been intro-
duced a woven or mesh wire from two to six
inches in its interstices, and about two feet
wide, in the web that offers quite an improve-
ment as a protection, and in its more agreeable
appearance. With two wires stretched above
this a pretty good fence may be made, with the
addition of a small wooden rail or strip attached
to the upper wire, that may be observed by ap-
proaching stock. It is a frequent occurrence
that horses and cattle run through a single wire
fence without ever knowing it was there. If
this style of fence is adopted, which, no doubt,
would be cheap and durable, the next import-
ant consideration would be to supply posts
adapted to it. This could readily be done by
planting out a row of lemon or other profitable
trees around a grove, about nine feet apart. By
the time an ordinary pine fence is decayed,
these line trees, with a little pruning, would be-
come permanent and profitable posts to which
the wire may be connected by elastic fastenings
that would not interfere with the growth of the
trees.
A better, cheaper and more permanent fence
may be made of the Cactus opuntia, which is
indigenous in Florida and grows without care,
cultivation or expense. Its fleshy and strong pro-
jections constituting both stock and leaf, and
armed with irresistible spines, present a hand-
some and formidable obstruction to all invaders.
Sometimes a single plant will furnish material
for fifty yards of fence, and possesses the two-
fold advantage of being easily trimmed and oc-
cupying but little space. This neglected
but valuable plant will yet be appreciated and
utilized. If any one should regard this sugges-
tion as Utopian or speculative, he might be in-
formed that in Italy hundreds of miles of it


This is the fourth year I have used Mapes'
Manure and I am more and more satisfied that
it is the best thing to raise potatoes with in the
market.
THANKS to COL. D. DENNETT, of the New
Orleans Picayune, for an excellent article on
Jute culture and Jute machinery-to which we
shall refer hereafter.

f KEEPING MEAT.-A correspondent of a
Northern paper keeps his beef-steaks and mut-
- ton-chops for three or four days, or even
- longer, in the warmest of weather, by strew-
ing each piece thickly with Indian meal, and
rolling it up, and then burying it in meal.


"Florida" Lemons.
PINELLAS, FLA., Dec. 4, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Can you give us any information as to what
kind of Lemon the New York Weekly Herald
referred to in its market review of November
18th? It said: "A few boxes of Florida Lem-
ons have arrived, and are most inviting in ap-
pearance and quality," and gave quotations at
$4.00 to $4.50 per case. We have some Sicily
Seedlings which we wish to bud if we can find
a good lemon in Florida. INQUIRER.
REPLY.-We regret our inability to give
our correspondent any satisfactory information.
The fruit indefinitely known here as the Flor-
ida Lemon is almost worthless; but we have
seen and used some large, thin-skinned and ex-
cellent Lemons from various groves-different
varieties, with different names and "pedigrees."
Any one having really superior Lemons should
send them to our next Fair, and let the Fruit
Committee test, classify aid name them. Then
our nurserymen will propagate and put the
trees in market.-EDs.
Potatoes.
We take pleasure in publishing the following
respecting the merits of "Mapes' Manures :"
Copies of letters received from Mr. Jesse L.
Delano, author of the Prize Essay on Potato
Culture, published in Transactions of Franklin
County, Massachusetts Agricultural Society,
1881 :
SUNDERLAND, MASS., October 17, 1881.
DEAR SIR: I am now in a condition to re-
port in regard to the effects The Mapes Potato
Fertilizer. I took four separate pieces of land
of equal size. The land was all similar, in the
same condition as near as could be taken.
Planted all pieces April 19th, and gave them
the same cultivation and care.
The result was as follows :
Firstpiece.-I gave good First iece.-Yielded at
strong manure from the rate of 220 bushels per acre.
barnyard, at the rate of 40 The potatoes were, how-
two-horse loads to the acre, ever, quite badly cut by the
one-half plowed in and one- wire-worms and grubs, and
half put in the drill, quite rough.
Second piece.--I gave Second piece.-Yielded at
Mapes' Manure, at the rate rate of 316 bushels per acre,
of 800 Ibs. to the acre one- of nice, large, smooth pota-
half harrowed in and one- toes.

of 1,000 lbs. to the acre, one- of very large and smooth
half harrowed in and one- potatoes, with very few un-
half put in the drill. marketable ones.
Fourth piece.-I planted Fourth piece.-Yielded at
without any kind of ferti- rate of 140 bushels per acre
lizer whatsoever, and a good many small
ones among them, though
smoother than on frst
piece.
From the foregoing I draw, that with high
manuring I obtained 80 bushels per acre more
than where the manure was used, but with
Mapes' Potato Manure I obtained 176 and 200
bushels per acre more than where no manure
was used.


Louisiana, are now operation. The welfare of
at least 150,000 laborers depends upon the re-
sult of the present work, and $40,000,000 of
capital are awaiting the returns on the invest-
ment.
IMPERFECT SUGAR MACHINES.-It is stated
that for every ten hogsheads of sugar extracted
from the sugar cane eleven hogsheads are lost
because no adequate machinery has yet been
devised for crushing the cane and extracting
the rich juices thereof. The assertion comes
from the very highest authority on matters ap-
pertaining to the sugar culture that our plant-
ers lose 200,000 hogsheads a year by this waste,
an amount representing $20,000,000 per an-
num.


630


THEI FLORIDA DISPATCH.


- I, c ---


I I I


I


'


Government Agricultural Department.
The Annual Report of Hon. George B.
Loring, Commissioner of Agriculture, has been
submitted to the President. The several di-
visions of the Department are shown to be in
excellent condition. The report of the veteri-
nary division exhibits much valuable work,
and shows less disease among domestic animals
(Texas fever excepted) than in many years.
Interesting and valuable examination into the
fibres of wool and cotton have been made; and
two sites, both in Colorado, have been selected
for two artesian wells, for the construction of
which contracts have been awarded. In the
forestry division increased activity has been
shown, a special agent having been appointed
to collect information west of the Mississippi.
The statistical division estimates the following
as the yield of 1582: Corn, 1,635,000,000
bushels; wheat, 410,000,000; oats, 470,000,000;
barley, 45,000,000; rye, 20,000,000; buck-
wheat 12,000,000. The work of the chemical
division has been devoted largely to the investi-
gation of the sugar-producing qualities of sor-
ghum and other plants.
The Disston Lands.
Replying to a correspondent, the Agricultu-
ral Editor of the New York Times, says: "The
so-called 'Disston purchase' is a large tract of
land in Florida, in the counties of Polk and
Manatee chiefly. This is in the southern part
of the State, and adjoins what is known as the
Everglades and the Lake Okeechobee district.
The latter is a very large tract of submerged
land, which is now in process of being drained
and freed from the shallow overflowing water.
The tract purchased by Mr, Disston, of Phila-
delphia, was 4,000,000 acres. A portion of this
is now offered for settlement at the Govern-
ment price of $1.25 per acre. There is no
doubt that this is a favorable opportunity for
settlers in that State, and the locality is unsur-
passed for the growth of oranges, bananas, pine-
apples, and other tropical fruits."
"GooD farming consists of such manage-
ment as will make the farm produce the best
possible results without deteriorating the soil.
This can only be accomplished by a rigid
economy in the making and using of manure,
and by such a systematic rotation of crops as
will be the least exhaustive to the soil."
SUGAR IN LouISIANA.--We learn from our
New Orleans exchanges that over one thousand
sugar-houses, through twenty-seven Parishes in






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 3:


Peach Orchards.
We are pleased to notice an increased de-
I'mand for Peen-To and Honey peach trees, in
different parts of the State. Wherever the
Peadh .'lc. ceMds, it is the most profitable of
fruits-our climate giving us'great advantage
in ar nf which makes all the difference in
SNortherA, markets. A Kentupky correspon-
Sdent of the Pratical Fanrer, remarks that he
prefers fall pantifhg nd adds:
"Thebes titti8tibn fW la peach orchard is an
Elevated one, :i there 'is les danger of frost.
The eoil should be rich, ifit is not it shouldbe
mapl ud. The peach te, requires richer soil
than' the apple., Th culture is simple and
ea*t, biut must' be thorough and constant.
Neither *grass no grlfin srhdild be allowed to
g rowin thepeach orohardl. Garden crops may
be Qswaeven to a benefit, as they are heavily
i Pa ,nd well vor4lr :rBu1 the ground
ihoul dbe cultivated shallow ear thetrees.
IA prtfr' a Siall tre'6 "b 'aet tMi. ooU are
malfler, Willl strike 'tqutike Atd ti^bt
suo8h a. eleck from- transplantihag. I t the
same as apple trees. The tree;should be kept
headed in and well balanced over the trunk."

New Jersey "Rio Grande" Sorghum Sugar.
We have already published some account of
a very successful Sorghum Sugar plantation on
a large scale, known as the "Rio Grande," in
New Jersey; and Hon. Duncan F. Kenner, of
Louisiana, a well-known cane planter is quoted
'by thej Pieytias folidwt, speaking as a mem-
ber of the elate Tariff Commission
S"Au important matter brought to our notice
was the remarkable success of a sorghum plan.
tation in New jersey. The crop this season
amonuited to over 1,200 hogsheads of sugar
resembling the clarified sugars of Louisiana.
The samples I saw of the sugar from this plan-
tation-0-e Rio Grande--would be worth here
from 7 to 8 cents, being fully equal to what
'is known as "off whites." There are, I think,
about 1,0p acres in the Rio Grande planta-
tioni The cost .of cultivation of the sorghum
was problbf~ less than that .f so much cane,
but the gathering and manufacture into sugar,
*probably grater. Vacuum .pans and centri-
fugals are used on the Rio Grande plantation,
and also on a place near Chatham, Ill.,from
which a report was received. These are the
qneprgrhum growers, out of some nine or jen
hufired, who use the improved machinery, the
others employing these opep kettles'"

Oe-v-c-i !-A po6r, half-frozen uilbscriber,
|writing :from New Ldr;don, Conn. under date'
iof December 11i shiveringly says : miay
come ldoWn'to yd1ar1ldel1'Statt'n JAiuairy, t
Spend 'thh inafiidt' E of the Winter, for it is win-
ter with us in good earnest; ice three' inches
thick last Fri4y night, th it," "


M TPRQoR CGICAL REPORT. .
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION 1
SGN1AL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLI't L.
Weather for week ending December 22, 1882.
Therm., Wind.

DAT-E.i PO 44
S. I c 0:
___a1aA C( L-


tu 6.... 80.08650135 40.3 51.0 0.26 NW 5 Fair
S 0.18.. 47128 38.31561.03 0.00oo W 4 Clear..
306...... .258357 46,01 71. 0.00 SW 6, ar, 6 ir
e .... 019140142 51.i 79.3 0.00 NE 4 Fair.
W0e6m 2 70 68.31 83. 0.07 S 4 Fair.
S21... 3.0 76 6 f7.7 82-0 0.0o0 S 9 Fair.
rida .....I 29.91 68 64 65.0 92.0 1.94 S 10 Fair.
Hie rometer 39.29, lowest 39.87.
SHighest iSrlperatire p 6l lowest 28.
SNoTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.


