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Florida dispatch
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00038
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: December 11, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00038
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text
SPECIAL LARGE EDITION.


I JAI Ov, 4'Aw

Fl i11h i'


jtt'*~ahufa~dflfg an~d Tndtstrial Thterests Oi YbJrid aond tks $stth,


New Serie 8.-Pa ished by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.,


Price 5 cents.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


f:- IZ


FLORIDA GRAPES.&
:;'Third CrQp, xrEord Itar. 01i.1 ,
We received a small box of Goethe ind
Del ware grpes of. ne ize and' excellent,
quolitt l vthe AitK.of0 DIecember, with, the
folowing inte i etter from a'lued
I,,


I send this nqte for the pvrpoe ,of giving
information rh regard to- t'A;faw mt.w ed
hye ufteaybifif t bb&itdi 1 g
you think aay .be of ervie ,toyouf 'readers,
you are at liberty. ato :made sati se of it you
please. .* '
Asi many inquiry are Imade as to whether
gripes can be successfully' it'ld ifit' Voridat, I
send .f Wa) l ttSlgiVl 64i Ytpqatit&Wet0
them the pai m&i.onA 4'lstaO fl a few
bunches of the Delaware ..an Goethe grapes,
cut from th@'Mines a. fi.o jhieffi6 thW 25t"
and 27th of the presdn 6 month, being the
gatthe Id from my vtnesr,hs ,-,... n
During thefit'*4 k t%;4j4 4
iri.~ y vines three va;Tie ,
In .May and Jwe e n'.wi&Jton iding .st a. p
droAth, I gathered a very heawvv qp;fi,-*a
,the same vines,.of Hartford.i it D eifAI;)Ilaware,;
Wi'ite Sweetwater, .Contcoird, .t. ii
rst.tr, and'later Agawam^'NeotrteUs'glnia;
an Ixiessling on J... erli
varidies jpd ?f if.w 16-4U
Rested about'si owdek in.uU fnIF"a B 'dt gwt
during thb aid isf e h
ag i and bloomed'frteely Sorn 't,
from thirty to forty bunwies, .soon,= avery; few,
and others more. .Myo,,niie,,4~ wi, .on
pinfe land, -with noextrwsar. em'ceplmg' ood
cuttivation. I have ne~ see ,f:ieafruit
better, either in the North or. 'est. The leaf-
roller is the principal enemy we h6ve to ,con-
teiMwith, and on the thigk'" .~ fities
mt t- be closely watched, .The M Mt of thy
grapes are from layers ad4 eutii .'giut I.
ha le grafted the Black #4'rg of
Alexandria,.Malaga, White.SweefwatCer Aiess-
lin, br Johannesburg all on Lei.'ld '"(ii oe"
root, and the. most of them minde a -very


remarkable growth, oftefi .Aending out a main
shoot frAi."',enty to thirty feet in length the
first E-sedswo -ides numerous side branches.
t he first th're varieties named, mildewed
badly with ine, 'ut I used no r6&mdies to
prevent it.' T hite SweetWrateo, aad Ries
ting, have fr t vily in les'thl ei. hteen
months froni ie and indeed some have
bope a few buncm 4ihes swon e g ;
a smooth plaoe i tiooknd cut it off
o7 the U groeia t- ra inrthmidd al,

shaped scio, 4m dtry dekt gaftim-"
e nctQ^W ^Ql^/i^ ^ : a cio n m o ft <'rf
usin io erigtho urioni o f soion and'
stock wieh earth,'leaving one bud' just at the
Asui* o6tf"e'o6ound, but partially covered.
I r. o p in 'January, and if the work
is care- ay' 'aie lnd 'the clay kept slightly
Wa ltf theg be almost suri to grow.
)plant a small Bu"lace vine in winter, spring,
ot $j t'ere. I ,,sh a vig to, grow,
Aind graft the following winter with' some
gra,. ,^; ,mt ea, my, nmirst graft being only
grape tenp ger a
tthieery a o_ ..ut,' believe it to be y
thd dt l4iwilgg tinri it 8, n W
fin& frui, 'iI th, s hrtestp ssible. time.' ,Yours
respecfliily_ : A, S :

(G a:) .Td _y .O.. openiyg
theii'ey ;:ee Vthat "'eii frtng is
the op e ,to extensive ,farmmg. ,Less land
and t rt6e ,wbrk -fe r., aires and. a greater
sq4Vly of fertfiti-er-nnt so much careless crop'
raslg rand imore ig gw culture.' One acre
well' prbpardd 'and dir'fillly 'ciltivatd'i r wr..th
five acres indifferently prepared and ,careletsl
exUltititted: "."
; CROPKo D FENCE CONp.ERS.-Every obqrv-,
i g tmtuntrymant knows that more good land isU
wasted in crooked fence corners than would suf-
ficee to supply lie faraning 6populatiofi with bread..
,tTsually! it is the very best Ind that is faquA next
to fencess especially in. fields where the habit
has bee, to plow arou nd, turning th' fuiirows
into the fence every time the field is tilled.


'Pea-Cabbage-Tomato.
From some experiments made at the New
'York Experimental Station, we learn that the
earlier plantings of pea'e were fit to cut in 77 to
80 days after, plating ; the. later plantings ar-
rived at an .eatabl conditioni in from 54 to 84
days, according to varieties. The perip ,:of
ripening fob the seeds has varied from 74 to. 109
day' frnIM planting,. Of t varieties of pease
te d., 'Laxtb's;- 'Earliest" was first in'
dpitt-,of erhe Next N ocoiMe "'Thorburn's
First and Best," "Early Alpha,,' Daniel
O'Rouke," and "Philadelphia Extra Early"'
i one day' late ther an. e "American Woh-
der," ",Preitum Germ,," "McLean', IXttle
Gem," "Kentish Inrieta" and "WilIlm thIe
First." The m t dwarfed variety was'An~pri-
clean Wonderi.? The most prolific variety was
Haip's Dwarf "Green Marrow,"
The earliest varieties of :taabage, 4*t of.. list
of 29 sorts, were Early Otheat, and Nonpariel.
These were plante. in the oold fra 'April 8,
vegegtqd .pril ,*,#. pita :..ay .26,.
and si~"p wre in eatit o" n" July
26. Aboti-wo ,day ter em e Vilmorin's,
Early Flat Dutch and ewark .auily 'Fit
Dutch, .,arly t *'4Aeey Wake-
field and' Early E ,W ,e- fit ,for the
table August ,. ', fTfie1hetad' thus far are
from Vilmorin's ~Flat,*tch.
The director of the stationsays that the May-
oWier Tdnttifo is '/ery pi6hlsifig new variety.
PlAited in. the hot-bed 'A i T..vegetated April.
12, tranplanted into gar&' Xay '29, it blos-
sorned op, June,16 4d A' hej -ripe frait Au-
gust 8, two 4aysefpre .theEarly Acme. These
fruits easure threeiches diameter, which
is sQoewhi.!g ,ii, n. the. ly Ancme, and
they are nearly b'qveite as-smdoth as this van-
ety. The plants are very prbdactive.
Our Florid,' readers.; will, of course; make
proper allowance for the difference in dates of
plantinig ,&e; the, atee givenn ab6ve are "cal-
culated for the' meridian" of New York.


- _lr. .. Ir ~


1 1. - 0 .P fi I I I .


t 0 i p 1 4 - .





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~Y.--.. L~U--~ YWIIPIr~4~UII. V -III~~I~Xrl~~YU~ ~ -. -i.. 1-----1--~~r71-~1~_~ I~L_ I~ L I~ii- -C .. L~ ~


"I1





S T HE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


PREMIUM LIST

Of the Eighth Annual State Fair, ,
To be held in this city, February 13, 14, 15
S ,and 18,4 3 :
4
Intoluottry. .
In announcing this,, the.. igth iAnnual Exposition,
'th6 managers feel emburdeied in predicting a more
Son lete and successful Fair than has ever yet been
he l n Our State.
SThe beeflcial effects.these expositions haye from year
to year, .rouh out to ouir State, especially, those'-parts
anci sections of it which'have taken the trouble to show
What they could.do ar m& nifest, and the people are now
enjoying the results inn ithfux of wholesome and de-
siable population with san amazing increase in values
and a division of burdens,' ..
Our sister Southern States are heartily engaged In the
race for the sudeess and 6r the building up theiK waste
places and. enhancing their wealth. One of the Drinoi-
pal means used are tQese Annusl State Expsiti6s, to-
gth er with the ever-recurring local County Fairs, thus
atinonstrating the facts in regard to their capabilities
4b actual exhibits of their products to the Vty. eye of
the be -TinA itb1eomes necessary that we, the people Flor.-
ida, should watee t ooprespondg 0rlt ofexie prlse,
and enter the lists with our sisterStates aid We feel we
may call upon you, fellow-eitizens, in full confldecpe of
e hearty response. There is but one florila in l.U our
Sast national domain,'peculiar in climAte in soil, hnd as
vgrietw as peculiar in products;. and white she Is so fa-
moou for her health-giving qualities, let us make her
still more famous for her products and advantages by
piling up her rich fruits and -fleecy staples, her extraor-
dinary fibres, her starch-producing plants, her tobacco,
her wines and herg'rain, While the pv0duote 6f the gas-
den-farm shall in midwinter astonish the thousands of
eyes from abroad all over our country, who shall behold
them. 'I;
Let every man,, every woman, everywhere in all parts
of our State resolve to make this, the Eighth Annual
State Fair, the grandest and most successful of them all.
Free transportation for all exhibits and excursion
rates for visitors will be arranged for with all lines of'
railroads and steamers, -and ample and cheap passage to
the Fair Grounds. Jt ,} "

Entries.
To insure proper entries and an examination by the
Judges, exhibitors should carefully consult the premium
list and definitely deteinmif in what depfirtmetit anAd
for what premium they desire to cWlpete.
Pedigrees ofullthoroughbred antnials, with ag6s and
nam es of te, stock exhibited for premnigm, must be filed
with the Secretary before the edh'bibibin;.
No animal will be allow9 t compete ,foi more than
onepremium. "
Entries nust be madq at the Secietary's Qflice on the
ground .--f I ta
A person making an entry must 1W* to.^,he Secretary
a written statement of the department and the number
of the exhibit, with the name 4nd re.idenoepf the e-.
hibitor. For example: if a person wishes to compete
for the premium for the "best doten osiApgo .of One ypr,
riety, he must deliver to the Secretary a written state-
ment as follows :, i
Department A: Exhibit 6. Entered ...........................
....f.........;.....:........Fort id .^: l .... '
After the entry is ,ade, yt iqeiretary, the e.hibltor
will receive two ards, a eds, a hici he must p'tceed to
the proper department and'dlVly the ct, t1 the Su-
perlintendent. The exhibit Will be placed in its proper
position, one card attached there.t a4 the.bther re-4
ceipted and returned to the exhibitor. '
To spur e tdelivergy f th lto th 41bse of te
Exposition, the exhibitor must return to the Superin-
tendent of the department the pecoeitd card,,a ,thg ex-
hibit will be surrendered only upon the presentation of
'sam e. ii : ,- < ,,. ; t -
Entries having been made, will not be changed by the
Secretary unless an error has been made by hit.

All shipments of articles for exhibition should be
plainly marked "StatPair, Jaekabntit~ Florida.
Ou ART DEPA T EIT. i,, /
Our citizens shonYd take pridb ini furniAlsing a' c'iditi
ableand attractive dplay in te a "*rt GieryindI on
.Exhibition." This department is uniderThe supervision
'of thope whbset namea'rean plegupranty for, theft artis-
tic arrangement and careful andling of all articles con-
iflded to theisisre. : ...


SPACE FQR THE FAIR.
Those dountles or person dbeiring pake f6ri the doni-
ing State Fair, will please make ,ppioatlon foTthe same
'to the Secretary, enclosing stamp f6 reply. '
It is desired that these applications be np p ~y In
,order that the Directors may fully know whatthey have
to do.
A. J. RUWL, Secretary, s. P. A.
RULES.. '. ',
1. Exhibitors must be excluOed during their delibera-
tion.
2. No exhibit will take a-premiumi where there is no
competition, unless extraordinary inetit shall exist.
3. Judges will be provided by the Secretary with a
"Judge's Book," containing a transcript of the entries
in the department ippn which they am to ,pass.. They,
will record in this book thnir awards by the numbers of
,the entries.
4. Judges are requested to withhold the award of a pre-
mium where the exhibit As not considered meditortous.
5. Judges will apply to the Superintendents of, the de-
partment for all necessary information concerffing the
exhibits upon whiqh they are to, mae their awards.
' 6. No appeal from the decision of 0the Judges 'will be
entertained; the Judges will therefore exercise the
greatest possible care in making their awards.
7. Reports of awards in each department should be
signed by all the Judges.
8. When exhibits, not otherwise provided in the Pre-
mium List, are deemed worthy of a special prize,' thq
Judges are authorized to award diploma for the same.


9. Judges are expected to be on the grounds at 9 a.
m., of the second day of the Exposition, and, upon arri-
val, report themselves to the Superintendent of the de-
partment to which they have been appointed, and be
prepared to remain until their duties are performed.
The department superintendent shall designate prize
articles and animals, after awards are made, as follows:
First premium, blue ribbon; second, red ribbon; di-
ploma, green ribbon.
Tickets may be procured at the principal hotels and
Jat the gates oft he Exposition.
- 'i6grammes *ill be published in the city papers each
day.
Refreshments can be had on the Fair Grounds.
Each occupant of a vehicle must be provided with an
admission ticket.
Officers, Superintendents and Judges will procure
badges from the Secretary, entitling them to free ingress
andcegress.
With the exception of the usual courtesies to mem-
bers of the press, no complimentary tickets will. be is-
sued.
LOSSES.
Every possible precaution will be taken for the safe-
keeping of exhibits, by an efficient corps of constables
and watchmen ; but the committee will not be resporsI-
ble for any loss or damage that may occur.


LOCATION. fully
The Exposition will be held at the State Park Associ- p9ts,
action grounds, northeast of the city, on the shell-road- tray
an easy walk or a pleasant drive. .frola asy part o the value
city. Carriages and hacks will be in waiting at all the Ev
principal hotels, and there will be steamboats ru*tg Open
regularly, at short intervals, between the city and t'ir a
Grounds, during the Fxposition. Ju,
S'The gates will be open at 9 a. m. each day. sle
INFORMATION FOR EXHIBITORS, '
Premium List will be forwarded by mail upon apfio- io
cation to "A. J. Russell, Secretary, State Park A
tion, Jacksonville, Florida." -r -
Articles may be sent y freight or express, prepaid,
dddessed, "Florida State Fair, JacksonvlUe, Fiord. ,
Payment of Premiums. ms
On the day following the Exbosltion, the becr st
wil frunish the successful exhibitor with a check o
Treasurer who will pay the premium to the exhibitor one
on his endorsement of the check. Premiums unclaimed note
for thirty days will be considered as donations o the pand
Association.and


Transportation. ,
Arrangements will be made with all a rs and
railroads to and from the city for one fare laVtsitors
and exhibitors, and to have all exhibits t sagr$edfree
of charge. ,
ADMISSION TO THE .)S. ,
Season tickets, admitting exhibitors oly, to be ob-
tained upon certlficatb of the Secrery...............1.00
Ticket admitting one person......... '.............. 50,
Ticket admitting child under 12 fears of age............ 25
Four-horse vehicle and driver. J......................... 1.50
Tw9-horse vehicle and driver.,. .......................... 1.00
One-horse vehicle and driver...'....,.............................. .
Saddle-horse and rider.......... -. ........ ......... 75
,General W e
Sspeces of gambling will tied w t 4hin 4e
C Irmlttee's jurisdiction.' -. .
( No animal wilfbepermitted& t .''(. '1
, Any person attempting to interim ra arny way in-
flueniethe Judgea during their t ton,"will be
promptly excluded' from competition.. -,.,
D deputy Sheriffs will be in attendance, an8 act under
the orders of the Executive Committee, and -it shall be
their duty to arrest, any person creatUrg a disturbance
or violating any of the rules and regul tons of the Com-
mittee or laWs of the State. .': I
Complaints, to secure attention, must be mde to the
Superintendent of the department. "
All rules. not embodied in the lpreced semona, n*all
be determined by the Committee, an r deisn be
As the time of the Secretary wi t fuily occupied,
verbal or irregular entries will not i teyved or acted
upon.,
All entries must be made and exhl Its ree lived before
Tuesday, at noon, if the objects enteWd a i-inteinded for
competition,

Special Premiums Offered by fl. 02 I~ls .
1. O. Pansler, formerly o6f Gk nda hl. iiga,
and- Atlanta, Georgia, but now of Jaokso1mtielior da;
and Cincinnati,. OQhio, offers the foloWlngopledi4
,pei premiums at the forthcoming tat'FL '
'or rhe-best bale of upland cotton of the l 4eo
market grown in the State, first premium -20 i2 gold.
Second premiuim one French China deooratedf nner
et fromHaverland's factory, at Leqnogne, not less than
S hundred and seventy-five piece, all l
Trd, premium, one similar to there above, -nt l esthan
ore-hthdred and fifty pieces valued at$l*...
For the best, hle of Sea Island cotton, prAisely the
atn as offered above for the best bale of uplad cWton.
'or the best two boxes of oranges packed for shipping,
together with the best two baskets of oranges, contain-
ing not less than one hundred oranges each, lund the best
two hundred loose oranges displayed on the fruit stand,
and the largest number of oranges on one limb; all to
be the growth of one grove. The test to be on flavor, tex-
ture of nnd, aifd commercial excellence and beauty of
combination in exhibit.
First premium, t200 in gold.
Second premium, same as that offered in the second
premium for cotton, value $160. ,
Third premium, same as that offered in the third pre-
mum for cotton, value $125 ,i ,
fourth premium, a six-pieced silver plated tea set,
consisting of one coffee pot, two tea; pots, one sugar
bowl, one spoon-holder, one slop bowl. All elegantly
graved :vaLue 875.
or the best exhibit of pine-apples, not less than two
dqzenpVines. ,
First premium, one French China tea set of fifty-six
pieces, beautifully decorated, valued at 25.
Second premium, a silver plated ice pitcher, elegantly
engraved, value $1.5.
For the best exhibit of bananas, not less than half
dozen bunches.


