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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00039
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: December 18, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00039
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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Bleoted to ths i-ric _u '-_, ,-
-v


Vol. .--No. 39.


i ; : t14.


ring ahd Indistrial Interests of Florida and the South.


D BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla


Price 5 cents,


Monday, December 18, 1882.
I -.1 j 11 L'.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


The Palm-No..3.-Livistoft.
FEDERAL POINT, FLA., DecI 2, 1882 '
Editors of The Florida Dipateh:
This genus of Palms was named in conaili-
ment to Patrick Murray, of Livistone, in -, Q
land. The varieties composing it .are fous
in Australia, Southern China, NeP~i lt Iia
and the Eastern prchipef ..h'e#w n
beauty and rotbut constitai ireade' ti
general favorites in the conservatory, antd their
power of withstanding unharmed owtemper-
ature, would indicate a special ladat to
out door cultivation in Florida; Their:elekitne
of foliage and stately aspect make then par-
ticularly desirable for ornamental purpose I
but beyond the use of the leaves tA* thach ad
braiding hats, little can be said.Srardin thqir
useful properties. Their fronds aie 'tanaper 4
petioles generally armed along..the e-dgef ith-
spines, and enclosed at their bases iupa th'
sheathing of coarse netted fibres. TheirurmalA
white flowers are produced on bran4eiddpadles ,
springing from among the leaves; anth&*i it
is a shining blue dmrpe, encastd ia 4tdry c
Before describing any palmth with
leaves, I may remark that they a.re a. i
inferior in rank to those with piuntte Ael
ery leaves, and are only about .ne ixth .'4ah
mierods. In the former, the d t~ioSQ te
from a common centre at the extreme tyV; the
petiole, which is called the raohi&. thaua i
highly developed form of thelatter, diha ,jtl.s
is prolonged into a mid-rib, with. the :stituqs,,
or pinne, disposed on either sidi,; n8toidy.a
more elegant' arrangement, ,but sometimes l
training far more ample proportion$ thnI thz
palmate leaf, as shown in the magnificent
plumes of Raphia taedigera, which reach the
astonishing length of fifty feet. ., ;
The most notable among the Livistonais~&L
Australis, commonly known as Corypha'A4i-
tralis, a native of Australia, and .grdwitg to
the height of a hundred feet. Its stot, dark
brown petioles, armed at the 'edges with' sharrp
spines, are beautifully polished,,and as .g
as if coated with varnish. The :eavela' 7r
alit intanarrow segments, form a. complete cir-
cle, and are of a rich dark green color. It
will bear nearly, or quite as much cold, as our
native palmetto, and I have seen it exposed for


many hbt#lSt eight degrees of freezing,
without the bl of a leaf or any percepti-
ble iaurystiril l winter weather, when
Sre tender stationary, it grows.
somiy yu 4 n, bearse our

,|A rgvs ^a~ reeh to
Iues t.-ini a few years

S ave s enorel desihate for
9r ament than thi r en we anider: the
S ims keightil. ma.y attains, its value
ti men caaint e appearaune of
ma rk d gro3I n forming avendes, will
Lm daily be. It is rpagted only by
d Rhia h Jittle smalek than
f tblesh nnd femy rmtuate.. It is exten-
elyb~ usd hr garden decoration, in
tern: cities, anadplants
S m romat. nurserymen.

fol relt of a singular ae i
I. AppirjpMf.s ase of Australian1
Mtei C a JEogld, too indolent tp
isfor af haly 4mplqyed aes
Instead, of ,thesoeda
4f #l~lhahpened .to be aNore con-
a ri therr ey nearly all 'tare-
,. 4 peMi Ag, d it was th-Aiajde
the is te y ,of aick seeds dmold .:be
npreerv~a by placing them at ionee in
i Ava d atge was taken of this discovery
t osqaewt collectors, and to it we owe the
it rod titoaof many of the rare and fine va-
at ls sii e ~ate been brr ht into culti-
; s ,, :',: . . ...
etrhe species very nearly as hardy as the
i is .. Sinens,, familiarly known 'as
e bwca. Tf~ also is grown in large
qu ttlie by. northern aurserymen, and is the
.sft; commonly used b corative pur'-
A is of fower gr t han Corypha
S ab*toie foliage i Mre graceful--the
leading, lig green leas being deeply cleft
harrow detWten u rpooA g at the ends.
W le oanig, it require4to' be shaded from the
burning sun in summer. Dr. Bennett speaks
in glowing'terine of an avenue 'of these palms,
alternated with Chamcerops humilis and Drae-'
cena Draeo, .i. the experimental garden 'at


Algiers, and says that the effect of this wide
avenue of tropical palms is perfectly magical.
There is nothing to hinder the successful es-
tablishment of similar avenues in this part of
Florida, but:the lack:of taste and the will to
, t them,,usingsomethiag else in place of
.biiw 'Draw, which is impatient of frost.
Livitona' fdauritiana is either closely allied to
the foregoing, or identical, and is quite hardy.
if a~mtive of the, fae itis, as the name would
seem to indicate, we might infer that there
may be a few other intertropical palms capable
of bearing exposure to several degrees of frost,
thou'gh,of codMse, 'such examples would be rare.
Besides the species alluded to above, there are
some that have not been introduced into this
country and considering the beauty and gen-
eral hardinesss of the genus, they are eminently
worf y of trial. Another native of Australia,
L. hu a ti, described as having a stout, tall
trunk, and a majestic crown of very large
leaves. .'
L. Jenkinsiana, found in Assam, latitude 25
to 28, is a very elegant variety, and as Griffith
informs us, is an indispensable accompani-
mqnt of every Aative gentleman's house; but in
some p rte it israte,'and the .trees ase then of
grkat value., The leaves are in universal use
throughout Assam, for covering the tops of
palanquins, and *"' sof of boat and also for
making the pi~' r M tiibrela-shaped hats of
the Assamese." '"
L. rotundifolia4; native of Java, is one of the
most useful, its leaves tdwood being employed
for a variety of purposes, and L. altissima,
Hoogendorpi, Olipeformis, Filifera, Subglobosa,
etc., re natives of te Malay Islands.
E. H. Hart.
E'"oild settlers" of DeLand, who date as
far b4ck as 1875-'76 and '77, held a Pioneer's
Meeting oh Thanksgiving. The Agriculturist
says: "A etbd sbcial time was spent in review-
ihg the hards'a~irnd inconveniences of the
past, :congratnl: tiofi on the wonderful develop-
ments that have been' fiade and are still con-
tihuing, and 'anicipatiohrs of the happy and
bright future. The table fairly groaned with
the good things of'this lifb, and all did ample
justice t6 the royal feast spread before them."


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"High Farming" in Georgia.
The "Intensive" System, as set forth by Hon.
F. C. FURMAN, of Baldwin County, Georgia,
before the State Agricultural Society:.
Our lands then, we admit, are daily becom-
ing poorer. The first question to ask is, what is
the cause; for we know that the cause is an arti-
ficial one, one of our own creation, not a natu-
ral one. Nature never tears down, she always
builds up. Turn your lands out and leave
them to nature and you know they will im-
prove. The trouble then arises from some de-
fect in our system, some artificial cause for
which we, the creators and promoters of that
system, are directly responsible, for in this
world men always make systems, systems never
make men.
I am satisfied that the evil springs from two
sources. One we will call chemical or scien-
tific, the other mechanical.
You all know that every crop draws from the
soil certain proportion of its fertility. Your
land is, as it were, your bank, in which nature
had made a deposit for you of a certain amount
of fertility, both organic and inorganic, min-
eral and vegetable. Now, if you keep drawing
from your bank without making any 'new de-
posits, experience teaches you that after awhile,
sooner or later, your deposit will be exhausted,
and then you know that your drafts will be dis-
honored and returned unpaid. Just so with
your land. You plant crop after crop on it,
draw draft after draft upon its natural re-
sources, and expect them to last forever. Is
this common sense ? Oh, but, says some one,
nature will reproduce what the crops take away.
This is a- fatal mistake. Nature can do much,
but she cannot reproduce elementary inorganic
matter. Your plants need phosphoric: acid,
lime, potash, magnesia, soda and other inorganic
elements for their successful growth, and nature
cannot reproduce these when they are Aith-
drawn. Nitrogen and humus or. organic matter
Li.LJy U ICU-Ctu u) JILLy uiiiLi jpiUCte-l-iui ,U lii.
inorganic elements. These have resulted from
the leaching and weathering of the soil for cen-"
turies, and when exhausted it will take centu-i
ties more to replace them with: a strong possi-.
bility that even time will not act effectively.for,
their restoration.' ,
What plan then suggests itself 'td he intelli-
gent' farmer as a remedjr against this evil ?:. ie
must plant crops, and crops will exhaust Ihis
soil. Me thinks I hear an answer to the ques-


tion Oh, says one, if I were only a good'them-
ist I could analyze my land and find out in
what elements it is lacking, and then by re-
placing these all difficulties will be obviated.
SExperience and experiment have demonstrated
that this plan won't do. In the first place, it
is too expensive, and in the second, it is too un-
certain and inaccurate, and in all his operations
it is absolutely necessary to success that the
farmer avoid extraordinary expense, and that
his work be done with certainty and accuracy.
Soil analysis won't do, but you can analyze
your crops, and here is the solution of this
branch of the problem. Ascertain carefully
and accurately what elements, organic and in-


organic, it requires to mike a given crop, and
in.what proportion, of eac, j'hen make your
manure for that crop so tha it .wi return to
the soil whatthe crop takes in;the proportionsa
in which each element is .taken, being careful to
return each time a little more than the crop
takes away. Now, this is not difficult- to .do,
and doing this is intensive Ofrmit, Suppose
you intend to plant a crop of corn or of oats,
from which you expect to gather fifty bushels
per acre. If you are ignorant as to the cheini-
cal constituents required to make up your crop,
Professor White, our able State Chemist, will
take pleasure, if you write and ask him, in tell-
ing you exactly how much your crop will with-
draw from the soil, what elements and in what
proportions. Then, buy the chemicals, and
using muck, barnyard manure and cotton .wed
as a basis, go to work and mix your manure
according to the formula furnished, then put it
in the ground before planting your crop, and
don't you see your land can't be injured, but
will be benefited. So with every crop you plant,
fertilize with direct reference to the require-
ments of the crop if you wish good results, and
steadily, permanent improvement.
There is no farmer but would laugh at
the idea of attempting to make a crop without
feeding his mule. Why, he will say, ny mule
will die., So with your land. If you crop it
year after year without feeding it, it will die as
certainly as your mule. There is only a little
more time required in the one case than in the
other.
Whilst dpan this blanch oftheisubjert',Ide"
sire to call your attention tp9he verv import-
ant point, and that is. theisait fes essity, for
complete manuremnent.'I Itis on account of the
one-sided, incomplete esytem of nianhuement
that it has come in vogue ramonggess anditbat
so much prejudice husarear ,; rC nd:jihstly; !too,
against the use of 'phos~iatic am'moriated ma-
-nures, commonly known a's b nmercial fertiliz-'
ers.. As bearing die6ttV,*pon.a this subject' I
will -read you an extrat diom a lecture deliv-
ered in Germany by Professor Franz Giers-
berg, a gentleman of such reputation astohave
been employed, by the government to;deliver
.lectures before the' agriaultuiral societies
throughout the' Empire. He ays: r'There is
no doubt but:that the application of bone dust
'as well as other phosphates & her soil, may and
will produce large':yFelds 'o several. years,; the

more vigorous action. Tide seit yields, largely
of the nourishment which, in' addition:to' phos-:
phates, all plants necessaritlyrequire, but as no
comnperisationi is allowed fori the absorption of
the former, we but too'often. ete rienee' the' re-
sult, that where a soil receives 'on phosphate.
manuring, for a: lengthof'time,'it wilUlbec me
eventually li entirely unprodstiieis. ,: Phosphate
imarra~ g te ly retanslow'theni s i*e fee, olmtit
ting; the other nouriahftients .i Mdd fir 1thd ac-


Cual thriving-of. ths plants, an d,:.asa ,nse-
quence, the soil'and orops deterioratet'in qual-
ity On-sided mintiturement will not produce
satisfactory :resultsfobr any' length -of time." '
How aptpi thlasllustrates the experience of
many of our Gedrgia farmers. Without any
knowledge of what their crops R.equire, they
have gone on blindly buying, at extravagant
prices, phosphatic ammoniated manes, of
whose composition they are ignorant, and after
finding the yield their lands wonderfully im-
proved for severii ears, suddenly ra fearful
falling offtakes pla e, and then they blame the,
manure, when the fault lies at.thei# own door
on account of its im poper, application., Just
here I do not wish to be misunderstood; I be-
lieve that commercial manures, as they are used,
have been productive of great evil to the agri-
culture of the South, but at the same time, the
materials that enter into the composition of


these manures as chemicals, are very valuable,
and were I deprived of their use I could never
make a compost to suit the requirements of my
crop. The true plan is to save all the lot and
stable manure under the shelters you can, rake
ott your fence corners and ditches, and gather
all the muck and humus or decayed vegetable
matter that is rotting uselessly around your
premises, go into the woods and gather leaves
and pine straw, and then compost them with
chemicals in quantities and proportions to suit
the requirements of the crop you expect to grow.
And above all else save your cotton seed for
composting. Cotton seed comes nearer being
within itsef a perfect fertilizer than any other
one thing known to the farmer of this day and
generation.

to use it. I applied this year five thousand
pound to the acre. George Ville, the cele-
brated European authority, says that in France
and Germany 20,000 pounds to the acre is the
rule for the application of compost.
In Ohio, we are told that, the compost raised
on a farm of fifty-five acres from ten head of
horses and thirty head of cattle, in the space of
one year, was valued by the State chemist, af-
ter careful analysis, at $2,660, and this was ap-
plied broadcast at the rate of forty thousand
pounds to the acre, with the final result of a
clear profit of $300 per acre. This compost
was made with muck and lot manure without
the addition of any chemicals. By the proper
and judicious addition of chemicals its value
would, in niy judgment, have been largely in-
creased. Fniithis statement, gentlemen, you
can readily perceive that millions dollars are
lost annually to the farmers of the South
through theji laziness and carelessness in the
one item of a alluree to pen their cattle at
high. "Give me a good pile oflot manure and
cotton seed, land the chemicals as I may need
them, aud I wili] guarantee to make a manure
that will pay anywhere from one to five hun-
:dred per cent. on its cost in increased produc-
tion of crops alone, leaving out of the account
the immense, and permanent increase in the
value of the lands upon which it has been ap-
plied. Now, gentlemen, to give you the prac-
tical results of the experiment that I have
made. Five years ago I selected about sixty-
fived acres of land, the poorest I could find. The
characterr of the land was sandy, with a clay
subsoil, near enough to the surface to be brought
tr w'th th~a'nl th sorowt ochn
oak and pine, but this nauee ec'oW~Ro ikn ~
land worn out before I was born. To see what
it would, do, I planted it all in cotton the first
year and .cultivated carefully, and the yield
was eight bales ion the sixty-five acres, or about
a' bale to:eight aeres---pretty good evidence of
the extreme poverty of the soil. Next year 1X
comrieneed mamining, using five, hundred::
pounds of my compost t6 the.' acre,. applied in
the drill; .the crop for that year was twelve
biles. The year: after I .doubled the manure,


using. 1,000 pounds to the acre, and I gath-
ered that year twenty-three bales. The year
'after, or last year, I doubled the manure again,
'still applying in ihe drill, using two thousand
pounds to the acre, and the crop,in turn,doubled
itself, yielding me forty-seven bales. This year
I have doubled the manure again, using an
average of from four to five thousand pounds
to the acre, and my crop is estimated, by good
judges who have examined it, as promising
from seventy-five to one hundred bales of cot-
ton. In addition to this I have already gath-
ered from this sixty-five acres five hundred
-bushels of 6ats, as follows:
- Last fall I planted five acres of the sixty-five
in oats, using in it two hundred bushels of cot-
ton seed per acre, as a manure. From this, on
the last of May I harvested one hundred bush-
els of oats per acre, or five hundred bush-
els altogether, and after clearing off the oat


9 , ..... .. ..... .
ii. . .. . r l T, . . .---.. n -.7 nlmm ln~ ln n ll- .. . .. .. .....*, - .