ScmnwldaL1

Orange Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, P
316 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, December 19, 1882.
Receipts of oranges at this port via Florida Dispatch
Line and Southern Express Company, week ending
19th inst., 12,100 boxes. Condition most fine.
PRICES.
Floridas, $3.25 to $4.75 per box.
Messinas, $8.00 to $3.50 per box.
Palermos, $3.00 to 8.50 per box.
Valencias, $6.00 to $8.00 per case.
Jamaicas, $6.00 to $7.50 per barrel.
C. D. OWENS, General Agent.
NEW YORK, December 2, 1882.
Special Telegram to The Florida Dispatch:
Receipts of oranges via Florida Dispateh Line and
Southern Express Company this week, 5,828 packages.
Selling from $3.00 to $4.50 per box. C.D. OWENS.
Jaekaonville Wholesale rices. "
Corrected weekly, by JONFS & BOWEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
FRUITS-
SUGARs-Granulated ....... ................................ 10
W white Ex. C....................................... 91
Golden C ............... ............
Powdered.................................. ....... 1
Cut LOaf....................... .... ........... 11.
CoPrY E, Rid -Fair.............. ................ ............. 9
G ood............................................. 10%
Choice .................. .......... 11
Best .......................... ....... .12
Java G ........................ ... ...... 18.
M ocha ............................. ............... 35
Peaberr y. ................................. 18
M aracaibo........................... ............ 18
Any of above grades roasted to order
, FQUR-Snow Drop, best, patent........ ......... 7 75
N. A.patent........ ............... 7 60
O. creole, 2d best................................... 7 25
earl, 3d best.................................. 700
Orange Co. No. 1 ...................... 6 50
M ATS- acon....... ........................................ .. 11 to 1
ames (Merwin & Sons)....................... 1
oulders......... .......................... 12
HoMINlY- rl, per bbl................................ 4
MEAL-- r 1 .................................... ........ 486
LARiD--Reflf in. pails............................... 13%
BUTTER-Ve s, kegs (on ice)................. 35 to
CHEESE- eam ............................... 153
ToBAcco--Smd t--"the Boss" Durham %s
Vd s ..............I ......................... 32
"The Durham 1 b pkge......... 30
"8l tt Bll"D. (genuine) s ....... 50
ittg ll" (genuine) s ............. 75
"SittingB (genuine) ........... 49
"Sitting B (genuine) pkge.. 45
Plug-"Sthe Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30
ft boxes.............................. 55
"Florida Boy .' 5 plugs to lb., 30 lb
boxes... ...... .. .. .... ............. 3
"Florida-Girls right twist, 14 to
lb., 17 lb i ......................... 50
Cigars-"'Long Brnch"a very pop-
ular brad, pr thousand......... 27 00
"Our X" choice r, easy smok'r 24 00
"Our XX a veiy voice smoker .... 26 00
"Florida Boys," (we areState Agt,) 35 00
SOAP AND STARC--Col 8 oz., per box.. 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz.,eruy .........3...... 50
Starch, fump, pr......................... 6%c
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, KING POWDERS-
Hops, per lb.... n- I4.......................... ........... 16@22c
Ager's Fresh Y Cakes, per doz .......... Oc.
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
do, 1...... .. ..................................... .......... 225
Town alk Baking Powder, perdoz. lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. % lb..... 270
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. y fb...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.,
'POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new................... 3 50@8 768
CHICKENS, each............................................ 20@40
EG -Per o .... .................................... 34@35
IDS tr-D Flnt C es, perlbt., first clasa 18
CoutryDry Slted, per ..... ....... 911
Butcher Dfr BSalted, per 5?............. 9010
Damaged Hides................................ 6
Kip and Calf, 81bs. and under............... 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb.............. .............. 35
1 -,; Deer Skins Salted, per lb...... ........... 2@30
.FUR -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
S t r.L... .....,i .................. .............. ... ..... i 0@ 4 00
, Raccoon, each........................................ 5@15
W ild C t, each............ ... ...... ........... ... 10@ 20
Fox, each.... ............................ .............. 5@15
BEESWAX--per lb...... ...................... .... ...., 20
WooL--Free from burs, per lb............................. 17@22
Burry, per b.......................................... 11@15
GOAT 8xINS-Each per lb.................................. 10


Afterftioz I"Polltry W.Efaa..
DR.: R. BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs, all
Other domestic animals are benefittedby its use. This
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
It is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONE DOL-
LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to the proprietor.
R. BACHMANN, M. D.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., 36 Bay Street.
, aug. 21 to feb. 21. '83.

For Sale.
Orange Seedlings and Small Trees with 1, 2 and 3 year
old buds. All sizes of Sour Seedlings. Also
ORANGE LANDS
On the Bluffton property and in Orange Co. For partic-
ulars apply to
F. C. SOLLEE, Supt.,
tomar 10 '83p Bluffton, Volusia Co.. Fla.


I


LeConte Pear Cuttings.

20;000 LeConte Pear Cuttings for sale at 820.00 per thou-
sand, well packed and delivered at the Express Office,
Thomasville, Ga.
to jan 11 '83p R. N. McKINNON.

If you want- to become a telegraph operator send twen-
ty-five cents to C. E. JONES & BRo., Cincinnati Ohio, for
best illustrated instruction book. eow to July20-83


eow-6t. to jan. 8. '83.


-


Peas, Beans, Potatoes,
Of all well know varieties for early -planting.
CABBAGE PLANTS,
CABBAGE SEED,
ONION SEED,
ONION SETTS,
With a full line of Garden Seeds.
Send for New Catalogue.
C. B. ROGERS,
Seedsman,
133 MARKET ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA.
tojan8'83



DIXIE NURSERY.


JAPAN PERSIMMONS,
LE CONTE PEAR TREES,
AND A FULL LINE OF NURSERY STOCK.

-ir Orders by mail promptly attended to. "S

H. H. SANFORD, PROPRIETOR,
tojan 17 '83p THOMASVILLE, GA.




Merchants' line,
DOUBLE DAILY,

CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.

ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.
REGULAR MAIL,

GEO. M. BIRD, Capt. G. J. Mercier.
H. B. PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Eary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street daily except Sunday, at 3
p. m., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
all intermediate landings.
ROSA. Capt. J. L. Amazeen.
FREDERICK DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel.
WELAKA, Capt. J. S. Mattheson.
On of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
Whaif, foot of Laura Street, daily except Saturday at
4:;0 p, m,, and from S., F. and W. Railway wharf at 5 p.
e., for Palatka, Sanford, Ehterprise and all intermedi-
ate landigas.
Connects at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad
for Gainesville and Ocala.
Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
on the Upper Ocklawaha.
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Daytona.
Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Idngwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, OrrTido,
Kisaimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
Connects at Enterprise with Coaches for Daytona and
New Smyrna and Titusville.
Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
morning at 7 a. m., and Sanford at 7:30 a. m. and 9:0( a.
m., making close connections with S., F. and W. Rail-
way for all points North East and West.
^-JThrough bills of lading given to all points.
The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
respect.
For further information, apply at General Ticket
Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets.
W. B. WATSON, Manager.
C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agept. Aug. 7-tf.


--T~-


~ _I __


AY'L`) I,_/~i?~:b ::`~fh:r :`;
j





32 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


might make a stand. History should be a
strong point, for in history we are approaching
the scientific field; and in history nobody can
doubt that we have made in some respects
enormous advances. The Anglo-Saxon and
Charlemange have been nearly abolished, and
that is understood to mean that we have made
a great advance in accuracy of research. But,
from a literary point of view, it may be doubted
whether we could meet without misgiving such
a champion as Macaulay. The difference is
significant. It is easy to point out Macaulay's
glaring defects; the limitation of his political
views ; the offensive glitter of his, style; and
in that respect, at least one living historian
seems to be justly his superior. Yet, when we
read the "Essays" and the first part of the
"History," we are less colfidelit. The extraor-
dinary fullness of knowledge, the command of
material, the power of grouping events and
forming them into clear and flowing narrative(


good old friend, the late THURLOW WEED:
"Mr. Weed was very fond of animals. He used
to stand at the window of his study and feed
all the sparrows in the neighborhood. They
knew him as well as the thousands of people
who took off their hats to him in the street, and
his appearance was the signal of an amount of
chirping and chattering which would have de-
moralized any one but a confirmed lover of
animals. His special pets, however, were a
white pigeon and an Italian greyhound. They
were with him constantly until the evening be-
fore he died. The pigeon had to be excluded
from the room first, because it insisted in
nestling on his pillow close by his withered
cheek, and cooing as if to arouse him to con-
sciousness. It was locked up in another room,
and there it moaned like one in distress."
I FARMS, FENCES, FERTILIZERS, &c.-The
Sfarms of the United States are worth $10,196,-


The Decay of Literature.
About thirty years ago, there were novelists
of the first rank; writers such that the an-
nouncement of a new publication by them sent
a thrill through every corner not inaccessible
to circulating libraries. In the period from 20
to 40 years removed from us, we had been
startled by the new power revealed, though not
for the first time, in "Vanity Fair," and had
eagerly accepted "Pendennis" and the "New-
comes" and "Esmond." A foolish controversy,
still sometimes continued, was raging as to the
rival merits of their author and the contempo-
rary author of "Pickwick" and "David Cop-
perfield." Wiser persons enjoyed both, and
there were few months in which one did not
greet with delight the appearance of a number
of one serial in the familiar yellow, and another
in the equally familiar green. Then the whole
literary world had just been thrown into an ex-
citement, never since paralleled by the sadden
apparition of "Jane Eyre." A greater writer
was making a more gradual approach to fame
by the publication of the "Scenes of Clerical
Life. And besides Thackeray, Dickens, Miss
Bronte, and George Eliot, a number of writers,
some happily still living, provided agreeable
entertainment in the intervals, and might be
regarded as at least worthy subordinates. Lord
Lytton-to mention only the dead-was pub-
lishing "My Novel" and "The Claxtons" which
are at least excellent specimens of good literary
craftsmanship; Mrs. Gaskell produced "Ruth"
and "Mary Barton," and Kingsley wrote "Al-
ton Locke" and "Hypatia" and "Westward
Ho !" books which, if they will not bear the
closest inspection in all respects, show at least
a vigor and originality for which it would be
hard to produce a later parallel. It is rather
dangerous, perhaps, to ask whether we have such
novelists now. But allowing every reader to
select his favorite, or pair of favorites, to be
worthy champions of the moderns, he will find
it hard to fill up the list capable of doing bat-
tle against their predecessors. Have we any
counterbalancing considerations to suggest ? Is
there any department of literature in which we
can Ilaim a preponderance as distinct as our
predecessors in this direction In poetry, phi-
losophy, fiction, we mean to have the worst of
it. There is yet one direction in which we


CURE FOR COLDS.-A gentleman who was
subject to attacks of acute bronchitis, succeeded
in warding, them off by observing the precau-
tions against catching cold, but especially by
chewing a small piece of ginger whenever he
was obliged to go out doors on a cold day.
Since he had adopted the plan of keeping a
piece of ginger in his mouth while out of doors,
he had never had an attack of bronchitis, either
winter or summer.

GLUCOSE.-The manufacture of glucose,
which for a time was very profitable, is said to
be overdone, and many of the factories have
been obliged to shut down. The Pavenport,
Iowa, Democrat gives a list of twelve establish-
ments in various parts of the country, some of
them very large, which have either proved
failures, or been compelled to suspend opera-
tions on account of the overstocked condition
of the market.


m


I -
I ___ ----~--
I- _ -, - - - -----------


are so undeniable that we are inclined to admit,
in spite of his faults, that he is unapproached
by his successors in the power which goes to a
monumental work. Modern writers seem to be
sometimes the victims of an indigestion caught
at the State Paper Office; sometimes they are
tempted to tack together a series of brilliant
pamphlets and trust to fortune to make it a
history. At present they seem capable of turn-
ing out work so massive, so finely executed, and
marked by such unity of design as their fore-
fathers. And yet we may admit that, in his-
tory at least, we have the advantage of a seri-
ous and energetic body of students really
achieving good work, and at least accumulat-
ing the material of literary triumphs. Casting
a rapid glance over these facts the conclusion
seems to be inevitable. The literary, like the
natural harvest, has been of late blighted and
scanty. We have passed from a land flowing
with milk and honey into a comparative desert.
As Johnson said when he went from England
to Scotland, we see the flower dying away to
the stalk. In a utilitarian and scientific sense
we may be making progress; in the regions of
immigration and artistic achievement-so far,
at least, as literature is concerned-we have
been progressing backward. Great names are
scarce; there is hardly a leader left who can
stir the enthusiasm of the young and make us
feel that the torch of intellectual light is being
delivered into worthy hands. If we would not
flatter the time, must we not confess that we
are at least crossing a barren zone, and at pres-
ent without any distinct glimpse of a fertile re-
gion beyond?--The Cornhill Magazine.
THE COLORED PEOPLE'S FAIR.-A New
York city daily says: "The Industrial Fair
which the colored people hold at Raleigh every
year deserves the highest commendation. The
North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture
delivered the opening address at the recent
fair, and Governor Jarvis delivered the annual
address to a great crowd on the day following.
Much progress in the quality and number of
exhibits is noticed from year to year, and there
is a fine display of stock and agricultural pro-
ducts. The colored population of the United
States was shown by the census of 1880 to be
6,580,793, and people who doubt the capacity
of the colored man to become an independent
producer and accumulate wealth, should at-
tend the Industrial Fair at Raleigh. If the
pride of the colored population can be touched
and their ambition excited to achieve prosper-
ity through industry, their progress will be
rapid. Let their enterprise at Raleigh have
the attention and praise it deserves."-Southern
Industries.

KIND-HEARTED OLD THURLOW 1-The
New York correspondent of the Fernandina
Mirror, tells this touching little story of our


I
AW


799,645; the fences, $78,765,723; live stock,
$500,832,187; farm implements and machin-
ery, $408,516,902; manures and special ferti-
lizers cost $28,587,865. The total value in-
vested in agriculture is rated at $12,210,253,-
316. Its yearly products foot up $2,500,000,-
000, and the revenue yearly collected from its
products for the support of the national, State
and local governments and for education
amounts to nearly $100,000,000 annually.
*-
Take Care of the Tools.
Millions of dollars are expended in this
country every year for agricultural and horti-
cultural implements and tools; and by far too
great a proportion of such tools are neglected
and not properly cared for. In many cases
they rust out more than they wear out. Re-
member, therefore, whenever a tool, imple-
ment or farm machine is laid by for any length
of time, it should be protected from inj ry by
rusting. Take half a pound of lard, ad4 to it
a piece of rosin half the size of a hen's. egg
and melt together over a slow fire. This may
be done in an old tomato or fruit can, or in
some other convenient vessel. When com-
pletely melted, remove from the fire, and. stir
with a stick until cold. This makes a soft oint-
ment which may be applied with a cloth.
Whatever metallic tool, or part of a tool put
away for the winter if smeared with a thin
coating of this will be perfectly protected from
rust. Not only the coarser implements of the
farm, but knives and forks not often used in
the household, may be protected. A mere
film is all that is required. The wooden han-
dles of tools should, also, receive from time to
time a good coating of some good paint.
Nothing pays farmers better than a little care
rightly bestowed upon their implements.