Spec
cou
' Flo
To w
prem

Me
prem
colle(
on gr
Sp
the p
game
great


First premium one French China tea set of flty-lx-
pieces, beautifully decorated, valued at $85. I
Second premium, a silver plated ice pitcher, elegantly-
engraved, valued at l.5.
For strawberries, tiot less than ten quarts fro ~any
one grower. -
First premium, one French China tea set of fity-six-
pieces, beautifully decorated, valui *r. '
Second premium, a sUver piate4 i pitcher, elegant-lr
engraved, valu $1& ..
For. the best loaf of whitee bwead, made and iAaked
any young lady under the ageof eighteen years, T
bread fr competition must be accompanied w
ten ert it 'the person exi biting tr "a;"
baked i wit distant Instructi n
one. This requirement ts i rtive.
First premlu,.a dinner nhu t
pieces of Haverland's Frfi a ,
ted, valued at $150..
Second premium, a ilinter d" p above, o
Third pr a t t M, dee
as above. value'lB& ,.. A ;' . ,


I' '


tb dulay -of 1ilers1i CM set of
,bix re q elue S9, mA nhg" ue ormprem-
offered by this liberal gentleman to 62,040, who
he willave the China sets and plated ware on
blijon iA his store, which will be opened I.this city
r about the first of January, and 'of which due
e wL be given through the columns of the city
rs. These sets are all of genuine Pren) .Ch na,
are well worthy the efforts of our people.
BIG CABBAGE.
tal premium offb&d4 cAildnlQ.iissau
inty for the largest Cabbage grown in
rids,,fi .00
hn R d ..... 1 00
iium ,;....... .. ..;,. .":g ...^. ...... .,,.............. ,, -, 10 (^
FERTILIZER.
ssrs. Gould & Co., Manufacturers, offer a special'
ip m of .30 or afton,-ot their pi-tilier for ie, pe$.,
action of field or garden products, or fruits grown
ouad where their fortdaier it used., , ,4I.
racial premiums will be arranged and announced in
public papers for Base Ball game and `o6 M 'RH
es, which it is expected-will b.q Atroducd, aading
tly tothe amusement of the oeeion."' '- '


SPECIAL HONEY', PlEM. UM. .
iFo' the best display of loney in.all its depart- ;
'entia.of productonL and care......^......: .:.. -40 00,
For the best exhibit of Hpney Comb, not less. .
th n i po d ......................................... 1
There must be two or mome'exhfbitsin eompehlUpn.,
SPECIAL -BREMITM. -- '
For the best and most varied exhibit, of farm ,.
products, grown on one farm by any. one
larm er,.................... .,',.n .......... ....&..Wh ....... s, o ft0
Third bes. exj itit as a ve. ..........,,........-. ... 25.
State Park AssooiatiUo Premium hidt.
S Department Ar-FMitsi.. -',
J. D. MuAD, Putnam"county, aSup .. 0 *:
Dr. N. II. MOl4GNE Duval county. Ass,(. 9upt.

Messrs, C. J.Kenwrty, W is an A. I. Bi-
well, of DuVal unht ; r Ohd Dr. T Wal,
- Hillsborough county ;. .6J. Finnoganl, 0 .ge-.
county; Fred. Flemiln Cl ont.
1 West collebtoni Afd I&apMc !'dPriStf grown" -'
' Ia Flortda, diploma ............... ............ 850 ,
Secopidbest............................................... .... 2 00
2 Bof: eolledtlonI.f'COn'kSVA' flily, diplotnas f,' ,
a nd ...... ..... ................... ...............................
Sed iO d best-..................... .............. .
3 Best collectionn and display of Oranges, di
loma and........... ... ............. ... ...... ... 00,
Second best W .. ............4...., ......... .... ............. 00O



speelmende tso rttbibted), exhibit t must
be made by grower or q.aent.(If practica-
ble4 history, th a seedenvolo0e to acOom-
eacl hibit), diploma and................. 10 00
8 Best oze el.............................................. 5 00
9 Bes do andarin or Tangerine............ 500
10 M altese Blood.......................................... 5 00
11 display of Oranges on one limb ...........practica-
12 peck Lemons, diploma and................... 10 00
Second best....................................................... 5 00
13 Best dozen ltrons....................... ................ 8 00
14 do andin o............r Tangerine........ ........ 00
15 dozen Grtpe ruitBlood............................... 00
16 Second pekL es........... .................. ...... 500
17 Be" dozen Pino pps l ........................................ 10
18 bunch of a oaknas.... ........... ............. 5
19 dozen Gi pe iberries.......................... 2000
16 Secondbest ..... ............. ............................. 5 00
20 Bestq art of 8rtawberries..... .... 3 00
21 dozen Guavas............... ............ 00
22 dozen Pomegranates................................ 8
23 -dlozen ,O StvejAr...e...................... ............... 00
24on beunh et..................of Dates...................................5 00
25 six Melon Papaws.................................... 3 00
26 dozen Sapadilloes ................................. 3 00


I _ I_






THEE FL 0 R I D A D IS P AT C H. S1


27 display Japan Plums ........................ 5 00
28 "qisp Tay.Tm an .inds................................... 300
29 dozen Mangoes ................ .................. 300
30 dozen Sugar App!es.................................. 3 00O
31 dozen Sour Sop.................................. 2 00
32 peck Japan Persimmons.................... 500
33 ,two boxes Oranges packed for ship- ,
meint....... 10 00
34 Bestbtthnch of Cocoanuts. Florida grown...... 1000
35 'Second bist ...................................................... 5 00
No b hibit in this department will be allowed to enter
into more than one combination, or in any way com-
pete for nibre than one premium.
NOTE.-As the awards of this department are of great
importance to the State, it is specially requested by the
,c n_4ttee that the Agricultural and FrUit Growers'
As gciattions of the State appoint from each society one
delegate to accompany. the judges in this department
wleirthey are examinig exhibits and making awards.
Bt no person will be %eognized as a delegate, or
I al)pwed to accompany the.judges,without first present-
ing a proper certification from the society represented.

Department..B.-Floral and Horticultural.
ARNOLD PUETZ, Puval county, Supt.,
* JUDGES *'
W, P. Lipsey, Alachua co~ ty; C. J. Kqnworthy, Duval
county; E. H. Hart; Putnarm doUnty.
|G6-Open to all Competitors..gI
1. Best collection and display of Flowering and
:Ornamental Plants (not less tlhan 25 varie-
ties, not less than 100 Plants) diploma and... $20 00
2 Best collection and 4ip01, f- plants in.
*. bloom (not less than ya reties, not less
.., than 75 plants) diplqa ad.................... '1500
3,B'st collection and diplay O ruit platits ; .
,(not less than 25 varieties, not less tlti 100
plants) diploma and : .....2000
4 Second best (not less than 15 varieties, not
' less than 75 planti).............................. ....... ,
S5 Third best (not less than 14. varieties, not les "
i than 50plants)........... ....................... 10 00
6# $ix best grown specimens of Le 'onte, Pear
,trees, diplomaan,................. .......... 5 00
7 Six best grown specimens of Peen -To and
Honey Peach trees one year from the bud,
8 diploma and .......... ............... ................... 3 00
S8'Six best grown specimens of Orange and
': Lemon trees in one or -more' kinds.............. 5 00
9 Six best grown specimen& of Strawberry
"plants in one or more kinds.......................... 3 00
10' Six best grown Pine-apple !plants in one or
m ore kinds................:........... ......................... 3 00
11 Silx best grown specimens of Japan Perslm-
Smon trees in six variits.............:............ 5 00
12' Best collection of Cut Rokeasnot less than 600
"roses in 15 different. varietle or more, di-
ploma and ...........:..... .:.. ..................... 1509
'13 Second best,not less than 800 roses in 15 varie-
ties or more.... ...... ...............'.......... 10 00
114 Third best, not less thah 200 roses in 10 varie- '
S ties or't m Issew..... .. ........... ....................... 500
15 Bet display of mixed Out lowers, not less
S t tan 500 flowers in 25 varieties or more...... 10 00
S16 Second best, not less than 300 flowers in 15
S varieties or m ore............................................ 5 00
'17 Best display'pio e ge 4 q u 'Foweos,
i not less than 100 skes ................... 2 00
18 Best floral design of freshFlowers................. 5 00
!19 Second best .....:., ...1..'.......; .................!.............. 2 00
0 Best hanging basket with plants..................... 00
121 Second best ....'.............................. ............. 1 00
v2 t vase with plants .................................... 2 00
S23, ednd best........ ................................ ...' 100
2i 2 Best collection of wild native flowers, not
S less than 20 varieties.................................... 3 00
25 Second best, not less than 10 varietiesi............ 200
26 Third best, not less than 10 varetieties' ........... 1 00
M 27,Best collection of native Grasses, not less
S than 20 varieties............................... ............ 3 00
28econd best, not less than 15 varieties........... 2 00
29 J9hird best, not less than 10 varieties .......... 1 00
30 Best bouquet of Ornamental Grasses for
parlor or mantle decoration........................... 1 00
l !OTE-All the exhibits of Fruit and ornamental plants
Snn cut flowers must have been grown by the exhibitor
; orJn his possession at least six months..
: Department C.-Pot Plants.
'Opea to Amateurs Only.'42#
;, JUDGES.
Messrs. W. B. Lipsey, Alachua county; C. J. Kenwyrthy,
1' Duval county; E. H. Hart, St. Johns county.
,1 ,Best six Roses, in pots and in bloom .......... 3 00
;2, *1 three Begonias.......... .........,...,.., 1 00,
3'3"' three Geraniums in bloom.................... 100
S4. *" three Cacti............................................... 1 00


, 5 three Ornamental Foliage Plants ........... 100'
6 three Ferns, distinct varieties ........... 1 00
7,'41 three Azaleas in bloom......... ........ 1 00
?. 8 0, three Camelias in bloom................ 1 00
:9 "', .three Pelargonium ilu bloom................. 1 00
10 "' three hanging baskets with plants ......... 2 90
11 three rustic vases with plants.................. 200
(NoTEi-All the articles referred to above must have
been in the possession of the exhibitor for at least one
month, and all exhibits except Nos. 10 and 11 must be
in flower pots. Exhibits will not be received or staged
unless this rule is complied with.)
12 Best twelve varieties of rose, cut blooms, one
of each variety................................................ 2 00
13 Best six. varieties of rose, cut blooms, one,,
bloom of each variety.................................... 100
14 Best three spikes of tube rose ....................... 1 00
15 collection of annual plants, cut blooms,
not less than six species ................................ 1 00
16 Best collection of perennial plants, cut
blooms.......................... 1 00
17,Bet, collection of perennial plants, cut
blboms, not legs than six species.............. 1 00'
18 Best bunch orange flowers .............................. 1 00
19 collection of wild flowers....................... 1 00
20" floral'design............. ......................... 2 00
21 "' basket of flowers....................................... 2 00
22' "'Mbat quet for the table ............................. 1 00
23'" d" Vet for hand ............................... 100
'24 bridglb6'h ueq t.......... ............................. 1 00
25' *'collection of native grasses, ornament-
S' ly arranged in vases or otherwise ......... 5 00

NbTH.-All the exhibits in this department Under the


head of cut flowers, with the exception of Nos. 19 and 25,
must be grown by the exhibitor. Prizes will be with-
held in every instance in which this rule is violated.
The word "Amateur shall mean persons who culti-
vate plants and flowers for pleasure, and no award will
be made in the Aqmateur's List to any person who
cultivates plants or flowers for sale.
NOTE.--NO exhibit in this department will be allowed
to enter into more than one combination, or in any way
compete for more than one premium.

Department D-Garden and Field
Products-
CAPT. Win. JAIMES, Diuval county, Supt. ..
W. H.. EBRING, Levy county, Asst. supt.
JUDGES.
D. Redmodnd, Duval county; James A. Harris, Marion
county; C. R. King, Columbia county.
1 Best market bale sea island cotton, grown in
F lorid ............................... ......................... 25 00
2 Best market bale short staple cotton........... 25 00
3 bushel rough rice (by weight)...................'20 00
4 corn in ear..................................... 5 00
5 bale Florida grown hay .. ......... '20 00
6 bale pea vine hay.................................I...... 1000
7 '" exhibit of Florida grown tobacco. 10 00
,8 fifty pounds Guinea Grass hay.......... 500
9 fifty pounds Para Grass hay........... .. 500
10 Second best............................ .. ....... 2 00
11 Best six- heads cabbage................................ 3 00
12 Second best.........................................:.. '.. '..... 2 00
13 Best six heads cauliflower...................... 2 00
14 Second best......1.................:..... 00
15 BeAt six heads lettuce ......................... 3 00
16 Second best........ .................... 2 00
'17 best six heads endive...................................... 200
18 Seco.nd best ......................................... ....... ... 1 00
19 Best six heads celery.................... ........... 3 00
20 Se iond best............................... ....... ...... 2 00
21 Best bunch parsley..............................:.. 1 00
22 p ck onions...................... ..... 2.... ........... 00
Second best.... ............................. ............ ...... 1 00
~B st dozen cucumbers............. ....... ...... 2 00
V.,5 second bests...... ...................................... 100
B26 Bst watermelons .......................................... 5 00
27 l bunch spinach........................ ................. 2 00
28 'peck okra,..... ........ ....................:............ 2 00
29 :t lf-peck tomatoes............................. 3 00
30 half-peck peas in pod................................. 2 00
31 e8660 best..... ........................ 1 00
32 Best ejk snap beans.................................... 2 00
33 cd id best............ ............ ........... ....... 1 00
34' half dozen squashes ................... 200
35 second best................................. .. .............. 1 00
36 Best ten staliksugar cane............'............... 5 00
37 Second best .: .............................: ... 5 00
38 Best half bushpl cow peas.... .............. 3 00
39 Second best..; ...................... 2................... ....... 2 00
440 Best dozen beets........................... ... ....... 3 00
41 bushel sweQt potatoes............................. 3 00
42 Second best.....:..V .. .................................. 2 00
43 Best peck peanut :........................................ 2 00
44 peck parsnips....................................... ..... 3 00
45 largest pumpkit4X .. .. .. ............... 2'00
46, ." bunch oradsh............................... 2 00
47 bunch asparagus..................................... 3 00
48 bushel Irshl potatoesb, ................:.;........... 3 00
49 Second best..........................'. .. .... ................ 2 00
50 Best bushel rye.. .................:........... / 3 00
61 bushel oats.. ....................... ..... ........... 5 00
,52 bushel wheat............ .................... I....... 3 00
53 half bushel turnips.................................... 2 00
54 half bushel rutabagas......................... 2 00
55 half0)whel qarrc ......... ..... 00
56 peck chufas................................................ 2 00
57 collection garden and fieldseeds.......Diploma
58 peck arrow-root......................... ....... 5
5 cassava root........................................ 500
60 peck of West India yams.......................... 200
61 peck ofJamaica yams......... ................. 2 00
2 lot of m usk melons. ................................... 500