THHiE FLORIDR; ~ A 1 I 9PAT A ff.-~


612







1~LORJhIYA Si~ATCff.
-rrv~' i'----.* ''T~" _____________________________________________


stubble I planted t}e land in, cotton and now
have cotton growing on it of which this stalk,
whic I shaX ou,.is a8 simple. This stalk is,
you observe, fully five feet high and has on it,'
by actual count, omne hundred and twenty-sfit
loikls.blooiKs and squares. And yet;'to-day lit
igr~O* n~inhs .ihd one day since the seed,
S -,.it.srpng, was deposited in the
ground. "'ad it ~eI planted and grown on
DAAn'd W R a %$i -ithe i`nft6is1vd 'system ft
wbttfl1'WtW f4m Uhinn half' as large, and-
would be far behitidtItalk I exhibit in fruit-

Whe expense o making this crop this year,
all' Indtusve] rVbor',T"offire, gathering; CW',
will- -B04-xceed$fO0, sit 1- if' I make. thf
lowet tetiwate, the- saetetyAve! baleS- t, 10
7 bales cotton each............. ...................... ,750.00
2 "t has c. a s ed ii ... ...... -.... a
500 u el o o seed, 12 cent .. ... ...
A kW" 354 .. ...:.... ;................

j "rBa.tp*hW iw aotlitriktrterpu(eA t be -
the expenw acc.uMQ,iUqludet.he estir-e et p'
OPmy. wq--ppe hrin
d99s, not give all theroduts ras there.
8Acet b.eg~ri live 'fotiduthat i oiitd dulti-
vat"nof iatt tht i~Mdty'five-. tt' with 1two
phldti;'.andi1 hhiLve added-4abut twenty actes
more, making in all about eighty-five acres..
(Copcltded next week)
T* Agricultural G.llege Fund.
We have a'ftid of nearly tone'hundted and
fifty1 thousand dollars, the; proceeds of the Ag-
rioitltuuml Colleg6 scrip, donated -by the Uaited'
Sthtei, tying, 'As ait has been. lying fi)r .seyy.ral
years, .anapproptiAed. ... ;
A difference of opinion has exiatod, as.. (o 0ts
application, whether ito found ,and ,stai 1an
exclusively agricultural college, or giveit to t, e
iammons ,phoolfund. Spone of tle St,4tes have
ed'thpf. fn4.to- establish. griuitural yolpges.,;
some to establish agricultural depayertesian
qxiting Ste,institutions. .
SIt hs been suggested m this tate that fhe
fund should go to the common schol fiinddbqt
this would clearly e a isappro riat onof te

!h ,.e provision of the act o6" 1'81b cohYe-dJ
' plaed a separate aigrieltui'at college: Is l
ppe was thus deinned
SEc. 2. The design of this intitUtilion is to
t aadh' sfrich Ttthches of learning al-ag e rdi^W
to agriculture and mechanical arts witiputl*t
eluding er ci ntiic aid. c9~ie.l e4ues,
ana including military tactics m iordr to pr -
mote the liberal and practice ediu'catot -o!tIt
industrial classes in the several'ptsht -B


,proif iona,oflifUW -~': .- .. i .) 7 (
tersts (; :the. fmun4 hall be .rqgu.;y ;pplk,
without 4dmiition to thepu'po.es spt thiR
section 2. In section ,, that its location shall
be as neat^ nt9c,,fhtett4~al possible,
at some healthy 'anl convenienDfy ,accessible
point,' and td purchase or obtain by :rait 100
'ctdre ;' ' ' o' '0 ,' -
'The purpose of. the agriculturall, laad garit
,was ..-t especially to; educate a ,?la sp iuch
pto, dvpop id.plarge the science ,of agri-
edltyreo ,as. ah outcomee of the. bette idt-rtc-
i 1o o0f oul youth in tlioseobradiht s "'-dienb
which have a bearing on the bultifftson of ,the
sbil o 4iithwiedge of its coistituent element, ;the-
law af. organicgirowth in plants, treOe and ani-
" As will be aden, by vte second section of the
act. organizing the Agricultural College, in-
stftction in-this special knowledge was to be


an adjunct to the other branches usually taught
in our seminaries of learning, not to take their
place or dispense with them.
Taking the more restricted' view of the pur-
pose of this grant, agricultural schools or col-
leges have been established in several of the
States in which practical and theorteical farm-
ing were attempted to be made the leading and
principal characteristic of the instructrions
given, ; i '
These special agricultural colleges have gen-
erally proved a failure. Young menI b 'ought
up on farms were unwilling to be simply taught
the principles and practice of their special vo-
cation. They understood and desired education
iii a broader and larger sense, hence the agri-
cultural colleges received buit few students, and
those noto of the brightest. -
/ Itecognizing the fact that the ,4griculturist
neeAs.a broaer system of insti ioj4 ,. order
to come an educated fayerp; tle pIafi lias
now e.en generally adopted, f either nimaking a
edpartnment of ,Agriculturein ,onnectin, Wyith
te, State University, or establishing in the
t~te University a chair of agric,l4ture, to which
Fe allied the departments of ch jnistry an4d
lysics. In Georgia a branch .of..he State
'University has been established as' a depart-
ment of igricultuire., In Tennessee a depart-
ment .f agriculture has been organized at the
State J1Vi sity at Knoxville. .
The act.6f 1870, passed by our Iegistature,
has never :been carried into effect,.because it
seemed unWi* undertake-the actual creation.
of a college, the necessary professors and
officers, .upoQa~ ome of ten thousand dollars
per 'year, Hiithou ildings, capital or appli-
antes. and. atpar The interest has beqn.
accuiulatii, b.b Pee, capital isstiL,coippar-
ativ[y small, and ioi'ent .toestablish a re-
spleitqble collegeafr d ... .
SThe State has alrea colleges or semi-
unries;, .doing.,~ ery,. essful work in the
cause of, education. ,j/ eminaxry at Talla-
hassee hina atna O .at cellent reputation,
jand has been well ged, although, fi-om
circumstanes,.it u, ii rather circumscribed
in its operations and benefits to its immediate
vicinity. '
ilTe", EastF lri'M Seminary at Gainesville
has latelyy expand&l -very' greatly its plan of
ilselbiness, 'and ikor .numbers on its rolls stu-
dents from all pMbrtif.s of East and South Flor-
fis', it .wouldreeimnto be the duty'of the Leg-
isiatre O makeiae. earliest, practical' axd ju
difos ause oo thnKi sal, which is attainable, we:
asee aoireasorifn wv why thbse State semiaries,
orOe,' ofthampshbould not be designated asth
Agrieitltural Gpilege, -and chairs of chemistry
AKda plied scie deebe organized as departments
of a school of agriculture instead of waiting to
create a separategagripultural college.
The second section of the act of 1870, both
iAk irit api d'a tei','would be cdnfriried to
if bd"eg'slthre;': i'fi Its 'wisdomn, should con-'
c(ti&H'W niake this arraigenent anid' ditsposi-
*tifi'oftht'heiome of theft timd. iThe students


i tbitir' Stte' seminaries arie of the very- class in-
t'ded b be" benefited.
ST' I h '"second section sirch I inches of learn-
tig' iie' to-be taught as are related to agricul-
ftfil Atnd"'mechanidal arts, without e.rcluding
dthbrBiuiitific and classicalstudies, and includ-
I~i r '-itry tactics. -
By the 13th section the location is to be "as
near the centre of the State possible;" and
"at some healthy and access W point."
. Th'efe conditions can certainly be fulhilled by
creatingan agricultural department at Gaines,
ville, 'and also at Tallahassee, if, deemed neces,
Sary.. The obvious economy of such a course
in saving the expense of buildings, teachers,
library; etc., ia a strong argument inI favor of
this mode of mediately utilizing the firnd.-
Florida Mirror.


A Youth's Questions.
OHIO, November 21, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
1 You will favor me very much by answering
a few questions in regard to Florida. I hear
considerable talk up North, here, about the
"Sunny Southl," and I, wish to ask you if it is a
good' place for a youth to start out in life?
That is, I mean, what are the employment for
a youth ?'I presume agriculture is the princi-
pal employment. Please mention the principal
employment and what they receive for their
work ? Also, is it ,advisable for any one to pur-
chase land down there through correspondence,
s some of my folks have bought land in Or-
ange Park, Clay County ? If so, please state
where is the best location to buy, and all about-
faOlities.
IV!y employer, Nr.-, who I have been work-
ing r, for the pst four yea rs, has purchased
four hundred acres in Kansas, and is contem-
plating a removal to that place, and wants me
to go along with, him, but as our folks have
bought land down there, I thought I would
write and ask you a few questions in regard to
Florida, so that I could think over the situa-
tion I am in and see which would be advisable
for me to do. Some say it is so hot down
therein the summer time that the men cannot
work part of the days, but I see by the papers
they contradict that statement,
; By answering these questions, and as many
more pertaining to Florida, you will confer a
great favor .to me. Please answer through
mail, and not through. your paper, By so do-
ing, you will very. much oblige,. AlM.
REPLY.-'--WCe re constantly in receipt of let-,
ters similar to 'the above, the writer generally
forgetting to enclose stamp for return postage;
but requesting an answer "per mail"-to whicVl
request'we are almost always compelled to give
a courteous but very decided refusal, even
when the stamp is sent us. We feel nothing
but kindness for the Ohio youth, and if he has
the real "grit" in him, we should like to wel-
come shim to Florida. But, knowing nothing
whatever of the lad personally, it is impossible
'for us to predict either his success or failure
here, and we can only advise him to read the
copies ofTEns DISPATCH mailed him, as well
as all other books, papers and pamphlets in re-
gard to our State; and then, finally, to come
"down" here; "winter and summer" with us,
end judge for irnself.-E-D-s.'
Cpst of Fencihg.,"
Editors of fTehF loridZ Di/patC14 :.,


Says the Sot/dwrh Planter: -"There are six
millionimiles of fencing in- the United States,
the total cost of which has been more than two
thousands million dollars. The Census Reports
show that.. during the census year there were
expended nearly, eighty mills& of dollars.
How great then, is the demand for law to reg-
ulate and cheapen enclosures. Virginia, with
her local and conflicting laws, is only piling
trouble on her citizens. Wise legislation on
this important subject is demanded, but to the
average legislator it may, as a dog law, influ-
ence- a few votes against him, and he lacks the
nerve to do the right thing."'
;)'Is this not also true of Florida ; and is it not
time to send inen to the Legislature that will
give more time and attention to our interests ?
We want a practical "Road Law," a "State
Board of Agriculture," a "State Agricultural
Society," a "State Chemist," an "Experimental
Farm and Garden ;" and that long looked-for


S0


I







.-T THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


tile region!
But my preface is growing too long and too
didactic, and I should have done better, per-
haps, to have simply said that my desire and
purpose is to put into the hands of such of my
farmer and gardener friends as may appreciate
them, some of the little helps which have aided
me in my work, and into their minds some of
the minor items of experience which have been
a part of my own, or which have come under
by observation. I may wander off into a short
sermon or two occasionally, as I am wont to do
whenever a tempting text offers, but I promise
not to offend thus too often.
A "SLEDGE" OR "BOAT."
One of the handiest of- my farming conven-
iences is a roughly built sled on which to haul
out manure from the stables to the fields. It is
made of two pieces of common joist lumber of


Agricultural College, and many other things
which would suggest themselves to a practical
agriculturist, and less politics. These things are
of much more importance to us at present than
to have a Constitutional Convention called, and
would be of much value to Florida. The ques-
tion is simply, shall we have wise legislators,
such as will draw to our State a flood of ener-
getic settlers, or foolish political wranglers,-
and thus drive away the intending immigrant ?
G. J. A.
Hints and Helps for Farmers.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I have for many years profited largely by a
careful attention to the little things of life, and
especially the minor conveniences with which
every worker can and should surround himself.
Simple labor-saving contrivances are more ben-
eficial and necessary to farmers than to any
other class of workers, perhaps; at least they
are more easily and cheaply attainable; and
when I see a farmer or gardener who "takes ad-
vantage of his work, and makes every edge cut,"
I know him for a successful worker, which is
the highest commendation he can expect to de-
serve. According to an old saying, "An hon-
est man is the noblest work of God," which is
true enough; but to my mind, taking it for
granted that the honest man is no more and no
better than he who ought to be-that it is a
matter of course that all men should be honest,
the really noble one is he who does his allotted
duty with intelligence and cheerfulness, and
thus attains success'when many fail from lax
habits, careless use of their opportunities and
inattention to the petty details which go to
make up the sum of every man's work.
Florida, to many of its most valued and active
developers is a terrace incognita in nearly every
characteristic of soil, climate, etc., and few of
those who come to join the already large and
constantly increasing "army of occupation,"
are able to accomplish perfect work without
first unlearning nearly all they know of agri-
culture and horticulture elsewhere, and begin-
ning anew. There are, however, innumerable
details of farm and garden work which their
previous training in other climates will enable
them to apply with tenfold effectiveness in this;
and in the better methods of agricultural occu-
pation ; in the intelligent application of experi-
ence acquired elsewhere ; in the devotion of the
best thought and most earnest endeavor to the
solution of the problems which confront them,
in the hopes of success in agricultural pursuits
to every new settler within her borders.
The man who makes two blades of grass grow
where one grew before, is sententiously called a
public benefactor. How much more, then,
shall he be a public benefactar who by thought-
ful, earnest labor and patient experiment aids
in developing its best possibilities the wonder-
ful, natural resources of this wonderful and fer-


and badly-shaped branches. There is an art in
pruning, and if the reader is a novice, he should
consult some standard authority for instruction
too extended tod be here set down. One of
the most convenient implermnts for the purpose,
in careful hands, is a carpenter's chisel, used
either with or without a light mallet. If asaw
is used it should be one with fine teeth and very
sharp. FEEDINGG BOX.

A handy substitute for a basket, in which to
carry corn, vegetables, etc., from the house or
crib to the stables, is a stout box eighteen inches
square and ten inches deep, with a handle of
hickory bent and fastened to the sides with
screws. It will last a lifetime, and can be made
to any exact measure. *
YANKEE FARMER.


two inches thick by twelve inches wide, five
feet long, for runners, rounded at one end, of
course, and solidly framed together with oak
pins (not nails.) On this is nailed a floor of
inch planks, laid lengthwise, to facilitate un-
loading and cleaning out, with sides and a front
board twelve inches high. It will hold all that
one horse can draw, and as soon as the bottoms
get worn smooth will run over soft plowed
ground muchbetter than anything on wheels.
Its greatest advantage, however, is that it saves
the light wagon from becoming foul in perform-
ing this most necessary work of the farm and
garden. One of its uses is to transport ugly
logs, stumps, etc., without requiring so high a
lift as to put them into the wagon.
A HAY HOOK.
A very convenient little article is my lay
hook, made from the stem of a young tree cut
off about four inches below its juncture with a
short branch, the branch cut off about the same
distance from the stem, both sharpened to a
rounding point, and the upper part of the stem
left for a handle about three feet in length.
This is a proper implement for pulling hay out
of the stack or mow.
A GOOD WEEDER.
Get your blacksmith to cuout a piece of
plow steel three inches wide and, six inches
long for the blade. By drilling two holes in
the centre he can fasten on the shank for the
handle, which should be forke and provided
with a socket for the insertionfof the handle,
and should be set at an an.lfof forty-five de-
grees to the plane of the .yie. The two long
edges should be drawn t'in and sharpened,
You have now one of the most effective weed-
ing hoes ever inventedlnd it is not patented.
It has a double edge,id can be worked equally
well by pulling or pushing. It passes along
just under or on the uiface and effectually cuts
off every weed betwftt the roung plants in the
row without too mu 4i itnrbafnce of the sur-
face. It is not inte" as a cultivator, of
course, but as a weeder i "hard to beat.
CUTTING THE CULLS.
Milch cows are greatly benefited and will in-
crease and maintain the flow of milk if fed
upon the little potatoes, -sh or sweet, which
are left over from the cro tmd are too small
to sell or use at home. /ut they should be
cut fine. A good plan 'to have a trough
or stout box in which, aft' washing, the pota-
toes can be cut with a c ''on spade; but a
better plan is to take an old spade or hoe or
fire-shovel, and by attaching a stout, short han-
dle, provide an implement expressly for the
purpose and save the wear and tear and rust of
the spade.
TRIMMING THE TREES.
During the winter every fruit tree, not ex-
cepting the orange, should be looked after and
thoroughly put in order. All dead and decayed
wood should be removed, as well as all ugly


D. W. K., Fort Mason.-We have had no
personal experience With Guinea cows. Will
some of our readers who "know all about them,"
give us the special "points" of this breed ?
Professor Tripp's Lectures.
We call attention to Prof, TRIiP'S adver-
tisement in this issue' of THE DISPATCH. Those
of our readers who desire to see and hear some-
thing of interest, and at the samertime pass an
enjoyable evening, should patronize Prof. Tripp.
He comps well yesommendedd Prof. NOAH
PORTER, of Yale College, says.:
I certify with great pleasure that from the
lectures which I have myself heard, and from
what I have learned of them from others, ILbe-
lieve Prof. Tripp's lectures to have been very
carefully prepared, and to contain a great deal
of valuable information for all classes of people.