"IMPORTED."-To many Americans the
magic word "imported" coming from a sales-
man's mouth, is sufficient to cause them to
choose the foreign article in preference to an
American article of equal merit which could
be obtained for two-thirds the price.-Philadel-
phia Commercial Bulletin.

-There are in the United States about
10,000,000,000 families. Our annual taxation for
federal purposes is about $400,000,000.: Each
head of a family pays, therefore, an average
tax of $40. Under the existing revenue sys-
tem the working classes are more heavily taxed
than their wealthy neighbors, for the highest
duties are imposed on the coarser goods used
by the poor.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Barefooted Horses and Bad Shoeing.
I owned a mare for fourteen years which
was never shod. I used her for breeding from
a colt, and kept her without shoes because it
was better for my purpose, as she would not
be so liable to injure her colts, and she was
not driven enough to require shoeing. This
mare was never lame or tender-footed, but she
would slip on smooth ice, and once fell down
in crossing a pond, and would have injured
herself (as she could not gain a foothold) if
she had not been held down until removed.
She was gotten off the ice by putting a rope
around her body and hitching another horse to
it and sliding her several rods broadside to the
shore. Her feet were never cut, and contained
all the natural rim on the bottom, which, it is
claimed, in a state of nature will hold horses
up, keeping them from slipping anywhere.
There is a vast difference in the wearing
effect on horses feet on prairie land where there
is an absence of grits; on plains where there
Sis more or less grass to soften the footfall, and
also an absence of gravel, and a gravelly road.
On such a road a horse might go on a walk, if
not driven too much, without wearing the
hoofs to the extent of becoming footsore, but
if driven on a trot or galloped any considera-
Sble amount, it would become footsore. I have
known colts while running in the pasture in
summer on gravelly soil, by the natural wear
of the feet and in stamping on account of flies
-to wear the hoofs away so that they became
decidedly tender-footed.
There is a great difference in horses about
stepping; some strike the feet very hard on
the ground and others lightly. The former
would be sure to get footsore without shoes, and
with them unless well shod, while the latter
might do very well barefooted, under possible
circumstances. There is also a great difference
in the shape of horses' feet; some are born
flatfooted and become crippled unless extra
care is had in their shoeing; others have hoofs
so upright and hard that they will endure
neglect and keep their feet in sound condition.
A flatfooted horse usually has a soft hoof,
Which wears out rapidly. It is apparent from
these facts that a general rule to deprive
horses of shoes cannot be niade always practi-
cable.
A horse well shod, so that the outer rim of
the hoof rests fully on the shoes, will always
,travel better than one .poorly shod or one bare-
Ifooted. The curse of shoeing is the buttress-
'an instrument which a blacksmith seems to
delight in using to cut down a horse's heels,
?and more hbrses are made tender-footed from
This abuse than all other causes. Farmers are
Very apt to allow their ,horses to wear their
shoes so lo.g that the outside of the, hoof
!grows over them, and they grind the soft and
tender portion of the foot, producing corns;
whereas the shoe should always rest upon the
rim or outside. This neglect is the worst kind


of economy, as it often results in permanent
injury to valuable animals. Such shoeing is
worse than no shoes, but this .abuse is not a
conclusive argument against shoeing, but
should be conclusive against bad shoeing.-
Saratoga, in N. Y. Tribune.
HOG CHOLERA--BURNT CORN.-- Every
,paper in the United States should occasionally
keep the fact before. its readers that burnt
corn is a certain and speedy cure for hog
cholera. The best way is to make a pile of
corn on the cobs, effectually scorchit, and then
give the affected bogs free access to it. This
remedy was discovered by a Western man, at
the time his distillery was burned, together
with a large lot of store corn, which was so
. I I I i ~


much injured as to be unfit for use, and was
hauled out and greedily eaten by the hogs,
several of which were dying daily. After the
second day not a single hog was lost, and the
disease entirely disappeared. The remedy has
been tried in a number of cases since and
never failed.
SHETLAND PONIES.-One of our Texas ex-
changes describes an 8,000-acre ranche in that
State entirely devoted to the business of raising
Shetland ponies. The breeding stock consists
of seven Shetland stallions and forty-five mares,
all thoroughbred, and two hundred small ponies
range over the prairies like sheep, and are de-
scribed as very gentle.
LICE ON CATTLE.-An old remedy is to
take the water that Irish potatoes have been
boiled in and wash or wet the cattle thoroughly
to the skin with it. If properly applied it is
a sure cure.



Cotton Manufacturing in the South.
The development of cotton manufacturing in
the South is one of the most notable and prom-
ising industrial occurrences of the day. Not
merely because of the rapid growth of the busi-
ness, but more because of its appropriateness
and apparent profitableness. The conditions
would seem to be altogether in favor of the
Southern mills, so far as the supplying of their
home market is concerned at least, and it re-
mains to be determined whether they have not
also marked advantages in the competition for
control of the markets of the West. The larger
part of the charges for freight, jobbers' com-
missions,. storage, insurance, etc., which the
Eastern mill owner has to pay, the Southern
mill is exempt from; and the difference from
$2 to $3 a bale in freight alone is clear saving.
The Baltimore Journal of Commerce estimates
the actual capital now invested in Southern'cot-
ton mills at $50,000,000, of which nearly one-
third has been invested within two. years.
Touching. the prosperity of these Southern
mills, the Journal says that ten per cent. an-
nual dividends are the lowest reported, and this
after a large amount has been .taken from. the
earnings for increasing the size and capacity of
the mills. Under more favorable conditions
the dividends have been much larger, as in the
following instances :
The Augusta, Ga., factory, the oldest mill in
that city, has a capital of $600,000, .and runs


26,200 spindles and 790 looms; from 1865 to
1882, 17. years, it has paid out in cash divi-
dends $1,467,000, or about 2i times its capital,
or an average of 14. per cent. per annum ; be-
sides this it has laid aside a surplus of between
$340,000 and $350,000, or over 50 per cent. of
its entire capital; its stock is worth 160 to 170.
The Langley mill, of the same city, has' a capi-
tal of $400,000, with 10,000 spindles and 329
looms; it has paid in the past 31 years 474 per
cent. dividends, or an average of about 15 per
cent. per annum; last year it paid a dividend
of 20 per cent.; its present surplus is $200,000,
and its stock is worth from 160 to 170. The
Graniteville mill, also at Augusta, with a capi-
tal of $600,000, has 34,600 spindles and 900
looms; this company, pays 10 per cent, divi-
dends, and then puts its surplus into new spin-
dles; out of its surplus earnings, that is, earn-
ings above its dividends, it has built, without a


dollar's expense to the stockholders, the Vau-
cluse mills, with 10,000 spindles for making
fine fabrics, at a cost of $340,000 ; it has also
laid aside an additional surplus of $125,640.
The Enterprise was started in 1877, with a capi-
tal of $900,000; it has also paid 10 per cent.
dividends, and laid aside the rest of its earnings
as a surplus. The Wesson mills, of Mississippi,
have paid a dividend of 26 per cent., and the
Troup factory, of the same State, 24 per cent.,
while from time to time they have noted divi-
dends of from 30 to 50 per cent., the latter hav-
ing been earned by a Pulaski, Tenn., mill last
year.
Against this, by way of comparing the rela-
tive profitableness of Northern and Southe rn
mills, is set the assertion of Mr. Randall, Mem-
ber of Congress from Massachusetts, who said
in the House of Representatives, that he had
from official sources a statement showing that
fifty of the leading corporations in Lowell,
Lawrence, Chicopee and Salem, Massachusetts;
Manchester, Nashua, and Newmarket, New
Hampshire; Lewiston, and other points in
Maine, representing a capital of $50,000,000 en-
gaged in manufacturing the various grades of
cotton and woolen fabrics, have paid to their
stockholders in the last five years an average
dividend of a little less than 7 per cent. per
annum only.
The cotton mills of the South already give
employment to something like 40,000 opera-
tives.-Scientific American.
WIRE FENCEs.-The N. E. Farmer says
the discussion of barbed wire for fencing has
again got into the Vermont Legislature, where
a committee have had a hearing on the subject,
which is reported in the Freeman. With very
few exceptions, all who were heard in the mat-
ter, spoke in favor of barbed wire, and believed
it is to be the fence of the future, and that no
legislation concerning it is required. There
seems no reason why a person building a wire
fence should be responsible for damage to ani-
mals, more than if the animals were injured by
picket or stump fences. It is quite evident,
from the testimony, that the use of barbed wire
is rapidly extending throughout the country, on
account of its cheapness and efficacy. It seems
equally adapted to restrain horses, cattle, sheep,
swine, and dogs, the latter especially.

STEEL NAILS.-The days of :the iron nail
are apparently numbered. Pittsburgh has a
company with $750,000 capital, organized to
manufacture them of Bessemer steel, and fac-
tories in Wheeling will come only a little
later. The steel article is stiffer and tougher
than the iron nail, and so much lighter that
the added cost per pound will be more than
balanced by the increased number.
AMERICAN SILK.-New Jersey has 106 es-
tablishments for the manufacture of silk and


silk products, which employ 113,650 persons,
whose aggregate yearly wages amounts to $4,-
178,000. The average wages of the operators
is $333 each per year. There is $6,053,000
capital invested in the industry in that State,
and tfho T,'-,JIxo cXdP thoZ prodvi"o j'o yut cat 917,-
122,000.
"If you have a friend worth loving,
,Love him. Yes, and let him know
That you love him, ere life's evening
Tinge his brow with sunset glow.
Why should good words ne'er be said
Of a friend-till he is dead ?"

If you hear a song that thrills you,
Sung by any child of song,
Praise it. Do not let the singer
Wait deserved praises long.
Why should one who thrills your heart
Lack the joy you may impart?"


LI


I
---- -
I -' I`~~-~-~".- .- --- --I-~ ~ ---~-~--------------- -- -- -
-~--- -II -~ ---- -lh--c- ~ _ C-_l_~_ ---_IIS~--C-- ~_Il~nrl__-~I A I I






34 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


ke airida isitch.
JACKSONVILLE, DECEMBER 25, 1882.

D. Redmond, D. H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.


RATES OF ADVERTISING,
PA-IID IIN AIDVtANCE.


SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. MO. MO. 1 YBAR
One..................... 00 $ 250 5 50 $1000 $ 1850
Two.................... 200 500 1000 18 00 3400
Three ................ 300 700 1400 2500 4600
Four................... 4 00 900 17 50 3000 58 00
Five........................ 450 1100 19 00 35 00 6500
Eight................. .... 8 00 1650 .30 00 5000 10000
Sixteen............ 16 00 3000 500 8000 15000
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) 20 cents
per line.
CIRCULATION.
This paper has the largest circulation of any
paper (dazly or weekly) published in Florida,
with a very large circulation in Georgia and the
Southern States; also has subscribers in every
State in the Union, with many in foreign coun-
tries. After October 23d, we shall issue weekly
from 8,000 to 10,000 copies, about 40,000 per
month.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Persons are warned against paying subscrip-
tions to any one calling himself our Agent, as
we have no regular canvassing agent.
OFFICIAL OR AN OF THE FLORIDA
FRUIT GR WERS' ASSOCIATION.
Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for onE YEAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
American Agriculturist....... ......... ..............$2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine ...................... 4.20
Country Gentleman............................. 2.75
Detroit Free Press ............ .......................... 2.50
Eclectic M agazine....................................... 4.20
Florida Agriculturist......................... 2.25
Florida Weekly Union......................... 2.25
Florida Weekl Times .............. ........... 1.50
Family Story aper................................... 3.50
Fireside Companion ........................... ..... 3.35
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly................. 4.20
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.20
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly .................... 3.40
Frank Leslie's Sunda Magaiine................. 3.40
Harper's Illustrated Weekly................. 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Bazar........................... 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Young People.............. 2.20
Harper's Monthly Magazine......................... 4.20
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine ...................... 40
Nebraska Farmer.................................. .. 2.00
North American Review................................. 5.20
New York Weekly Sun............................... 1.76
New York Weekly Herald............................. 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune......................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times.............................. 1.76
New York Weekly World.......................... 1.75
New York Ledger ....................................... 3.35
New York Weekly .................................. 3.35
Popular Science Monthly.........................5.20
Philadelphia Weekly Times...... ............ 2.50
Southern Cultivator..................................... 2.00
Scientific American................................. 3.75
Saturday Night................................... 3.35
Savannah Weekly News...................... 2.50
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.20
Waverly Magazine.................................... 5.20
The above are among the very best publications
Remittances should be sent by Check Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
SASHMlAIEJD BROVLS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
"Merry Christmas I"
The entire "stafi" of THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


unite in sending the "compliments of the sea-
son" and all kindly wishes to our subscribers
and readers everywhere.
POULTRY IN FRANCE.--Strange as it may
seem, there is more food raised in the poultry-
yards of France than in the stalls and pas-
tures of England.


worth sending for.
E. L. M.-A "half-barrel box is the ordi-
nary Florida orange box, holding about 128
fair sized oranges wrapped in paper.
J. E.-The Rural New Yorker is published at
34 Park Row, New York. You can obtain
specimen copies by writing for them.
W. J. T.-J. B. King, of Sanford, Florida,
may be able to furnish the Japan Plum trees
you desire.
PALMETTO TREES.-J. L.-Transplant in
the Spring, just as the young plant starts to
grow. Get all the roots possible-water,
shade and mulch-and then success is uncer-
tain.