Department E.-Table Luxuries.
MRS. J. PARKER. Duval County, Supt.
MRs. W. H. WILSON, Columbia County, Asst Supt.
JUDGES.
Mrs. S. A. Hartridge, Puval County; Mrs. Dr. J. D.
Mitchell, .Mrs. S. H. Ingrain, Orange County.
1 Best collection of bread by professional, di-
plom a and................................................ $5 00
2 cake by professional, diploma and...........
3 "' wheat bread by amateur.......................... 5"'0
4 corn bread, home-made........................".... 2 00
5 Graham bread, home-made.................... 200
6 sponge cake, home-made....... .............. : 2 00
. 7 fruit cake, home-made..... ...........". 2 00
: 8 jelly cake, home-made............................ 2 00
9 cocoanut cake, home-made.................... 2 00


10 collection cakes, home-made.......,....... 3 80
11 specimen plum jelly, home-made......u..... 1 00
12 specimen grape jelly, home-made.......... 109
,13 specimen orange jelly, homre-made......... 1 00
14 specimen strawberry jelly, home-made.. 1 00
15 specimen guava jelly, diploma and......... 3 00
16 specimen blackberry jam......................... 1 00
17 specimen orange marmalade, diploma
and ........................................................ .. 5 0
18 specimen preserved orange.................. 3 00
19 specimen preserved figs......................... 3 00
20 specimen preserved citron ....................... 3 00
21 specimen preserved ginger.................. 2 00
22 specimen preserved peaches...................... 1 00
23 specimen preserved strawberries............. 100
24 fpecimen preserved tomatoes................... 1 00
25 specimen preserved pine-apple................ 200
26 specimen preserved plums...................... 1 00
27 specimen preserved guava.................. 1 00
28 specimen preserved blackberries ............ 100
29 specimen preserved whortleberries ........ 100
30 specimen canned tomatoes...................... 1 00
31 specimen pickled oysters.............. .. 1 0
32 specimen pickled peaches................ 100
33" specimen pickled figs................................ 1 00
34 specimen pickled cucumbers.................... 1 00
35 specimen pickled onions........................ 1 00
36 specimen pickled okra............................... 1 00
37 specimen pickled cabbage palmetto...... 1 00
38 specimen dried figs.................................. 1 00
39 specimen dried blackberries.................... 1 00.
40" specimen dried peaches........................... 100
41 specimen dried persimmons..................... 1 00
42 specimen orange vinegar..................... 1 00


4 specimen home-made vinegar, any kind
4 specimen tomato catsup.........................
45 specimen Florida honey............ ......... .....
46 5 pounds home-made sugar.....................
4 .. gallon home-made syrup...........................
4 5 pounds arrow-root starch........................
45 5 pounds cassava starch....................... ...
5 5 pounds canna starch ...........................
5] 5 pounds comti starch..........................
5 5 pounds butter made In Florida..............
54 econ d best........................ ...........................


1 00
1 00
3 00
500
5 00
5 00
3 00
3 00
3 00
5 00
. 300


Department F--Native Wines.
C Ou F. L. DANCy, St. John's County, Supt.
A. L., EICH.ELBERGER, Marion County, Asst. Supt.
J UDGES.
,General J. J.. Finley, Columbia County; D.. H. Elliott,
Suwannee County; General F. ER. Spinner, Duval
SCounty. .. o .
Best collection of native wii,;' diploma and .. 10 00
Second bestq ..... ........................................ ... 5 00
Best white scuppernorig wine... .. ...... 3'0b
Second best............................ .............. ............ 2 00
SBest Flowers, Thomas or other wine ofscup- '
B s pernong fam ily............. ....2..................... 00
Best grape wine, pure juice, without sugar or
Se other addition.............. ..... ................. 2 00
Second best........................ .............. 1 00
Best native claret ......2............... .............. 2 00
Second best.............................. ...........1
1 Best sweet orange wine....... ...................... 2
1 ond best ....................... ...... ... ............... 00
J Best sour orange wine............ ............ .. 2 00
1 Second best.........: .................00
S Best spar lipgwn. .. ....., ............ ... 2.; 200
Second b t ........I ..............l... ........... ...... 1 00
1 Best blackberry wine..... ................ ...... 2 0
1 second best ............... ......... ..................... 00
1 Best orange btters......... ............... 2 00
1 second best..... ....... .. ............ .',. 00


Department G-Ladies' Handiwork.
MRS. SAM'L PAYNE, Dtu.v lCo8utty,Seupt.
Miss S. P. HARTRIDGE, Duval County, Asst. Supt.
JUDGES.
rs. Mary Ball, Mrs. Brown, Mrs. John Clark, Duval
S .. . .. 'C unty.' '
Best log-cabin quilt.............. ... ... ...... ... $200
Spatch-work quilt.............................. ......... 200
knit and crochet quilt......................2......... 200
w hite quilt................................................... 200
S worked quilt................................................ 200
white worked quilt.......... ........ .......... 200
S silk quilt..................................................... 2 00
Sheath r g........... . .., .. 100
Sfoot M ai.. .... ..... .. ................................. 1.00
1 ottoman cover.... ...... .... ....... 100
1 table cover. .... .... ......... ............. 100
1 fancy chair work with needles............. 1 00
S fancy chair cushion and back............................. 100
1 'croohet shtwl ........... 100 '
1 crochet tidy ................. .......................... ........ 1. 00
crochet tidy. ..... .. 1 00
1 lace cap ...1.................. .... ......I....... ...... 100
. 1 lamp statdmkts:.,'.......:....:: ........... 100
1 embroidered cloak (infant).. ..............' 100
+ < hamdkerchief.............:......... 100'
2 chenfle eihbtoidery..s .... ... ....... 100
' silk embroideryu............ 100
2 gold thread embroidery ............................. 100
Sembroidered sofa cushion.................. 100
2o100
2 tablesped..................... 100
.. . ai .. dore .ssr.f.g ..gown..................... ,10
"t pl of robe (la s) ..) .......1.::... 100
2 d re s ............ 1 00
3 clothes (child's). ....... 1 00
3 tattin colla ..:'... .. ..... ...... .......... 100
3 Berlin work ................ ...... ..... 100
S silk embrodey pitures.. ... ............... 100
3 worsted embroidery. .. ...........' 1 00
5 piano c veo.::..'. ....... ..:.... ... .. .. ... '.'. 1 00
3 child's afghan........................:.:; :.. ..... .... 1 00
3 child's afghano.......100
3 hair wreath... .................. 1 00
fancy hair work................ ......... 1 00
displayof f y knitor.:.......... 1 00
4 worked collar............... 00
4 embroidered c ady)................ 100
4 worked handkercliir.',,.' .... 1 00
4 knit cloak ..'. !.:....... . .......................... 1 00
4 group of artificial flowers... ............... ... 100
4 variety of a1iito eed flowrr..:......'..... 1 00
4 specimen of 'wax.loweri .:...:'..... .&;; 100

,4 largest variotyiof a f.tti ..:.:.'l'..:.... 000
5 ornamental needle' wb ... ....... 1 00
specimen cone wOrk! ,h,:;.''; ". ;'""'* 100
S ,/ leatwork ...................1.T .,,::EiT !:!7 ;:.. :*.. .. ( 1 00
flower work (Mast'Wi 'or' ...'.20.... ...0. 01 0
'( leather w ork ............... ..........'............. 1 00
,"' applique work; .1..';.''..' .......:,.,.... ....) 1 00
5 '" lace ........... '.......... ,.............. .. .......... 1 00
5 w orsted ppor s.......... 1.......'.'.... .............. 00
511 pillow sham s............... ......... .... . 1 00
'" ladies' untlergfrments....'..'....1... 100
.6 *ut-ned net-work for chair cover.............. 100
6 large.afgaMn' la~p obe:............................. 100
'" toilet-cushion and watoh-oaee............... 100
f raisedwos'tedcWork.4.........;.:.'.............. 100
Kensington needle-work or wreath......... 100
w ork ........:,.................,...;.. ..., ........... .... 3 00


61 lady'a patimetto hait ...... ................... 2 00
68 gent's palmetto hat........................................ 200
S" palmetto braid................................ 2 00
7(" palmetto fancy work any kind................. 1 90
7 spec a ork............... ... 2 00
7 specimen feather-wo. k.............................. 00
specimen tr.tmning' for 'ladies' wear,
made by exhibitor..... ............... 2 00


DeparltmntW M--Children's Work.
MtRS. IULIA. RUSSELL., Duval County, Supt.
"MRS. GEO. BRsIDjib; Nassau County, Asst. Supt.


_1-11-~1. T- I"I


_ _I___ __ __I~__~__ ___1 ___






94- THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Small Boys
Will be given premiums for the
39 B est k ite ..............................................................
40 The handsomest bird house..............................
41 Neatest bird cage, of any material..................
42 Best m odeled boat........................... ...........
43 drawing, of any kind..............................
44 top ...............................................................
45 toy whistle ................ ........... ......
46 hand-cart..................................................
47 w ind-m ill...................................................


Department I--Fine Arts.
WM. H. ASHMEAD, Duval County, Supt.
DR. W. S. BALDWIN, Duval County, Asst. Supt.
JUDGES.


50
50
50
50
50
50
50
100
100


Mrs. R. B. Van Valkenburg Duval County; Mrs. J. E.
Ingram, Orange County; Mrs. J. M. Schumacher, Du-
val County.
1 Best display of oil painting, diploma and ....... $10 00
2 specimen of oil painting, diploma and.... 500
3 display steel engraving, diplomaand....... 2 00
4 display chromos, diploma and ............. 200
5 display paintings in water colors by ex-
hibitor, diplom a and .............................. 5 00
6 crayon drawing, diploma and.............. 300
7 pencil drawing, diploma and ................. 300
8 specimen architectural and mechanical
drawing, by exhibitor, diploma and..... 5 00
9 specimen landscape plan drawing, by
exhibitor, diploma and ............... 3 00
10 specimen landscape painting, by exhib-
itor, diplom a and................................... 5 00
11 specimen landscape pencil drawing, by
exhibitor, diploma and......................... 300
12 specimen ornamental penmanship, by
exhibitor, diploma and....................... 2 00
13 specimen plain penmanship, by exhib-
itor, diplom a and.................................... 3 00
"14 specimen shell, bone and ivory carving,
diplom a and ........................................... 00
15 specimen cane or wood carving, diploma'
an d ..... ... ............................................ 2 00
16 collection Florida stereoscopic views......Diploma
17 collection Florida landscape views......... Diploma
18 collection colored photographs, any
style............ .............................................D iplom a
19 collection photographic portraits............Diploma
20 collection photographs enlarged..............Diploma
21 collection photographic groups.................Diploma
22 map drawing from copy, by a pupil of
any school, diploma and................... 3 00
23 map drawing from memory, by a pupil
of any school, diploma and.................... 300
24 display of stationary...........................Diploma
25 display of models, diploma and............... 300
26 cabinet of stuffed birds, reptiles and ani-
m als, diplom a and................................ 5 00
27 cabinet of insects, diploma and................ 500
28 cabinet of medals, diploma and............. 300
29 cabinet of minerals and crystals,diploma
and. ... ........................ 3 00
30 cabinet of curiosities, diploma and.......... 5 00
31 sign painting........................................ Diploma
32 oil painting, amateurs, diploma and ....... 500
33 water colors, amateurs, diploma and ...... 5 00
34 display of specimen job printing, di-
plom a and ................................................. 5 00
35 display of pamphlet and book printing,
diplom a and.............................................. 300
36 specimen of work in wax or clay statu-
ary.............................. 10 00


Department K--Manufactures.
R. N. ELLIS, Duval County, Supt.
D. H. BERRY, Leon County, Asst. Supt.
JUDGES.
T. Murphy, Duval County; Dr. R. H. McIlvaine, Levy
County; S. B. Hubbard, Duval County.
1 Best steam engine in Operation on grounds,
diplom a and ............................................ $2500
2 cotton gin in operation on the grounds,
diplom a and...... ................................ 2500


JUDGES.
Mrs. Stevens, Putnam County; Mrs. Noble A. Hull, Du-
val County; Mrs. J. S. Parker, Duval County.
1 Best perforated board cross.............................. $1 00
2 tidy.............................................................. 1 00
3 set of table m ats........ ............................ 1 00
4 specimens of tatting................................. 1 00
5 embroidered slippers............................... 1 00
6 w atch-case............................. 1 00
7 zephyr wreath........................................... 1 00
8 w orsted w ork.............................................. 1 00
9 monogram handkerchief........................... 100
10 plain apron most tastefully made............. 1 00
11 pair pin-cushions..................................... 1 00
12 palm etto work............................................ 100
13 shell fram e................................................ 1 00
14 needle w ork.. ............................................. 1 00
15 crochet collar.............................................. 1 00
16 drawing crayon....................................... 1 00
17 sample of cake........................................... 100
18 sample of breadn.......................................... 1 00
19 Handsomest piece of embroidery on best bris-
tol board..... ....................................... 50
20 Largest collection of pieces of work on perfo-
rated board ............................................. 1 00
21 Most neatly dressed doll.................................. .. 1 00
22 Best specimen of darning................................. 200
23 w all basket ...... ..................................... 50
24 specimen shell work................................. 100
25 six button holes.......................................... 1 00
26 specimen splint work............................... 1 00
27 work on canvas.......................................... 1 00
28 Handsomest book-mark.. .............................. 50
29 Best patch-work quilt..................................... 1 00
30 card-case and basket................................. .. 50
31 m ade dress................................................. 200

For Girls Under Nine Years of Age.
S32 Best table mat, of any material........................ 50
33 sample of patch-work............................. .. 50
34 sample of plain sewing of any kind......... 50
35 Handsomest pin-cushion..................................... 50
36 Best dressed doll............................................ 50
37 paper doll................ .............................. 50
38 splint w ork............... .............................. 50


6 Best brood mare, four years old or over...........
7 filly, three years old..............................
8 two years old.......... .....................
9 one year old.... ...............
10 colt, one year old............ .........................
LOT 2-ROADSTERS.


1000
5 00
3 00
2 00
200


(To be owned by exhibitor, action and style to be the test.)
11 Best pair roadsters............................................. 10 00
12 single horse or mare................................ .. 5 00
LOT 3-DRAFT HORSES.
(Test to be made on the ground.)
13 Best pair draft horses or mules.. ................ 10 00
14 single horse or mare................................... 5 00


LOT 4-SADDLE HORSES.
15 Best saddle horse or mare...............................
LOT 5-SWEE PSTAKES.
(Open to all.)
16 Best stallion, showing the best three colts,
one year old or under................... .............
17 brood mare, showing the best colt............


500



1000
500


LOT 6-MULES AND ASSES.
18 Best jack ofany age.......................................... 10 00
19 jennet of any age........................................ 500
20 pair mules any age................. ................... 500
21 Florida-raised mule.............................. 5 00
22 mule colt, Florida raised........................... 3 00
No animal can be entered but for one competition in
this list; an attempt to do so will forfeit all claims.


3 top-buggy, State manufacture, diploma
an d ............................................................ 10 00
4 open-buggy, State manufacture, diploma
and .......................................................... 5 00
5 spring-wagon, State manufacture, di-
plom a and ................................................ 5 09
6 sulky, State manufacture....................Diploma
7 two-horse wagon, State manufacture......Diploma
8 dump-cart, State manufacture, diploma
and........ 5 00
9 dray, State manufacture............................Diploma
10 display farm implements......................Diploma
11 display garden implements....... ..........Diploma
12 two-horse plow, State manufacture.........Diploma
13 one-horse plow, State manufacture.........Diploma
14 shovel plow, State manufacture...............Diploma
15 cultivator, State manufacture............... Diploma
16 harrow, State manufacture.....................Diploma
17 seed-drill, State manufacture........ .... Diploma
18 wheelbarrow, State manufacture............Diploma
19 single-harness, State manufacture............Diploma
20 double-harness, State manufacture.........Diploma
21 gents' saddle, State manufacture............Diploma
22 tinware, State manufacture...........Diploma
23 specimen drive well.........................Diploma
24 specimen pump......................... ...........Diploma
25 specimen wind-mill..............................Diploma
26 specimen sewing machine..........................Diploma
27 specimen evaporator........ ...... ..............Diploma
28 specimen sugar mill................................Diploma
29 and cheapest rice cleaner..........................Diploma
30 and cheapest fruit dryer...........................Diploma
31 display tailoring, State manufacture...... Diploma
32 display shoemaking, State manufacture.Diploma
33 .' pair boots, State manutacture.............Diploma
34 pair shoes, State manufacture..................Diploma
35 side of leather, home manufacture...........Diploma
36 calf skin home manufacture .................... Diploma
37 sheep skin..............................................Diploma
38 tanning material, State manufacture......Diploma
39 specimen cotton sewing thread, State
manufacture ...........................................Diplom a
40 display cotton fabrics, any kind, south-
ern manufacture.....................................Diploma
41 five pounds raw silk, Florida raised ........ 1000
42 peck silk cocoons, Florida raisedo............... 500
43 cabinet-work, State manufacture............Diploma
44 rustic work, State manufacture ...............Diploma
45 basket work, State manufacture..............Diploma
46 vegetable and fruit case, State manufac-
ture .......................................................Diplom a
47 bunch shingles, State manufacture.........Diploma
48 bunch staves, State manufacture...... Diploma
49 syrup cask State manufacturem... ........... Diploma
50 rope from bear grass, or State manufac-
ture of other fibres................................... 3 00
51 sisal hemp fibre, State manufacture....... 3 00
52 bear grass fibre, State manufacture......... 300
53 jute, State manufacture..........................$ 500
54 paper-making materials, State manufac-
tu re ............................................................ 5 00
55 blacksmithing, State manufacture .........Diploma
56 ox-yoke and bow, State manufacture ...... 200
57 glue, State manufacture............................. 2 00
58" indigo, State manufactureo......................... 200
59 stump extractor, State manufacture,
dip" lom a and.. ...... ....... ....................... 5 00
60 rice huller, Florida nvention..................... 10 00
61 rice mill, Florida invention........................ 10 00
NoTE.-Any article In this department competing for
a single prize, cannot enter into a combination for an-
other premium.