.*'~hii.L-s~";; ~.r


Answers to Inquiries.
CAssAvA.-Any person having Cassava seed
(stalks) for sale, will please address H. W.
Lawrence, New Orleans, La.
B. P. W.-The books you inquire for are
advertised by Ashmead Brothers, in supple-
mental sheet to DISPArcH of last week (11th
Dec.) This Publishing House can furnish; at
short notice, any book .lor periodical known to
the trade, at publisher'spriies.
J. G.-We do.not affect the Rubber Boot.
Once punctured or iSrQen, (as they are very
apt to become,) they are prctically useless, as
no one this side of the factory can mend thdem.
For rough, every-day tramping around the
farm, grove or plantation., we prefer a good,
well-fitting kip-skin or cow-hide, boot, thor-
oughly "anointed" with the folHdwing prepara-
tion,which should be applied before the boots
.are worn, and frequently during the winter/and
rainy season: 'Melt together, tallow 4 oz.;
Rosin and Beeswax, each,'1 'e.; wheni melted,
add a quantity of Neatsfoot oil, equal to all the
other ingredients. ApplJy this mixture, warm
to both soles and uppers, rubbing it in well be,
fore the fire.
J. S. T.-Address Col. Richard Peters, At-
lanta, Ga. He has, perhaps,.the, finest and
purest Angora goats in the United States.
J. L. R.-Mr. Hill, of Lawtey, Alachua
County, Florida, has two hundred Japan Per.
simmons in his grove. A. J. Bidwell, of this
city, can, probably, furnish all the budded trees
you may want.
Jwo. B. P.-We have already published an
article on raising sour orange seedling stocks--
(see DISPATCH, of Nov. 6th, page 518,)11-but
we will take up the subject aind go into it in
extenso, next week.
A. T.-Address T. Graham Ashiiead, Wil-
liamson, Wayne Co., N. Y., for the Plyinouth
Rocks and Brown Leghorns.
D. L. A.-The seea-head you sent per mail,
is the "Evergreen Millet," or "Branching
Sorghum," a number of packages of which
were distributed to subscribers of .THE DIS-
PATCH, (through the kindness of Dr. G. W'.
DAVIs,) last spring. Your estnaunication
shall appear in our next.
E. P.-Plant your trees at 'any time conve-
nient and favorable, from now until the latter
part of January.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH l


TRANSPORTATION COLUMN.

Florida Dispatch Correspondence.
We commence this week a column in THE
FLORIDA DISPATCH, devoted to enquiries and
.nswers in regardto the Florida Dispatch Line
business, ,fepl justified in this movement
.fromlieh re P9fthe inq 'ri, The replies
,th te e~o, ,. IQi will be instructive and of
general interest iW Florida:
PENN, iPU4M COUNTY, FLORIDA.
;'C!A ,-0 Wifke no time contracts on
freight. The connections to Philadelphia via
"Atlantic Coast Line' are daily. Schedules
of trains by *itch; nrit iS ,ioved indicate time
Sbeween Jadksaovilleadl PhilJdelphia eighty
fobur .hours. : ; .
FOtfT MA Tf WIrIDA.
1MEsRsL V.-F Ftirit f;roarded prompt-
r ly m &n Wille lo. W iS hort Lmeine
S pdrid P ,Li) without
refeepce tq any agene here.
SANFORD, FLORIDA. .
L. P.--4Se ashloWe to k .
SORaikdtAEi, FLO6IDA.
Ai K. I.-Our fruit train leve Jackson-
ville at 6:30 p. m., arrive Szavannah :6:30
a. m. "The mail boats have been mnaing the con-
nection this season with commendable regular-
ity. We make the connection and have time
to transfer to ship, at ship's side, unless the
ship sails previous to, sa, a. m., in such case
shipments should b1 made the day previous.
See schedule of days and hours 6f sailing in
this paper. ,

STle $tsp na Orange. A
An up-river correspondent, to whoi* we sent
a couple of Dr. HALL'S a0ow fious Satsuma
oranges, writes a0 follbws, in answer tf6 ur ex-
pressed opinion that the fruit, strongly reem-
bled the "Mandarin" (C. Nob is.)
"Itisa different from the Mandarin--quite
different, in the cellular feoimtion of the-rind
-antd should be from this formation one-third
larger than the Mandarin in size. This is a
Very imperfect fruit, lacks potash, also nitro-
gen, and has an excess of lime, as shown even
by a tirsorl eBxamitiatio. I am sure it will
prove a valuable addition to our fruits. It can
be grOwuv to thiee times this size.
S+' Very truly yours, I L




S i-, METEOROLOGICAL REPOJST.
Orr" or O5VE VATIO ,ro )
aG A Lf4 ylICEp U..,. JACKSONVII.LE, iLA.
S' either for week, ending December 15, 1882.
: ' ,-. "


,r here. in
'' , !;t .. V, l .... .ind-- +8 ; +,:+p





Saturday 9... 30. 61 4 5.3 80,3 0.00 N L 2Clo '
Sunday 10.......I 3.07 55 59. 89.7 0.20 8 4 Fal
Monday 11...... 1 0.16 ,49!53 58. ..0 0.00 N1W 5 Fair;
Wdnesidy 13 8.06 :S7556'66.3-78.7 0.00 SW 2 Fatr.'
Thursd a*y[4 ... 29.7 6017it 4.| 6 00 .09o NW '1 Fair.
Friday 15....... 29.87 70150160.31 5 0.24 W 6Cloudy.
'Highest barometer 30.8f lowest 29.79.
Highest temperat~l -l ( 414
NorL.-Baromente Mn n -edaced to sea level.
J 3. WJ. SyXiT S signal Obterver U. 8. A.

" PERSONS ORDMBIIG GOODS FROM AD-
VERTIBERS1 APPEIKAING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WItL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


SAN MATEO NIURSEBRIES ?



This well known Nursery is now open for orders for all the best varieties of


Budded Orange and Lemon Trees!

On Sweet and Sour Stocks. Also a choice line of Ornamental Trees, Evergreens, Flowering Plants and Shrubs.
A specially fine lot of Japan Plums.


to mar 18 '83p

Sq eaTl.


MAXWELL, ANDERSON & CO.,
SAN MATEO, FLA.


Peas, Beans, Potatoes,
'Of nll well know varieties for earlv planting.


Orange Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, CABBAGE PLANTS,
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, December 12, 1882. CA'3BAGE SEED
.Receipts of oranges at this port via Florida Dispatch"\ A .EED ,
Line and Southern Expiess Company, week ending ONION
10th inst., 11,000 boxes. Condition most fine.


PRICES.
Floridas, $3.00 to $4.25 per box.
Jamaicas, $6.00 to $7.00 per barrel.
Valencias, $5.50 to $8.00 per case.
Messinas, $3.00 to $3.50 per box.
Palermos, $3.00 to $3,.50 per box.
C. D. OWENS, General Agent.

SNEW YORK, December 15, 1882.
Special Telegram to The Florida Dispatch:
Receipts of oranges via Florida Dispatch Line and
Sou Express company this week, 7,000 packages.
Sell rom $3.00 to $4..50 per box. C. D. OWENS.


SJacksonville Wwolesale r~iees.
Cbq-rected ,by JONES & BOWEN, Wholesalesale
W tIl Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
FRUITS--
SUOAS-ra ted .........., ..............................

C hut LoB r ....................................
G oldenoicw ..........................................
Pow de .........................................
COFFEE, Rid-Fair.' .................
Javac 0. ...................................

JavaO . .. .r .... ............... .
M ocha ........... ........... ..................
Peaberry .....i .... ...........................
M araca bo..... ............... ..............
Any of above grad d to order
FLOur--SnQw DTp, nt.......................
N. A.patent.,A .. ...........................
O reole, 2d b .i...............................
Pearl, 3d be o ....0................... ..........
Orange 0 o. 1 ..........................
MEATs-Baconn..,......... ............. ........ 11 te
Ham (erwin & Sons)........................
Should .............. .............. ............
Ho Y-Pea r i bbl...............................
MEAL-per bbl .. .......................................
LARD--Reflned ipails.....................................
BUTrtR-Very best, kegs (on ice).................... 35
CHE SE--Fill re m ....o......o................................
TOBACCO-inooki 'l-"the Boss" Durham Y80
b e s... ...... -... ....... .......
*"The Bosi" Durham 1 b pkge.........
"Sitting Bull" D. (genuine) ~s, .......
""Sitting lull" (genuine) s...........
"itt!ingirll" (genuine)s .s...........

Plug1- hell Road" 4 plugs to b., 30
4 b boxes .... ............ ...............
"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to 1b., 30 lb
boxes............ ................. ...........
"Florida Girls"--Bright twist, 14 to
b., 17 l. boxes.. ..... ..............
Cigars--"Lohg Branch"a very.pop-
',4 ular brand, per thousand. 1...
S ,Our X" choice cigar, easy smok'r
Qur rXX," Ya very choice smoker....
S "llorda Boys," (we areState Agt,)
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per bok..
Peerleas oz, ,per box............. ........
Starch, fumpper lb...... ........ ............
HoPs, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS--
Hops. per .... .............. .................... .... 15
Ager'sFresh Yeast Cakes, per doz..........
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb................................... ...... '
Town Talk Baking Powder, pqr doz. 1 b.
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lb t.....
Royal Baking Powder, per dozr. rlb......
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new....... 3
CHIOKENS, each.... ........ ............... .......... 2
ESAe-Per doz................................................. 3
HIDEs-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class
Country Dry Salted, per lb.................
Butcher Dry Salted, er lb....................
Damaged Hides...... ......................
Kip and Calf, 8fbs. a nder................
SKINS--Raw Deer Skins, per .l...................
S ,DeerSkins Salted, per fb.... ............... 2
FUas -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter.................................. .......... ......... 1 50S
Raccoon, each............... ........... ......
W ild Cat, each........................ ........... 1
Fox, each...... .... ..... ..........
BE w;w-per lb....................................
WooL-Free from burs, per lb...................... 1
SBurry, perlb.................... ................
GOAT SKI s--Each per lb...................................


and


1
11
9
10%'
11
12
18
18
18
7 75
750
725
700
312%
17
500

to 40


32
80
75
49
45
55
36
50
2700
2400
26 00
3500
350
3 50
S6ec
@226
0Oc
2 25
225
2 70
1 50

825


9@10
10
35
6@30
g4 00


SEED,


ONION SETTS,
Witlr a full line of Garden Seeds.
Send for New Catalogue.
C.B. ROGERS,
Seedsman,
133 MARKET ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA.
to Jan 8 '83


DIXIE NURSERY.


JAPAN PERSIMMONS,
LE CONTE PEAR TI'EES,
AND A FULL LINE OF NURSERY STOCK.
__ -- ---
W- Orders by mail promptly attended to. i

H. H. SANFORD, PROPRIETOR,
tojan 17 '83p THOMASVILLE, GA.



M erehants'9 ine,
DOUBLE DAILY,
CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.

ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.
REGULAR MAIL,

GEO. M. BIRD, Capt. G. J. Mercier.
H. B, PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De lary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at 3
p. m., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
all intermediate landings.
ROSA, Capt. J. L. Amazeen.
FREDERICK DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel.
WELAKA, Capt. J. S. Mattheson.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Saturday, at
4:30 p. m., and from S., anand W. Railway wharf at 5 p.
m., for Palatka, Sanford, Enterprise and all intermedi-
ate landings.
Connects at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad
for Gainesville and.Ocala.
Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
on the Upper Ocklawaha.
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormonrd and
Daytona.
Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Iongwobd, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
'Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
New Smyrna and Titusville. ^
*Returning Mail Steamers re Enterprise every
morning at 7 a. m., and Sanforl :80 a. m. and 9:00 a.
m., making close connections with S., F. and W. Rail-
way for all points North East and West.
r-Through bills of lading given to all points.
The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
respect.
F or further information, apply at General Ticket
Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets.
SW. B. WATSON, Manager.
C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.

LeConte Pear Cuttings.


5015
0@20
5@15 20,000 LeConte Pear Cuttings for sale at $20.00 per thou-
20 sand, well packed and delivered at the Express Office,
1@15 Thomasville, Ga.
10 to Jan 11 '83p R. N. McKINNON,


i. b -------- --- --------~ --- -- --


-.-j rL-.-.--m.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


t


ment of a number of very large lumber mills, adding
materially to the amount of money brought into gen-
eral circulation, and giving remunerative employ-
ment to a great number of working-men.-Alachua
Advocate:
FLORIDA SETTflrF The hopeful feature,"
says the Palatka Herald about the tide of immi-
gration to Florida is that so many came to settle, or
to prospect for others. With land enough to take
care of a million of people, and with advantages of
entering into innumerable new industries, and with
facilities for the humblest and the poorest to woik
out a living easily, with a modicum 'of pluck, or
' stick,' and with such industry as characterize the:
northern or western people, why should not.iFlorida
flourish in the near future, as never before, or as
many of the Western. States have in the past ? No
reason in the world why our State should not fairly
jump forward for the next five years, now that our
climate and resources are becoming so widely
known."


Our Industries and Productions.
Within the last ten years the industries and pro-
ductions of our county have greatly increased in
numbers, qualities and quantities. So soon as the
muscle and skill of our impoverished people had'
eked out a foundation for development, and the
muscle, skill and ready-made means of new settlers
were added, diversified industries began to multiply,
and a greater variety of products to supersede the old
annual routine of investment and labor, and tihe
qualities of all to take on improvement.
The mechanical trades were the first to work out
permanent betterment. This statement is sustained
by the fact that our mechanics were the first class
able to build better styles of houses for themselves
than any that surrounded them, and to invest in town
lots and small farms. Their success naturally at-
tracted a large number of mechanics to come in and
make their homes in all our towns. As a class, not-
withstanding the very large increase in numbers, they
maintain an advanced position in the race for compe-
tence and its accessories.
The mercantile business, although scattered to
every point where the trade of comparatively small
neighborhoods c6uld be concentrated to a partial ex-
tent, has been singularly exempt from the fluctua-
tions and disasters incident to it. But for occasional
embarrassments, growing out of losses on bottopn,
many of our merchants would now be 'iben of consi'd-
erable surplus wealth. Under all disadvantages their
credit as a class has always stood at par, and they
have not only annually enlarged the quantity and
quality of their stocks, but laid up some capital, while
there has been a very large addition to their num-
bers. The latter fact demonstrates the confidence of
keen-sighted and safe business men in the soundness
of our merchant class and the value of the trade of
our people.
But the major part of all the prosperity attained
by our citizens, has been ploughed and dug out of
the ground, at last. A conclusive evidence, this, of
the capacity of our soil, and the steady and healthful
prosperity of our rural population. But for the
muscle, skill and industry of this class, the bone and
sinew of all development and wealth, all our indus-
tries and vocations would now be in decay, and 6tir
people emigrants. Taking our gardeners and farm-
ers aggregately, they have prospered to a degree that,
while it cannot be estimated in dollars and cents, has
well fed and clothed aall liberally, habled most of
them to add to their possessions in farm stocks and
fixtures, and many to, make valuable improvements
or purchase more laidd. This general prosperity is
due principally to the diversity of crops--a system
that is growing in favor as it ought. Cotton, corn,
rice, tobacco, cane, oats, peas, potatoes, with early
garden vegetables and small fruits for export, having
received more equal attention, have yielded a greater
income per annum than could have been realized on
cotton alone. So soon as the young orange arid lemon
groves, the vineyards, and the peach and pear or-
chards, and those of kindred fruits come into .good
bearing, and rice and tobacco take their proper places
as prime articles of cultivation, the one for home con-
sumption and the other for exportation, our farmers,
fruit-growers and gardeners will set out on the road
of assured prosperity leading to wealth.
The opening of facilities for trade, travel and set-
tlement by railroads from Waldo southward, and
from Gainesville eastward, and by steamers through
several of the large lakes, has induced the establish-


There probably never was a time when the people
of the South, as a whole, were rhore Pro'perous than
they are to-day, and it is a prosperity built upon a
solid foundation, that of industry. Hard years of ex-
perience have taught the people that success, was at-
"tainable only through labor, and to-day theQ are la-
boring with hand and brain. '-They are but begin-
ning to find out the vast'resources of a countryy
which for climate and variety of products is unex-
celled in the world, and they are going towork to
develop and utilize those resources. They are learn-
ing to be independent, and instead of shipping grain
.and hay from the Nor we shall be surprised if in a
few years they do not n the tables and export food
to the North-indeed Whas this yearSalready begun.
The time was when the 'South was. exclusively agri-
cultural in its pursuits, "but the past few years has
seen factories springing up all over this section, and
as they have proved profitable,' others are rapidly fol-
.owing. The South is destined at no distant day to
not only raise cotton to clothe the 'country, but to
manufacture it into fabrics, thus keeping at home all
the profits.-Americus (Ga.) Recorder. V


Learn a Trade.
Jas. Parton, in a recent lecture, says: The at-
tempt, I trust, is about to be abandoned to educate
human beings through the brain alone. The hand,
the wonderful human hand, will perhaps soon resume
its part in education lIt is only by discipline and
by labor that the world can be conquered. The mil-
.itary cadet, 4as an exqaptionali advantage ,4n being
able to earn his'trade,ean'd getihis knowledge at the
same time. Three years ago I visited Cornell, and
was told that nothing was more successful than the
machine shops. At Eton, one of the most aristo-
cratic of the English public schools, the students, the
.year before last, made a five-horse power steam enr
gine, which is used in their shops for turning their
lathes. All the elder boys have their separate forges.
The education which leaves the hand undexterous and
the arm puny, is not culture but degeneracy. Let us
not forget that the men who have made America,
have all been educated by head and by hand, and the
men who have misled America have been educated
otherwise.
Washington used four trades, three of which he
knew thoroughly. Jefferson knew three or four
trades. Franklin besides being an excellent printer,
was ajack-of-all trades, and, contrary to the proverb,
very good at several of' them. Look through the
history of one hundred men who; have become ,illus-
trious, and you will find that the majority of them
had their heads knocked against something hard in
their early days. Dickens working in the blacking
shbp is an example.

cotton Sedfopr Manure.
It is poor economy for cotton-planters to sell 4he
cotton seed grown on their plantations, at any price,
unlessits equivalent in matiurial value is returned to
the soil in some form, writes Commiissionqr flerider-
son of Georgia, in his rccett report. The most simple
way of doing this is by anexchange, of the seed for
an equivalent in value of the cotton-ied, meal. He
considers 20 cents per bushel the lea ,pice at which
the farmer can afford to sell cotton sed, for the reason
that he cannot with less money rei 4& aiiamount of
plant-food equivalent to that re6f ed in the cotton-
seed, and when this.is not done l'::aly deteriora-
tion of soil is certain. The high 06tiu set; upon cot-
ton seed and cotton seed meal hows the fist inereas-
ing appreciation of bothpri ucers and manufactu-
rers of this substance, onl r few yeArs ago consider-
ed as almost worthless' JEse. To quote from the
report: According t tthb method of calculating the
commercial value of co *'cial fertilizers, a tgn of
cotton seed meal is wort | 2,,ut: it. contains an
excess of ammo nia which iake an application
of the meal alone wasteffi t I.niking the meal,
however, with a high grade of 'perphosphate (non-
ammoniated) a very superior fertilizer I' obtained.
About the proper proportions wotila bei, p of cotton
seed meal to two of the superphos ate. The ammo-
nia in the cotton seed meal is otIalal and becomes
actual only as the particles o .thsF i 'decompose,
and hence is. better than That 'die frpm animal

the rapid decdtfi6 isitidr 'of 'the l ~dliina tter.' The
,average analysis,.of six chemists wt that whole cot-
ton seed contains of nitrogen 2.'5 ar'nt., phospho-
ric acid 1.75 per cent., 'ian pVt .! er cent. Ac-
cording to the valuations ppl i' ~: constituents
of the meal, the commercial value -f th4Ston of seed
is $15 36. There are sixty-six bushels in a ton of the
seed, hence $15 36 per ton will' be t the rate of
twenty-three cents per btushel. If the producers and
the mill-men can agree, upon prices, it is plainly to
the advantage of both and of,.the whole cqwtry that
the oil should not be wasted, as it is when the whole
seed is used as a manure" ..