Our full line of fine goods are now ready for shipment
embracing the following:
Orange Marmalade, Preserved Scuppernong Grapes,
Scuppernong. Grape Jelly, Guava Jelly, Guava
Marmalade, Preserved Figs, Quince Jelly,
Quince Marmalade, Sweet Pickled Peaches.
Our goods are first-class in every respect, put up in
neat, attractive and merchantable packages and ready
for shipment to all parts of the United States and the
Canadas. Our object is to give to the best trade a per-
fectly pure article and every package bearing our trade-
mark can be relied upon as strictly pure goods. To those
who are selling our goods it is unnecessary to commend
them, but to those who are not we beg tQ say, we are
packing the best goods manufactured. A trial order is
solicited. Price list sent on application.
We offer every variety of Fine Candies known
to the trade, and if a first-class strictly pure article is de-
sired at reasonable prices, send for price list.
W A.1R OCK N& ICO.,
nov27 tf JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Delay in Issuing The Dispatch.
The Publishers beg to inform their numerous
subscribers that on account of making addi-
tions to their Printing House they have been
unable to print on regular publication day as
heretofore; but, they hope to be through with
carpenters, plasterers, &c., before January 1st.,
with greatly improved facilities for printing
with neatness and dispatch.
Literature.
Harper's Magazine-The Atlantic Monthly
-The Century-Lippincott's-The Eclectic-
North American Review-Popular Science
Monthly-all the Literary and Scientific
Magazines of the day; American reprints of
Foreign Reviews; standard editions of all our
best authors; richly illustrated and superbly
bound volumes, suitable for holiday presents,
may be found, with countless other articles of
taste and elegance, at Ashmead Brothers.
Florida State Fair I
We are informed by the worthy and indefat-
igable Secretary of the Fair Association,
(Major A. J. RUSSELL,) that the prospects of
the coming Fair are bright and "booming;"
and that the exhibition in all valuable points,
will, doubtless surpass any we have yet seen in
Florida. We are rejoiced to learn this; and
we trust every reader of THE DISPATCH will
do his part at the Fair in illustrating the ca-
pacity of our truly wonderful State. See Pre-
mium List, published in our paper of Decem-
ber 11.
Answers to Inquiries.
J. L., MAITLAND.-"Kainit" is one of the
cheapest available sources of potash. Add from
300 to 400 pounds to the muck compost you
are preparing for an acre of orange trees; and
the same quantity, or more, if you can "afford"
it, to each atre of Irish potatoes. We have
used it for many years, and always with satis-
factory results.
J. R. E.-The fowls we alluded to, were
"Rowley's Improved Dominiques"-a full ac-
count of which we shall endeavor to print in
our next. They strongly resemble .Plymouth
Rocks-are full as large, and differ mainly in
having double, or "rose combs."
R. L. W.-The newest and latest "sensa-
tion" in the way of a strawberry, is the "James
Vick"-a cut of which will appear in our first
number for January 1, 1883. Thestock of this
plant is held mainly, if not entirely by Chas.
A. Green, of Rochester, New York. Mr. Green
is sending out an excellent catalogue, contain-
ing Hints on Fruit Culture, &c., and it is well


COL. M. B. HILLYARD, a valued friend from
Alabama, called at THE DISPATCH office in
our absence, and left for us kind greetings,
which we heartily reciprocate, and deeply re-
gret that we could not have the pleasure of
meeting this public-spirited and accomplished
gentleman. Col. Hillyard is very actively and
earnestly engaged in the encouragement of Silk
Culture in the South ; and will, doubtless, do
very much to advance this important industry.
We wish him all the success he deserves and is
laboring for. #
N. B.-Almost every one of our subscribers
and readers can add from one to ten or even
more new names to our list for 1883, by taking
the trouble of showing THE DISPATCH, and
speaking a kind word for it. We desire to give
the public one of the VERY BEST AND CHEAP-
EST PAPERS in the country; and to do this,
we must have a large list of subscribers and
advertisers. So, good friends if you like our
paper, and think it is doing worthy work, give
it a helping hand.
AMERICAN POULTRY ASSOCIATION--The
Executive Committee of this society have voted
to accept the invitation of the Central Massa-
chusetts Poultry Club to meet at the Bay State
House, Worcester, Mass., Wednesday, Janu-
ary, 31st next. The Secretary is Mr. GEO. S.
JOSSELYN, Fredonia. N. Y.
"FEORIDA INTELLIGENCER."-We are under
obligations to W. L. WHITFIELD, Esq., for full
files of his excellent monthly, published at Live
Oak, at $2 per year.
LLCONTE AND KEIFFER!-See advertise-
ment of the Pioneer LeConte Pear raiser, Capt.
L. L. VARNEDOE, of Thomasville, Ga.
MANY original articles of interest and value,
are unavoidably deferred until our next issue.

F L 0 1R I D. A&
rr-
Semi-TNirical Fmiit Preseoring Co.
AND
MANUFACTURING CONFECTIONERS,
Post-Office Box 45,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.









-,


I I __ ,
---~__I_ ,- ___
- - -- ----





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. e(
..,- ~ -- I- --


I I


ARRAWT
the Farm
f i
S oe. 1114
I _ _


to jan80, '88.


I

A .

|E* Ar
1
Horticult

N ; My ne
Closely]
'lustratei
free on
S stamp.


to Jan 9, 83
'* '* * * 1! *.V -


QueeurTE South

FARM MILLS
For Stock Pd oZ MaGMl foc

S Write for Pamphlet,
lSimpon t Ga( t WfP Co.
8ucoeJaou to ZBTaU MILL 0o.
CINCQNNATI. 0.


U


N

U

U
15
s


to sept 10 '83


Sedgwick Steel Wire Fence
..c _aCO


ira wutasnm a znaiauware eaiera or aaareats e Manu-
fd uremrsG IWIK 330.
Mentor tts paper. eRiin d.
to dec 30, '.82.


SKieffer-Pear. Jap. Persimmon. LeConte Pear.
5ooT o 0 ;Cuttings and Trees FOR SALE. More
X 0 trees in orchard than any five growers
of the LECONTE PEAR. Apply to head quarters.
W. W. T'IHO1MPSON, Prop'r.,
LeConte Nursery, Smithville, Ga.
i SEND FOR CATALOGUE. to feb 1, '83-p
!


I p of Marion Conty, Forida,
-BY-
S J. W. BUSHNELL & A. T. WILLIAMS,
Showing all lands subject to Homestead entry, also va-
cant State, Railroad, Disston and Reed lands, all post-of-
flees, railroad stations etc. Adopted by Board of County
Commissioners as the official map. Price, in pocket
form, $2. Price, on rollers for office, $3. Sent postpaid,
on receipt of price.
Sar ,. A. SALOMONSON, General Agent,
tp ,Iqar 17, 83 Ocala, Marion Co., Fla.
mm -


TREE


BRADLEY'S ORANGE
We have prepared this Fertilizer
especially for the culture of the or-
ange tree, and from the results al-
ready obtained from its use on the
orange groves of Florida, we feel
justified in claiming that it cannot '
be surpassed, if equalled, by any
other fertilizer.
It is composed of the purest and
highest grade materials, combined
in such proportions as to furnish all
the elements of plant-food in prop-
er quantities and in the best form
to promote a rapid and strong
growth of the wood and insure an
abundant yield of fine fruit.
A sufficient proportion of its
phosphoric acid, being readily sol-
uble in cold water is immediately
available as food for the young
rootlets of the tree, while a consid-
erable portion, being present in the
form of pure ground bone, undis-
solved by acid, becomes entirely
soluble in the soil only by the ac-
tion of the elements of nature in
due course of time. Thus this all
important food is not soon ex- ,
hausted by th6 tree, or washed into
the ground by heavy rains, but is
supplied in abundant quantities


Maanufactur ers of the Celebrated

.EBradley'Ba "PLhospla-ete,"
the Standard Fertilizer for all Field and Garden Crops, and especially adapted to the wants of the
Cotton Crop.
MAIN OFFICE, 27 KIJIBfY STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
For further particulars and pamphlets giving testimonials from some of the best orange growers in the
State, address,


O. W. Birovmwell & Co., Agents for State of Florida,
49 W. BAY-ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


Wholesale Dealers in



Foreign and Domestic Fruits.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS FOR THE SALE OF


Florida, Oranges and Lemons,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


----0--o-------
PCORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
-REFEREINCESn.-First National Bank, Jacksonville, Florida. Union National Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
sept 4, tf.


FRANK W. MUVMBY.


S JNO. N. C. STOCKTON.


RAYMOND D. KNIGHT


MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


1879.
F. W. MUMBY & CO*


SUCCESSORS TO -

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Mafolica FatVnce, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crowl and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.,
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
W*E WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WEST BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,
to July 5, '83. (Mention this paper)


to oct 9. '83,


I


FERTILIZER.
throughout the season.
The nitrogen and potash also are
furnished in the most nutritious
forms and approved proportions
for this crop.
After giving this Fertilizer a
thorough trialof three years on or-
ange trees in Florida, we intro-
duced it last season quite exten-
sively throughout the State, and
the results have even exceeded our
most sanguine expectations. We
have yet to hear of a single instance
where the most satisfactory returns
have not been derived.
We have nothing to say about the
fertilizers manufactured or sold by
other parties, as we believe, with an
established reputation of twenty-
two years in the manufacture of
high grade fertilizers, we can stand
upon our own footing, without call-
ing the attention of the public to
the record of any of our competi-
tors, or to the value of their manu-
factures as compared with that of
our own. Our fertilizers are all an-
alyzed, when manufactured, by
competent chemists, and none are
shipped to market until they are
known to be up to the standard.


---
1R~ I - ...


A-A - r 7 --:


---
h
-L-.: I -t


~ ----------
--


-
r





3 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


northwest of us affords protection from frost so perfectly that the extreme cold of December 29, 1880, did not inj ure our orange trees or fruit.
We are offering these choice lands to actual settlers at from $15 to $50 per acre. Village lots and improved property for sale also. For further particulars, call on or ad-
dress J. Y. PARCE, DeLand Volusia Co., Florida, or H. A. DeLAND, Fairport, 1fonroe o., N. Y. toiXli.F'83

CHAS. H. DORSETT, -s -
EW. N. JUSTICE,
COMMISSION DEALER IN
FOridO AWholesale Commission Merchant,
lori a Products, wo. 313 Nortli Water Street, Plilladelpwia.

ORANGES, SYRUP, EARLY VEGETA- SPECIALTIES: FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.
BLES, HIDES, SKINS, ETC.
Large shipments remitted on day of sale, small shipments weekly. tonov27 83p
Prompt attention given to all business. Account Sales
and check given as soon as goods are closed out. i &l-'EDis a new town in Orange
Stencils will be furnished on application. Bearing Orang-e G-rove WINTE r l County, ilorlda, eighteen
16 a Street, FOR SALE. miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
156 Bay Street, FOR SALE. with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful lakes.
T Located 2/ miles from prominent landing on St. WINTER HOMES in themidstof Orange Groves, or
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA.John's River: 200 trees in full bearing, 400 trees not yet Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets an
to mch 3 '83 bearing, in fine condition, good neighborhood, churches, Maps giving particulars, address .
schools, post and express offices. Owner would prefer OH APM A & CH AS
to sell one-half, has other business, would sell the whole -CHAPMAN & C ASE,
GET RICH selling our Rubber Stamps and Music. if desfred by purchaser. For particulars address with WINTER PARK, ORANGE C., FLA.
toSamples free. L.P. Bissell & Co. Cleveland, stamp T.F. DRUDY, Fla. dec 4 f
to may20-'83 to inch ;383' Emporia, Fla. dec 4 tf


0


THE MAPES COMPLETE AND SPECIAL MANURES
FO It


Orange Trees, Fruits and Vegetables.