Department M-Horses and Mules.
J. H. MCGINNIS. Duval County, Supt.
M. A. KNIGHT, Clay County, Asst. Supt.
JUDGES.
Col. A. G. Morgan, Clay County; Geo. R. Bennett, Du-
val County; Dr. Mclntry. Alachua County.
To obtain any of the following premiums there must
be competition between two or more counties, and all
exhibits must be on the ground by the close of the sec-
ond day of the Fair, and remain uninterruptedly until
the close of the Fair. No entry or record will be made
under any other circumstances.
LOT 1-THOROUGHBREDS.
(Pedigree to be presented to the Secretary when the entry is
made.)
STALLIONS.
1 Best stallion, four years old and over........... $15 00
2 stallion, three years old.......................... 10 00
3 two years old............................. 5 00
4 one year old..... ................. 3 00
5 colt, one year old..................................... 2 00
MARES.


Competitors for the best display of Poultry will not be
allowed premiums for trios embraced in the collection.
Under No. 15 any variety of the game fowl other than
"Shawl Necks" and "Black Breasted Reds" may be ex-
hibited. No premiums will be awarded to fowls exhib-
ited in pairs unless specially recommended by the
judges. The judges will not be required to conform to
the rules laid down in the "Standard of Excellence."

Department P-Miscellaneous.
Gen. Wi. BAYA, Supt.
H. A. L'ENGLE, Asst. Supt.
JUDGES.
Gen. J. E. Yonge, Leon county, Capt. S. Pasco, Jefferson
county, F. P. Fleming, Duval county.
(All articles not enumerated elsewhere may be exhibited in
this Department.)
EXPERTS.
1 Best drilled Infantry Company, diploma and 50 00
Second best.................. ................................ 25 00
2 Best drilled Soldier................................Gold Medal
3 drilled Officer................. .................. Gold Medal
4 equipped Comp'y, Tournament Knights
six or m ore............................................... 100 00
Second best ... ............................. 75 00
Third best..... ........................... 50 00
5 Best drilled Artillery Company................ 50 00
Second best..................................................... 25 00


I I_


I


r


Department N--Cattle, Hogs, Sheep, Goats.
E. W. GILLEN, Duval County, Supt.
W. L. IRVANE, Suwannee County, Asst. Supt.
JUDGES.
John W. Rice, Suwannee County; Sam. C. Tucker,
Alachua County; John Sauls, Volusia County.
To obtain any of the following premiums there must
be competition between two or more counties, and all
exhibits must be on the ground by the close of the sec-
ond day of the Fair, and remain uninterruptedly until
the close of the Fair. No entry or record will be made
under any other ci-cumstances.
CATTLE.
1 Best Devon bull, diploma and.......................... $2000
2 Devon cow, diploma and.......................... 1000
3 Alderney bull, diploma and...................... 2000
4 Alderney cow, diploma and .................. 1000
5 Jersey bull, diploma and........................ 1000
6 Jersey cow, diploma and.......................... 500
7 Ayreshire bull, diplom aand..................... 1000
8 Ayreshire cow, diploma and.................... 500
9 Native bull, diploma and....................... 1000
10 Native cow, diploma and......................... 500
11 Native calf, diplomaand........................... 3... 00
12 Native fat steer, diploma and............... 500
13 Milch cow, same breed, diploma and ...... 10 00
14 Guinea bull, diploma and...................... 5 00
15 Guinea cow, diploma and........................ 300
SHEEP.
16 Best Merino buck, diploma and.................... 5 00
17 Merino ewe, diploma and......................... 300
18 Southdown buck, diploma and................... 500
19 Southdown ewe, diplomaand .................. 300
20 Cotswold buck, diploma and........... ........ 500
21 Cotswold ewe, diploma and.................. 300
22 Native buck, diploma and....................... 300
23 Native ewe, diploma and........................ 200
GOATS.
21 Best Cashmere buck, diploma and................ 5 00
25 Cashmere ewe, diploma and................... 3 00
26 Native buck, diploma and..................... 300
27 Native ewe, diploma and..................... 200
28 Herd of deer, two or more, diploma and.. 500
SWINE.
29 Best Berkshire boar, diploma and.................. 500
30 Berkshire sow, diploma and..................... 300
31 ssex boar, diploma and .................. 500
32 Essex sow, diploma and............................. 300
33 Suffolk boar, diploma and...................... 500
34 Suffolk sow, diploma and ........................ 300
35 Chester white boar, diploma and............ 5 00
36 Chester white sow, diploma and........... 3 00
37 Poland China boar, diploma and........... 500
38 Poland China sow, diploma and...... .... 300
39 Jersey red boar, diplomaand.................. 500
40 Jersey red sow, diploma and................. 3 00
41 Red Berkshire boar, diploma and........... 5 00
42 Red Berkshire sow, diploma and............. 300
43 Sow and pigs of any breed........................ 500
44 Lot of hogs, all ages and breeds combined
owned by exhibitorsi...................... 1000
45 Largest and fattest hog, any breed........... 1000


Department 0-Poultry.
G. W. DAVIS. Duval county, Supt.
M. R. COOPER, St: John's county, Asst. Supt.
JUDGES.
D. Redmond, G. W. Davis, M. Hearn, Duval County.
1 Best collection poultry, diploma and.............. $1000
2 trio light Brahmas ................................... 200
3 dark Brahmas.......................................... 2200
4 buff Cochins........... ................................. 2 00
5 partridge Cochins .................................... 200
6 black Cochins........................................ 200
7 white Cochins...... 200
8 black Javas............................................... 200
9 white Leghorns.................................. 200
10 brown Leghorns...................... ............. 200
11 black Spanish. .................................... 2 00
12 H oudans...... ............ ............. 200
13 shawl neck games............... 200
14 black breasted red games........................... 200
15 G am es ........... ............................................ 200
16 Plym outh Rocks......................................... 200
17 White, Golden or Silver Hamburgs... 200
18 silver spangled Polish................ ... 200
19 golden spangled Polish.......................... 200
20 D orkings ..................................................... 200
21 D om iniques................................................ 200
22 Bantams (any variety).............................. 200
23 Rouen ducks........................ 200
24 Cayuga ducks............................................. 200
2.5 Pekinducks......... .................... 200
26 Muscovy ducks.................. 2 0
27 Toulouse geese......................................... 200
28 white China geese...................................... 2 00
29 Bronze Turkeys..................... 200
80 Peafow ls...........................................20.......... 2 0
32 exhibition coop (home-made).........- 200


I


I


I





TI F LO ID ; A T PAC 1. o
RaIL T.n. f $, '1 '0 Those of our subscribers receiving two
6 I~Mt ibeBte ade'yi? teriiof live'tf en at of T.-E
,, ,, : 9 ....... ,.4 .. ............, copies of THE DIPArTCH thif week will con-
.;a aleB oMiAB' aatndt:rtn i i OkeechobZe Lands, fer a fa~von the publishes .y bandajig it to
li 2ie drey'ding fair ee o ODE', MitEE O., FLA., } a neighbor or sending it to those interested in
S ,. .. 27, 1882. Flbridaor ..-ltalaffairs:
Diw tler Prei ns. Editors of The florid Dispatch:
TrP"g i ar rutuW h I truSt the article in your. issue o' te 13th PLYOH ROCK1 Ax DoMNqui !-
eIoq o tne g.~~Xlr ipnt, will be read in every State in the Union Our next number will contain a very intrest-
S... .viz:. 4"Homes in minylorida"l' There is ,a in aceotnt of,.the orin f prved
WL.S.P. A.,Dee. 7, ~S2. slight mistake, however, ; neiart of said omini r queor e-Co mbedIok,
A. .^,article. .F ridaI tah ad ro. ent from the pen of that veqra breeder 9~ne
Coman y ofrfesits nda ,ti C o at$1, per fowler, Col. Sarn RowEY .of Mothid ity,
e re, and to the act eWt4r, at $1E ,pri. acre. K . ,. : .._.
;L U!The writer of the article under ddisssion
MET2E#Id6BMIAL RiSPORT h"a not done jaiticeto their ftilitiestlrered to
ov io .. : tr.' veler b the 0pnitg "; 'the Lake
SOkeechonbee. Ie havetee arinn ow
bee. Ja eso .ie wholesae .P ...
IromnF Poit 4)gd06n o1h.PePao' ,Ored'n.iver ., 'Reto ~ ",
through Chailotte Harba, ay CptiltPais .... ..i..... 1.. ......
via PI v t as os.ecti. ...... ... ...h.....a.. .. --.v..,
])PAT&. Keys am&rbKey West rbpwekif P 3'" eis PoloM .
o up to Fort Mye .. aIi f p he Loa ...... .............
..'!lo osahatchee River tow Ods ()keeehobee as Ow E,,
. .... ........Choi.e............... .......h.'.,
______ a .ll steamer can-go. This. is a beautiful ctoice.. ...............:
SI .7 r r for ti l iktitf ld 1I t seekers. The J......... ...... ....................
*1..".... ,7o and top1?vQment Company has ebe ...................................
'.t H&R200 r.d, ., 0st. t m parket- on Maracaibo............ ...... 18
Thu ....y... .u e k"ivper, nort o ort Ogden as Any of above grades roasted to order

.... w.M .8p Obrer ..A. teare coming up r rver o............. ...... o
Friday 8... 30.44 48 41.7 68.0 0.00 N 8 Cloudy. norIn0,oor ]a as Fzum-SnowfDrop, beet, w.
on 'mail boatsrb, paooner loo (N.A.patent..... ons................. .7 50
Higest eromer .1 loet .. the tideinthafirs of
oo ?A .n t s, b uld Poe riin the ln in s Pearl best ............... ...........


Sobervti w.- n rr dailo nmail boats, shhooners, slo s, e Sons) 1....................
tve slam .,li .. vea decripking e bestf.n kind of "-Srmp lb boxe .. .. ............. ...... ........ '
Ke an ab bascbn, 882. a' l e la ioa o n ve any no Ainfprmation '
=. , ; o. ..... : .. .. n1 0loc lit h 'i efh iiclose ,14 -% stekegt (Oh see)..
Aftderaatbrrou7ea. for c fbr 2' he shoIg'tie sined," I has11e'thefi tiUbeHalf
6 ..t.. m e oirr8A.a- olfh e .
Monthly mean teompentu, 61.1. P etceo. Crk vi4'.. ;~A g afterr im vin ToBACCO-Smokin "te urha
ath me d crr' te. form ioofm he give',to 'd e i," 'ie "'''h 5e )
PrevalingiWnd t of dtor mied r0t ieth'ree 'the readers of THE I PATCH. 1'. . Sitting (gebui ne ) w. ... .......:.. a
Stetegraphi observations, north nd Wo'rchea e,' '"Will any of yoaIdeerw .be goold enough to 't Ie11- oi, r.. 45
... le Dti .s eryconp s '. jf AW.A "g111 a 'I "el. aiy80 r be goo hou n0 li i'i 30
givewadeFRErlpt e best kind 'of "Srumph "t" a o.
Sgna C A. ve a des ip o e ..... ..:........................ .

SPrevailingwind directin,taheatt COMPA nArtV HMi'RTiir ""' ...' '' 'OH "ROO. 're.. ..s uler b n 4 ..o.i ...H, 2
1871, 71.6. 1872, 57.8; 1873, 0.80;,1874, 710.1; 1875, 13a ''; 'l 7. d -^ .! 'ur x," ove Jtsy SioSS r . W00
16.6"0"; 1877, 9.6; 1878, 69.10; 1879, 89.2; 1880, 72.8.. 1881,72S.OAP: AND W e' "or'ia "' eoy0^ (w'tpSt g .)1 ..: -.0-
188teo7.10. wj. '. Tcoisvr Dfe cembe norhr 6th, 1882. a SnrARC-Colbtg's 8 g., ter boB.." ,
egenS g, nal.j, ., A .." Messr.".,oY., soei e Well Peerless 8ox04 per Pow....- 350
See wrtc. Ppleidw' 'T.' FLORIDA DtPAreH, for Hops, ger.r k .-.
AveSAe sbarometrfofr moth.1 r whick 'lasttit 'shoft'time .since,, I 1have 'Grant's.lme ]Baksl#.. nder, oit .
Averst temperture for montbSO0. ..o.wn. """" i "ends, wh0,upon reading, ,'do 13................. .. '
Averae temperature ofParmesg da ,, "that ,so .e, ad 'oya ...^"''c 15 0
JlAverage tomeratUttto o. dlgt' eiifco.p pei..'?; !'i nM ~i0ono'. a wag te be had hi your oyS. -faking tof ir..'f' >(2 0
Highest temperature of w ..... -' t.oxr ..
Totlrainfal formontl4~e. .' *' state. Fowftmrha handedmv ae teeitrb a.kiinwd owStumprl, d.
Prevailingdirection of wtnd for mn o tir'my nth`1 noear.s pAbs B' nh ,;rke, ior.ruk -:, ..." t ..
.na' w (ind C 1t ir ge n h ,whi&s l.,eerewithe.&holoe ryon. (I rtn-. .....,rf ...,
; r .... .... ,. :,:- .... ,I,- ) ..... ,, A.. 'aikIr the piper .lla 1stoihv iabie'ui l al .who6 T', '.flD'Pji''ro'4 l..... ....' .. n,, _

and this is theway.t!e naa 1' armw speaks itgfrujt and' 'le pro.uctidoa.', ;';' 'S.l, a W i v- ;I. ,36
0;*of ofur .'earthly ,6-0;; ,aradse":; ,18 ,"" . .. estl i ., ., .:Oi, Wr Wdsi.l " .gU@g a