Southern Prosperity. ''


inches. At 15 feet no perceptible effect of the
manure was visible, the growth not exceeding
three inches. The experiment showed that a
decided benefit was gained to thetree at 11 feet
distance through th.e few: rots on.the one side,
and that the roots fornaedL a radiating circle, at
least 22 feet in diameter.i. The absurdlit yofthe
practice of applying a sinall:heap ofmaLntrreat
the base of the trunk of the tree is 6bio: .
Pacific Rural Press '


The Clebudine a'Teias) iChrbrnidle thus de-
soribes the Cactusl Hdge, ;ht Oaves,y inq lqubt
as to the variety of cactus uepu for thb purppsp.
Will our contemporarykindly supply this omis-
sion ?
We have in the past few weeks made it' a


ee


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Irl .rlLL~rr L


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Florida Fisheries;'
Fisheries of Florida on the Atlanti, coast::
Persons em played ..................................................... 88
Capital dependent on the fishery industries ........ -48,55
Pounds of sea products taken (including qysters)..L6l9,300
Value of same.......... ... .............
Pounds of river products....................... ..6,450
Value of same... .... ... .............. ... ... ..;.. .02.. .... 32.3. 6 i
Total yalue of products to the fsherme..,....... $78,408
There are in the South 2,480 'ifshermem and
the product is 188t is valued ati 8e6i 8 The
mullet trade beaches 3,000,000:pounds, c m*d: is
worth $123,4Q8; besides: this,: 1,)0; 1veet wre
engaged in spongig~ :and their catch is worh
$300,740. This was :.1 88g0, Since then this
industry in allits bran itf s bexA largely in
creased. ..

WEALTH OF yObUNR13~ --The .wealth of
the United States'i eo`aeiceds that of either
Great Britain or France, but the average
wealth per capital, is/iearhp 3 than in those
countries. The wealth ,fth unitedd Stajqs is
$49,8000, ,00,00, j95 pe at~i af' Great
Britain, 44,10J000;,O , ,00 r per
hAd FI $37 00,0*,, $04 per
5spita. In 1840 Gedt Bfit tis'w 'atth as
five tim es as great ia o.u, i .. -.

A *#Ahes; Hel^thI '!
Heigh-hq I ga44le kth p, g 1
How I do wish that dinners would grow!
.Ai spbn' fea 1iife ar < dshngut tteeLL
lWhat tf fr&eshing Aikht to'sed i
SHeigh-h6!' '"Masure and sew!" :
How I do wish that grments wbuld grow!
SAn overskirt bush, o rbundabbut tiee--'
What a refreshing light'it would b.:

y

Fertilizing Fruit Trees.
Many, orchaidists ii C(itfi~or iiA are awaken-
ing to the necessity of maintaining thi fertility
of their orchards by the application of:panures
of different, i ls, and,it will be timely.tqo trpo-
duce some factsconcdrjIwg t'e retho 4 ap-
plication. Th0eie is a wrong siY ;aM'd -right
way, and fortuniately the piop~~fmhethod cainbe
shown by a series of systematic, exper'ipents.
A writer in the *Coougry GentEma giv&e the
following,: A rule adopted, ,by old -riters gave
the length of the. roots as eqtal to the Jength of
the branches above, It is,mfetaa,;y atiat :,is
rule does; not indicate .generjlylaothia a
tenth of the ground which ;thenti~v rqas .ta ealy
ocoupy. : Many yeare.agoi, islb:ans ewpoe i-
ment on a row of peaoc kr.es planted; .int grass
and within a few feet:fofea ethti.' They had
been set three or four years, and" were eight or
nine feet high. Within a fe yfet of one end
of the row, the grounid waA' :ve~r rich with a
heap of manure. Its stimulating effect on the
nearest tree was such that the shoots, made in
one season were two feet and a half long. "The
tree which stood seven feet 'fr'o the, mahiured
ground, made shoots 15 inches long, and at 11
feet distance the shoots grew seven or eight


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THE FLORIDA D:IS PATCH.


point to enquire of farmers in the country of
the Texas Cactus Hedge, and we must say that
it is about the finest thing we ever saw growing,
or heard of, that is used for fencing purposes,
and that it gives the farmers more perfect sat-
isfaction. There is no question but that it .is.
to be.the hedge of Texas.' Notii4g thlat gows
in this climate equalitt'fbri stafidhg'a f'frdlth.
It grows 'Iiteriahttlyi- and onty from three to
,four i:y4krd is 'tlquiiVed .to make a .hedge thaq
would nbt only -pr9tectA f faim again& ithoJ'dep-'
redatiosiflan i okU .as.nbstja, eyyclone, .Fomn
a small bud, dropped a, few incheia-ap.r in- a
row, where it iWdesirl;le to haye a hedge, with
ordimity4&WiltifAtfoibnttP W1few j^ Wtit thk .plants
will grow frdm fear to Nsix feet, ti height and
will look very beautiful ..Thq ,sh contains a
small thorn or dagger,' c. ,nakes it more
shunned by stock n than te bo' "avc, or even
the barbed-wire fening r ome of the advan-
tages the texas Cactus hedge possesses over
anything else knoWn t tofift6rA are:. '
1. It is the cheapest. '- .
2. It will grow im any k.id4 .
3. It only grow a few feet i' height,and
shades but little ground.
4. It is a hardy plant and i:sa fe .ieti t little
by dry weather. .- .: .
5. It is cut down and destroyed at the pleas
ure of the farmer. : 'i r
We u teit figly, irTo
Cactus ..f. t i "O1 ^t f
its. All that can be said oof i ly, mius
be said in its praise, and the most incredulous
will be convinced of all We lia~t siaidiii 4ts~-
vor by simply .isithig e~AeA those farms in
Johnson and Hood Counti e ad see it grow
ing for themselves.
Italia or $4iish s
A subscribeyrW. F .) at' t Fla
asks:
"Will you kindly fdri yo g criber
where 'e Italian sn b
purchased." [W o
Augusta (Sf 'Ie nut,
is not grown irifty part ef lor idaofar as;
we know. We q'p offr'-no "ef' its
adaptation. .to: ~i ese s pf bsoul not
be very sanguine oftsuces6m.-- s.'l,'.j (1in n,:, '
ORAnGES 'N BATow.'R-The A 1IJ1o fae6tysay
"The .ra~ngi. crop this .. r iA't rift'f ndl
if properly .handl h 'iilAd intiin 'jf rces.i
But we are told that most of tlre it''ughlye
hand4bd, and haiule'd 4'l t, ?
so that prices atre hmch reduie wll
not be, for crates can be jAdi' .e, a < 8{ap
elsewhere, and the frait oughtt' ,
and packed at home, and byjll'means w~iapped
min paper before packing ; then:,gi id4~m
would be received 4o the erop' 'Aei i i'litl?'
over half value i.ssecured. fr.,eveinW,,',;lia
fruit fr' .- ** h ,. ; >7 < .


OLD ORANGE TREEs.-The Lake City Re--
porter says ttthere are-i f 3 ebi tgora
County that have been in. full bearing for more
than thirty years, and. still. look. freh'-tiaid, vig-
orous, bearing as well and as 'teif aof.bttp
fruit than the younger trees. "Ai, d .we.,do'
suppose an ounce of fortili'er,. as cvge'r pl'd
around:them. .' ; '
THE LAsS6.-A very nove. ieatu'e outie
State Fair at Austin, Texas, was a roping con-
test ,between tA6i1Ae hinfeh for a prize1
saddle valued t $300. *T. 3J. Moris,,-of-0tdd-
well Counity, was the victor, having" rope(,
thrown down and tied a "exas steer in one mn-
fite and forty-five seconds, hife some ofi hIs
competitors required five minutes for the feat.


Experiments in Goat-Farming.
A, unique agricultural experiment is being con-
dutetd on the Surrey tills. Abbut seven miles fiom
Dorkintg, seven miiles from, Leatherhead, and the
same distance from Guildford has been started a goat
dairy farni, devot&4 .exclpusivyly to tlie supply of
'goa&Vsnik hirgj uiAntIty, 'Vith sub~tdiaty. pro-
.4cet of g'k s.p4ilfj butter an4,d cheesei ids forthe
butcher, and goat and kid skins for the .love-maker
n-f thk Abbot al F.'" ,The otelelected i %6dldifhg
of 210 acres on the Earl of Lovelaoe.6 property, not
far distant from the rabbit farm*. on the same estate.-
Lately 'visiting the farn i question, we found a herd
of 120 milch goats, wlich is being increased to a pro-
posed stock of 300. A couple of spacious, airy, well-
ventilated bai~~ l l',aphJtt foors, aud fitted
with continuous feeding troughs and racks round all
sides form'conifrtable quarters for the flock at night.
Here the goats'eat thiri allowance -of hay and thEir
feedsof oil cake and corn, having access always to
lumps of rocit s4t t'hej lie upon clean bedding of
straw, -which it hewed dtiy iand clean withini se upk'L
lo.us care, and ther8 is no trage ,a all of thb unsavory
odor popularly attributed to goats. Infact it is only
the male goat which is ever offensive i this way, and
the two kept at the farm are tethered or housed in places
by themselves. The goats, young and old, appear
clean and perfectly healthy; their bright, hairy coats
are. subjected,, to ourpy-Qom.lina g. no troublesome
foot disease demands attention as in the case of sheep,
'iid' any internal ailmnents at promptly arid succes's-
tfi.y dealt with -j thoemopalthi iiiedl es, of which
f h nae F~e, ptaks ,the greatest
dn d nce'N satifact orii Ih" the s ouses the goats
are milked.tWic ye i ~lArea.tie ,a day for a
period t 4UgT g.e 1 a ~- a1 i ot "set her
foot" to W milked from one side, like a cow, but she
is fastea~tifGaiu b her collar r.ohiadih~lraeekattached
S chaji e ilkman, wth his head resting ppon
1't11tiler ull'to-teated' udedr from be,
Airt "il Iti atiappear that any special difficulty
is arrange t so th e gr after portion of tie goats
drtp kidrWP e i4'e y Asjheing, tl4reoVeffl 4t
every, piontw Win a 4 summer. Thi yield of
nmil~k a&W h I 6S l.t ',auitwo t W ir6e
.aiD^ uej" a ^. i^ ght rontp, tin ,te.year,
and hegaea tre n~ r ids, inwo iddings, to
b'ellleda t' t C;~[ f sl del|ate, choice
meat, superior to iWnl~~ t present, we believe kid
meat equal to.aw, is rly supplied by only a
fi.le abecl't a'b ~tIt, where' it's duly ap-
ppwi il, a~nd lw^( ^ -qea<}cirehly.-..The.
Go h rmha .gec for the rdu glyf u s he
f~l1i -*68 iI MW th aitf& f
nursing and rei ive diet, which medicaltotintdf
he e ery3 4j r7 A M ing,
opr ag s f vid" patients, iut w m is no-
*ijher r or' obtainable.4dt-ai i tyisn e
for a reaisonabfe ice. Next to asses' mill,- (opi.ct
difficult to find, r-cept..a a very high price, and
then extremrnleySj J h(? feS-W.zit ) goats' milk
approaches ino ion m t y to mothers'
-..B k, ad .sid I O ble numtiptfrn d atb invioiating
s8FSt" s "49 sy i0gg a kl Jnfaint gazn d
or retotrmng aeeu~ to consumpfives, are under-
oa.' lQt es'Tof EttriopB.*-IM*dca Times.

.' ,. y ,l .t' v .n .' ., . .,

POULTRY AS FooD.-There is mno',aeai $oI
cheaply raised and fattened as poultry. Most
Wsia',. &anilid prefer, fresh :ialtedito meats,


idi arlJ dqrlg er,,randl thre.i
oe more available everywhere than that of
i" 6ib fo'o ikes a mMIl fElr al hre fam-
ily, and there is none left to be thrown 'AiWy-,
or to be salted to prevent its spoiling. The
.i'kt"''rit ir uriniitig'arouhd, preserved iiatu.
mality.utfl needed. &A blshel of corn will keep
.1, fa.onmrs' fowl ia good eatingg: condition for ;:
, iSl/e' o ill lay 100, eg ~p d ov r,
wh'h will more than pay for the gsn glvp ,
and the butcher's cart is thus a~y ''e
door,. And what more palatable dish to set on
tn ;i a a Mi n ken, as er r oil.

i,. UJl OF F- HitrvtQwS ce ide &Pfitp1ervi ci6
4 T t4e refers Qt.Iumay m by .b&e -
taOed frote statement tha~ NeVt Yorkt g City
CdoT sui{ 't 9,t'3~, w6rt" f"ggfls nnual y,
WiA) WtibhMiati6 i '6f- the.ednt~l 'cottitry 1is
estitis*ted at about $75,000,000 worth:, i, .


;Whirr of machinery throughout all this district.
industry is seconding thd Efforta bf capital;
agriculture is brought together, ;and the wel-
fare of at least. 150.,000laborers depends upon
the result, while over $40,000,000 of capital is
iAwaiing the return for' its 'invest ment. All
will be" rush throughout the sugar districts
for te next sixty days and Christmas will scarce
find the year's work done." .
. IRISH POTATO SPROUTS.- e see it stated
in a foreign.agricltural journal that thi sprouts
from' poIt a 'e'latmted 'i'. separate rows pro-
dftid Lbtter results ini an English experiment
than the potatoes themselves, thus indicating
that much of ,th~ vitality of the potato goes
into the first set,f sprouts.
TWo CxoPs.--The Pensacola Commercial
says that 4 Siberian Crab tree on the grounds
of Alex. Stoddart, Esq., near that city, bore
and ripened two crops of fruit the past season.


*1


e1.7


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Peat and Muck for Manure.
When one has peat or muck in any form
upon his own farm, it is criminal almost not to
make use of it, and if it can be bought at any
reasonable rate-say at 25 cents a load-it
will always be well to buy it. It should, of
course, ie dig when the water is low in the
swamnrpsian'.the task pf getting out muck may
aid essentially the work of reclaiming the
swamps. Thus the main ditch maybe dug the
width of a cart track. By making a narrow
preliminary ditch to carry off the water and
dry the. ground,' a, horse and cart may be
brought into the ditch and the muck carried
directly off to dry ground, where it can dry.
In all such ditchingwe must begin at the lower
end of the ditch, go that there shall always be
a free outlet for the water. A boat, to be used
in removing muck from the bed through a
water channel to a hillside. It is of pine boards
nailed firmly to side planks braced by a cross
plank at the middle. If made 9 feet long, by
4 feet wide, and 16 inches deep, it will float a
ton of muck. A runner is placed under each
side, so that the boat can be drawn upon the
land. A hook or eye should be placed on each
side, and others at one end, by which the boat
Might be drawn. While floating, the boat is
moved by handspikes. The place where the
Paock is heaped to dry should be as near as
possible to the bed from which it is dug.
The muck may be very peaty, or the mate-
rial really made of peat-that is, consisting al-
most entirely of vegetable matter and ash-
whereas muck, as the word is applied in the
'UnitL6e States, is used tb mean such as would
be of little or no value as fuel, from the amount
of soil or sand or calcareous matter, in it; but
is useful as manure. The peaty mucks are
greatly benefited by being treated with lime-
in fact, it is only by acting upon them with
lime or ashes that they can be made rapidly fit
for use in coinposts or for application to the-
land.. The old rule to slake stone-lime with
strong brine, adding only brine enough to dry-
btke the lime, is a very good one. Such line
Miy ibel;. i ed .lP. f0r the best results
wheni composted 'w.th muclk.-American Agri-
eulturist. .
SUGAR IN LOUISIANA:..--A late NPicayune
ays: "The fires a're nQw lighted in over 1,060
Sugar houses'through twenty-seven parishes in
sLouisiana From Red River to the Gulf, from
the Felicianas to the cattle ranges of Calca-
sieiu, the thousands of laborers engaged in the
production of this great staple are busy. It is,
in fact; a "vast manu'facttiritig entire. The
qane carts follow the legions that are leveling
.with knives the rank rows of. cane, and all night
is heard. the grinding of the rollers and the





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B-IG TTHE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Ek edlorlda Vispitch.
JACKSONVILLE, DECEMBER 18, 1882.