A ftul' assortbifn'tt compris'ing eight different brands, kept in stock at Warehouse in Jacksonville, Fla., also The Mapes Pure Ground Bone, Dry Ground Fish,
Potash, Salts, etc., for prompt shipment or delivery at all times. Circulars containing guaranteed analysis and composition of The Mapes Mauures, prices, full directions
for use as well as reports from well known Truckers and growers of Oranges, etc., giving their practical experience in using the Mapes Manures may be had of

THE MAPES FORMULA & PERUVIAN GUANO CO., TYSEN & SMITH, Our Forwarding Agents,

158 Front Street, New York. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Some Practical Results in Florida, Season 1882.
Dr. R. J. MARVIN, Orange City, Fla., November 9th, 1882, reports: Crops-Oran es. Lemons, Limes and other semi-tropical Fruits, 800 trees on ten acres, ranging in age
from one to six years, used fertilizers as follows: I applied The Mapes Orange Tree Manure from two pounds to the smallest, to fifteen pounds to the largest tree, twice a
year, in December and June, nothing else being used, and I am putting in now at the rate of three tons per year and increasing a half ton, each year. The Mapes Orange
Tree Manure was scattered broadcast and raked in. Trees are now growing finely, thrifty and clean ; soil is a sandy, pine upland, season dry.
Remarks-"When I purchased this grove, the six acres of large trees had been sadly neglected. They were stunted, starved and covered all over with the scale insect, in
fact were in a dying condition having as many dead branches as alive. I used various fertilizers the.first six months without discovering much benefit, when a year ago I
determined to try The Mapes Orange Tree Manure. During the past year the trees have cleaned off, put on a heavy new growth and averaged at least oile-third larger. They
are in a fine growing condition now, the sap flowing freely, I am well pleased with the results and having laid in a stock of The Mapas Orange Tree Manure intend to continue
using it in the future. I am acquainted with the principlesof vegetable chemistry and biology, enough, at least, to form a correct opinion of the quality of a fertilizer and
the needs of a member of the citrus family."
C. CODRINGTON & CO., Editors of the Florida Agriculturist, DeLand, Fla., November 12th, 1882. writes, "There are many fine groves in this section of all ages, ma-
nured with The Mapes Fertilizers." "The Mapes Orange Tree Manure is fast gaining in favor."

Cabbages, Tomatoes, Watermelons, Turnips and Potatoes.

H. G. LEEK, Mandarin, Fla., June 16th, 1882, writes: I am unfortunately located on some of the poorest lands of the State of Florida, and have kept correct account of
the results of using the Mapes Complete and Special Manures on it, and send you the following, which you are at liberty to use if you think best: I used last fall on 1,000
plants of cabbage one barrel of .the Mapes Complete Manure for light soils (vegetable manure) and realized therefrom $75. On 300 hills of tomatoes I used, this spring, $2.50
worth of the same fertilizer and sold therefrom $51. On 500 hills of watermelons I used one barrel of the same brand of Mapes Manure and netted therefrom $54. I used 55
pounds on a small patch of rutabagar turnips and sold $20 worth. On Irish Potatoes the result was m n surprising. My crop has been far ahead of all my neighbors,and I
would travel a long distance for the Mapes Manure if I could not get it ot horwisp. to feb 27 '83

DELAND, FLORIDA.T

DESCRIPTION OF DeLAND, FLORIDA!
The climate is semi-tropical. Range of thermometer last four years-lowest, 26 degrees; highest, in the shade, 101 degrees. Weather-Fall, Winter and Spring dry
and pleasant, with occasional rain; Summer, sunshine and rain alternate. Soil--sandy, underlaid with clay in many places, covered with a growth of wild grass. Water
in wells 20 to 40 feet deep, usually soft and good. Surface-gently undulating. Timber-Yellow Pine, 80 to 100 feet high. Average product of Orange Trees in full bearing,
1,000. Average price of fruit in grove, $1.50 per 100. Number of trees per acre, 50 to 75. Extra good care and culture of course produce better results, Best months for 3
planting Orange trees, January and February, June and July. Other products-Sweet Potatoes, Cotton, Sugar Cane, Rice, Corn, Pine-Apples, Bananas, Melons, Pears, etc.
Good Board $7 to $10 per week ; $1.50 to $2.00 per day. In gardening excellent results have been obtained in a small way, and this business will be developed with added
experience and better transportation facilities. No cases of yellow fever, cholera, sunstroke or other epidemic or prevailing fatal diseases have been known here, and all
climatic conditions are most favorable to health and longevity. Many settlers from the north and northwest are coming in, and there is an indication that our orange belt
will soon be thickly settled.
The village of DeLand is located five miles east of our landing on St. John's River, where all the river steamboats pass; very near the geographical center, north and
south, of Volusia County, in the center of the
GREAT ORANGE BELT
This place is twenty-five miles from the Atlantic Ocean, and is almost constantly favored with a tempered
SEA BREEZE
and from its elevation above the river, its location among the pines, and its isolatioii from all standing water, it is peculiarly adapted to the necessities of invalids. This
belt of land is about twenty rhiles long, and averages about five miles wide. Our lands are
UNSURPASSED IN FERTILITY
by any pine lands in the State. In our village, which is only five years old, we have a
FINE SCHOOL BUILDING
used also for union Sunday School and Church Services. A Baptist Church is now built, costing $4,000 furnished, and paid for. Methodists and Episcopalians are also
building. The.Presbyterians hold services every other Sunday in the school house. We have daily mails, four General Merchandise Stores, one of the largest in South
Florida; a Drug Store, Millinery and Notion Store, Furniture Store, Livery Stable, three Steam Saw Mills and a Blacksmith Shop. A Hardware Store is soon to he started
with a full supply of Doors, Sash, Blinds, etc. Also, a Jewelry Store is soon to be started, and in the fall a Bank and High School. .
THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURIST
a large eight-page weekly, is published here, and is a valuable paper for those desiring information about Florida'. We have a Bell Telephone line in successful operation
between our village and our landing on the St. John's River, and a railroad from our landing via DeLand to the Atlantic coast is chartered with a land grant of 8, acres
per mile. The Palatka and Indian River Railroad which is now being built, will pass through DeLand, and will be completed, as far as DeLand, by next winter. Our ho-
tels and boarding houses afford good fare at reasonable prices. Passengers will find a conveyance at DeLand landing on the arrival of the up mail boat daily, Sundays ex-
cepted, and a carriage will be sent upon order, by telephone, at other times. For the information of invalids we will add, that several good physicians are settled in our
midst, cultivating oranges as a business, but affording excellent medical aid when required. They report the following
REMARKABLE HEALTH RECORD
"During the years 1878, 1879 and 1880, within a circuit of six miles diameter, DeLand being the center, with a population averaging over 250, many of whom came here
invalids, there have been but four deaths. Two were infants under six months, and two were men who came here sick." 1881 and 1882 have been so far equally healthful.
Population now in and near DeLand city, that trade there, 800 to 1,200.
A CHAIN OF LAKES





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR

ACER'S DRY HOP YEAST CAKES, 60c. PER DOZ.

i SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


SNOW-IDOP PATENT FLOUR.

first IEandas on Finest QGuality

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 31 Cents per Pound,

M I^C .rW E 0 T O 3 LCOE.

No. 38 West Bay Street, - J~cltonville, Florida.
tf.


Land .g; 4 ents, LaSnd Z Buyers andc Ljand. Owners,
S Aid Everyone Interested in Florida Lands
Can be supplied with
| TOWNSHIP MAPS
Made froxi United States Surveys-scale two inches to the mile-with topography complete, for every
township in EAST and SOUTH FLORIDA, delivered, or sent by mail, for 50 cents each.
S(Postage Stamps : ken.)
Discounlt to Dealers.
T.EXPI~ NATIOTI9 N CA'RD sent with every Map, showing vacant lands and where to apply for
i .them to purchase.
Sie 1ell IV SapS of Counties, Cities and towns made to order.
-A.rclz.itectural Designs a specialty.
My long connection with the Florida Land and Improvement Company (DISSTON PUR-
CHASE) is a guarantee of satisfactory work. Correspondence solicited.
Address T. 0. TlV' E ~t S, Civil Engineer and Draughtsman,
Office with Florida Land and Improvement Co., cor. Pine and Forsyth-Sts.,
__JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. oct23tf

ESTABLISHED 1866.

M. GEORGE & CO.,

General Com m mission M merchants,
95 SOUTH WATER STREET, CHICAGO.


FLORIDA ORANGES AND VEGETABLES A SPECIALTY.
REFERENCES:-National Bank of Illinois, First National Bank, Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale
Grocer in CHICAGO.
Stencils furnished by J. C. LANIER,


to apl 8, '83.
. .


G. L. LAWRENCE & (
I I


LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


O, COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
MERHATS


FOR THE SALE OF


Oranges ald all Florida Produce,


234 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK.


QUICiK SALES, IIONEST, R ETURNIS aInd
o P!ROMP!T IEMITTANTCES.


REFER BY PERMISSION TO


Hon. S. B. CONOVER, Tallahasse(
to jan. 30, '83 p.


e; D. GREENLEAF, ESQ., Jacksonville;
MESSRS. GOULD & CO., Jacksonville.


F. 5. COE A. H.MNIL, .A IL


F. S. CONE A. ]I. MANVILLE, E. A. HILL,
President and Businoss Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer.

I A SVI E NUIRSEBRIES,
Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate.

ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3,Just out, free on application. to apr 17,'83


e37


PLYMOUTH ROCKS.
The great demand for these fowls have induced me to
secure the agency of Mr. A. C. HAWKINS for the sale
of his stock, which has no superior. I can sell
FOW LP O~ EG GS,
direct from his enormous establishment, at his prices.
I am also agent for the
AMJERICAN POULTRY YARD
-AND THE-
POULTItY WIORnLD,
and on receipt of stamp I will send sample copy to any
address. No one should undertake to RAISE POULTRY
without some good POULTRY PAPER.
I.. PW. ARlEAMORE,
to feb 12, '83 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.



HoneB Moon NIrsories,
THE PIONEER NURSERY of FLORIDA.
ONE HUNDRED ACRES IN STOCK.
THE SWEET ORANGE A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue sent free on application. Address
L. A. HARDEE,
to feb 20, '83 Jacksonville, Fln.

FOR SALE.
LANDS on the east side of Lake Harris, Sumter
county. We the undersigned offer the property de-
scribed below, situated at and around Esperance, at
great bargains. For further information apply or ad-
dress
W. P. COUPER,
D. E. LOWELL, Esperance, Fla.
W. N, JACKSON.
(1.) 90 acres land at Esperance, mile lake front; first-
class willow-oak pine land; several fine building sites;
good elevation. Price $35 per acre. The above tract can
be bought in lots.
(2.) 80 acres, same location, 30 acres hammock; fine
building site, 80 feet above the lake, with Y mile lake
front; 10 acres cleared; 500 trees in grove, part bearing.
Price $6,000.
(3.) 40 acres, about20 acres hammock, full view of the
lake; good land. Price $700.
(4.) 40 acres fine, high land; view of the lake; one
mile from Esperance. Price $600.
(5.) 75 acres, 20 acres cleared and fenced; 000 trees in
grove; pine-apples, etc. Splendid location; ,j mile
lake front; 2 miles from Esperance. There is on the
place a comfortable dwelling. with a sufficiency of out-
houses. Price $6,000. Terms easy.
(6.) 40 acres good pine land, Y mile from Lake Harris;
25 acres fenced; 17 acres set to orange, lemon and lime
trees. Lemons, limes, guavas, pine-apples, bananas,
grapes &c., in bearing; comfortable house and outbuild-
in. erms to suit an actual settler. Price 3,000.
(.) 120 acres good pine land, to % mile from Lake
Harris, in lots to suit purchasers, $20 per acre.
20 acres first-rate pine land, overlooking Lake Harris,
$25 per acre.
(8.) 15 acres on Lake Harris, with lake front good
view of the lake; nice buildingsite; 3 acres of ham-
mock and two of pine- cleared. Price $500.
(9.) 160 acres, to mile from Lake Harris, good
pine land, in lots to suitpurchasers. Price $10 per acre.
(10.) 80 acres of land beautifully situated, with a'oom-
manding view of the lake; 6 or 7 magnificent building
sites-; mile lake front; 10 acres splendid hammock,
balance No. 1 pine land, mile from Esperanoe. Price
$20 per acre.
P. S.-Land will be divided if necessary.
(11.) 80 acres land M mile from the lake, No. 1 pine
land; handsome location; view of the lake; % mile
from Esperance. Price $10 to $15 per acre in 5 or 10 acre
lots.
Groves will be set and cared for on above lots at reas-
onable rates. The party making the offer has had sev-
eral years' experience in the management of groves.
to feb20-83


- -- L_ -- -- I --I I --- -- C-_Y
----------- --


i --


Im


L I
-- -- --, -- -- -- -7 T--


WHOLESALE GROCERS,


WHOLESALE GROCERS,


I


m


FLORIDA DISCOVERY.
NEITCAT. EVERY DRUGGIST IN THE STATE
r WILL BE SUPPLIED.
It kills Ants, Roaches, Mice and Rats. Nothing ever
before offered has half the merit. Any Druggist in
Jacksonville will supply you.
CONE WILLIAMS,
Manufacturer and Proprietor,
oct 80-tf [P. 0. Box 126.] JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

THE ARCHER NURSERIES
Grow a general assortment of FRUIT TREES, with
some Ornamental Trees, Shrubbery,
Vines, &c. Our stock of
ORANGE TREES
is good; both SweetSeedlings and Budded sorts on both
sour and sweet stocks. Some 8,000
LECONTE AND OTHER PEAR TREES,
one and two-year-old-fine.
A large number of JAPAN PLUM TREES, with;a few
hundred of the famous
JAPANESE PERSIMMON
on native stocks &c.
ORANGE and PEAR GROVES made to order and
cultivated by the year for non-residents.
SEND FOR PRICE LIST to
LIPSEY & CHRISTIE,
to feb 5, '83 Archer, Alachua Co., Florida.