" W e like Flor we be ter ..... : ,' ',0
and while web r64 ite )ili*AlWn 1r882. t AA
ocessio hil,1%tt -r b p naer of ,oxeo I* N IH,,toveinber 27, 1882.: .'........5
0oeeasionil tttelr un Ft6ridt abooi'aat' s of S? .27, WA.8 pe' "t i ..".......i'..." ,
general iateest,iwe do nsaihankerafte letters .Aito*f _'Fia : ilrlb ....
theatre, ly,adveertisei "A I amhinking ti0fi n h r As I 4t.l Plorida, I 'l4'f'. r -i
ful land,.ocroqdiles nylw fer,, writAn '. i ir particars of' ,'
to call away snsas peore fom the best place and thepricd ii h dw,6 4', Or anbadti ,
in'lteioAan 'theI pric;b h" ,Il.,.,i ...W
inthe wd. t tc. 'Ao about soldes iing places arid OD
" Howevr, 'for the infortaiialon ,ofi ,or if th.a re any, god' take. o s
reader who desire reliable .and truthful Tours tr-ly," .' T' P.c.
information,1 en tthoulh it be iptersd, ..-It Ago .'"I er di t to repy to ''iime i
Florida, the may obta it by addressn W,. .. . ... f:tB .oiir a teylm en uti b. oddr vaguenquiries like thefoegoiag. If ur o ~eore.
respondentseriously interidcksetting i.0 0Flor Pboridaw ;0 .00 er 'MP
,. ..i~s!R thtv
'LOtIDA ed w eral ",hemust oe'andlook up the "ei. r
ad.very eeoorageous grape letter of D s8. proved places," andtek he terIm or hiA- 'e. OEN aesiente. u.
CaE, E, from South Lake Weir, just ,: "'
below latitude 29 degrees. The letter tells its "YANKEE FARMER" and other communiea- pe~a wgram-o The Florua .paieh
our story, and needs no comment. tions of interest in our next. Rtromm,0 to4 .O per box. C.D. OWEN5.g





one large turipip e ..e large Ioe ojiT head of
celery, four large -carrots, three sliced tomatoes,
7 a quarter of a ay. leaf, three or four cloves
stuck into a carrotor turnip ,'ip while ppeper-
corns, and as much more ground as is liked,
three allspice W.s .sj ,fij Lgood sized
bunch of parsleyiud chevritied together. We
fihd d. ple "df ialf'; liver Mnd "a resh young
a'gibge i i Ve W U l11 1 .41 aDter
oftftte.W.hen boiling,, si: yl a
take the pot f thfire ,ai g placingg it q ete at the
edge so as merely tQ Oinp'er gently-or, 'b the
French call it, to smile--for six hours at least.
The great art of'" k l g th! krt- of,#ple
broth is never to let the1 fireigo ttn too 'mach,
n6r to all6 tti AfilP to tioil too fast, so as not
to require filling up ,ith other water to re-
place what has been consumed-or, rather,
wasted-by too rapid ebullition. Half an hour
before 'you require your soup take it off the fire


t


WEAIlthi NATURAL FLOWERS ".
A Florist Tells how to do it Without Soil g9
the- Dress.
A 'St/? otii florist 'says':. Probably more
- ladies would. wear natural flowers if they kntw
; h9w,;tq,x AxheI oi othe, co"g, or b1t without
t e m te, '
.bw'9satigt he !dories ? .. o .....
:U'EAsily teifoghylwherehEsayhish a back-
ground of fern or smilax, neither of whieo.lis
moist. Roses, carnations and the bouvardia,
that spiked flower .that looks like jessamine,
never stain. Any o'r all' of these, placed on
smilax, for instance, the ends wrapped in tin-
foil, could ,i. worn with safety, though .a soft
handkerchief might p'be playedd' "beneath fort
protection. If the spraysahould .be. it' all
amp, laying it on white niigl ed paper
awhile will soon absorb the moisture. Corsage
'bouquets are placed with 'tli'.. pint, down.
SWith'a little care those flowers could be worn!
on any dress. saw dozens of' ladies at a ball
Who had been presented boxes' 6fthe;most ex-
pensive flowers, but they wore. not a single bud'
to show for it." ... ; ,, ,
"Why don't you, introduce the"'European
custom of using bright 'ol6red' flowers for
.fUnerals?" ;
S"We are trying to. New York.ha alvady
adopted it, but there arie few St. Loiis people
who approve of it so far. The practice 6of
sending flowers to funerals is mu.c imivreased.
The pieces don't cost 'a fitiucl'ithey .i0ed to,
Which probably accounts for it."
Waste-TEconioTy-Sotps-Meat. &c.
Says a lady in oxid q i i: "Having
lived a grext. part f my ''fe abroad in coun-
tries renowned for good living, and having
looked on' in amazement 'at the enormous
amount of.waste permitted in our English
households, Ie.sd,a recipe :in use in my own
hbuse, where-we seldom 'buy meat on purpose
for soup more than once a week, although we
edt it every day. 'Have the bones of any freshly
roasted meat-beef, veal, pork, venison, mutton
or lamb-broken up into 1rgish pieces. he
first four sorts -may be mixed with advantage,
while matton aii a iamb are better alone. Add
the carcasses ,oremainin limbs of tiny roast
poultry--.ucks, '-owls, pi eons geese, turkey,
or game, and tlie fresh lieri gizzards, necks
and combs of any poultry you hi Wpet to be
going to cook the. same daya'iit d a slice of
Ien ham if you have it. 'Put allttoja r
in an earthe ou1 paniltiat will stand the Oe
aid will hold on ttid A:dr c0a1dter thani
you require for your soup to. allow for the loss
in boiling; fill with water, iand piace on abrisk
fife till it boil". Then add salt"(leas quality
if there be ham in the soup), one large onion,


I WJQ .,J LV, 0 9. ., -yVU-., ,V-L% -.. -^ , ^. + 7- --.
lh6dSiB6x, 'se- ii ngfbr Wa' af awelf-"AS6 all'
litteithings of greato1value. -'," I' -
I .if there ate children: in the household this
.4teption to, ppearaees wil1,pe rorei igflw.
ence than many are aware of. The little ope
required to hve clean anS ana smo 'hair
before sitting down to a meal is not' eiy apt'to
grow up a man or woman careless of personal
neatness. This attention to, small things is
riot an evidence of mental smallness. A


,, The work of ti -od-TIwsipq4 an. orange
tr&e root, iidemstuetive, and.smecond only. 'o
gatiuseet min ithpotttti & feat iitin AfT e
Oln^' to be ctasiindd e tiind r
maker of treatment to trees "t, i,, -uys
theminon-woklgig.,: I.AIave, seeni .t ,NrWaged
y '4hm where'perctly dlad& cultivabtIathxas
;bln ob 'bs '1014 4tbvtea v 'ifflo d
inwoo 60d irownr r l
were unmolested, "and aain e p
would be the case. ;Mick, manure and dqcay-
ilev W iatlbi ^ ia; 446d8ahla & t `I jaar-
bors i I e. I 'hate" obrvld the- toltgr gTbtd
and., iwkig gnost vigorously, in >ipea -xis,
buried about the tree, over which Jime ,has
been plentifully scattered pnd where the
ground was free from trash. Wood ashes are


I It '*. I . 1. ' ND; ISIPT~.~~~~~~~_~


I


and strain hr.ujh :a .:oinader, thn through a
fine sieve, aid put it on a brick fire. Whenp
quite boiling .d^ ta #,~go, vermicelli or'
semolina, scattering it in lightly and.allowing
one.tablespopnful, foz each person. Rice may
also be used, but it recwiresa fullhajfhqsr.4and
consumes more brt. "We use this broth' as a
'fcundittioh fodr every kind 6f vege fibT4$i4rees
as rbll as others. Of 6ourie,'as regards eeon-
;omy, muith must depend, upon whether one'has
a kitchen garden or can, have vegetables, at a
low price, for no soups good without gopod
many; 'and' I presume one does not want the
^tsisteess, unseas'ied!p odi t liich is iMally
called broth: Some people like' so 6p' slightly
'colored, which is easily done by adding a avill
pieeWif theearamelesold for that purpose, when
the'yegetables are put in.. The principal diffi-
culty in English kitchens is the, difficulty of
regulatigg the heat bof4he ire;i so thAt it, isnot
by I a means.; easy to'makb good stwa, magoutts
o, .soups, which all pqore, -mild pde .s .of'
boiling, wherea's-ir eoo. arei accustomed -!to
Jet everything boil fiuY-gAllop, which eniirrly
spoils all sunh dishes. : ; -,-.
...'**; ." ,k "2 -. -, "
'I A 'little boy 'was vptyifi' arouuild to It 1e
et fo" dinner; busily ari'Mgig devh pos
wiP 6I id .h taken ..from, h .Ae-.oaid.
'IfNh is that for nqu"ired jl 6',"
said the little i fellow;. in, a4d etic tone,
"just for look@." ' .'. '*" -' ., ,
'There was at idea in Thf t Ildi' n an
element .which, if pro.py d"; cted, pould
.grow into something .j calculated .to give,
pleasure- to himself 4nuaothers. There. often
appears in indiv dua stand even mi sOme- wile
'coilhfiuniities, particu t rru Ia nes, seemifhg
contempt for any im~Vpment put forward
-just for looks." .,,,. .
City regulations provide 6i. the -removal of
garbdge,- and compel householders t6 be' careful
as to unsightly objects on tli, premises; but" in
villages and agricultural disriets these matters
are not so closely '1&4el -r by boards and
corporations.. The houseber, who 'just for
loo k is carful obut O m 1 opsim ,the
,baqk yar4, and 'die vaqi y4 o.4a,ap4 nds
whichh accunpulate about ~the; premises,; is ,not
only instituting neatness and qrder, peasant to
the eye,'but d6ing agood wfk tforsthe healthh
of her own home and neighborhood., ..-
... Within doors4 I would advocate iy, .little
things, for whose doing we ,a. giveino notte
,#asoB than- ,i just for 'looks.".'- &uy l"A1e
management maea' the table ;.lea!eantto'Athe
eye'; tot merely a- place at whickAw&fgiathed 'to
eat. Expensive adornments are riro4 e seainlt.
It require n' reore time to .t. dishp straightt


I


sense of order, iai cQd'fyitiOQWof the m~qioy of \
'clh iUiness, a nice deveopnmentf- ote,. may p
notbe liven, in the sa' ed egree. ao.Aech one,
'bt,.in autifying outaiomh ,-'i~g, due
regard to the adornment of our persons, in
seeking O yrpus qyvhich often
rove ameotaies of:.l-e,'t weI actmipoc,' no
te ciptt let NO, ':i
LUCY R ANDOLPH BtiEXXinO" m 'A"ffWan
Agriculturist for Dece4.ier.
THE VALU ,O OPo AP.Ds,-r-John ,Wal-
lace,, a sfibtantial farmer who lives in New-
bury County, close'to the Laurens tlirqe, came
to thitdity yepte with .i. 'v1 f cot-
ton, which he sold-at siich am advance 'dver the,
prices be.o n ha pti~g ~ mmsw home, as
to pqy him for his h~bl of over forty miles.
He 6-f;id. Was d t* ,ell'% @d ith1 i result,
stffd pfid6i itd tb ipedtt tre'3iMnt.
diutr t ffw pr' fitble tliought in
ti I Cent e ne dfedircti'on fom it is, that
bij :lour rweis we:.goed' wk *ill have trade
fro Veyiywer. e ''witfin-three b1ays"jbturney.
If ot rods aF betterw tlih lse leading to
Spahitabifirg, Lmaurns 6r6'Ahrson, we will re-
oirve much cotton that would to thoetatowns.
T^ nimp ovdioh ~$h4f no mesh,{' Us-
and*sf dollaW o dditienaI tae n-
vil)(-- Grenveile lVewa ,, :


.How .tP lat Trw.
Deep planting is one -error.i To plant a tree
'rathbtshalloWer that 'it'fd Zr .. id l-
ly the right way, whilst many plant a tree as
they would a post. Roots a.e';of' ZW' 14d4 --
the young and ,tende''--rootetseo en-
tirely of cells, the feeders of, e.,fie 41Weays
found near the surface, 'tti-g air dli 'tiois-
ture, and roots of over one year old;, which
serve only as supporters of the trees and as
conductors of its food. Hence the injury that
ensues when t-he deicate iroolets are so deeply
buried in eartj. 'la'clng :frh r 'r.: gree,i 'rpa-
nure in contact with the young. roots is another
great error. The place to put manure is on
the l'irface, where the elements disintegrate,
dissolve and carry it downward. Numerous
forms of fungi are generated and reproduced
by tl t p4,14ptio 9fsal1~ manure directly to
the roots, and they.immediately attack, the
tree. It is pery;wl',:4U ,tdh 'tis :.'il at
transplantiw t-he tree, but the minftire,if tp be
in contact with or very near thei roots,.. should
bd thoroughly dpcbyiosed., ;' '; : j
w6 i: e n: tethe Oran eoyreth tIim,
W: C: N., on Palatka Journal writes:
What causes the white ant or wo9d-louae to
A.'L,4A qV :,. '."' ;1<'',aV best ".,/1 .
Work on orange tre nd wht is te best
method for getting rip tm ?are qiuestiinss
very frequently asked, an' "wth, the rapid
pcqese of groe eyre,. mporoant pOes.


1J


than crooked. .
Not only' does, atteritioni tooutide appear-
ances beautify the home, but it pays ad well.
The painted.fege a ?ogt an incploqur w4k ,st
logr-tau an unpainted one. Th.gaeging


I






TH FLO ID DIP T H .597-------- --- ------ -----


'I


I


I


THE WOES OF COTTON PLANTERS.--Just
about the time the farmer begins to get his cot-
ton crop into market that he has toiled so hard
"tb make, paying exhorbitant prices and meat
and money to make it with, it begins to tum-
ble in price. .It must go, however-no help
for it., The poorer, the man the more surely it
must go, and prices drop, drop, 4(-op down, un-
til all the poor man's cotton is gone, and it gets
into the hands of the speculator and then it
goes up. This is indeed disheartening; but
how can it be avoided ? There is no way to
avoid it unless the strong will help the weak,
that is, unless the well-to-do farmer will have
some sympathy with his poorer bother and the
farming' cla* will combine, the rich giving
credit to the poor, so as to enable them to get
supplies at living rates. Nothing can be done
for the shiftless, the indolent, or the drunkard,
but a great deal can be done for the indus-
trious, the energetic, the economical. The farm-
'rs must, be united; it is more necessary for
them than for any other class. They must
workk together and help each other. Combina-
tion is the only thing that will benefit them.
If such a state of affairs were brought' about,
tihy would sopn become perfectly independent
as aclas.-- West Point (Miss.) Farm and Stock
.eporter.
She Cassaya.
dirTs of he F4nfda Dispatch :
WiJu you, through the columns of THE
FLORIDA DISPATCH, please give me some in-
formation relative to the propagation and cul-


you will starve to death. I said, "I won't," and
ain't dead yet. I didn't try the hogs-had
enough of them from my neighbors.. As to
smothering-that can't be done.
A piece of heavy palmetto land that I have
had cleared this fall was so dense and thick
that it was almost impossible for any one to go
through it, and nothing that I could see, ex-
cept a few wild grape vines, grew out of it, but
in about a month after grubbing it, I was pleased
to see a beautiful crop of Nut Grass spring up
all over it very rankly. I say pleased, advis-
edly, for in working my grove I have come to
the conclusion that it is a very good thing to
have in an orange grove. It looks badly, anid
makes one cultivate often, which, on my land,
seems to be necessary, and at each working*


not at all repulsive 'to them. A neighbor
ence scattered ashes close about the trees, and
coming in contact with bark at the dollar, for
.the benefit of his grove as he supposed, but
the result was a vigorous attack and a great
deal of daniage done to trees thus treated.
Both sweet and sour are alike affected; but in
my own 6kperience sweet stock has been the
.most eaten'. In a grove of 400 trees set
promiscuously to sweet and sour stocks, of
which no fewer than twenty-five have been
eaten, and this to, with but four exceptions,
'his been done to sweet trees. In the case of
the neighbor above referred to, the stock were
..There is.but one way of "coming up" with
tLiese ravages, that by keeping constant watch
of every tree in thi grove, and their presence
will be easily detected. The ,sap oozing from
the wound cakes or forms a oaeust, of earth
about the collar of the tree. They; commence
work just below the surface, working down,
destroying and barking the main stem and
rdots, perforating and destroying the tap roots,
which causes the tree to droop. Leaves turn
yellow, and finally, unless early found, and
a good opportunity for resuscitation, die. To
destroy the ants the earth should be entirely
removed from the affected parts; dust liBerally
with pyrethrum-a small powder gun will be
found most convenient for dusting. The
extreme nakedness of the ant renders the
application very effective, and their distorted
forms will soon be seen after the application
has been made.
CALIFORNIA PEACHES.-The Riverside
(Cal,) Press says: Heretofore we have been
compelled to allow other localities to publish
reports of the largest peaches, but now James
Bettner brings to this office fourteen Salway
peaches that weigh 10 pounds 11 ounces-an
average weight of 121 ounces. The largest
peach in the lot weighed 14f ounces. These
were the finest lot of large peaches ever
brought to this office, and we think we may
challenge the coast to produce their equal.


ture of the Cassava root; and, also, if it is a
paying crop ? and oblige, yours truly, L.
REPLY.-The Cassava is propagated, like
sugar-cane, by pieces of the stem. It is sup-
posed to grow best on land of moderate fer-
tility; but the finest crop we ever raised, was
on rich land, well manured. There is something
of a "boom" on Cassava, at the new town oj
Taveres, in Orange County, where a mill has
been, or is soon to be erected for converting the
root into starch. It is said to pay well to raise
it for that purpose.-EDs.