D. Redmond, D.H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
STATES OF ADVERTISING,
LPA.ID IN ADVANCE.
SQUARES. TIMB.I 1 MO. 3 MO. MO. 1 YBAR
One.................... $ 100 $ 2 50 $550 $10 00 $ 18 50
Two............ ........ 2 00 5 00 10 00 18 00 34 00.
Three ................. 3 00 7 00 1400 2500 4600
Four................... 4 00 9 00 17 50 30 00 58 00
Five................ 4 50 11 00 19 00 35 00 65 00
Eight ............. 8 00 16 50 .3000 50 00 10000
Sixteen ............ 16 00 30 00 50 00 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) 20 cents
per line.
CIR CULA TION.
This paper has the largest circulation of any
paper (daily or weekly) published in Florida,
with a very large circulation in Georgia and the
Southern States; also has subscribers in every
State in the Union, with many in foreign coun-
tries. After October 23d, we shall issue weekly
from 8,000 to 10,000 copies, about 40,000 per
month.
SPECIAL NOTI CE.
Persons are warned against paying subscrip-
tions to any one calling himself our Agent, as
we hdve no regular canvassing agent,
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA
FRUIT GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEA1. :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
American Agriculturist......... ...........$2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine.......................... 4.20
Country Gentleman................................. ..... 2.75
Detroit Free Press............ ........................... 2.50
Eclectic Magazine ......................... 4.20
Florida Agriculturist.............. 2.25
Florida Weekly Union............................. 2.2
Florida Weekly Times ............................ 1.50
Family Story Paper...... ................ ............. 3.50
Fireside Companion.. ........................... 3.35
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly................ 4.20
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.20,
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly..... ................. 3.40
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine................. 3.40
Harper's Illustrated Weekly............................ 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Bazar............................... 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Young People.................. 2.20
Harper's Monthly Magazine.......................... 4.20
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine.................... 8.40
Nebraska Farmer........................................ 2.00
North American Review.............................. 5.20
New York Weekly Sun......................... 1.75
New York Weekly Herald....................... 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune .......................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times............................ 1.75
New York Weekly World......................... 1.75
New York Ledger ....................................... 8,35
New York Weekly ................................. 8.85'
Popular Science Monthly............................ 5.20
Philadelphia Weekly Times........................... 2.50
Southern Cultivator............... ..................... 2.00
Scientific American.............. ...................... 8.75


Saturday Night............................................. 3.35
Savannah Weekly News................................. 2.50
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.20
W averly Magazine.................................. 5.20
The above are among the very best publications,
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Regstered Letteor addressed to
ASHrEAD BRO'S,
A_.. .__ _JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Terms of Dispatch for 1883.
THE DISPATCH for 1883-new volume, com-
mencing in January-will contain 20 pages,
and the subscription price will be $2 per year.
But we will credit a full year's subscription
for next year (1883) to each subscriber, old or
new, who will send us one dollar before the
first of January next. See, also "Garden
Seed Premium" for new subscriptions.


Fine Felt Hats.
Some time ago the Publishers received from
P. 0. HILBORN, manufacturer of fine hats,
Boston, Massachusetts-who, by the way, we
understand is interested in Florida lands-two
fine felt hats, of a very superior quality and
make, and for which he will please accept our
thanks. He can suit others as well as ourselves,
and we cheerfully recommend our readers to
write him for prices.
18831
,
Our New Volume I
Commencing in January, 1883, will be enlarged
to twenty pages. It will be printed on finer'
paper than we have heretofore used, and much
more profusely illustrated. This increased size
will afford the editors more scope, and enable
them to supply a greater variety of new and
important matter; and they will endeavor to
fully represent the Rural, Manufactural and
Industrial interests of Florida and the South,
and to place THE DISPATCH among the fore-
most journals of its class, in this country., See
terms, elsewhere, and aid us in the good work.

CHOICE GARDEN SEEDS I.

Premiums to New Subscribers.
The publishers of THi' FLORIDA" DISPATCH
have made arrangements with THORBURN &
TITUS-one of the most reliable seed firms in
America-for a supply offthe choicest and
most valuable Garden Seeds, packages of which,
worth 40 cents each, will be sent per mail, post
paid, to every NEW subscriber to the NEW VOL-
UME of THE DISPATO, commencing in Janu-
ary, 1883.
Present subscribers renewing for next year
(1883) Will, also, recei vthe seeds on the same
terms; and other premiums will be announced
hereafter.
Those who desire the seeds offered, will please
notify us to that effect when they send in their.
nam es.
Editorial Miscellany.
That charming Floral and Horticultural An-
nual, "Vick's Flofal Guide," is received just as
we are going to press. Will give it proper no-
tice next week; meanwhile send for the Guide
to Jal. Vick, Rochester, New York. It costs
only 10 cents, and is worth at least five times
that amount.


GEO. R. CARRUTH, Esq., the courteous and
efficient Money Clerk in our city Post-Office,
will please accept our thanks for appreciated;
favors.

ORANGES, in Philadelphia, December 9th,
ranged from $3 to $4.50 per half-barrel box.
Lemons from $3 to $4. We quote from C. A.
Bockhoven & Co., No. 323 North Water Street,
Philadelphia.

ACCORDING 'to Democrat, the Key-West-
ers are getting u a boom on the Cocoanut.
That paper, of recent date says: "Our people
still talk of big cocoanut groves, even larger
than have ever been planted, and if some of us
live ten years longer, we will see tremendous
fields, stretching from here to the mainland,


covered with this symmetrical and beautiful
tree."

NATIVE VS. JAPAN PERSIMMONS.-The
Charleston News says of our native Persimmon :
"Although this fruit grows wild in our South-
ern States, it is a most delicious one, and there
is no reason why they should not form a source
of revenue to farmers. Mr. John A. Harwood,
of Davidson County has recently shipped to
Chicago a lot of this fruit, for which he received
$12 per bushel."
IF you desire anything in the way of Nurs-
ery stock, Japan Persimmons, LeConte Pear
trees, etc., write to H. H. Sanford, Thomas-
ville, Ga. See advertisement elsewhere.

Attention is called to the advertisements of
the following firms in this number of the DIS-
PATCH: H. H. Sanford, nursery stock, Thom-
asville, Ga.; Maxwell, Anderson & Co., nur-
sery stock, San Mateo, Fla.; Mape's complete
and special manures, Tysen & Smith, agents,
Jdcksonville, Fla.

IF LC> 0 B1 I D A

Sm-T oicl Frait o-... CO.
AND
MANUFACTURING CONFECTIONERS,
Post-Office Box 45.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.













Our full line of fine goods are now ready for shipment
embracing the following:
Orange Marmalade, Preserved Scuppernong Grapes,
Scuppernong Grape Jelly, Guava Jelly, Guava
Marmalade, Preserved Figs, Quince Jelly,
Quince Marmalade, Sweet Pickled Peaches.
Our goods are tirst-clas in every respect, put up in
neat attractive and merchantable packages and ready
for shipment to all parts of the United~.tates and the
Canadas. Our object is to give to the best trade a per-
fectly pure article, and every package bearing our trade-
mark can be relied upon as strictly pure goods. To those
who are selling our goods it is unnecessary to command
them, but to those who are not we beg to say, we are
packing the best goods manufactured. A trial order is
solicited. Price list sent on application.
We ottffer every variety of Fine Candies known
to the trade, and if a first-class strictly pure article is de-
sired at reasonable prices, send for price list.
WARROCK & CO.,
nox27 t JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Attexntlozn .E'o itry I me=.
DR. R, BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs; all
other domestic animals are benefitted by its use. This
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
It Is put up in packages of FIrFTY CENTS and ONE DOL-
LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to the proprietor.
S~R. BACHMANN, M D.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., 36 Bay Street.
aug. 21 to feb. 21. '88.

For Sale.
grange Seedlings and Small Trees with 1, 2 an#l 3 year
old buds. All siges of Sour Seedlings. Also
ORANGE LANDS
On the Bluffton property and in Orange Co. For partic-
ulars apply to
F. C. SOLLEE, Supt.,
tomar 10 '83p Bluffton, Volusia Co.. Fla.






TH FLRD DIPTH L


I





4a


'A

K

N

U

IA
*


to sept 10'83


SedgwickSteel Wire Fence


ntin thts paper,. e l .
to dec 30, '82.
--


Kieffer Pear. Jap. Persimmon. LeConte Pear.
X o o Cuttings and Trees FOR SALE. More
3 004 trees in orchard than any five growers
of the LECONTE PEAR. Apply to head quarters.
W. W. THOMPSON, Prop'r.,
LeConte Nursery, Smithville, Ga.
SEND FOR CATALOGUE. to feb 1, '88-p


of of mI f _ollllty, Florid,
-BY-
J. W. BUSHNELL & A. T. WILLIAMS,
Showing all lands subject to Homestead entry, also va-
cant State, Railroad, Disston and Reed lands, all post-of-
fices, railroad stations etc. Adopted by B6Ard of County
Commissioners as the official map. Price, in pocket
form, $2. Price, on rollers for office, $3. Sent postpaid,
on receipt of price.
F. A. SALOMONSON, General Agent
to mar 17, '83 Ooala, Marion Co., Fla.




-E-
ARRtANft S IDadE veryhin
the fflm a. stdOt
ou sent iee.eNVSTOK ,
A~ke1e dsta ridWarehouse.
No. 1114 Market street, Philadelphia.
to Jan 9,83

U OF T South

FARM ML LS


mrpon f V9 Co.
to an 30,i .83.
tojan 30, '88.


TREE


BRADLEY'S ORANGE
We have prepared this Fertilizer
especially for the culture Of the or-
ange tree, and from the results al-
ready obtained from its use on the
orange groves of Florida, we feel
justified in claiming that it cannot
be surpassed, if equalled, by any
other fertilizer.
It is composed of the purest and
highest grade materials, combined
in such proportions as to furnish all
the elements of plint-food in prop-
er quantities and in the best form
to promote a rapid and strong
growth of the wood and insure an
abundant yield of fine fruit.
A sufficient proportion of its
phosphoric acid, being readily sol-
uble in cold water, is immediately .....
available as fOod for the young
rootlets of the tree, while a consid-
erable portion, being present ip the
fqrm of pure ground bone, undis-
solved by acid, becomes entirely
soluble in the soil only by the ac-
tion of the elements of nature in
due course of time. Thus this all
important food is not soon ex-
hausted by the tree, or washed into
the ground by heavy rains, but is
supplied in abundant quantities


Manufacturers of" the Celebrated

. rad~ley' :Ixosphate,"


the Standard Fertilizer for all Field and Garden Crops, and especially adapted to the wants of the
Cotton Crop.
.,J.fAIN OFFICE, 27 KILBY STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
For furter particulars and pamphlets giving testimonials from some of the best orange growers in the
State, address,
S0. W. Broxnwell & Co., Agents for State of Florida,
toet 9,' _________ 49 W. BAY-ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
,i :. 77 .
WE .0 416,


Wholesale Dealers in



Foreign and Domestic Fruits.


MISSION MERCHANTS. FOR TIE SALE OF

Floi-da Oranges and Le ons,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


,' i^W IR QNDE E SOLICITED
. RE.E.;;.4 r ,.i.-First National Bank, Jacksonville, Florida. Union National Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
sept 4, t. __________ __


FRANK W. MUMBY.

M UMiBY,

179
F. W., MUBISA' CO.
S * IMP(


JNO. SC. STOCKTON. RAYMOND

STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
,:0C


-- SUCCESSORS TO
ORTERS AND WH LESALE AND RETAIL


D. KNIGHT


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We hav0he largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. LeAps
and handlers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone a1d'Tnware." he American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATEDt
Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST .IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely s& Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel Is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WEST BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to July 5, '83. (Mention this paper)


__


FERTILIZER.
throughout the season.
The nitrogen and potash also aro
furnished in the most nutritious
forms and approved- proportions
for this crop.
After giving this Fertilizer a
thorough trial of three years on or-
ange trees in Florida, we intro-
duced it last season quite exten-
sively throughout the State, and
the results have even exceeded our
most sanguine expectations. We
have yet to hear of a single instance
where the most satisfactory returns
have not been derived.
VWe have nothing to say about the
fertilizers manufactured or sold by
other parties, as we believe, with an
established reputation of twenty-
two years in the manufacture of
high grade fertilizers, we can stand
upon our own footing, without call-
ing the attention of the public to
the record of any of our competi-
tors, or to the value of their manu-
factures as compared with that of
our own. Our fertilizers are all an-
alyzed, when manufactured, by
competent chemists, and none are
shipped to market until they are
known to be up to the standard.


THEFLRD DIPTH


619


-- I -------- --I-----~





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


THE MAPS COMPLETE AN'T SPECIAL LMANURES


...... .. Tr. uits a e, .e ntab es.


A full etY orment comprised Ce rnt brands, kept in stock at Warehotre'ltiJa ksor 'Vle, yla. iso '- a Mapes 14e Grouid Bn#ne, X G*wosi lish,
Potash, alt, c., for prompt ship itor deUvey t pl-ties Circulars containing g a hnteed dialysis ad composition ofThe Mapes Mares full directions
fre use as Well a reports fronellll k netowxTruck*ers ajl4 g Towrg.of Ornge s, etc., givi ig th r practical experience in us the Mapes Manures
THE MA FORMULA & PEROVIANR GUANO 0 :, TYSEN-'& S0 gOts,
'158 Front Street, New York. LA

Some Practical Results. i FloridA SeaP i
Dr. R. J. MARVIN, Orange City, Fla., November 9th, 1882, reports: Crops-Oranges, Lemons, Limes and other semi-tropical Fruits, 800 ranging in age
front one to six years, used fertilizers A follows: I applied The Mapes Orange Tree Manure from two poU tds to -the,smallest, to fifteen t tree, twice a
year, in December and June, nothing ;tse being used, and I am putting in now at the rate of three' tons per yearand increasing a half yar. The Mapes Orange
Tree Manure was scattered broadcast raked in. Trees are now growing finely, thrifty and clea ; o is aW sae dy, .,
Remarks-"When I purchased thi.rove, the six acres of large trees had been sadly neglected. They were nted' e insect, in
fact were in a dying condition having a rnny lead branches as alive. I used vario~,sfetilizers 1he first fi'.'trilbths with be ny a year ago I
determined to try The Mapes Orange Tree Manure. During the past year the trees have cleaned off, put on a heavy new eA They
are in a fine growing fltonho ~dlv, the $ p flowing freely, I aeSt eet paeasd wf tth t M4 iAfe h lIvi laid in a stock continue
using it in thefuture. L am acquainted ith the principlesof v&getfble.chlcmisry Shd biwlbgg, ethoun, at least, to fo rt ) rttizer and
the needs of a member of the citrus family." ." :
C. CODRINGTON & CO., Editors of the Florida Agriculturist, DeLand, Fla., November 12th, 1882, writes, "There a; aels, ma-
nured with The Mapes Fertilizsrsa." The- Mpes ramn-1TreMas isef#$legpeti4M itfavor.'.. W

Cabbages .-omatoes Watermelons, T iW
-" .. ..lS., ,:1"
H. G. LEEK, Mandarin, Fla., June 16th, 1882, writes: I am unfortunately located on some of the poorest ofthe State of Florida. an hay kept correct account of
the results of using th Mapes Complete" a cial Manures on t n snd yo ll i which you are at by to ed I all on 1,000
plants of cabbageoi bn-irel 6fthf'e Map plete Mkfiune forith ilhettea1d realized there o spring, 2.50
worth of the same fertilizer and sold th erefrom 1.0 n 500 hills 9~f atermel e lWd )ebtn of0be o ra d ofr{I|pa o, Jrm.: I used 55
pounds on a small patch of rutaibagar turnips and sold $20 worth. Oni Irish Potalbes the result wa My crohbors, and I
would travel a long distance for the Mapes Manure if I could not get it otherwise :' Mcr:'"o a .ea "of feb 27 a8n