I


i







I










I,






38 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


V


ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6th, i(JB,
Trains will leave and arrive at Jacksonville as fol-
lows ;
Fast Mail. Daily. Jack'lle Ex. Daily.
Leavve- Leave-
Jacksonville at 9:30 a. m. Jacksonville at.. 5:45 p m
Arrive- Arrive-
Jacksonville at.. 5:00 p m Jacksonville at.. 7:30 a m
-Callahan at......10:15 am Jesup at..............11:25 p m
Waycross at.......12:05 p in Brunswick at.:.... 5:34 a
Live Oak at........ 6:45 p m Macon at............. 7:00 a m
New Branford.. 8:30 p n Thomasville at... 6:50 a m
Savannah at...... 3:40 p m Albany at............11:15 a m
Charleston at..... 9-00 p in Montgomery at:. 8:00 p m
Thomasville at... 0:55 p in New Orleans at... 9:20 a m
Albany at...........10:30 p m ILouisville at......
Montgomery at.. 6:45 a m Cincinnati at...... 7:00 a m
New Orleans at..10:00 p m Chicago at.......... 7:00 p m
Nashville at........ 7:00 p m St. Louis at......... 7:00 p m
Washington at... 9:40 p m New York at...... 3:50 p m
New York at...... 6:50 p m
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train from
Jacksonville to Cincinnati via Atlanta and Cincinnati
Southern Railroad; to Montgomery via Albany and
Eufaula, and to Chicago via Montgomery and Louis-
ville.
Passengers arriviing by this train for Palatka and the
Florida SouthertiRalroad, make cl6se connection with
steamer at the Railroad wharf.
Night Express-Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at..................... ................ ...11:20 p m
Arrive Jacksonville at................................ .........11:05 p m
Arrive Savannah at............................... ........ 7:00 a m
Arrive Charleston at................................ ....12:30 p m
Arrive Washington at....................................... 1:00 p m
Arrive Now York at............................................. 9:30 p m
Arrive Atlanta at... ......................... ............. 12:10 p m
Arrive Cincinnati at................... .......... ...... 7:00 p n
A rrive Chicago at................... .......................... ---
Arrive St. Louis at.................................. ........... -
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train for Sav-
annah, Charleston and Washington.
Passengers taking the night express can get into the
sleeping cars at 9 o'clock p. m.
A new Restaurant has been opened at Waycross, and
abundant time will be allowed for meals by all passen-
ger trains.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections .secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay-street and at Depot
Ticket Office. GEO. W. HAINES, Agent.
JAB. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l F. and P. Ag't. [*]


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-o---
MERCHANTS AND MINERS TRANS-
PORTATION COMPANY.
SAVASNAH, GA., September 12, 1882.
The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail from BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY
AT 3 P. M.,
and from SAVANNAH tbr BALTIMORE,
EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY,
as follows:
Friday, November 3d, at 12:30 p. m.
Tuesday November 7th, at 3 p. n.
Friday, November 10th, at 7 a. m.
Tuesday, November 14th, at 9:30 a.nm.
Friday, November 17th, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, November 21st, at 3 p. m.
Friday, November 24th, at 6:30 a. m.
Tuesday, November 28th, at 9 a. m.
Friday, December 1st, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday. December 5th, at 2 p. m.
Friday, Iecember 8th, at 3:30 p. m.
Tuesday. December 12th, at 8:30a. m.
Friday, December 15th, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday December 19th, at 1:30 p. nm.
Friday, December 22d, at 3:30 p. nm.
Tuesday, December 26th, at 8:30 a: m.
Friday, December 29th, at 10 a. m.
Cabin Passage, $15.00; Second Cabin, t12.e0; Round
Trip (Cabin), $5.00. The Company reserve the right of
changing the sailing days.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from


Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.


S


Subject to change without notice.
l4The "Rapidan takes no passengers.
WM. L. JAMES, ,
4-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia.
[ESTABLISHED 1866.]!


WM.,HUNTER & SON,
Agents at Savannah.


E, ROBERTS & BRO, COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

FLORIDA FRUIT AND I REDUCE A SPECIALTY.

226 AND 228 NORTH DELAWARE AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA, PA.
OTIR IMOTTO : Qiick Sales andt Prompt Returns,

to jan 13 We ask a trial. STENCIL PLATES FREE.
~7 ~ '~~~ J" ~~ 1 ^ ~~~ ; ----- --1 -4---- -- -* '*~i *- -- - --' --


The Savannah Guano Co. 0of Savannah .,
Ixnmporters an d 1VCa ifnufc turers of of igh a n-rad.e Per-
tilimermy Offer for Sale W32heir

Golden Fruit Fertilizer,
A strictly first-class Manure prepared specially for Florida Oranges.

" T. ur~ 0 T,," for Florida Market Gardeners and Farmers, is highly am-
moniated.

Also ENGLISH ACID PHOSPHATE for composting. Pure dissolved Bone. KAINIT,
COTTON SEED MEAL, pure BIRD GUANO,
MURIATE OF POTASH, &c.
Each sack bears the Inspection Tag of the State of Georgia, which shows that it has passed
under the rigid inspection laws of that State, and is a guarantee that the Guano is what the
Analysis on the sack represents. No other brands in this State furnish such a reliable guar-
antee of their merits to the purchaser.
Send for Circular. 0. D. IDT IUTC42A.ST,
to may20-83 Jacksonville, Fla., General Agent for Florida.


A. L. HUGGINS, Agent, .
Long Dock, Baltimore, Md. 0ttW EIiltl S.


SHOUSE, 60 acres hammock and pine
AN $ oo land, 300 orange trees in grove well
advanced, few bearing. Price $1,000. BRae chance for
new settler.
W. W. DEWHURST,
St. Augustine, Fla.
N. B.-Letters will not be answered unless stamp is
enclosed, to feb 20, '83


ORANGE AND LEMON TREES edand approved varieties, andhealthy stocks.
Also, JAPAN PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
Florida. Address, '
- ee0.to Feb 20 1 eorod83 d.a
to Feb 20 '83


AM


_1. _____lsl I J -------- _I ~_ r -- -----


1 -
I-c ,_ I- -- ------ ----


I


SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA

WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.


Ocean Steamship Company.

SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.
SAVANNAH, December, 1882.
The Magnificent Newv Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CHATTAHOOCHEE, Capt. Daggett, Wednesday, December 20th, 2:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nicierson, Saturday, December 23d, 5i00p. m.
TALLAHASSE, Capt. Fisher, Wednesday, December 27th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH. Capt. Catharine, Saturday, December 30th, 10:30 a. m.
Through Bills of. Jading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, l avannaah, Florida & Western
Railway nd clo6 conltections With the newaiand elegant steamners to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 85 N. Riyer, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Savh, Florida & Weatar .J815 Br wT ~N. .


Boston and Savannah Steamship Company,
ONLY DIRECT LINE.
Transhipment and extra handling avoided. Cars unloaded itwif4spalfVa taf~ta 4n.pr passenger
accommodations.
The magnificent new Iron Steamships sail from Boston every Thursday at 3 o'clock, and from Central Rail-
road Wharf, Savannah, as follows: -", ."r ".." '& '
Gate City, Capt. Hedge......... .....................................Thursday, De'eiber 21st, at 3:30 p. m.
City of Columbus Capt. Wright.......................................Thursday, December 28th, at 8:30 a. m.
Qate.City, lCpt. id g. .................................................. Thui4aF,Jt icy tt( at Pin. .
City of Columbus, Capt. Wright.................. .............Thursday, JiIar Itc, at : p. n.
Gate City, Capt. Hedge..................................... Thursday, January 18th, at3:00 p. m.
City of Columbus, Capt. Wright.........................................Thursday January 25th, at 7:30 p. m.
City of C6Ium sCat.li, aWrfgit............................... ..Thurilay j bru fy(hf.a.l.,at8' .. .
Gate cqIity, CapX. 0 .*.o. ...< ..........^^ .***-*********yoy^^fr'fa i
SCity of ol untnsu ght..................................... Tn rsday;'ebr a ,
Gate City, Capt. Hedge.......................... .............Thursday, March st, at 12:00 m.
City of Columbus, Capt. Wright .................. ..................T.ryTad March 8th, at 5:30 p. m.
THROUGH FIRST-CLASS CABIN PASSAGE 9Ati AS TO NEW YORK.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents, Savannah, Ga.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. and W. Ry., Agent, Jacksonville.
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., General Agents, Bostpn. 44-tt

Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.
ir-SAVANNAH AND PHILADELPHIA.-O
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM BACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for January are appointed to sail as follows:
FROM PHILADELPHIA: ,:O .FM. SAVANNAH:
JUNIATA ....................................Thursday, January ......... JUNIATA......... Tuesday, Jan..................... ..................
JUNIATA.. .. ......... ............. Saturday, January......... JUNIATA.........aturday, Jan.... ....................... .......
CITY-OF MACON.......................Saturday, January......... CITY OF" MACON.........Saturday, Jan..............................
SII RAPIDAN........Saturday, Jan.......................... ...............


.


ow


JASi. R. W-1iJ;8T & (," ..,Ngents,
v-,Ai- S .cav Tiah CrnL


'RL J U -EW M '-PJaw M6qw








THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 3


T. . T


THROUGH TARIFF ON ORANGES ONLY.
VIA THE FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, AND ITS CONNECTIONS.
I:14T E E m 1":p C! m 1qOT7OTE:V:I :Ea;EM 2 2-tl, 1 33 2.


FROM
JACKSONVILLE AND
CALLAHAN JUNCTION
TO


Macon ..................................
Augusta .................................
Atlanta ..................................
Columbus, Ga........................
Montgomery, Ala.................
Mobile....................................
Chattanooga, Tenn................
New Orleans ...........................
Nashville, Tenn .....................
Memphis, Tenn .....................
Louisville, Ky....... ................
Cincinnati, Ohio..................
Henderson Ky..................
Columbus, y........................
Hickman. Ky.........................


35 $70
401 80
40 80
40 80
40 80
5011 00
501 00
601 20
001 20
601 20
701 40
701 40
70 1 40
70 1 40
70 1 40


$61 25
70 00
70 00
70 OC
70 00
87 5
87 5
105 OC
105 00
105 00
115 00
115 00
115 00
115 00
115 00


FROM
JACKSONVILLE AND
CALLAHAN JUNCTION
TO


Madison, Ind........ ................
Jeffersonville, Ind.................
Evansville, Ind.....................
Cairo, Ill. .............................
Indianapolis..........................
Terre Haute................. .......
Columbus, Ohio...................
St. Louis .... ........................
Chicago....................................
Peoria, Ill.............................
Cleveland ..............................
Toledo...................................
Detroit............................ .....
Milwaukee .............. ....... ......


150
1 5
150
150
160
1 do
1 60
170
1 70
1 70
180
1 80
180
1 80


s3


12500
12500
12500
12500
130 00
13000
130 00
140 00
140 00
140,00
150 00
15000
15000
15000


TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
FROM
Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. Per Bbl.
Jacksonville......................................... 25 $50 35 $ 60
Landings on St. Johns River.............. 35 70 40 75
Stations on Florida Transit R. R.......... 45 75 50 80
Tampa and Manatee............... ........ 70 1 05 75 1 10
Stations on the Fla. Cen. &4West'n R'y 40 75 50 85

In Connection with the Atlantic Coast Line.