"W.R. Fulford pranced into our sanctum
the other day, bringing a huge cassava root.
It was seven inches in circumference and
weighed 51 pounds.
"It was grown by Mr. Fulford without any
extra care, and shows what can be done in
Suwannee. Can it be beat anywhere in the
State ?'--Live Oak Bulletin.
Compared with the specimens of cdssava
grown here the above is small. We saw at
Sinclair's starch mill a root eleven feet long,
seven inches in diameter; and which weighed
over fifty pounds. It grew on the Mathes
place, south of Lake Maitland. It is no un-
usual thing to grow roots weighing twenty
pounds without fertilizer. Still as a profitable
crop to use on the farm, roots the size of that
grown by Mr. Fulford are preferable to larger
ones.- Tavares Herald.
Nut Grass-Again.
GEORGETOWN, FLORIDA, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
I see in THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, of No-
vember 13th, an article on "Nut Grass-to De-
stroy," which, after all, does not tell how to do
it.
I bought my place six years ago this month.
It was an old field, and I knew nothing of the
existence of Nut Grass. But one fine morning,
late in the following spring, I saw something
growing up All over my newly-ploughed and
planted grove; it was about as even, and as
thrify as a good field of newly-sprouted wheat,
and on my enquiring what it was, got a good
deal laughed at by those who knew all about
it, and thought. when I bought I was badly
sold. Much advice, too, I got with the laugh-
ter. "Take up your land and sift it" said one.
Another, "get a lot of hogs and root it all out"-
they had been doing that for several years pre-
viously-until the land was all hills and pits.
"Plant cow peas, and smother it out," said a
third, while one old man from Georgia very
confidentially told me he had a plan whereby
I could certainly get rid of it. It was this :
"Run away from your land, for if you don't,


BARRELS, NOT HOGSHEADs.-The Louisiana
Sugar Bowl, says :"We give precedence to
sugaE* barrels, for rapidly the antiquated hogs-
head is being disposed of by the neater barrel
package. Those who make clarified sugars
employ more and more barrels annually, to
supply the increasing demand, and sugars so
shipped usually bring from a half cent to a cent
more per pound.


there is a good deal of vegetable matter to work
into the land. I am sure that my land is much
improved in quality since I bought it-not
from bought fertilizer, but from the Nut Grass
I have hoed and cultivated into the land.
I notice that when, ,and where the grass
grows rank, the trees do well; and when, by.
neglect to the land the grass begins to cease to
grow,*om looks yellowv and small, the trees be-
gin to go back on me.' To gardeners and farm-
ers it is undoubtedly a nuisance, but let no
man who has it in his orange grove be discour-
aged thereby. After working it in and observ-
ing the' effect on his land and trees, he will
surely ask as I do, what do you want to destroy
it for?
I have another piece of land where my nurs-
ery is, which is entirely free from it, and I am
glad of it, but were I intending to plant a grove
on it, I would/as soon as possible, sow it thor-
oughly in Nut Grass. AARON WARR.
The Farmer.
In his address, at the opening of the Wiscon-
sin State Fair, Governor Rusk said: "Agricul-
ture is the foundation of the business and pros-
perity of the whole country. When the toil of
the farmer is utterly lost; when, after planting
and tending and waiting, the harvest time
brings no harvest to him, every industry and
every interest instantly feels it. How com-
pletely a series of crop failures, or even of short
crops, paralizes the business of the country! So
a series of good crops stimulates every business
and revives every dx.ooping industry. The
railroad lines lengthen, the rolling mills are
busy, the iron mines, the saw-mill, the lumber
camp are all scenes of activity, and every in-
strument of commerce is in use. The hum of
the machinery is the natural accompaniment to
the songs of the harvest field. The daily pub-
lished telegram from the money centre of the
world is an unconscious daily tribute to agri-
culture and the farmer as the prime factor in
commerce. They note and chronicle every frost,
every rain, every hostile insect, as carefully as
the physician does the symptoms of his patient.
Stocks go up and down with the varying re-
orts as to the wheat and corn. The Wall
street gambler who never heard the meadow-
lark in the fields, reads with an eager interest
the news from the grain fields, as one fear-
ing for a friend would read the casualties of
a battle. But such tribute is temporary and
compulsory. It springs from selfishness mostly,
and the crop assured, indifference to agricul-
ture proclaims itself too often in an undue levy
upon the crop for carriage and in other ways,
which I have not time lo0",enition: With the
growth of the country, increased irbsperity anid
multiplied and sileridid educational facilities,
our colleges, universities, academies and other
institutions of learning are filled up with ambi-


I


I


I


THEFLRD DIPTH


t597


---~~ Ql~d~a~zLrs.


-- -- __


Nomw


d


tious farmer boys; vigorous in bodIy and mind,
bent upon acquiring knowledge. This is well.
They make good students and scholars, but I
have feared that toonmany of them rather dis-
dainfully turn from farm life to the professional,
as being a step higher. I would like to impress
upon such youngmen that they are mistaken
in this. There is jn a true sense no step higher
from the.cai, flr, c Ah fill,' healthffiul; independ-
ent life of the intelligent farmer."


n








Q THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


One......................... $ 100 $ 2 50o $5 50 $1000 $ 1850
Two ..................... 2 00 5 00 1000 18 00 34 00
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Four......................... 4 00 9 00 1750 3000 5800
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Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) 20 cents
per line.
CIR CULA TION.
This paper has the largest circulation of any
paper (daily or weekly) published in Florida,
with a very large circulation in Georgia and the
Southern States; also has subscribers in every
State in the Union, with many in foreign coun-
tries. After October 23d, we shall issue weekly
from 8,000 to 10,000 copies, about 40,000 per
month.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Persons are warned against paying subscrip-
tions to any one calling himself our Agent, as
we have no regular canvassing agent.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA
FRUIT GR O WERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
American Agriculturist.................................. $2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine........................ 4.20
Country Gentleman............................... 2.75
Detroit Free Press............ ..................... 2.50
Eclectic Magazine................................... 4.20
Florida Agriculturist............................... 2.25
Florida Weekly Union................................. 2.25
Florida Weekly Times ................................ 1.50
Family Story Paper............................... 3.50
Fireside Companion..... .............. ....... 3.35
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly........... 4.20
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.20
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly...................... 3.40
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine .... .... 3.40
Harper's Illustrated Weekly.... .............. 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Bazar.................... 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Young People....... ...... 2.20
Harper's Monthly Magazine........................... .20
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine................ 3.40
Nebraska Farmer.................................. 2.00
North American Review.............................. 5.20
New York Weekly Sun........................... 1.75
New York Weekly Herald...... .............. .175
New York Weekly Tribune................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times.................................. 1.75
New York Weekly World...................... 1.75
New York Ledger.................................. 3.35
New York Weekly ................................. 3.35
Popular Science Monthly.............................. 5.20,
Philadelphia Weekly Times............................ 2.50
Southern Cultivator..................... ................ 2.00
Scientific American................ ...................* 3.75
Saturday Night.................... ...................... 3.35
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The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.20
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The above are among the very best publications"
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASHMEAD BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


"HARPER'S CHRISTMAS" is the finest exam-
ple of the wonderful capabilities of the wood-
engraver's art, as well as the perfection of the
art of printing, that we have ever seen. It is,
really, a splendid combination of art and liter-
ature ; and the price (75 cents) places it within
the reach of all. It can be obtained from Ash-
mead Bros.


Read over carefully, the Premium List in
present issue of DISPATCH, and be on hand
with your exhibits to illustrate the capabilities
of Florida!
"SUMMER THOUGHTS "-A well-known
"editorial brother," in Western New York,
drops us these pleasant words, at the close of a
business postal card: THE DISPATCH is a
welcome visitor-it keeps summer thoughts
alive !"

THE attention of fruit-growers is called to
the advertisement of R. N. McKinnon, Thom-
asville, Ga. LeConte Pear Cuttings for Sale.
For prices, see advertisement.


E e 91orzlda sa h.

JACKSONVILLE, DECEMBER 11, 1882.
D. Redmond, D.H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
IAT.ES Tr "IF A VI>ERTTISING,
PAID IN ADVANCE.
SQUARES. J1TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR


1883 1

Our New Volume I
Commencing in January, 1883, will be enlarged
to twenty pages. It will be printed on finer
paper than we have heretofore used, and much
more profusely illustrated. This increased size
will afford the editors more scope, and enable
them to supply a greater variety of new and
important matter; and they will endeavor to
fully represent the Rural, Manufactural and
Industrial interests of Florida and the South,
and to place THE DISPATCH among the fore-
most journals of its class, in this country. See
terms, elsewhere, and aid us in the good work.

CHOICE GARDEN SEEDS I

Premiums to New Subscribers.
The publishers of THIE FLORIDA DISPATCH
have made arrangements with THORBURN &
TITUS-one of the most reliable seed firms in
America-for a supply of the choicest and
most valuable Garden Seeds, packages of which,
worth 40 cents each, will be sent per mail, post
paid, to every NEW subscriber to the NEW VOL-
UME of THE DISPATCH, commencing in Janu-
ary, 1883.
Present subscribers, renewing for next year
(1883) will, also, receive the seeds on the same
terms; and other premiums will be announced
hereafter.
Those who desire the seeds offered, will please
notify us to that effect when they send in their
names.

Terms of Dispatch for 1883.
THE DISPATCH for 1883-new volume, com-
mencing in January-will contain 20 pages,
and the subscription price will be $2 per year.
But we will credit a full year's subscription
for next year (1883) to each subscriber, old or
new, who will send us one dollar before the
first of January next. See, also "Garden
Seed Premium" for new subscriptions.

Beautiful Books I
EVANGELINE, with 59 magnificent original
illustrations by Frank Dicksee, A. R. A.
DANTE'S INFERNO, with 75 full page illustra-
tions, by Gustave Dore; MILTON'S PARADISE
LOST, with 50 full page wood-cuts from designs
by Dore; and a thousand other beautiful,
attractive books; with myriads of fancy and
useful articles of every possible description,
may now be found at Ashmead Brothers.

Our Florida Fair I


_~ ___ r


New Publications.
THE COMPLETE POULt'Y BOOK.-A manual
for the American Poultry Yard. By C. E.
THORNE, Associate Editor Farm and Fire-
side." Published by Mast, Crowell & Kirk-
patrick, Springfield, Ohio. The ever-increas-
ing interest in the subject of fine Poultry is
evinced by the number of books on the sub-.
ject constantly issued; though it would seem
difficult to say anything new or very important
on the matter without "poaching on the
manors of the English Tegetmeier, Wright,
Doyle, &c., as well as many of our Aimerican
writers and Poultry Journals. Mr. Thorne
very modestly claims only the honors of a
compiler, but his book is a good one-in many
respects the best practical treatise we have had
of late, and the cheapest. It contains 224
octavo pages, closely printed and profusely
and well illustrated. Price $1 bound in cloth,
and only 30 cents in paper covers. It may be
ordered direct from the Publishers, or through
Ashmead Brothers.
THE SOUTH-WESTERN POULTRY JOURNAL is
a monthly of 16 pages, published at Galveston,
Texas, by A. A. PITTUCK. $1 a year.
Proceedings of the Western New York Hor-
ticultural Society. From CHAS. A. GREEN
Esq., of Rochester N. Y.
PENSACOLA POULTRY YARDS.-Brown Leg-
horns and Pit Games exclusively Southern
Bred and fully Acclimated. Address: J
DENNIS WOLFE, Pensacola Fla.

A Challenge Accepted.
A writer in THE DISPATCH gives notice that
Levy County will contend for the premiums at
the Fair in February, by an exhibition of
"oranges, Bijou lemons. Japan plums, straw-
berries, corn and Guinea corn ; potatoes, sweet
an Irish; rice, field peas, syrup, honey, long
cotton, jute fibre and plant, hay, iron and ore,
valuable woods, etc." Sumter County hereby
notifies Levy that there will be a little compe-
tition in some of those premiums. Sumter don't
like the shot-gun plan of a general scatteration
and a universal summing-up, but will come to
the front with a few staples, and. Levy will do
well to look to her laurels.-Leesburg News.
THE DISPATCH knows if Sumter competes,
other counties will have to exert themselves,
and wehope Orange, Volusia, Hernando, Hills-
borough, Monroe and the other counties, will
not overlook this challenge. Let us hear from
you. We should also be gild to welcome Leon,
Jefferson, Gadsden and Madison, and would be


delighted to see one of them take the premium.
Counties, now is the time to show what your
section can do, and another such opportunity
for attracting settlers and capital to your State
and section may not occur again.
If rumor speaks true, California intends send-
ing some of her Citrus fruits 4o our Fair, and
it behooves us to take care of our laurels.
Cannot Louisiana send enough fine oranges
to compete, also ?

FOR quick time in the shipment of oranges
made between Jacksonville and Chicago, see
local of the Louisville and Nashville Rail
Road Company. Capt. W. C. Wallace the
coast agent of the line will have an office in
Jacksonville, to whom it would be well to
supply for a tariff of rates.







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. S


Inspection of Commercial Fertilizers.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., December, 1882.
Editors of The Florida 'Dispatch :
The last report of. the Commissioner of Ag-
riculture for the State of. Georgia, furnishes
some interesting items on the Inspection of
Commercial Fertilizers. This is a subject on
which our own State should take immediate
action, and it is respectfully commended to the
attention of the Legislature, soon to convene.
During the season of 1880-1, there were 152,-
464 tons inspected, which yielded in fees paid
by the seller, the sum of $76,232, and after de-
ducting $12,171.80, as the actual cost of the
operation--salaries of chemists, assistants, in-
spectors, &c.-the net balance of $64,060 was
turned into the State Treasury. There was a
falling off the next (last) season in th ,.use of
fertilizers, owing probably to, the severe and
.protracted drouth, extendifig well 'into the
autumn months. Still the Treasury received
over $50,000 as the pet earnings of the systemV.
Just think of a clear, revenue ,of $50,000. re-
alized by a State for protecting its citizens
against fraud. But this is not all. The honest
manufacturer is rewarded by the enhanced pop-
ularity of his goods, while the imposter, after
the disguises of his worthless imitations and
noxiQus compounds are detected and exposed,
is forced to seek some other field for his swind-
ling operations.
A thorough analysis, by disclosing the com-
mercial value of the constituents of the manure,
guards against exorbitant prices, and enables
the consumer, the farmer, to select with cofin-
dence the particular brand required.
In the absence of authentic registry, it is dif.
ficult to ascertain the exact quantity of com-
mercial fertilizers brought into the State within
the past year. According to the most reli-
able estimates, the number of tons ranges from
10,000 to 15,000. Suppose it to be 10,000. By
the Georgia schedule of taxes and expenses, this
quantity would yield in fees the sum of $5,000.
Deduct $800 to cover the cost of inspection,
and there remains a net balance of $4,200, not to
be paid into the Treasury of the State, as is done
in Georgia, but to constitute a fund for pur-
poses to be developed further on. It may strike
the reader as being better in these initial pro-
ceedings, to appropriate a larger per cent. or
perhaps the entire earnings for the support of
the Inspecting Department. It amounts to the
same thing, in fact, as will be seen, and obvi-
ates the necessity of changes in legislation af-
terward.