KODELA ND N AR,
D ESAi C"
The climate is semi-tropical. J n Be t ofqa moogqlat!t fnut eerss-lowest, 26 deg ghest, in the s 101 4rd prlng dry
and pleasant, with occasional rain; Summer, sunshine and rain alternate. Soil--sandy falfrwith clay in pl e i grsr. war
in wells 20 to 40 feet deep, usually soft and good. Surface-gently undulating. 1imbe Iow Pine, 80 to 100 feet p e n full bearing,
1,000. Average price of fruit in grove, $1.50 per 100. Number of trees per acre, 50 to 75. ixtra good care and cult of course producee be ~tet months for
planting Orange trees Vanuary and February, June and J Otheiproducts-Sw tftoes, Cotton, Sug n Rice, (orn Pine-Appl, a Mels,Pears,'etc.
Go04 liard^ to+l0 per week ;'$1.50 to $.00) per day4 n g denying euellt ilI l itd in a aiay, ndth ine-s w be developed with added
expieca4 a better transportation facilities. 1o ca.es o ylow fe s eailnes haVee been known here, and all
lifiati c on4s aretnost favorable to health a nd longevity. Man settlers Tfrm or- t a B ng in g e is an indicalton that ourorange belt
will soon be thickly settled. .
The village of DeLand is located five miles east of our landing on St. John's 1r 1re, all he river htgami YoaA. . 1 .ge. al center, north and
south, of Volisia County, in the center of the '
Tipa o Isr ii i i U .AT IO Ei B' LT
This place is twenty-five miles from the Atlantic Ocean, and is almost constantly ith a tempered

and fr4 river: dion aonl& ot fterit s -peculiarly adapted to the necessities of invalids. This
belt of stand is about twenty miles long, and averages aboutfl iles wide. Our lands are t
UNSURPA ED !N E TILITY
by an p|" lanfs lfejt wI.'illage,wic is only five d.. .. ...

used also for union Sunday School and Church Services. A Baptist ClrA.i pob $4,000furnishe and pa e also
building. The Presbyterians hold services every otbee Sunday in the school house. .fly mails, four General S. V outh
Florida; a Drug Store, Millinery and Notion Store, Furniture Stord, Livery Stable, there .t w Mills and a lacksml Ofqstarted
with a full supply of Doors, Sash, Blinds, etc. Also, a Jewelry Store is soon to be star he fal a Bankc nd JH/fig i ,*, ," .

a large Mght-pau. vo4tly, Is 1iblIhhed here, find I*. valu-al e r4rU. rt*biai lorida We ha n~. e rationed
between our village and our landing on the St. John's River, and a railroad from ou y anlA i tthe tlantic c. of ., O.C acres
Ver mile. The Palatka and Indian River Railroad which is now being built, will pa thogb gnud will e comp fJur ho-
ters and boarding houses afford good fare at reasonable priceU Passengers will find a cons t d landing on thearivalofthe I matt t da i ys ex-
oepted, aod'k earriktl will be sent upon order, byitelephone, T)thftimes. Forthe in!.ill add, thqe ,sverfal hfe.e 1s 'etled in our
midst, cultivating oranges as a business, but affording excellent medical aidtwhen re uird. crtthefohlowing "" '. ... ...' .
H i" OT .sE.._y dt .AECOR..,,.. ..- ;.
"During the years 1878, 1879 and 1880, within a circuit of six miles diameter, DeLand hbemn e enter, with a populatipl ,Vem an f Ba I h here
invalids, there have been but four deat.hs. Two y.ere infattuiler stx months, andtwo were p 4e ne e sick."h a' .,-ythful.
Population now in and near DeLand city, that trade there, 800 to 1,200. .t. ,." '
- ;an;< .- ... A QJ-IAIN OF ..0.w,, -.. ... .:.....


northwest of us affords protection from o'st so pefect1ly that the extrinee cold 6of Deceniber 20 8*4 not isjure our orange easvfwrtait. .
We are offering th s choice nds to actua settlers at from $15 to $50 per acre. Village lots tlmprovecrOdperty frsaleaIs o Forir hi attimularscilonr ad-
ressJ. ,o ia- 4DLA jyV, r lla gor e
spa '44-9X Uf V f T a. OJ74wm^ ^ ^ j ^^'-'o .-~ c-


I to ji*i; jS IN DJ EALER iW i -

Florida Products,u

M4&S, 6tuIAIY VGETTA-
BLES, HIDES* NKNlS, ETC.
Prompt attention, given td'all business.'" Account Sales
and check given as soon as goods are closed out.
Stencils will bse furitished ion application.
156 Bay Strect,
SAVANNAH, '.. O G -RGIA.
to mch ,, :. T

Gto amplesay2-'83 ee. P.BiSse&C. evend.O.
to may20-'83


S. <. ,iW~o N. JUTIC lt,
Wholesale itiimmiss n rantn,
AA
*'o"3" 313. 3S"ort .Water Strc, 'hlJ, P a ,


Large ma!ts; reaittedaontday of ale, sriallh sh t" '' " ton.iV27 83p
eN i, ,' ,^ :, i-^ elwa new town in Orange
oeari .raug ro.( un t eighteen
W miles so Onfor South Railroad,
LFOR AtdBn witmia n Is s maUl lakes.
Loopod 2y. nent landing on St. WiN tEo afor
John y. In 40 trees not yet oIe I t iIea. ForrPamphet 'st
being, fine condition, good neighborhood, churches, Maps giving ,1 .. address
=o0ls; Vsost ancdexpress offices. Owner would prefer 'T A Ar A C~i AS, .
to sell on eWalj,'4lpt~her,'bn8nss would s(e wehle ..ra^VxWl^ -\-^. ^^9 -
ifdered eft .' flculr ldss th T PA, ORANGE Co., FLA.
stamp T. F. DRUDY "ly WINTER r, J K A- U., .-
toich383 Empbfia, Fla. dec4,tf


e o


7





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. :


WHOLESAM GROCERS,
AGENTS' FF STATE FOR


DOZ. ~


SOLE 'AGENTS FOR. THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-.bP.D PATENT FLOUR

.etst U 4"Ib< ao tieCet Qtal3 o
Best Btutter i Tubs at 3o to 31 Cents per Pound,

4=4 4C. 3 4
o a"ta - - JaoksoAville, F1orida.
tf


S, ... I I 1
An Everyone In ed in Florida ltafids
C&& ;:with
. TOWNS MAPS
Made from United States Surveys-scale two inches to t p mile-with topography complete, for every
township in EAST and SOUTH FLORIDA, de Ire4oi sent by mai, for 50 cents each.
(Postage Stamps f2hen
D. s o unt to D ers.
IEXIPXAX NATION CARD sent with every Map, showing vacant lands and where to apply for
them to purchase. .,
Special ZVx. alps of Counties, Cities and towns i ade to order.
l. o.teCt'.Tlral Designs a specialty. "'wa
My long connection with the Florida Land and Improvemnt Compny (DISSTON PUR-
CHASE) is a guarantee of satisfactory work. Correspondence = icited.
Address ." r-E.8'9'E 'ES Civil Engineer. ,.d Draughtsman,
Office ,vith Florida .a4nd and& Improvement Co., cor. in d nFor yth-8ts.,
J A CK SO NVI LL E, FLORIt.. oct 23tf


JE'STABLISHIED 1i8 : S ...." .
IE. GimonB & !.,
CG n e r a I Comm is si on 1VL 4rrcha t s,
.t 95 SOUTH WATER STREET, O ,, ,
S FLQBDA ORANGESAND YVEGTA BJCSJPECIALTY.
REFERENCES:-National Bank of fllinois, First National Bank,p oa0ng.erilal Agencies, or any Wholesale
Grocer in CHICAGO. ,
'J'i.. --;, ,' : Stencils furnishedby J. C. LANIER,


to apl 8, '83.


S LEESBURG, FLORIDA.
,; .


SL' LAWRENC&-IO.:N M :SION TEIS,
J. 'I J l a.lk + ,: / / S ''- + : "


FOR, PIMILR .";X O01


Oranges and all Forida Produce

234 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK.

QUITCK SALiES, I1ONEST IETtiUN'1. aind
**/ROM1?PT RE1MI'r'TANCES.

.. .. .... R E'"' "R% / *Y PER SION TO :: '

Hon. S. B. CONOVER, Tallahassee; D. GREENLEAF, Esq., Jacksonvile ;
to jan.* '84Tp. MESSRS. GOULD & Co., Jacksonville.

F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. HILL,

a M n .e. r , .f ..d c.. .'-: . ., ., * .: .

A FULL LINE ,pO .FTJIT TRE~"adapte'.to tis c'l~nate.
-.G:. ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3, Just out, free on application. to apr 17, '83


,, .9IQRIp 1ISCOQVERY.
N-E- EVERY DRUGGIST IN THE STATE
.... }.. WILL BE SUPPLIED.
It kulk Ants, Roeehes,iMice and '.Rt4 ., Ntthing ever
before offered has half the merit. Any Druggist in
Jackso wl^WW AiRpply you.
oct 6 JA.ONurr roprie, FLA,
oct .(W 6. otx SO26.] N-JACS LLE, FLA.


TIHE A1ICHE RNUR-ERIES
Grow a general assortment of FRUIT TREES, with
some Ornamental Tr ees, Shrubbery,
Vines, &c: Our stock of
ORA'NTGE TREES
is good; both SeetSeedliAigE Tand Btolded sorts on both
sour and swedt stocks. Some 8,00 .
LiCONTE AND OTHER PERAR TREES,
one and two-year old-fine.
A large number of JAPAN PLUM TREES, with;a few
hundred of the famous
JAPANESE 'PERSIMMON
on native stocks &.
ORANGE and, PEAR GROVES made tdo order and
cultivated by the year for non-resident: .
SEND FOR PRICE LIST to
SLI &5Y,& j 8T.' R.i A B,
* to felt 5, '83 '&rpli^r^ Aladcbdta 0o, Florid. |


PLYMOUTH ROCKS.:
The great demand for these fowls have induced me to
secure the agency of Mr. A. 0. HAWKINS for the sale
of his stock, which has no superior, I can sell,
FOWLS OJH EG.G.,
direct from his enormous establishment, at his prices,
I am also agent for the


AMER B AN PO ULTRY'YARD
-AND THE-


POULTRY WOID, ,
and on receipt of stamp I will send sample oopy to any
address.. No one should undertake to RAISE POULTRY
without some good POULTRY PAPER. ..
SR. IPA.RiAMI.0RE,.
to feb 12, '83 JACRSONVILLE, FLOB0IJ,


IHOIY MoniI NIIrQrB
THE PIONEER NURSERY of FLORIDA.
O NE .IIqXNDRED ACRES IN STOCK, ".
THE SWEET ORANGE A SPECIALTY.'
bUattlsre sentfre onapl Ads t.
to feb 20, '83 Jacksonville, Fla.
. . t > ... . -. . t
FOR SALE`
LANDS on the east side of Lake Harris, Sumter
county. We the undersigned offer the property de-
scribed below, situated at and 'around Esperahne, at
great bargains, For further information apply or ad-
re 4 :' .


W..P. COOPER,
D. E. LowLrl, Esperance, Fia.
W. N, JACKS., ., .
(1.) 90 acres land at Esperance, mile lake .font; first- -
class willow-oak pine land; several fine building sites;
good elevation. Price 35 per acre, the above tract can
be bought in lots.
(2.) 80 acres, same location, 30 acres hammock; fine
building site, 80 feet above the lake, withy4 mile lake
front; 10 acres cleared; 500 trees in grove, part bearing.
Price $6 000.
(3.) 46 acres, Pbout20 aeres hammock, faliview of the
lake; ood land. Pr1e 8700.
(4.) acres fine, high land, view of the lake; one
mile from Esperance., P .ice$60o.. ,
(5.) 75 acres, 20 acres lear d a4d fenced; 000. trees in .
grove; pine-apples, etc. .j:lepdid location. ~ mile
lake front; 2 miles from 'perace. There s. on the
laoe a comfortable dwelling. with a suffclenidy of out.
houses. $ric $,000. 'Tenis easy. ;
'(9.) 40 acres goodppne'lttn, d mill flrdanj tlaHars;
25 acrefenced; 17 acre et to:prangb, Ubn*1an done
't t ee s g ; i 1 b ft:9 b !in d ifo 1 s l,'f i o 1n u lld -
(7) 120 acres gb.pihne land,'1k4or%.AA6+1 Lake
-alr notsto sutpichaer 20ner'acrd.' '
20 rM tfrst-rate pine lan vkai6oltigt Lake HjtUis,
p r a re . : ...
8t ardies on Lake ,'ith. lake ftdt
tW Of the lake; ni b dlsite; 8 acred f.ham-I
t^ nd tw6 of pine 'cleered. rice $500. I
(9.) 0 acres, .to. mile from Lake Harris; 'good
pl a'1acnrL, in lot s1l rchasers. Price $10 per acre,
S(10.)' 80 acres A e -i beutifully situated it a'com
,baance No. 1 pine land mle fom nEsperance. Prica e
Per aceC 'e r c the om Ee rnc Prices
: p. S.-and will be divid I -,6cs&h '
,; (M.) .80 acres land % mile 'fr. he lake, No. .1 pIne
land; handsome location; view of the lIk.; .3,t. -ile
fromxEsjwrajpee ,-Ice $to $ 5 per acre I T 'WDl cre
Groves will be set and cared for on above lots at reas.
enable rates. The party making the offer has had sev-
eral years"' experience in the managementof groves.
to feb20-83 .


.


1.. I T .'...~


''


; ;7 1. ..7


I


I


I


AERIS?... i~ Y~~tiki~lB~!'i


I


I


.. 21


1






I THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


ON AND AFTJR SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6t9, 1882.
Trainrs will leave and arrive at Jackgfnville as fol-
lows;


Fast Mail. Daily.
Leave-
Jacksonville at 9:30 a. m.
Arrive-
Jacksonville at.. 5:00p m
Callahan at... ..,10:15 a m
Waycroe at........12:05 p m
Live Oak at....... :4 p m
New Branford.. 8:30 p m
Savannah at...... 8:40p m
Charleston at..... 9:00 p m
Thomasvilleat... 6:55 p m
Albany at...........10;,30pm
Montgomery at.. 6:45 am
New Orleans at.l0:00 pm
Nasahvlle at........ 7:00 pm
Washington at... 9:40 p m
New York t...... 86:50 p m


Jack'lle Ex. Daily.
Leave-
Jacksonville at.. 5:45 p m
Arrive-
Jacksonville at.. 7:30 am,
Jesup at...........11:26 p m
Brunswick at...... 5:84 a m
Masooi at. .......... 7:00 am
Thomasville at... 6&50 a m
Albany at............11:15 a m
Montgomery at.. 8:00 p m
New Orleans at... 9:20 a m
Louisville at...... -
Cincinnati at...... 7:00 a m
Chicago at........... 7:00 p m
St. Louis at......... 700 p m
New York at...... 3:60 p m


JAB. IL WESTj & CQ. AgeUnt.
114 Bay-St.. Savannah, Ga.


A. L. HUGGINS, Agent,
Long Dock, Baltimore, Md.


30-Ut


AN 7ROO HOUSE, 00 acres hammock andpine
AN $8oo land, So00 orange trees in grove, well
advanced, few bearing. Price $1,000. Rare chance for
new settler.
W. W. DEWHURST,
St. Augustine, Fla.
N. B.-Letters will not be answered unless stamp is
enclosed. to feb 20, '83


ON L ET LINE. -
Transhipment and extra hadlifg aAdo wh rin Savannah. Unsurpassed passenger
accommodations.
The magnificent nw4tIroaSteamshipssai .f Boston eBra t Shrsday at.3 o'ofkand from Central ail1
road Wharf, Savannah, as follows: -. o' '
Gate City, Capt. Hedge,........... .., .......D..........T Deember 21st, at 3:80 p. m.
City of Columus Capt. Wrigh ........... .......................Thursday, December 28 ,,at.: a
Gate City, Capt. edge... .... ............................ Thursday, Ja uary 4th, at 3:. m.
City of ColumibMus Capt Wr4tljf...Thursdy""Januar"1th, at? &0 p.m.
City of Columbus Capt. g.................................Thursday, January 25lht7:30 p. zf..
Gate City, Capt edge...:. ..............................Thursday, JFebruary 1st, at300 p.m .
City of Columbus, Capt. W r ht............... ,...................Thursday, Jan ay00hM.7.3 -

Gate C it y Capt edge .................. .............,. .... ...... .....Thursday February 1st, a :l0 p. mn.
Gate City, Capt ed ... .... .. .............. Thursday, february 15th, atl:30 p.m.
Gate City, Capt. ied ............... ...........T.nr................. ". Thursday, Februarch 1st, at 12:00 ..

Oity of ColumibusCAt.......................... ur.daya rch 8th, at p..
THROUGH PIR 0ASS CABIN PASS GE AEAS TO NEW YORK.
RICHAADSON & BARNARD, Agents, Savannah, Ga.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. and W. Ry., Agent, Jacksonville.
F. W. NICKERSON ., Gprl r ent 44pt ...




B 'RB0R,0 51 & BRQ0; .p4i(BI(N,, II4N I
E, ...T A uivO



FLORIDA FRUIT AND PRODUCE A SPECIALTY.
226 AND 228 NOUB i DELAWARE AVENUE, PHILADI)LPfIA, PA.

OUwR MOTrTO: QA. kSal es a4.'0Vropt RettirM, ,.
nov 13-tf' We ask a trial. STENCIL PLATES FREE.