From 1 From From
From Ld'gs on Florida Tampa From
Jackson- St. Johns Transit and F.C. & W.
ville. River. R. R. Manatee.
TO ---- -- -- -



Baltimore................................. 60 $1 20 70 $140 80 $1 501 051 80 75 81 45
Philadelphia.............................. 60 120 70 1 40 80 150 105 1 80 75 1 45
New York.................. ......... 60 120 70 1 40 80 1 50 105 180 75 1 45
Boston.................................. 65 1 30 75 150 85 1 60 1 90 80 1 55
Providence................................. 65 130 75 1 50 851 60 1 10 190 80 1 55
To all rail points, and via Atlantic Coast Line. Shipments daily.

In Connection with direct Steamers of the Boston and Savan-
nah Steamship Company.


SFrom
From Ld'rs on
Jackson- St. Johns
ville. River.
TO
6 1

Boston................................. ...... 50 o1 00l 60 $1 20


From From
Florida Tampa From
Transit and F. C. & W
R. R. Manatee.
----- - ... -- --



65 $1 20 90 $1 501 65 $1 25


In Connection with Steamships direct froin Savannah.

From From From
From L'd'gs on Florida Tampa From
S Jackson- St. Johns Transi and
ville. River. R. R.R. Manatee.
-l O--M--- ana-- -----
TO, ___

C4 I

New York............. ..... 50 $1 00 60 1 20 65 $120 $ 90150 65 l 25
Philadelphia......... ... 50 100 60 1 20 65j 1 20 90 150 65 1 25
Baltimore....... ......... ........ 50 1 00 60 1 20 6 1 20 90 1 50 65 1 25
Boston viaNewYork............ 73 1 451 83 1 65 88 1 65 1 13 1 95i 88 1 70
Providence via New York ....... 1 0 73 0 1 87 82 150 1 07 1 sO! ] 1
,, .,. _________ 73 150 .. ,, 10o .... WOW


In Connection with Steamships of M. & M. T. Co., of Savannah,
Via Baltimore.


TO


From
From Landings
Jackson- on
ville. St. Johns
River.



(!< k ( i ^


From
Florida
Transit
R.R.


Q-$i pI tC


From
Tampa
and
Manatee.

i t


From
F. C. & W.


goo --. 1 i -- -w
Boston......... .......... ... ............... 55 $1 10 65 $1 30 70 $1 30 $95 $1 60 70 81 35
Providence........................... 55 1 10 65 1 30 70 1 30 95 1 60 70 135
Washington........................... 60 1 70 1 20 801 0 1 05 1 50 65 1 25

To make rates from Stations on Tropical Railroad south of Ocala add 5 cents
per box and 10 cents per barrel to rates from stations on Transit Railroad.
Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
For Boston every Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
Tuesday and Friday.
To make through rates from points tributary to the above, add the rates for
transportation lines connecting to above rates.
The dimensions of the Standard Box for Oranges are 12x12x27 inches, and the
weight is estimated at 80 pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds, or 250 Standard Boxes. Excess of this
amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destina-
tion and to one consignee.
Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of
shipments will be an absolute requirement. It is clearly understood between the
shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to
which Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be issued only by the
Agents of this Company at Jacksonville and Callahan and the Agents of the DeBary
Merchants Line and Baya's Mail Line fromSt. John's River Landings guaranteeing
rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points
will not be subject to correction by this Line.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion
in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be charged in addition the single package
rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on a-pipu ion to any to
the agents of the Line.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For '.:;: ..r informa-
tion, if needed, apply to
H. YONGE, Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., 01tice New Pier 35 N Eiver, N. Y.
Gen. W. L. JAMES, Agent, 25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS,
Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM.. H. RING, Agent Boston and
Savannah Steamship Line, 18 T Wharf, Boston. O. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. &
W. Railway, 211 Washington St., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Agent S. F. & W.
Railway, 315 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway
43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Pier 41
South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F, B. B PAPY. General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. T.AYLOR, General Freight Agent, A-evanah, Ga.
GEO. W. HAINES, Ag;ent S., F & WV. R~il;ay, .T::?kl.:- lle, Fla.
S I,. 1 t: T JOTT, General Ant, Florida Pptch Li .- ', Fla.


S-- ... I


i l l l I


II 1 I \


1 I


- ---- --


__


I I -








S-40 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


JOIN?
J. M. STIG-ER'S COLONY,
GLE~MORE, WARE COUNTY, GA.
40 Hours from New York City; 108 Miles from
Savannah.
Here we can plant and gather some crops every month
in the year; good water, plenty of grass in the woods for
sheep, cattle and hogs all the year round; very profita-
Sble to the owner. Farms of 40 acres each at $1 to $3 per
acre; lumber, $1 per 100 feet, delivered at the depot;
shingles, $iper 1,000; will build a housewith 4 rooms, 6
panel doors, 6 windows, cement flue for chimney, well
dug and curbed for $150, on easy terms. Labor of all
kinds needed at fair wages; board at Mrs. Bainbridge's
from $15 to $20 per month.
We need farmers, truckers, stock and fruit-growers.
One bushel crate of vegetables delivered in New York
City for 50 cents; per barrel, $1, and with quick dispatch.
A number of Northern and Western families now here
are doing well no stones, no underbrush no winter,cli-
mate delightful and perfectly healthy all the year round.
Land is not cleared, but near the depot* some cleared
land from 3 to $10 per acre. All kinds ot grain, vegeta-
bles, berries, fruit, and stock, do well. Our farmers are
out of debt, some lending money.
Any number of acres, for colonizing or grazing, at $1 to
j3 per acre; 40 acres, with house complete, for $250;
EASY TERMS.
Come and see for yourself, or address
J. M. STIGER,
to jan 9, '83. Glenmore, Ware County, Ga.
COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,

Real Estate Agents,

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Have lands in every county in the Orange Belt, at from
$3 to $100 per acre. Orange groves from $1000 to $100,000.
Government lands in every part of the Orange Belt.
Can guarantee all of our property.
Strawberry Plants.
SWe have 2D00,00 best varieties for sale low.
Orange Trees.
W\e have 300,000 trees, all ages, for sale, at from 10 cents
ti $2 per tree, as to age.

COLONY, TALBOTT & CO.
Sep. 18, tf.

| ar-'W. H. PILLOW'S A


TRAWBERRY SBIIJPIN AIHNOY
-AND-
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE "REPACK-
ING AND COMMISSION HOUSE,
ASTOR'S BLOCK,
Packing House at Waycross Wharf, Jacksonville,
Florida. mayl2 '83.

TO II E

TROPICAL HOUSE,
-AT--
IHOC KILIdEGEI .
INDIAN RIVER, FLORIDA,
S. RYDER,
OWNER AND PROPRIETO R.
This House is centrally located at Rockledge, in the
(ar-famed Indian River region of Florida, and possesses
all the advantages of Climate, Health and Pleasure of
this newly developed region of South Florida.
Salt Water, Boating, Fishing, Oysters, Hunting, Rocky
Shore, Superb Scenery, together with the finest Oranges,
Bananas, Pine-Apples and Guavas, are some of the ad-
vantages to be found in this favored locality..
Take steamer from Sanford to Lake Poinsett, called
Rockledge Landing ; three miles carriage riding. Di-
rect connections from the House made with steamers.


RATES: $2.50 PERJ DAY.
Arrangements made by Week or Month. to mar 10, ,3.

A Truck Farm near Sa-
vannah.
I have placed in my hands for sale one of the most de-
sirable farms in this locality. Being within an hour's
drive of the city upon a beautiful road of hard shell, it
possesses all of the advantages of a suburban home.
The tract comprises 650 acres with a front of one mile
upon the White Bluff' Road which is the handsomest
drive in this vicinity. The land is adapted to the cul-
ture of any of the Southern products, besides having a
fine range for cattle. The present owner is now supply-
ing the butchers with beef fattened upon this range.
The improvements consist of a cottage residence, valua-
ble barn, stables servant's houses, etc. The whole tract
is under good fence. Besides a large vegetable crop
raised last year, this farm well nigh supplied the Savan-
nah market with the best Strawberries raised in the vi-
cinity.
This fine property can be bought at a bargain as the
owner is compelled to change his business. Address
C. H. DORSETT,
Real Estate Dealer, 156 Bay street,
to jan 8'83 Savannah, Ga.
f '^ '" ~ - - --- ^


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.

GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, 00PPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIIE TESrT.
Johnson'8 Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, 2fiartinez and Longman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel
to mar 25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
D. G. AMBLER. .. L. MARVIN. J. N. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
- Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. ___ __ apr 10-tf

O. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


07 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, - FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '83



Commission Merchant,
AND DEALER IN
Florida Oranges and Lemons,
74 WEST BAY STREET.
N. Y. Depot, MAXFIELD & CO., 67 and 69 Park Place; Mag-
azine and Packing House, Waycross R. R.Wharf.
MANUFACITTRER'S AGENT FOR
THE BANGOR BOX MATERIAL, HOOPS, Etc.


Have a large quantity of Manilla Wrapping
Papers, at Lowest Market rates.
Send in your orders for BOX MATERIAL. Can
ship promptly while freights are light. Have great
difficulty in getting it transported during the busy
season. [to March 25 '83

ICH'D H: MARKS'



ORBAN E mOUNT LAND AGENCY,
SANFORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for

FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMPY,
BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission.
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tt


ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
.
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.

OPEN T.':t UQQUG HOUT THE
YEAR.
to April 23, '83


---
ELLIS a& 1M oCJIt~IIE,

Awhitoptclt ps d Pl Tnpi nprpQ

Plans Specifications and EstitnateO for Buildings of
all kinds. Water Su y,, Drainge, ewerage, Bridges'
Roofs, Etc. P.O. Box784. Room Palmetto Block,
Bay Street. to Feb. 7,83
17 TOV pWAWTr

An Orange Grove or Orange Lands, in a hieAthy, beauti-
ful country,

Entirely Free fr-om FI'rost,

where you have the finest *

FISHING,
OYSTERS,
SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME
of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a new country. Address me with stamp,,
at Anclote, Hillsborough County, Florida.
I can sell you five acres, or five thousand acres, as you
desire.
to aug 20, '83 M. MA IK .

FOR SALE.
AN IMPROVED PLACE on the south side of Lake
Harris, in Sumter County, Fla., about a mile from Ya-
laha. It contains 225 acres of the finest first-class high
hammock, about 50 acres cleared. There are two bo1d,
never-failing brooks running through the place, from
which an unlimited supply of water can be had, mak-
ing the raising of vegetables a certainty. The place has
y1 mile lake front; the residence is a large, Southern
style house-six large rooms, store-roomand kitchen at-
tached there are 500 old orange trees from 7 to 10 years
old, budded with choice varieties; also, 700 trees from 4
to 6 years old; lime and lemon trees in bearing. There
is on the place, probably, the finest guava grove in
South Florida. The estimated yield in 1881 was 500 bush-
els. This property is one of the most valuable and in-
viting tracts of land in this State.: The quality of the
soil, besides growing orange trees, will make it, with the
advantages of irrigation, and remarkable protection
from frost, peculiarly profitable for ,ege'tab!le growing.
It can be divided into 3 tracts sufficiently large for every
purpose. Daily communication at Yjalaha by mail boat
' 0oniecting iwtll j1 Johns aind Lake EULtis Railway.
Only the non-residence of the owner induces its sale.
Price, $15,000. Terms easy. Address
to W. N. JACKSON,
to feb 208 Esperance, Fla.

LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

In lots to suit, in the town ofSatsuma, Putnam County, I
Florida. Bend for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,
JACKSONVILLE,
june 26-tf FLORIDA.


FLORIDA LANDS.


Parties wishing to Buy Lands.
Parties wishing to Sell Lands.
Parties wishing to Locate Homesteads.
Parties wishing to make Cash Entries of Govern-
ment Lands.
Parties wishing, to Loan Money.
Parties wishing to Borrow Money.
Parties wishing to Invest Money,
Should call on or address

W. B. CLARKSON & CO.,
50 West Bay Street,


P. O. Box


852.


(dec 4 tf) JACKSONVILLE.


FOR SALE.
126 acres, beautifully situated on Lake Tohopekaliga, a
few miles south of Kissimmee City, good for Oranges and
Vegetables. Very select and desirable. $30 per acre. Ad-
dress "L," Dispatch office. to dec 26 82


1_ ~ --,,
_ -- __ ____ _





TIIE FLORIDA DISPATCH. ^
.. . . . = . . . . . . ..