For reasons constantly tending to that end,
chief among which is the large accession annu-
ally made to the ranks of vegetable and fruit-
growers, it is obvious that the consumption of
commercial fertilizers will be greatly augmented
another season. And that their use would be,
further stimulated by the removal of all doubt
as to purity and genuineness, is also clear.
Consequently, with an Inspecting Department
in successful operation, it would not be unrea-
sonable to expect an income of more than
$12,000. Such a sum would wipe out all indebt-
eik s incurred to set the scheme in motion,
and have a handsome balance to the credit of
the inspt ion fund. To accomplish this desir-


able result,,25,000 tone of commercial manures
would suffice;; whether imported or manufac-
tured, in the State. In a few years the revenue
from this source will equal that of Georgia, and
exceed it., The very nature of our products-
their greater value-together with the rapidly
widening area of cultivation warrants the seem-
ingly bold assertion.
No State in the Union offers iUducemeAut for-
intensive farming superior to Flprida. Nione
equal, unless possibly California. And after
otmrpeople have acquired a little more confi-
deuce in this (to them) "new method" of farm-
ing, the old ruinous $10 to $15 per acre system,
will be abandoned forever.
It will scarcely be questioned from what has
already been said, that an Inspecting Depart-
'ient would become self-sustaining from its in-
cipiency. A few thousand dollars Will be re-
quired, it is true, for laboratories, anid salaries
the first year 'or two, but only as a loan. Inb a lit-
tle while the Department will command an iii-
come more than adequate to refund all' ad-
vances, and meet evei'y obligation. "
The interest on the 'Agricultural College fund
-obtained, as is well known, by the sale of lands
donated by Congress for an Agricultural Col-
lege--amounts this. year to a little over $9,000.
It is said the curators of this fifid contemplate
at some future day, after a sufficient sum has
accumulated, the erection of a grand college,
"of which the State may well be proud. 'It is
to be hoped, however, that wiser counsels will
prevail. The experience of several Northern
States, with ten times our capital, have in-
dulged a similar faniy for magnificent Agricul-
tural Colleges, to small profit. They send forth
a few graduates each year, who are better in-
formed on every other subject that-' agrictil-
ture. But aside from objections of this charac-
ter, which might very properly be urged against
suffering that fund to lie longer unemployed,
notwithstanding its increase by compound in-
terest, is the pressing need for it at this partic-
ular time. The encouraging prospect held out
by the future in the way of large immigration,
enhanced value of lands, cheap rates of trans-
portation, new markets for products, &c., war-
rants the belief that the next generation will
be abundantly able to provide for its own wants.
Besides, every effort now expended to foster
agriculture, and instruct the rising generation
to appreciate and utilize the many advantages
of soil and climate free to the humblest citizen
of Florida, is calculated to hasten the advent of
general and substantial prosperity.
A deliberate/consideration of illthe interests
to be subserved, has suggested the: following
plan, which is designed to advance in sev-
eral ways, both directly and indirectly the
great cause of agriculture:
Apply a part, or thelwhole if nces~ary of
the annually accruing interest of the Agricultu-
ral College fund to the equipment of two chairs
of Chemistry. One for each of the State Semi-


naries, having especial reference to the claims
of agriculture. Let the incumbents of these
chairs, in addition to their ordinary duties of
instruction, be also required, to act as analytic
chemists to the State for those geographical
sections now tributary to the Seminaries
respectively. Now for the cost.
The services of a competent chemist are
worth $2,000 per annum, or $4,000 for the two.
As for suitable laboratories, can it be stated upon
the authority ofthe Agricultural Commissioners
of Georgia, that the one used by that State cost
$1,000 in 1874, the year her system of Inspec-
tion was inaugurated. It is true her present
analytic chemist. Professor White, who was
elected about two years since, is also pro-
fessor of chemistry in her University, and of
course has the use of the magnificent Labora-
tory belonging to that Institution which cost


originally $30,000. The expense of providing
one or two Inspectors 'will be trifling. Georgia
has seven, and instead of perquisites or com-
missions, pays them salaries averaging $743
each. In place of a Commissioner, one of the
Cabinet Officers might be required to exercise
'a gei eral supervision.
At the close Of the' first year, fixing the date
for inaugurating th6 scheme at October 1, 1883,
the account up to 30th September 1884 would
probably show as follows:
To 2 labaoratorles at $1,000 oach............................... $2,000
" Salaries of 2 chemists......................... 4,O0
SSalaries of 2 inspectors ............. .................1,500
SContingent expenses................. .........^. ..... 500
Interest on 9,000 at 10 per cent...... ....... 5.... 900
.. 8,00o
BY inspection of 20,000 tons fertilizers at 50 cent......$10,000
Balanie to, inspecting fund................................... .......J,100
The revenue accruing to this fund should be
invested and tl* e interest applied tp ; establish
experimental gardens, assist ,1 i geological
examinations, and kindred purposes.,
Au. indispensable anxiliary to every scliool
of agriculture, is an e.per Iental farm, or
garden. Practical lessons in the art of'cultivat-
ing the soil, are far more desirable than theo-
rhetical instruction,where only one is attainable.
But with the; two combined, practice to illus-
trate and impress the truths of theory, any
young man can secure an education which will
fit him for a successful and useful career in
life. Such a garden, under judicious manage-
ment, could easily sustain itself after receiving
a good set off at the start. ,A4d so soon as the
proposed inspecting fund warrants the expense,
gardens for testing new varieties of fruits and
vegetables, as well as for determining the
local adaptability of those already in use,
should by all icans be established in various
parts of the State. '
Some idea may be formed of the immense
trade in commercial manure, and the import-
ance if not absolute necessity of calling on
Science to select the good from thie bad, from
the fact that 270 different brands were analysed
by the State chemist of Georgia during the past
seaseoh J. N. WA ITNER.
'The "August" Lemon-Unfair Freight
Charges, &c.
MANATEE, 'FLA, November 25, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
-I heai that' at or near Crescent City, a
tminon known as the "August" Lemon is being
extensively planted. Will you please give a
'deScription of this Lemon in THE DISPATCH
ilnd confer a favor on your South Florida
readers? We have a Lemon .here, resembling
the Everbearing some what, which is called
the "Pine Island Lemon;" It ripens in August I
and Septeimber. 'Thought perhaps if might be
the same as the Atfigust Letit6n'. Can you tell
me whether th fbrulgn 'lemon brought to
flhis country from thB shores of the Medi-
terrhnean 'are allowed to ripen on the trees, or
are they picked hen' of a certain size or age,
and subjected to a curing prodtess, to prepare
tlietom for mil'ket? Onie thing inore and I" am


done. I recently: bought in Jacksonville a
cultivator for $13.50 ,and paid $2.71 freight on
it to Braidentown, 'pyi'g at the rate of nearly
31 cents per pound. While' a' neighbor of
mine just bought th sainie thing in New York
for $11.50 and the freight bn his 'from New
York to Braidentown was $1.24. This looks
as though Jatcksonville would not get a very
large share of'trade from this section, unless
the present freight rates are' reduced. Very
truly yours, F. N. HORTON.
REMARK-We shall have to ask our Cres-
cent City readers about the "' August" Leinon.
We know nothing of this variety. The charges
complained of are outrageous, and should not
be borne. We believe the foreign lemons
are all picked before fully ripe.-EDs.







500 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Where the Woof romes From.
Let us see now where the -wol, of the world
comes from,.aind how it is distributed,, The
sheep of the world are estimated at 6.00,P00,000
head. This may be divided ipto fine ,(French
i and Spanish Merino, and, Selesian), medium
wool and long wool, eaph variety having dis-
tinct characteristics and being uniform, in tex-
ture and quality, and rough wool (medium
fine to coarse), but not uniform, in its texture.
When we say uniform, we mean that the more
modern and carefully-bred sheep produce wool
of constant and definite characteristics. For
I instance: Great Britian produces long, medium
and short-stapled wool; but neither 'of these
are known as fine wools. The fine wools are
produced by the. Spanish, the Saxiny, 'the Sile-
sian, the French and the 'Americdn Merinos.
The rough 'w6bis, as before stated, are medium
fine to coarse, but not" uniforn, nor ifideed,
nearly so, ifi their texture. N6w, this even-
ness of -quality,' whatever' the' :keed, is what
cpnstitutes the' principle 'value of the wool;
'that is,' ifnifiirmity dftbxturre and freedom
from long hairs, or the usually d~,dched halt's
sometimes found' in the flbece;' and whih h IVe
been denominated "jaf--this, 'inr fih& 'wo1l
sheep is especially objectiornable.--Bheded`s
Gazette, Chicago. '
The Walkinp H14tse.
The country would reap incalculable beine-
fit if the walk of its ordinary horse could be
accelerated a single niile per hour beyoui
what is now genera." It would put niill ions of
dollars extra into the jIati6ndal pockets 'every
year. We might hae might have horses which wopild
walk five miles per hour, jhst'as naturally and
easily as three tothreie'hn'a hai r, an' ra'.ely
four; as is pw. the rule. "All tiTe "arm and
much of the counitrY6oad anid own-sre*et.rse
w6ior' is'one ah'awalT. 'i"t' coi s o jnore to

any one calculate the profit an ttadvAitage 46f
using the former: in preference to the latter.
Let the farmer see how mpch .mpre. 'and per
day he can get. plowed ad. l4arrowe4,.; 'hv
many more loads, of hay, strvw, grai and
vegetables he can talte t ,,nrdet,,,nd W
muqh more rapidly heis a1le to fa,' l)4opiu4 -all
h'.to9ther work1 and he will Jau vIite pati.' e
ip koe.ping a .slow walking horse amiy longer ,
It i wil be the sa'me ;with the expressmn,^it~o
ternpter, and the truckian. i .
,Bellfounder, got by the. jce!brated. ,otting
horse of this name, out of ;Lady Alpz ,wasy
not only a fast trotter lut hud natural,. ey
walk of five miles per hopur. e wa,. ;pt, :
pouri, family several years, .nd early l'll, i.
to.k, out of ,quite commnpn .mrres; prove4 r
cellent walkers. This shows q ieasi4y .d
rapidly an increased fast walking s 8ck pi ay,;.
bred by all faripers,, if they willjophr rake ,4w


pains to selects the stallions to whiq4 they .may
htreafter nick their nares. A fst .walking
horse co acom a considerably higher ,price!
with those who care for the pace, thap,4, slow
walker, and such buyers are constantly oi th
increase now; and that day will come byi-nd-
by when a slow walker will hardly get a| big.
The fastest walk I have yet seen. exactly, tnd
and put ,on record, ,was that of .the. ngish
horwe Sloven. ,. He made, witqnti etr. ffor.,
5.69 ,miles per hour. All agricultural sie
ties Qugt to give good premiums to. fas lik-
ing horses, the hi iest priie to'be awarded to
the 6rie which aked' five m.ile eP&hour ; the
second toa'fdurnd one~half miiesi the third '6
four milesC ,iThisas t Wowld, be the-least time .
for whic,tp,0wag a4 pia. e, .pd all 1fe
should be allowed to compete.-A. BE. Allen in
New York Tribune.


What an Ardent Lover of the Turf Thinks
of the Improvement in Trotters.
James Grant, of Davenport, Iowa, one of
the most celebrated as well as one of the most
successful lawyers of the West, is in the city.
'He is President of the National Trotting Asso-
ciation, 'which controlA over two hundred tracks.
A reporter had an interesting chat with him
last iiight. M r. Grant, who is 70 years .old,
says: "1The 1reqd and use of trotting horses in
the past ten years has increased a thousand
fold; You may; travel through the countryany-
whe1 and fidnd farmers' 'boys training horses.
The boys are on the alert for good stock, and if
they find a horse to, be a good trotter they seek
every opportunityto put him in training. By
and by there is a, cpuaty fair., The boy enters
the horse and he,trots off with a premium and
a first-class record. Why, sir, the breeding of
tiottjig horses has become e great industry,
rringngngto Kentuqky, Ohio and other statess
hundreds of thousands of dollars."
,. -.What do; you think of ,he, fictitious value
.placed, popp yotoing gQrpes ?
.'Th. value ,o trotting horses has quadrupled
,within the ,past tep yeas, bpause pf their. su-
perior breed, pd trj0a ngy tira
,"W ^bhqi. yur 9ibpeAation; as to the increase
of speed iand thq methods, of' tr dining compared
wTh that; of years past?".
I haye pbsr.ved very closely, but kept no
;pppiadata. ,.Ib ae wyinesae4 ,the. change from
2.40 tp.2.101, This is the fastest time pn record,
pmae by Maud S. A')great number of horses
have.made less than 2.20. I attribute this im-
proyem~ent ,more to good breeding than to train-
ing.- Tltp last ses ou has been productive of a
grefit'nmayhores .whose records are under

S'i's thereany difference between Eastern
and Western blooded, stock as to speed and
quality ?"
S"It Ij my opinion that the section of country
has pothipg to, ,o wifh the quality of a horse.
The blood of fine trotting horses is diffused all
oyer t heUnIedtates."..
Mr. Grant was probed. fqr, some points as to
the. methods emplopyed in the ,practices of fraud
an4 riokery ^e^tyrf t
"Oh, there are a thousand, whys of corrup-
tio.p" h,.ai4,. "They ore toaq numerous to men-
tio.., A common Fraptice is to throw off the
rae and makp the best horse the loser. It is a
fact that horss are often drugged or in some
WSy pliysi4mly ijipairqd in order to make them
ps~e the race. You may take the best horse on
th turf, givehim two buckets of water at night
4pd he wil be beaten ,neyt day.--Denver Tri-
bune. .
SBi*etj W^ O~ V1R HoRSE.-When
' 1b i 4ixothe h ct badly i the harness, it is
befiu 'he 'has "n6t been properly taught his
btusiness.' To 'hip ahd misuse him is to spoil


him.- A' horse is naturally willing and docile
if well used, and much may be done by kind-
hess, patience and judgment in removing the
ill effectss of af o'g"tibaitment. A colt should
be trained when buihg, anid gradually taught
his dtities; the greatest care should be taken to
avoid frightening or irritating the animal, and
uiiich patience should be exercised. If the ani-
mil i*efties tW'do 'what i-'required, punishment
will 'Imake matterf worse; something should be
don '-to d-tr ct its attention, when it will gen-
erilly becoiie' dbile.-J-A-neiricah Agriculturist.
-'-Abouit 1,500 miles of new railroad were
put itoa opeoatkfn'in the Southern States last
.rer." 'The' g~6 earYdigsd of the Southern
!oadO' rzphed -$63,000',0, aaid the net earn-
ings incristbd: front $18,000,000 in 1880 to
more than $24,000,000.


A Boy's Potato crop.
Sometime last spring tlib poipridtor of the
Southern World offered: a' preiium iof $20, in
gold, to the boy under 16 years of,age, who
would report the best yield ofany crop, on .a
half arer of land. Master Bark battle, son
of Rev. J. R. Battle, saw the proposition and
contested for it. The YestiltA of lid tlbojr was
250 bushels of fine large swebt -.otatoes, on' a
half acre. A specimen,, busheL'of the ipota-
toes, and proper ,acy .4 jiryg certifcates-
sworn to by dismtterpsted parties--were for-
warded the other day 'to "tlie proprietor of the
journal mentioned. We commend the worthy
example of young Mr. Battles to the young
men and boys of Thomans. It shlwws what a
boy can do, when he trles. Boya make a great
mistake when they think that farming is only
drudgery, and cannot be made to pay. .What
the county needs is fbwer oleiks-, with hair
parted in the middle, fewer professiobaJ dronep,
pnd more manly youths who are not afraidand
ashamed to take hold of the plow, ut make
the country prosperous, and te 'towns will take
care of theitselVes. It is in the sbil whereI the
surest chances of success in, life are fodind; it
is on-the farm where the truest contentment is
found; it is around the country faeily.fireside
where the purest Virtue is found. Despise not
the country.- Thomasville (?Ga.) Temes.

POTASAI FOR MELONS.-Dr. Stuittevant says
that in growing melons, it seems well to add a
handful of sulphate of potash, or seeral hand-
fuls of wood ashes, :to -each hill. .The effect
seems to improve greatly the qmlity. of. the
fruit grown, and if his experience is sufficient
to generalize from, he would say that the ad-
dition of potash in excess to the soil upon
which the kmelon is grown Will add an ekcelleit
quality to the fruit.



THE PERFECT HATCHER.--Having noticed
from time to time, in the- Poultry World, the
various reports of scoeos oM failure of poultry-
men in artificial incubatidil, I thought it not
amiss for me to give, a fpw f c. r ating,to my
success with "The Perfect Hatcher,' iajde by
the Perfect Hatcher Comiipany; 'Imiraa N. Y.
After having runt an iiiicatbr Anitdi by other
parties which' provedi a- refrighdiar h: winterer
and an oven in summer, and, after having lost
a great many eggs by it, [ purchased, a Perfect
Hatcher, which I approached with many fears,
not daring to place' ovf' one huadr6d and ten
eggs in it at first. On the seventh'da)i:' A -
moved all but iinety-igh tklicth i pved fdr-
tile, and from these L. got; eightyrthree fine


chicks. After this I lhad perfect confidence in
the Perfect Hatcher, and kept itI''ul'lduring
the hatching season for two years or more past,
and with perfect success. I have, ti some cases,
got one hundred per ceit. of'the eggs placed
therein, and am satisfied that when eggs failed
to hatch that it was the fault of the eggs. and
not of the incubator .
I db not hesitate to give n as my opinion
that the'Perfebdt Hatchet is a Prff'fct siiccess,
and I do not see -how it coldd: ,te improved. It
is easily run and regulated, and so far; as my
experience, with it, goes, perfectlyy reliable.
Now I have no axe to grind, and no. interest in
the Perfect 'atdher wthadi!Vr, "doher than that
I feel' in, eery good thing. My objet in
writing is to assist those poultrymen .hlo "A
looking for an incubator that will do.,aawA,
if not better than the mother hen arnd. r~,d k
they will find it in the Perfect Ttihier.--P.
C. Sherwood in Poultry World. '


I


- -- -- -;---- ----- - ------- -- -




T 1 VE' "' t 9 ItA' is D1CI


Lan.dL-. g^to, I.a,4a. *wsByears.. aer.,
S n.b'esi'pp" I "
4Made om 1 T1itT tt-s trveyd sfche to L l -wih tp f h pi ft, fr every
township i EAST and SOITH FLODA, dept i ttr sent by mail, for 50 cents each./
D1 s ooun t o e .
EXPLANA'TION CATRD sent with every Map, showingvacant lands and where to apply for
them to Pure4 at plf
Special IVap of Countiest, teati0to di ,to order.
.rch0itect1Xa. el Designs a seil W. l
My long connection ith the" forida Lakd) npyei TOR PUR-
) is a guarantee of satisfactor work. Corresaondence so ,.
O fice smith FloridaLand ia, N roJmnr en ,o.,. h"t<23tf
JACX'SO fVILL-EL LR' 23tf


Gel)ne


E 'TfBLEBHEI D 18060.
M. GcEORGE o h.,
ra95 SOUTH TE T Eo p
95 SOUTH WATER TREET, r


SFLO1 Rg4 AGPAYR VEG X.5 4PE.CIALTY.
kt. -N .ctk, jl if 4or any Wholesale
a Stenl,8..:, l, f L SJ:B. C. A, I ,
to apl 8, '83.. LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


.4 4 1 4.