Pullmanu Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train from
Jacksonville to Cincinnati via Atlanta and Cincinnati
Southetfl R llroad; to Montgomery via Albany and
Eufaula, and to Chicago via Montgomery and Louis-
ville.
P iegers arriving by this train for Palatka and the
Florida Sou thernRailroad, make close connection With
steamer at the Railroad wharf.
Night Express-Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at .......... ....11:20 t~i
Arrive Jacksonville at...................... ......11:05 p m
Arrive' Savannah at.... ..................... 7:00 a in
ArriveCharleston at......... ...................12:30 p in
Arrive Washington at............. 1:00 m
Arrive New York at.............................................. 9:30 p mn
Arrive Atlanta at..................................................12:10 pin m
Arrive Cincinnati at.... .......... o .......... 7:00 p in
Arrive Chicago at........................ ....... ...........
ArriyveSt. Louis at...........................................
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train for Sav-
annalrrCharleston and Washington.
Passegers taking the night express can get into the
sleeping cars at 9 o'clock p. m.
A new Reataurant has been opened at Waycross, and
abundanttime will be allowed for meals by all passen-
ger trains.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam.
ship connectienbs, and Bagaige checked through. Also
Wileaping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay-street, and at Depot
Ticket Office. GEO. W. HAINES, Agent.
JAS. -L. TAYLOR, Gen'l F. and P. Ag't. [*]

BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-0--
MERCHANTS AND MINERS TRANS-
PORTATION COMPANY.
SAVANNAH, OA., September 12, 1882.
The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail from BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVEIY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY
AT 3 P. M.,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORH
EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIbAY,
as follows:
Friday, November 3d, at 12:30 p. in.
Tuesday, November 7th, at 3 p. m.
Friday, November 10th. at 7 a. m.
Tuesday November 14th, at 9:30 a. m.
Friday, November 17th, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, November 21st, at 3p. m.
Friday, November 24th, at 6:80 a. in.
Tuesday November 28th, at 9 a.m. in.
Friday, December 1st at 11 a. m..
Tuesday, December 5th, at 2 p. m.
Friday, December 8th, at 3:80 p. lM.
Tuesday, December 12th, at 830 A. inm.
Friday, December 15th, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday December 19th, at 1:80 p. m.
Friday, December 22d6 at 3:30 p. inm.
Tuesday December 26th, at 8:30 a: m.
Friday, )eceniber 29Dth, at 10 a. in.-
Cabin Passage, 15.00; Second Cabin, 12J0; Roubid
Trip (Cabin),, .00. The Company reserve the right of
changing tiesaIllng days.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore. '
By this route hippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quIck dispatch.
Bates of freight by this route will be found in another
column. .,_ ,


--


- I ; _


SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA
WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.


'..h, 1 a,`

The Sava h1 ano Coi". Ga

Atn-porters adnd. ManufaOcturers of Z-ig- G-racLd E'er-
til-ze f er for Sale TL'-.eir

Sold FFife Fetilizer,
A strictly first-css ManuI M c ly rida

*'TO S OQ~~772T for Florida Market Gardeners and Farmers, is highly am-
S.U I mbniated.

Also ENGLISH ACID PHOSPHATE for composting. Pure dissolved Bone. KAINIT,
COTTON SEED MEAL, pure BIRD QUANO,
MURIATE OF POTASH, &c.
Each sack bears the Inspection Tag of the State of Georgia, which shows that it has passed
under the rigid inspection laws of that State, and is a guarantee that the Guano is what the
Analysis on the sack represents. No other brands in this State furnish such a reliable guar-
antee of their merits to the. purchaser.
Send for Circular. .. Iia7"OA. 'T,
to may283 Jacksonville, Fla., General Agent for Florida.




ORANGE AND LEMON TREE fromtried and approved varieties, and
ORANGE AND LEMON TREES on good healthy stocks.
Also, JAPAlT PERSIMMONS, LsCONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
Florida. Address,

to Feb 20 '83


Ocean Steamslhp Compa .


IT.



T SAVANNAH ANA NEW Y
SAVANNAH, December, 1882.
The Magnificent New IroA Steamshiis sail from 8f'hah1P p llowindate
TALLAHASSEE, Capt. Fisher, Friday, December 1st l1:u a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. Catharine, TuesdI December 5th, 2:80 p.
CHATTAHOOCHEE, pt. aggBtt*T tmrWlyc -
CITY OF AUXGUSTAea. eM. ers|i.lc t
TALLAHASSEE, Cap Fsher, ednesay,Dember -
CITY OF SAVA&N H Capt (atharine, Saturday Decemer 16th 1030:.
CHATTAHO QQHE apt. Dage, eA, .'
CITY OF ~ O A,: napt.
TALLAHASSE, Capt. Fisher, Wednesday December 27th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH. Cat. Catharine, aturdy Dece ber 80th, 10 g.
Through Bills of La4x1q d ic ovw' e gen i<|
Railway, and close connections with the lew and el steer o a.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 865, N. R. Age. Savannah Ga.
H. YONGE, .-' Age.t, avannah, Gv.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R.of Ga.,-fmieewerPler *.ilVerN ?
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 817 Broadway, New York. WEN
CHRISTIAN, ^ e j acting Agent.1 Ag't a ~


~-----.------ I


I







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


623


THROUGH TAITPF ON' OANGES ONLY.
VIA THE FLORID DISPATCH LINE, AND ITS CONNECTIONS.
I1-T =,*:P:EVr TMW."... 77M2 M,3BE. 24..tl., S S .


JACKSONVILLE AND
CALLAHAN JUNCTION '
TO 04
Macon....... ......... 35 370,
Augusta ................................... 40
Atlanta ................................. 40 80
Columbus, Ga..................... 401 80
Montgomery, Ala................... 401, 80
Mobile ..... .......................... 50 100
Chattanoaega, Tenn................. 501 00
New Orleans..........................p. 0 1 0
Nashville, Tenn ........... .....01.. 0 1 29
Memphis, Tenn.................. 60 1 20
Louisville4 Ky......................... 01 40
Cincinnati, Ohio............. ,. I 40
Henderson Ky......................... 70'1 40
Columbus, Ky......................701 40
lHick anoX Ky.........................701 40


04


$6125
70 00
7000
7000
7000
8750
8750
105.00
105:00
115 00
115 00
115 00
115 00
116ll00


FRO "
J.CKSONVILLE A.D
OAULAHAN JUNCTION
TO


Madison, Ind...................
Jeffersonville, Ind............
Evansville, Ind........ .......
Cairo, Ill.........................
Indianapolis ......................
Terre Haute.........................
Columbus, Ohio........... ..
St, Louis...............................
Chi4agoi................ .
Peoria, Ill...............................
Cleveland ...............................
Toledo........ .... .........................
Detroit.....,................0.....***
Milwaukee .............--... #...


0
.4


150

1i

170
1 80
180


0@
40


TO SAVANNAH. TO CHA N.
FROM
S" ______ '________ _._ Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Bqx. -or Bbl.
Jacksonville.................................. ... 25 50 0
Landings on St. Johns River................ 35 70 40 75
Stations on Florida Transit R. ......... 45 75 50 80
Tampa and Manatee.................... 70 105 75 1 10
Stations on the Fla, Cen. AlWestn'y 40 75 I 50 85

In Connection' with e Atlantis Coast Line.


TO


Baltimae.............. .......
Philadelphia.............................
New York...........................
Boston................... ...........
Providence..............................


From
Jackson-
ville.





00 120
65 1 80
66 130


SFrol ,
LId'gs








75 1 50c


-~rom From

BR. Manatee.



80 -1 105 l-l
0 .150 1106-111
.150 11105 18
5 1 0 10 1 90
85 1 00 1 10 190


-- -


75 $1 45
75 1 45
75 1 45
80 1 55
80 1 55


To all rail points, and via Atlantic CoastLine. Slnimt s daily.

In Connection with direct Steamers Of th6 Boston and Savan-
; nah Steim& ip Company.

S From From From
From Ld'gs on Florida Tampa From
ille. River. R. R. Manatee.
TO

Bt. .l. 5 0 6 2 65 i0 0 *- 4 .
Boston............... ......... ...... 50 60 $120 65 65
.......... .................. ... 0 20 6 50 1


In Connection with Steamships direct front

I From From .
From. IL 'ga 9; Florida
e. mo iver. R. R-I
- .TO .- *: ---L "* -- ----



New York..... ...........00 60 20 65 $1 20
Philadelphia............ 50 1 00 60 1 20 65 1 20
,Baltimore....... .. .. ........ 50 1 00 60 1 20 65 1 20
Boston viaNew York....... 73 1 4511 83 1 65 88 1 65
Providence via New York ... 65 13011 75 I 50 82 1 50,


i Savannah.
7Z "' *


From.
Tama
an



4 I P-4
$ 90$150
90 1 50
90 1 50
1 131 95
1 071'1 8


From
F. C. &W.




65 $1 25
65 1 25
65" 125
88 1 70
80 1 55


In Connection with Steamships of N. & M. T. Co., of Savannah,
Via Baltimore.

From Landings From From From
Jackson- on Florida Tampa F. C. C W.
ville. St. Johns Transit and
River. R. R. Manatee.




Boston......... ............. .... ........... 55 1 10 65 $1 S 70 11 30 $ 95 1 60 70 1s35
Providence................ 5 1 10 5 1 30 70 130 95 1600 70 1 85
Washington.......................... 0 100 70 1 20 80 120 1 05 1 0 66 125

To make rates from Stations on Tropical Railroad south of Ocala add 5 cents
per box and 10 cents per barrel to rates from stations on Transit Railroad.
Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
For Bostod. every Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
Tuesday and Friday.
To make through rates from points tributary to the above, add the rates for
transportation lines connecting to above rates.
The dimensions of the Standard Box for Oranges are 12x12x27 inches, and the
weight is estimated at 80 pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
ThIe Ct -kod4 is estimated at 20,000 pounds, or 250 Standard Boxes. Excess of this
amount Will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destina-
tion and to one consignee.
Prepayment ofreight will not be required, but good border and condition of
shipments will beWn absolute requirement. It is clearly understood between the
shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to
.which Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be issued only by the
Agents of this Company at Jacksonville afid Callahan and the Agents of the DeBary
Merchants Line and Baya's Mail Line from St. John's River Lanlings guaranteeing
rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points
will not be subject to correction by this Line.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion
in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
Baltimore. If shipped beyond, t*oy wll be 9larged in addition t"e single package
rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of
the agents of the Line.'
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further informa-
tion, if needed, apply to
HI YONGE, Agent ~f Line, and C. R RR. of Ga. Office New Pier 35 N River, N. Y.
Gen. W. L. JAMES, Agent, 25 South Third St., Philadelphia~ A. L. HUGGINS
Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H. RING Agent Boston and
Savannah Steamship Line, 18 T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARS6N, Agent S., F. &
W. Railway 211 Washington St., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Agent S. F. & W.
Railway, 318 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway
43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Pier 41
Sbuth Delaware AVe., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, G%.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Jacksonville, Fla.
D. IH. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.


_ _ __


I II ..~. I .-


- 1-


i2.5 00'








JOIN
J. M. STIGER'S COLONY,
GLEYMORE, WARE COUNTYY, GA.
40 Hours from., New York City ;..108 Miles from
Savannah.
Here we can pIftnt and gather some. rope every rn tBth
in the year; good ht ,OJAty o1gfalls, the woods for
shee hcatt i l ll ii sx yfi- .. Au.i.d;veta-
ble to the ayner. arms, .4iares ea ch a P-,N
acre; lumber, V per- 0O0 faet, delivered at the depot .
shingles, l4per IJQ; *Zb bU4ld g jouve with 4 room "
Panel doors window, ement for chimnrey w
dug and crbed, for 6I0IA own aAy terms. abor d( J
kinds needed fair Wages; board at Mrs. Balnbridge's
from $15 to rion. '
We need -t 9 t.ickers, stock aoid frdit-grMjr'S
One bushel pt. of t egetables dllvered In Yo
City for 50 centOl; per barrel 61, ,n4 with ick dlnpatEh.
A number of Noihernand Western famliee now bere
are doing well; no stones nton uderbrush no winterell-
mate delight. and p'j futly healthy all the year rftid.
Land is not feed bt net 0 the dSpot: sOne cleared-
land from to $10 per ae, All kinds bf gralt, vegeta-
bles, berrie ,fitan4 stj ik, do well. -Ouri fltrmers are
out of debt, "me Aending money.
Any numberofd cres, for colonizing orgrazlng,atl to
$3 per acre; 40 acres, with house complete* for 20;
EASY TERMS. .
Come anA .setibryo OtE, ot-i(rgs ."
to Jan 9, '8, ,. .lenore, Ware County,
COU .om TAL-BCoXT
Rea a titn
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Have lands in every county in the Orange Belt at frhli
83 to$100 per acre oran gr efpm $i,( :tI $100,000.r
Government lajpdIne r fat or t gl91t
Can guarantee ll orroey.. .. ''
Strawberry Pla.d.. 1
We have 200,000 best varieties for salelo. ..

We have 300,000 trees, all ages, forrs e, f~ngp ents
to $2 per tree, as to age.
SCOLONEY, TAL8T ,T ,O.
nep. 18,w. '"

a W P. P ILO s a-




FUIT AND VEGETABLE REPACK-
ING AND COMMISSION HOUSE,
':A sd'"iV" B' '.', ." :' '.:, ...
Pa ,ing! housee atit Waycvr.s .Wharf, Jacksonville,
-Florida. mayl2 '88.



TROPICAL HOUSE,
'* -AT-- >L* / .

INDIAN RiVER, - + FIJORIbA,
RYDER,
o0wNE A ND P RO PR E OL
/l Honie is 'cetrallv located: .a1 Roclede I t
far-fanse. Indian Lveir region of Floridq .ndposes,

Shore, Superb Scenery, together ith e,
Bananas, 1lne-Apples and Guavasf are some of the ad-
vntrgeIo'bodi'n thi favored oi. r. ,
Take steamer from Sanford to LakePdinsitt, valldd
Rockledge Landing; three miles carriage riding. J,.
rect coinee iolfro Ithe goue made withgteamers.,
RATES: $2.50 PJER DAY. -.


.Ariatngements iade b y Week or Month. to. mar 10,A83,

A 1:ni arm near Sa-
vannah.
It have placed, in my hands for sale one of the most de-
sirable farms in this locality. Being within an hour's
drive 4o.the city upon a beautiful road of hard shell, it
Small of the advantages of a suburban home.
h" ract comprises850 acres with a frort of one mile
'upon the White Blufl Road which Is the handsomest
drkie -ai this vicinity. The land is adapted to the cul-
turfany of the Southern products, besides having a
flna renge for cattle. The present owner is now supply-
ing the 'utchers with ,beef fattened upon this range.
The improvements consist Of a cottage residence, valua-'
ble barn, stables, servant's houses, etc. The whole tract
is under good fence. Besides a large vegetable crop
raised' last year, this farm well nigh supplied the Salvan-
nah market with the best Strawberries raised in the vi-
ciniy.
This fine property can be bought at a bargain as the
owner is compelled to change his business. Address
C. H. DORSETT,
Real Estate Dealer, 156 Bay street,
to Jan 8 '83 Savannah, Gda.


ASA H 'THE L'oIlA BtISPAItR' ___


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHRA S
GLU.ES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage G ,

oDL1t) .AND MZF4t& X-LEAF
'&00PP'GPI ALUM, PUMI0 STONE, KaMOSE
:'if: d a d Emery'IPapersi, &o.
AGENT IOIL,
PRATPS MINERAL COLZA OI,
3000, FIUFR E *,sT. .
John on's Prepared Kab(vnine Wads-
Sworth, Mar'tinez ..nd 'noa ;;-'a
Prepared Paint .
... ... 4 lug ft .f 2 ,

HIALE OILSOAPA
FORO
Not. 4O0West Ba St., at"
to mar .,',8& ' .:- r i
JD. .... BL .f .T IN. C.

AER Az .





TRANSACTS A GENERAL uAn~KIN e tESS.
-i eDp p -ts reced ounvs mhd't,. Exchange
--klWt flid W,,i ,OST FAV0B TER.M,
Collections made and Prooeed-r;
Correspondents-Importeys
New York; Merchants NationAlj va naa6,,
Resident correspondents of Brow I 4.C, Drexel.
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons;,. Brqs.. New
York, and other prominent Ba tI' lg. etteiW of
Credit. : f ..a

SLo eK

MILLINERY, FANC 'S'. GOODS,'




'A'.r .' .. A >A NE L '


7 West Bay Street, Corner aura,.
T5ACKsON~Vffld^ -' -- FLORIDA.
.lto fb ~ 8, .,


Commission Areh
AD* *., AB DEALER IN
6id iid Orainges and Lemons, .
74 TWET BAY STREET ''
'..; Depot, MAXFII)LD & Co., 67an469 0I1 ace;Mig-
1 zheand Packing Iyouse, Wayoros .jE.Wha4 .
. MAlUFACGiliEB' AO ,T.E "
B;.TEANGOR BOX MATERIAL^Iff;:'


11 / ve a airge quantity of ManitaWdgia A i I
Papers, at Lowest Market rates,
Sind in your orders for BOX MATERIAL. Cah'
ship promptly while freights are light. ,, ve great
Uiefulty in getting it transported diuI the I ,eye
season. [to aibch265'88

S'ICH'D H. 'MARKS'


OllANGE COf LANDADKNIICYJ
SANFF'II ,D, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMINT COMPY,
BUYS AND SELLS
Orange Groves and Orange Land8 on Commission.
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
June 12-tf


ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVIf .E.A

o V)*IBRONHTTO POST-OPrriCE A! STEAM-
ER. ...J '8IV

SN. .H ^ THE




LI.,- '
16i


, beauti-


Frost,


ieet


S 4 F SHRIMP,
r ... CRAB,
GAME
of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
v:egetable, in a Vew eountry. 4dS ^'Yi t stamp,
MHllIki~borqagh Co ;rtyFg.^^^/- ,
SI arigeltyonalve g;s or ten tHeZntfAt M, 8 you
desire. -
0oaug 20,'$ K M ....I-"EK.