At Government Price of


$1.25 per


Acre


IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES.
These lands include all varieties of upland and lowland, and are adapted to Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Pine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar-Cane, Early Vegetables, etc., and are chiefly in the counties of
St.Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Orange, Sumter, Levy, Hernando, Hillsborough,
Polk, Manatee and Monroe.
The following are reserved and for sale at graded prices:
Gulf Coast Reserve," 268,000 acres, M. R. MARKS, Agent, Anclote, Fla.
"Timber Reserve," 100,000 acres, comprising choice tracts of Pine and Cypress, chiefly in St. Johns and
Volusia Counties. Address
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT CO.,
to mar 24 '88 Jacksonville, Fla.
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BARNES & CO.,
FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Soiutl ern :P'ruit an= d. egetables a SpOcialtyY.
3 06 and 3"Z North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83


ViEGET AB&LE GROWERS
CAN MAKE MONEY BY USING

FORRESTER'S CHEMICAL MANURES,
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR

Vegetables, Orange T rees
ANDI ALL
SEMI TROPIOWALL FRDW7TS
-- BY --
CEO. B. FORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York.
---() -
THESE MANURES ARE PREPARED FROM CONCENTRATED CHEMICALS; ARE FREE FROM ODOR;
Do not Breed Vermin or Insects in the Soil.
They have been used on FLORIDA LANDS for Years, and produce Wonderful Results.
3For sale by

Sanfo'd, Orange County, Florida.
___ Send bor circular. (to mar. 3, '83)p .

JOHN O. 1OORtE & CO.,

FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
"AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS-"
18S WEST SIXTH STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO.
REFERENCES: Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale Grocer in CINCINNATI.
STENCILS FURNISHED BY T. C a. IjA..TIEM,
to apl 8, '83. LEESBURG, FLORIDA.
I EI &POITT, FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
TO AND GEN'L COMMISSION MERCHANTS
NO. 41 SOUThI DELAWARE STREET,
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.
REFERENCES:
INGRAM FLETCHEB, of FLETCHER & SHARPE, Bankers, and Meidian National Bank.
A&- Stencils Furnished on Application. 0S
oct-16,tf


DISSTON PURCHASE---4,00,000 ACRES!


THE FLORIDA

LAND AND IMPROVEMENT
COMPANY

Offer from October 1, 1882, till May 1, 1883,

ALL THEIR LANDS


FINE POULTRY.

SEVEN BREEDING PENS OF THE FOLLOWING
BREEDS:
Two yards PLYMOUTH ROCKS, two yards each of
WHITE and BROWN LEGHORN,
and one yard of GEORGIA
WHITE GAME.
We are booking
orders now for EGGS, and
guarantee fifty per cent. better results
than from Eggs received from the North. Send for cir-
cular. R. W. PARRAMORE, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. C. BIRD, Monticello, Fla. tojanl5-'83

S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

"Harfwaro, Stovos, Doors, ash, Blinds
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIPE.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
S*eamn J Ga.s- Fitting, Plumnbig 4j Tia.stitsing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & CO.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
Send for Price List and Catalogue, "
to June 11 '83

A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,


I


GoI, Locimiths anl 8tncil oilers,
24 LAURA STREET,
JACIKSONVILLE - FLOIRIDA,
unsmithing done in all its branches.
G IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to june 12'83, (P. 0. Box 83-3.)

EMIC-r :..-TION-.


The agent of the "Royal Mail Line to the Nether-
lands," and of the "Florio Italian Line," in Jackson-
ville, offers his services to reliable parties in search oj
competent labor for their
Groves or Gardens,
to try to induce people from
Northern and Soiuthernn Europe
to come to Florida.
A'Carrespondence solicited.
C. II. VANDER LINDEN,
Care Florida Land and Imp't Co.,
sept 4, '82, tf. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
W$0,000 CASH
Can be invested to great advantage in the
ROCI LEDGE 0HOME GRtOVE
of 15 acres 700 bearing trees in the beautiful and noted
ROCK LEDGE HAMMOCK on the great Indian River
with its fish, oysters, green turtle and ducks. I will sell
the grove for
TWO-THIRDS ITS ACTUAL VALUE.
Numbers of visitors say it is the most beaulifil and de-
sirable property in the State.
Having purchased Jupiter Island, 100 miles south, I
propose to make a specialty of
COCOANUTS, PINE-APPLES,
and the more tender tropical fruits.
C. B. MAGRUDER.
tofeb 5 '83 Rock Ledge, Florida.


--------~~~'--~- I
---------






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Pears Po srs"1 Poars!! !
Still on hand and for sale. About 10,000 of those fa-
mous LECONTE, and a few hundred of KEIFFER'S
HYBRID Pear Trees. Apply to
L. L. VARNEDOE & SONS,
to mar 24, '83 TIOMIASVILLE, GA.

C INCINNATI, NEW ORLEANS AND
TEXAS PACIFIC RAILWAY.
CINCINNATI SOUTH RN.
GENERAL PASSENGER AND FREIGHT DEPT.
CINCINNATI, OHIO, December 16, 182.
L. R. Tuttle, RBident Agent Cincinnat Soudhern Railway,
Jacksonville, Florida:
Inform all shippers that car-load lots of Fruit and Veg-
etables, when in hoist cars or Cincinnati Southern re-
frigerator cars and consigned via
CINCINNATI SOUTHERN RAILWAY,
will be forwarded to destination beyond Cincinnati,
WITHOUT BREAK OF BULK.
E. P. WILSON,
to jan 24, '83 General Freight an d Passenger Agent.


Orange Groves
-AND-
LAND NEAR JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN.
Choice lots for Residence, Gardens, etc.
Groves built and cared for and improvements made for
non-residents, by J, B. BELL,
Real Estate Agent and Notary Public,
to nov 5, '83. Reed's Block, Bay-st., Jacksonville, Fla.


Lands in Middle and South Florida,
-ON THE-
TRANSIT,
FLORIDA SOUTHERN


and SOUTH FLORIDA
RAIL ROADS.


Lands tor Orange GroVes,
Lands for Truck Gardening.
At fair Prices and on Reasonable Time.
We also, ofer
MFi e u11ilcdi.ag Sites
IN THE FLOURISHING TOWN OF SANFORD.

Sanford is rapidly Growing; tndwe have some
VERY CHOICE LOTS on
the Market.

Sanford has Churches, Schools, Railroads,
Car-shops, Telegraph, Telephone, Water
Works and all the advantages of an
"E:~TEZR: Ec~cIT "".
For full particulars, address
JAIMES E. INGRAHAM, Gen. Agt.,
Sanford, Orange Co., Fla.
In regard Lands in Middle Florida, address
JOHN E. LAMBETH, Local Agent,
nov20-tf Gainesville, Fla.


I __ ~- -. -- --.~II


I


LOCAL ADVERTISEMENTS.
FOR SALE.--aw Mill and Machinery, capacity 10,000
feet per day. Will be sold at a bargain to settle an estate.
to jan 11 '83 GEO. R. FOSTER, Agent.
IMPORTANT BOOK.-A preliminary Report on Scale
Insects with Remedies for their destruction, by Prof. H.
G. HUBBARD, price 25 cents.
FLORIDA BREEZES by Mrs. Ellen Call Long of
Florida will soon be published by ASHMEAD BROS.,
and will have a large sale. Advance orders solicited.
FLORIDA ILLUSTRATEb).-10,000 copies of which
have just been issued by us, consists of 20 imperial size
colored views in a handsome cloth case, illustrating the
different sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever pub-
lished on Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00.
Every one interested in Florida should have a copy.
Address, ASHMEAD BROS.,
tf Jacksonville, Fla.
BLOOMFIELD'S ILLUSTRATED HISTORICAL
GUIDE OF ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA, with
map for tourists, invalids and immigrants. For sale
by all booksellers and newsdealers in the State, or sent
to any address for 50 cents by
MAX BLOOMFIELD,
to aprl5-'83 St. Augustine, Fla.
LAW BLANKS.-A full line for Justices of the Peace,
Circuit Courts, etc. Deeds, Mortgages, etc., are printed
and published by ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla.,
Write for a catalogue. tf
TO ADVERTISERS.-Large circulation: For the
next two months THE FLORIDA DISPATCH will is-
sue from 8,000 to 10,000 copies every week; about 40,000
a month.
Merchants and others should take, advantage of this
and advertise liberally.
For advertising rates see editorial page. tf
ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange wraps from
ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla. For prices see
advertisement. tf


1


I;IS0" 0 MF B0022CS 01-T 3F:LOMR311D)
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by
AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely II- A. T. Garey, (cloth).................................Price 1 25
lustrated) ....................................................Price $1 50 A MANUAL of GARDENING in FLORIDA
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE (Whitner)............................................. ....Price 50.
AND HISTORY (Lanier).............................Price 1 50 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA........................ Price 75
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paperPrice 10 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sdctional-
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA ........Price 2 50 the best).......................................................Price 1 25
GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE.......................Price 25 NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST.
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE JOHN'S RIVER........................................Price 25
BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL....................Price 75 McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMER- OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra).Price 6.00
ICA ........................ ................ ...Price 25 INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SU-
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition) PREME COURT OF FLORIDA..................Price 3 00
enlarged and improved...........................Price 50 NOTES FROM SUNLAND ON THE MAN-
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edi- ATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OF SOUTH
tion, enlarged and improved)..................... Price 1 00 FLORIDA. Its Climate, Soil, and Pro-
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead,..Price 1 00 ductions, (By Samuel C. Upham)..............Paper .25
HISTORY OF ST. AUGUSTINE-Dewhurst............ 1.25 FLORIDA AS A PERMANENT HOME,......Price .1
GUIDE TO ST. AUGUSTINE.AND FLORIDA-Bloomfleld............................................. ..............50
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price. "
37:EWS aOF V IO T IDi01A.-
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price.)
In Book F'orm, Containing 12 Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)................... ......... 25c Souvenir of Jacksonville, (large size) ..........................50c
Scenes ahd Characters of the Sunny South, (small Souvenir tuustse, si ......... 50
size) ................................................. .. ........... ........... 25c I Stereosco cV iew s perd 6A .............. ..................$1 00
PLOIZID-A. IL LCTrSTr.A..T ED.
10,000 copies of which have just been issued by us, consisting of twenty imperial size colored views in a hand-1
some cloth case, illustrating the different sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever published in Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00. Every one
interested in Florida should have a copy. ____

WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen.....................Price 50 I MORTGAGES per dozen..........................Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen...................Price 50 NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order.Price $5 00;
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers, Justices of the Peace, Circuit Courts, etc. Price-list:
mailed on application.
LRU BBER STAMP S .
Are manufactured right in our establishment, in the best manner, and at short notice.
ORANGE WRAPS. (Full count-480 sheets to the ream.) 10x10, 14c. per ream;,
11x11, 17c. per ream; 12x12, 19c. per ream.


SAN MATEO NURSERIES !



This well known Nursery is now open for orders for all the best varieties of

Budded Orange and Lemon Trees!


bi Swcetland Sour Stocksl. Also a choice line of Ornamental Trees, Evergreens, floetri g) pal.t~.aA )bs.
A specially fine lot of Japan Plums.

MAXWELL, ANDERSON & CO.,
to mar 18 '83P SAN MATEO, FLA.


3,000 BARRELS POTATOES.


lOIn E MICHIGAN EARLY ROI, FOR SIID ANW TL t

To arrive during NOVEMBER and DECEMBER. Also general stock of SELECT SEEDS for Gardeners, and,
SPECIAL FERTILIZERS for POTATOES AND CABBAGES.

FIFTY TONS TOBACCO STEM S.
These stems are claimed by WESTERN GARDENERS to be a sure specific for the INSECTS that destroy Cab-
bage. Full stock
BONE 1M[EAL, COTTON-SEED MEAL, HULL ASH:, ETC.'
E HART' "H i
to .an 6. '83 J AbKSONVfLLE, O DA. .


i


- I


I


I


;. r .:


- I, I --- I -~ 'CI


ASHMEAD
21 WEST BAY STREET,


I
___. ___ _.~ I--
--- --
_ ,, --


- ---


W


I


BROTHERS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,


I


PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN



We have the most complete Book Bindery in the State. Can Rule, Number or Page and Perforate any job sent us.
Blanks and Blank Books manufactured to order for Railroads, Steamboats, Hotels, Banks
and Corporations. The ruling of difficult jobs a speciality.
WE PUBLISII
Tal FLORIDA DIaSPATOaL
A 20-page Weekly Agricultural Journal, at only $2.00 per year,
Devoted to Southern Agriculture, Fruit Growing, Market Gardening, etc.
This paper has the largest circulation of any published in Florida. Specimen copies free. Write for a copy.

:~P1T'B9T5S ...
Itis generally conceded we do the Finest Job Printing in the State. We have all the modern machinery a d all
new type. Can print the smallest Visiting Card to the largest size Poster.
Printing of Pamphlets a specialty. Prices on application.


_