S FOR, SALE.
kAN' MPROVED PLAGE on the saolth side,; o(lae
Harrrit in 8niter'Cdulty, Fla., about a mile from :y,-
lahab tIt .cntans 226 acres of the finest iratflaek high
hammbek, abott50 acresi.cleared. There aam two hoLd,
nev~rhfhlsiio~ f rho through Ahhl.p jae, fvfiom
which an ut liitit i ply of.water.eansbm.d1m1
Ing tft4 i rfg L9 el ertanty. 7 Bt. o&b
M il' ire&A; I ; -WiksidzIsete is a 0 HeM
style hbtW.-si. tk rbimns, store-room &Hdsiteltwt-
taehedl -the4e are, 60old orange.trees froir teialO ea4r
old, budded withidh lce varieties ; also,.70Q 6treaDsftl4t
to f yeu.0old-flihe and lemon trees In bearing. There
is on. the place, probably, the of"uava grove in
South Florida. The estimated yid in 1881 was 600 bush-
els. This property is one of the most valuable an in-
viting tracts of land in this State. -The qtiulty h1 t6'he
soil, besides growing orange trees, *111IrmAi'",'ith the
advantages of irrigation, and "em eprtetoifl
from frost peculiarly-p ble fl* '- l"t ln
purpose. Daily communication at a-hb by maffboat
onnuotjng with St Jhm aid IH, U Railway.
Only the non-residence of the owner induces its sale.
,Price,, lO0. Terms easy. Address
l ;. W.N. JACKSON,
f.o feb. 2, ,. .._..Esperance, Fla.

LANDS FOR "SALE
SUITABLE FOR

in lts otb pit, nin.hQ. fti ta;1 11,
Flord. Sendfqr cireuli:Vto
WHTNEY- GOLD.& HODGES,
4uie 26-tf FLORIDA

"IrtE0 JP" LANDS.


Parties wishing to Buy Lands.
Parties wishing to Sell Lanls.
Parties wishing to Locate Homesteads.
Parties wishing to make Cash Entries of Govern-
ment Lands.
Parties wishing to Loan Money.
Part-le wishing, to Borrow Money.
Parties wishing to Invest Money,
Should call on or address
W. BW CARKSON &. CO.,
I6 W e.t B.ay Stroet,


P. O. 0Iox 852. (tec 4 tf)


JACKSONVILLE.


A __


f-OR SALE.
126 acres, beautifully situated on Lake Toh i-peliga, a
few miles south of Kissimmee City good for O ogtaddid
Vegetables. Very select and desirable. 180 perikcoe. Ad-
dress "L," Dispatch office. to dee2S882


r II: I II '1


....... _. ,,


ereaF


II.






T' FLO RIDA DISPATCH E


VEGET A&BL Pr WERS:
CAN MAKE MONEY BY USING

FORRESTER'S CC Alr NURES
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR

Vegetables, Orange Trees



GEO. B`QFORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York.
THESE MANURES ARE PREPARED FROM ,O OENTRATED @GHEMIqALS '-trA R *FRE FROM. ODQR;
Do not Breed Vermhifior iAs6ets iAi.thi Soil.
They have been used on FLORIDA LANDS' for Yea,nd prodie Wondeful Results.

F. k. or o1i County, lor.ia,
___ end for circular. (to mar. 8, '83}p -

J OH1N O. M0 .

FLORIDA FRUITS 1 I. VEGETABLES,
AND GENERAL COMMISSIONN MERCHANTS
19S WEST. SIXTH STREET, frNCINNATI, OHIO.-
REFERENCES: Commercial Agencies, ,orany Wh sale Grocer in CINCINNATI.
STENCILS FURNISHED. BY Cll_-. 3Lj A-ITZEt,
to apl 8, '83. ..* ., .. LEESBUR FLORIDA.
SinITIH & PoTrV[ ^ ^JQITS AND VEGETABLES
S M-- ANI!fO .MISSION MERCHANTS
NO. 41 SOUTH DELAWAR STREhET,
INDIANAPOLTS';' INDIA I .
.*-REFSRE <2E65', r: 'i-;.. ...J
INGRAM FLETCHER, of FLETCHER & S8AMIAE, Bankers, t ~A n n National Bank.
.B" Stencilse -Fu'rndl ti*dd on Applicat .
oct-16,tf .

DISSTON PUR 6HSEC RS "

TN' L.:IOR A' .

LAND AND jI'MPQVE MENT

: ; .; ,- *
Offer from Ottobber 1',88Z, til lVay 1 883,


At Governn :":t ',. ,, .
IN BLOCKS OF NOT L64 TH A HN ACRES.
These lands include all varieties of upla rd a >,ll d, 4 nd ar adapted to e,,L n ,imgs Pine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar.Qane, Early VegetAles,,e t^, apiq hie i3, thbe countIe r ; ,,.. ., *', r .m P e


St.J6hns, Volusia, Brevard, an i nilIsorcr
,Pyl apays.a ^oqroe..
Thefollowing are reserved and for .ale at graded.prc"s: ;, I .
"Gulf Coast Reserve," 268 000 acres, M. R. MARKS, .Agent, Anclote, Fla.
"Timber ReerReserve," 100,000 acres, com. uprising Wice acts f P e hy r., clefly j. St. Johps a.. .
Volusia Counties. Address . OR M4 B I- p'rL EEN
FtORI .A I"D D IP .E IiENT CO.,
to mar 24 '83_ acksonville, Fla.
[NiB ifLISED 1871.] '

JF. A. B ,TAI, A:P


COMMISS1p9 N JMERf ANTS.
Souatherin E'ut etald. V geta ble pNecilto.y
B30O and 38S North D'lawrlie eny e, Philadelphia.
tojan 6, '83


FINE POULTRY.
SEVEN BREEDING PENS OF THE FOLLOWING
BREEDS;
Two yards PLYMOUTH ROCKS, two yards each of
WHITE and BROWN LEGHORN,
and one yard o 'GEORGIA .

We are booking
orders now for EGGS. and .
guarantee fifty per cent. better results
than ffiom Eggs received from the North.' Send for cir-
cular. 'R.W. PARRAMO]E, .Jiclssoiville, Fla.
W. C. BIRD, Monticello, Fla. tojanl5-'83

S:B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKSOTN VI12E, iL-., .
; 'WholeAle and Retail Dealers in


PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON 'IPE.'
Sugar ., Mills, 'Rubbe and ofther' Belting,
Steam, Gas-Fifting, Plumbing. Tinsmithing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & CO.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
Ai Send for Price List and Catalogue, -"t
to june 11 3 <
A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,








..iii, bo m llj. l lji, tll rs,

S.:24 LAURA STREET,,
^JALCI~SO NVITT.I.0 - ItOIt-l>A.,
Qunsmithing done in all its branches.
G ... IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cuttln,.-by maIl'. Addre's, i
A l,



The agent of the ",Royal Mall Line to the Nether-
vilie, 6ff(e hts services tp reliable par1iea in'search oj ,
o m p e te tft la b o r' fc o t.h ~te t! : 2. 2 2'" H',, .J '

to try to induce people from i ,l-,K, ,, *,, it, :; ; ',*. !

to com e to Flo .i f ,,. ,-,,, 2'..** \ ',, .- r ;


tR't-orrespondeniegicit e 2 .2f


C. It. VA IERi LIINDEN,
,..a;', ,. ,CatorI a qandlt4Ip ,q
sept R A L
o0,0 i 0..- .
Can be etea great pniB thie :* '
of 15 acres, 70(Y bearing treesin the beautiful and noted
ROCK LEDGE HAMM QCC on the grep4 IndliaidRiver
with its fAh, oysters, green turtle, and duoks. 'V.will sell
thd 'g'ovg for .,, ,
TWO-THIRDS ITS ACTUAL, V.4LUE. .
Numbers of visitors say it is the most beauliftil and.de-
sirable property in the State. .2.
Having purchased Jupiter Island, 100 milessouth, I
propose top make a specialty of'
COCOANUTS, fE;-APPLES,. ,
and the more tender tropical fruit. '
C. B. MAGRUDER.
Bock Ledge, Florida.


I ,






24 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


F


JOHN E. LAMBETH, Local Agent,
nov20-tf Gainesville, Fla.


formations and thrilling dramatic epsoe, with vivid
delineation of the prominent actors, including "the
present momentous Eastern Question Wars in Tunis,
Egypt, etc., illustrated by large colored maps; the fruit
of more than thirty years research, largely from per-
sonal and original sources, and combining the fascina-
tion of romance with the rarest historical knowledge;
extensively delivered before brilliant audiences in the
principal cities of the United States and Canada, and
emphatically commended and Indorsed by eminent
authorities in Europe and America including President
Porter, of Yale College; Bishop Huntington, of New
York; late Prof. Henry, of Washington, D. C.; Rev. Dr.
Palmer, of New Orleans, and Gen Sir P. MacDougal, of
Halifax. N. S. (Particulars hereafter.) It


LOCAL ADVERTISEMENTS.
FOR SALE.-Saw Mill and Machinery, capacity 10,000
feet per day. Will be sold at a bargain to settle an estate.
to jan 11 '88 GEO. R. FOSTER, Agent.
IMPORTANT BOOK.-A preliminary Report on Scale
Insects with Remedies for their destruction, by Prof. H.
G. HUBBARD, price 25 cents.
FLORIDA BREEZES, by Mrs. Ellen Call Long of
Florida will soon be published by ASHMEAD BRS.,
and will have.a large sale. Advance orders solicited.
FLORIDA ILLUSTRATED.--10,000 copies of which
have just been issued by us, consists of 20 imperial size
colored views in a handsome cloth case, illustrating the
different sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever pub-
lished on Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00.
Every one interested in Florida should have a copy.
Address, ASHMEAD BROS.,
tf Jacksonville, Fla.
BLOOMFIELD'S ILLUSTRATED HISTORICAL
GUIDE OF 9T. AUG JSTINE AND FLORIDA, with
map, for tourists, invalids and immigrants. For sale
by all booksellers and newsdealers in the State, or sent
to any address for 50 cents by
MAX BLOOMFIELD,
to aprl5-'83 St. Augustine, Fla.
LAW BLA NKS..-A full line for Justices of the Peace,
Circuit Colits, etc. Deeds, Mortgages etc., are pied
and published by ASHMEAD BROS., Jackson vll' fFIa.,
Writedor a catalogue. tf
TO ADVERT8TEB,-Large circulation: For the
next two months TRW FLORIDA DISPATCH will is-
sue from 8,000 to j0,0 copies e'ary week; about 40,000
a month. fa '
Merchants and others should take advantage of this
and advertise liberally, -
For advertising rates see editorial page. tf
ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange wraps from
ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla. For prices see
advertisement. tf

Orange Groves
-AND-
LAND NEAR JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN.
Choice lots for Residence, Gardens, etc.
Groves built and cared for and improvements made for
non-residents, by J. S. BELL,
Real Estate Agent and Notary Public,
to nov 5%,183. Reed's Block, Bay-st Jacksonville, Fla.

Lands in Middle and South Florida,
-ON TIA-
TRANSIT,
FLORIDA SOUTHERN
and SOUTH FLORIDA
RAIL ROADS.
Lands for Orange Groves,
Lands for T'I'ruck Gardening.
At fair Prices and on Reasonable Time.
We also offer
Ins :te a ui d.ing SiteS1
IN THE FLOURISHING TOWN OF SANFORD.

Sanford is rapidly Growing, and we have some
VERY CHOICE LOTS on
the Market.

Sanford has Churches, Schools, Railroads,
Car-shops, Telegraph, Telephone, Water
Works and all the advantages of an

For full particulars, address
JAMES E. INGRAHAM, Gen. Agt.
In regard Lands in Middle Florida, address


WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen.............I...ri 50 MORTGAGESper dozen....... ..........Price 50
,QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per doen......... .. 50 NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, ra5d0d 0norderPrce $500
We publish a full line o Las. Bl#Vaos for Lawyers, Jtfusieeq of tMe, Page, C ,ouit Qourts,, etc. Price-list
mailed on application.


C


AR P E 1 S R E iA. AI P S .
Are manufactured right in our establishment, in the best manner, and at short notice.


HRISTMAS GOODS
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S CARDS IN GREAT VARIETY.


We carry the largest-toe In our line south of Baltimore.
A- Orders by malxestiicitUd and a Rpptly attended to., '
I Anything we send out, f notsatsf we will take back a'd reftnd the money.


[Full count-480 sheets to the ream.] ,


.14 c. pr ri. 17 c.r rm. 19 prm.
Address ASHMEAD :BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


3,000 B A R REL L P 0 T A TOES .



01101111 MIOIIIAN EARLY RDSE EII SEE A .'N TABL. 1181

To arrive during NOVEMBER and DECEMBER. Also general stock of SELECT SEEDS for Gardeners, and
SPECIAL FERTILIZERS for POTATOES' AND CABBAGES. ..
FIFTY TONS TOBA CCO 0 STE M S.
These stems are claimed by WESTERN GARDENERS to be a sure specific for the INSECTS that destroy Cab-
bage. Fullstock
BONE MEAL, COTTON-SEED ME.A1L, HULL AS, ETC.
J. E., ART,
to jab 6,583 J ACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


ASH MEAD IBROTHE-Sp'
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA., .

PUBLISH ERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATION ERS
PRINTERS AND BINiDERS,
AND DEALER N .



We have the most complete Boep Bindery in tlie n Rule.Niimber or Page and Perf6rate any j6b seot us.
Blanks and Blank Books manufactured rd-r for Iailroads, Steamboats, Hotels, Banks
and Corporations. The ruling od ic iUjt jobs a speciality.
S. ..WE PUBLISH
T911 FLOsKDA DXSPA TO1,
A 20-page Weekly Agricultural Journal, at only $1.00 per year,
Devoted to Southern Agpibulture, Fruit Growing, Market Gardening, etc.
This paper has the largest circulatliono any published in Florida. Specimen copies free. Write for a copy.


Itis generally conceded wedo the Fiiest Job Printing in the State. We have all the modern machinery and all
newtype. Can pilt '-he smallest Visiting Card to the largest size Poster.
Printing of Pamphlets a specialty. Prices on application.


FLORIDA: FOR TOURISM T Yi--r-ALJIDS ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, oy
AND SETTLERS (Barbo ofusely II- A. T. Garey, (cloth).......................................Price 1 25
lustrated) ... ....S.....E .., ...Price $1 50 A MANUAL -of ARDENLNG in FLORIDA
FLORIDA: ITS SCENE CLIMATE (Whitner)............................................... Price 0
AND HISTORY (Lanie ,...................Price 150 COLTON'SMAP OF FLORIDA........................Price 5
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (i .a perPrice 10 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF ........Price 250 the best)..... ......... .............................. Price 1 25
GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE.. ,. ......Price 25 NEW AND' ACCURATi MAP OF ;T.
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS RBN CE JOHN'S BIVER...................................... Price 25
BOOK OF WINTER TRAV ............Price 75 McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY AMER OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra)..Price 6 00
ICA...............................................Price 25 INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SU-
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition) PREME COURT OF FLORIDA...............Price 3 00
enlarged and improved........................Price 50 NOTES FROM SUNLAND ON THE MAN-
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (iW., edi- ATEE RIVER, GULF CAST OF SOUTH
ti enlarged and mpr y..Price 1 00 FLORIDA. Its Climate, Soil, and .pro-
ORA~hGB X Srtc. 100 ductions, By Samuel C. Upham e...dPaper .25
HISRT, huF .. 25 ... LORIDA AS A PERMANENT HM,.:...i;Prioe .0
GUI 'S ST -DA---Bloom ld ......................................................... . ...... ...... '
An the above books mailed on receipt of price.

( by mal, 4 pota ge free, on receipt of price.)
Sun of B FoU gamm, aloRtaining 12 Views ]pgvet..
Souvenir of FlortMao (small aze)....:. ........................... 25c Souvenir of Jacksonville, (large site......................... 50c
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small I Souyenir of St. Augustine, (large size)........................ 50c
size ................................. ............ . *............. 250 S tereosc pic Views, per doz........................................$100

10,000 copies of which have Juast ben by u. consisting of twenty imperial size colored views in a hand-
somo cloth dase, illustrating the lfe saoftee te'o Foida. "". ,' ,i. '
This is the handsomest work o the ikbt MledIn Florida. Price by tkit, ldstage fpee, $1.00. Every one
interested in Florida should have a eqpy ..., .


. --.' .-~..~..... I .....~... ..~L. iii i :-. ii . . ..~ ....' -. -I...


1R


4


L