46 ,Le LA NC-&fI~i
4 4 4,Vo-. 'w

1 4 "j./.

234!'A~flX4TON STREET, NEW YORK. .;u.)




H~n~: ~~ONOVER, Tallabassee ;~, 44. .~
83 AiRSl G.out Ma & nv e


*VA4 5 %W i 8 I *X.L.ANVILLEB E. A. ILL,
President and BusinesSaManager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer.
S: V:NI VL u;. ....
Lake" G e6rge, FlpriddA.. I ., '.i ,. 4 "
AL'" LiNE 6F FRUIT TREES adapted'td this climate.
ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3,just out, free on application. to apr 17, '83


4 4 I


4~ 4~ U-


I can supply, this fall and winter, a limited quantity
of the k-Pm 'nTh 1 ',Flgteh o China9,1 and th
Chin Led V-1o4, 1o n
Pear Tret of medium size, on their own roots.
D. REDMOND
r "M ..


_ I~


af,.F. W R

ACR' 'OPYEST,'A ~PER,'!DOZY
A* R' ,, SOH 'AiE. L':iFf& tAkrE)2Ai

~~fft;;
4 4 ~lito40.MEO lit*

OUR
di~~~~;o tL- .Yi4A. 14 *v' *Afo 4 ,. .i'4 ~ S af


P LY M O JTHI 'ROCA1 .
The great-demand for these towlsihave induaedt to
secure the agency of 1Mr. A. (0. HAWKIN88fesb te uale
of his stock, which has no superior, I can sell
,, FOW OREG3B S 0,,e. ,Q
direct from his enormous establip het,th (es.
I am also agent for the .
AMERWTCAN POUITrY TA. N
-AND THE-- "'*
. . . . ... ., *t q
Sand on I _ce.pto(u .Waxp I, will send same t-any
address. No one soaul uhidertake toB jpyWNtyW
without somePO IL. -"
S. W. iP UA*A l.." '
tofeblZ .,CKS0oVILi ^ .


.to a 1S,88 ~ :~r ~ ~ r


LA.' Lt q eets ep4 o, .t.er
4o00ty We tkevoidein OffW tlr, t*e ptpnqqty de-
scribed below, situated !at, and around Esperance, at
great bargains. .'I r fvthee information- apply. ad-
dress' : : ; .'. -.: ..
iW.P. CO PERt I _, ",:i., la..
front 190 acres Mr _tl W.gmlmrI
P i ce 0-. .1 .2
Soodelevation n
(2.) acreg no
Sol 1di ei a.. of ak

Prices. Prie rmSey. ...
(6.) 40 acres, pine land faileds. Hae s;

t. e adtntn1 an ,
grepine-Ap o milellee
C ism &O T saitw I dwgH.bW i -surebw Ont-'


20 acreflrstrate pine land, overlking I shqEa a s,
1aers oi) ,on L HarI ,Wh *ik .rket, ood
of the lake? nie bulld sigte t6acese .bam-
mock and two of pine" cleared. Price 500. .
9 1. aId's tot e riilk. 4ftom Lake Harris, good
ie land; in atotI 'sii t u rchasers. Price $10 per acre.
(10.) 80 acres of land beautbifuly situated, Wit a'm-
bitunding view of the Mte;' 8t.O 7 Tina fles n.tA building
sites; % mile lake front; 10 acres splendid hammock,
W per-acre. W.
land; ih 1 tit, of the JlAr6 % le,
from 1 per acre in 5 or 10 acre
[ r4oves will be set and cared for on above lots at reas-
onable rates. The party making the offer has had sev-
eral years'f experience in the management of groves.
to feb20-83


IT


m


---------


Ic
.1


r . .. .. . . . . . . .


I


- ~L-L -


1 w7tvw-A


.. I


Ir


r


* *..' AAA.i I~44,, ~


- 1


Vines, &c. Our stock of
"dRA. N G'EEES
'IA 6d;"Ibth kegf e I xgst pB~dsilt'pboth

'A ~e ber~PA1k PIR.MTrRES,witha fe*
V~t~u

.usItivated by the 4rear-foruai ts,.4 ;1 ot
It SMD Fx LWVcxL JT t -,.14- I


m


=1


*=



I







;, -


BALi'i-- WRE XPRES$
MERCHANTS AND MINERS 'RANS-
P"ro1TAI O ANr Y. i.
sa.Ay
BY*it"! Wi llN FAY Abi SATLTRDAY
-.. ... .- AT 3 P. Al., ? i
EVER Y1 T U ESD)AY A.ND Fi-l DAY ,
as follows: .. r ,, ; ,



. ; Fr;i4 ',t ovelpliM 2 :. ,) |
S,' t "- .. if . .30.


,. .r l '.,I e il allt ^ n. 1
... tiid y, k~ei ller i tn, a 0 a2 p. ni. ',, ,,\.^
., ..8.Ply, .I we m r ii, tu l0 . U "
..,, ~ vrl t ,ber "it 1 a. in "
.." Tiwwya Decembe lFX t , l; P p, m., ....,., ,,,

1 ,,, ,i .,.f o , 1 ., 1 -
-. s~.btn, ileMi eti0J1.0; ,ecot ,t Cbiabi, i.8.l ;Rotui1
Trp (Cbin) I.O.. mpuy reerve the ,ri&% 34 f
,^ B">*. ip"rt i "l. i s L 1 a i.
i ajkg ouisp mentauinoai of te Georgla and threa

tIispois aist u i *api l sD.lr int schedule, t ilier jr

By this rute shippers are asured that,
,wl el w -eqmaelhit hanmlsing anti:if u 41at4ei111l. : i <
v. ae ofe .e ht ty PU)iby >Pte ~i0L b# tau4l a. r
column. ' '

-A., A ,L m iu INS, Agents. .. .: ;
S:,,Long I Do .altiatore, q4A ,___ 4.

| lA~l 4 [ y land, 30 orange trees In la ve w
fdvancei, few bcfitni. 'P"& e $,100. Baf t 4Bl.aiee fo
li* "w.* w w DE L',
,. .., W.W; 1DEWA:U-tr, ,


St. Augustine, Fli.
N. B.-Letters will not be answered unless stamp ip
encl ed. to feb20, '83


SAYA AR .AILWAY
VIA





NA AD R ,SUN .Y, NOVEMBER 6tb, l ,I
lows; ...
Fast Mail. .,p J 1 ?lEx. Daily.
Leave-t..M a. v.-,
Jackpnv lle 0 a. J soville at. 5D45 p m
Arrive-.i U.-". ..
Jac ksofrl it ... 5.00 t arnvlle t.. 7:A a

Live Oak 4. i pm m i at............. 7:00 a *1
SNew .tV1nlr.,,!M1 qliW v -.a
Savannah at......40 p m A iA
Charleston at.... 90 p ontgom ry at.. ": ;
Thomol*))*fi.1at H lf ,... 9:20 an
Albany at..........lW. p in aLo vsv-n. ......
Moltgomery at.. Q.454kmp Cl.n.lattLt^.._i iln
iNashville a 1Xil4 oiago p'W fttiO l.a ,'"1.-L 7
Washington at... 9O p ni T&"lwYorit atra..i 8.p
Pl tnUa' PUI9 46l0 1ln Cars on the's Trais 4troi.
Jacksonville to Cincinnati via Atlanta and Cincinnati
Southern Railroad; to Mont omery via Albany a dl
a hi W"1Voot n -r
Passengers arriving by this train for Palatka and tl e
E loritMouthern lilroad, make lose onneeqwo. ri t
.steasmeratthealdmtmadwliarL*,: ":,. 4 ,;, ,.-
Night Express--lPa Iy. "
LeaveJ e iille at ....... .. .. ... :2 p
ArriveJacksonville at..................... .......... ...11:05 p m
Airive tva rih tit.................... ..;.... ........:... 700 a i
Arrive Charleston at.......................................... l p 6i
ArrilveWashington .t....,..., .. .. ......-..... 1:00 P i
Arrive New York ..L....... ...... :.;.......9....M....: Ds m
Arrive Atlanta at............................................. I 10 p m
Ariv Cnc nati at..... ....................... ... 7:00 p hi
St........................... .................... ---
'A b ll^it ritt s Tralirn',,ia

11 g W 4 l .sowit It XQ::: P. .:;.: :::; :
Arry atpS g I ul atle p..r. ., i.... i
A netitestaurant has been opened at Wuycross, ansi
abaM iger tra&U.
Coninetl ng a t Savan nah with steamers for New York,
Plwt i lwi r for New

e . Al
Sle AjiA lfnw stctiotta t -i m pan yis
Office In Astor l iiig, 84 ee*" at Dep t
TiclAGf.I-F-,- -.. aO-lAIN B, Agent.;
JAg. ] ;'iTYi1i'A Oen"I F. and i [ ,


S p4 p" 3 favoidled. C.Js 0 s e i
The magnificent new Iron Steamships sail from ha 1ituday at 3 eleok, and from Central' Rail-
road Wharf, Savannah, ap.Mllows: '
Mu ybiI Ag.,v-lt.., i mbb-s'easta ,m


-L'~yoI l ,Himi~ upl i ? wnliii .. ..JB.. ;.. .............. ...1 ur ry *^puqir-Jjbu, R-w. m. m.
Gate City, ge.................... D.......... u ecembe 2lt, at 8:30 p. m.
City of Columbus, Ca I t ,. mum ag.;December 28th, at 8:30 a. m.
TI UHG OUq- ME AS TO NEW YORK.
*U: SONB4 ,AIRNt Agen Ui, Savi4nn Ga.
S, .. AIN, Agent S.,F. and W. Ry.; Agek, Jacksonville.
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., Gea S o 44-tf
O e ..Ar 4 t


,i ~... 'lX R8 4V 1 8 6.. ,6 :. ..
une
E .', ROBE, i'&BRO., COMMISSION RCHANT
FLORIDA I l ASPECIA
226 AND 2 AWA VTJE, PA.
OUR MOTTO: Quick w and Prompt Returns, '
nov 13-tf LeII .W'i k i tif.S: "STENCIL PLATES FEE.!
^=- 3-- J, 42---=


The Sava ia O &f a

- a* nrteg uafacturers of z-rig'b. Qradt Per-
1 Of0A Sal bists
. a u MP rult "FertiiIzer
A istriilfT 1 4 Ma i re tfeally for Florida Oranges.
,,t r ,,, ,c* n.-;./ ,, tk t , *
"OTTr1 ," for Florida Market Gardeners and Farmers, is highly am-

Also ENGLISH ACID PHOSPHA& '1 r cMhpoAing.. 'Pt eisasol dnae. KAIN T,
COT'ION SEED MEAL, pure BIRD GUANO,
MURIAfrIE OF POTASf, &c.
Each sack bears the Inspetioin ag of the State of Georgia, which shows that it has passed
g id" "tii"ma L "m al" agua- attic"t&&' e-
1 ^ffiie1 caF e .Bran'Sr is a f ish unHfW ar-
antee of their merits to the purchaser.
Send for Circular. ,7r. 14 .T11't '; :i .iT c 1Q.. ^T, '
to may20-83 Jacksonville, Fla., General Agent for Florida.


G-e mRrUWSeOW U'af T!dl( Et vIE.ti '


ORANCE AND LEMON TREES ongodhealthy stmok vevarieties, and
Also, JAPAN PERtSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to

to Feb20'8D v*. *. -' t. ,


For Sale.
Or nge aeedlags ~pd SniTrees witl 1, apd 3 year

ORANGE LANDS .,
On the Bluflton property and in Orange Co. For partic-
ulars apply to, ; C LLE, Supt.
tomar 10 '83p Bluffton, Volusia Co.. Fla.


LeConte Pear Cuttinpg.

S0, CtePr Cuttings r st peUia
sandt 1l*ekCkdind dAliveid atI16h E^5rts Hce.
ThOa.ville, Ga.
to Jan 11 '83p R. N. McKINON.
If po want to become a tel.g4 4 oitr send twen-
.1 ceTt to C. I.. JONES& oloi. Coi L ti Ohio, for
best illustrated instruction book. eow to July20-83


V --__ __ __ ____ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _


Ic


I1


1


W- hi ~ ,a .\14:l,~Prli:


LLAHA aEE Ct. l Fshe Fridayt DcmberlIst, 11:00 a
CITY OF 8AVAd, d m .030-M..
CHATTAHOOCH t:8ln wrly, ...
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. person Surday, December 9th, 5.1 p m.
TALLAHA8EE, Cat. Fisher Wednd December 13th, 8.30 a. m.
CIT OF AUGUSTA', Cat. Nlceron, Sturday, December 28d, 5:00 p.

Through Bills of Lading and Ticeta over Central Ralroad of Georia, S F lorid & Western
la elg tnionel namer

Agent of Line, and C. R. oGa., Offee ew Pier 85 N. River, N.
W. H.RHETT, General Agent, 817 Broadway, New York. DO
12H. CHIIST AIDe.lit e tq A o, 81 DrOWENS.


- -- 7


i -----~


I


m


I


t


i


- AX.lUL


I


I







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


e03


c FROM
1 JACKSONVILLE AND 0
CALLAHAN JUNCTION 1.
TO4 6 Q
25 Madison, Ind........ ................ 75 1 50125 00
00 Jeffersonville, Ind........... 75 1 50125 00
00 Evansville, Ind....................... 75 1 50 125 00
00 Cairo, Ill................................. 75 50 125 00
00 Indianapolis........................... 80 1 60 13000
50 Terre Haute............................. 80 1 60 130 00
50 [Columbus, Ohio..................80 1 60 130 00
00 'St. Louis ............................... 851 70 140 00
00I Chicago...............................85 1 70 140 00
00 Peoria, Ill................................ 851 70 140 00
00 Cleveland ................................ 90 1 80 150 00
00[ Toledo...................................... 90 1 80 150 00
00 Detroit................................... 90 1 80150 00
0 Milwaukee.......................... 90 1 80 150 00
TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. Per Bbl.
25 50 35 $60
35 70 40 75
45 75 50 80
70 1 05 75 1 10
40 75 50 85


In Connection with the Atlantic Coast Line.
From i From From
From Ld'gs on Florida Tampa From
Jackson- St. Johns Transit and F.C. & W.
ville. River. R. R. Manatee.
TO _______


Baltimoreo .......................60 $120 70 $140 80 $150 05$180 75 $145
Philadelphia.................... 60 1 20 70 1 40 80 1 50 105 180) 75 145
New York......................... 60 1 20 70 1 40 80 1 50 105 180 75 1 45
Boston............ ................ 65 1 30 75 1 50 85 1 60 1 10 190 80 1 55
Providence................................ 65 1 30 75 1 501 85 1 60 1 10 1 90 80 1 55
To all rail points, and via Atlantic Coast Line. Shipments daily.


In Connection with direct Steamers of the Boston and Savan-
nah Steamship Company.

SFrom From From
From Ld'gs on Florida Tampa From
Jackson- St. Johns Transit and F. C. & W
villo. River. R. R. Manatee.
TO --- .



Boston....... ........ ........ .. ... 50 00 60 1 2011 65 $1 20 90 i1 50 65 $1 25

In ConUnetion w ith Steamships direct from Savannah.

From From From
From L'd'gs on! Florida Tampa i From
Jackson- St. Johns Transit and IF. C. &W.
ville. River. R. R. Manatee.
TO _____
ok 2;1 '4

New York............................... 50 $100 60 $120 65 $1 20 90$1 50' 65 $1 25
Philadelphia.............................. 5 0 60 1 201 65 1 20 90 1 50 65 1 25
Baltimore.................................. 50 1 00 60 120 65 120 65 1 20 90 1 50 65 1 25
Boston via New York............. 73 145! 83 1 651 88 165 1 13 195 88 1 70
Providence via New York........ 65 1 30 75 1 50,1i 82 1 50) 107 1 80o 80 1 55


In Connection with Steamships of M. & M. T. Co, of Savannah,
Via Baltimore.


TO


From
From Landings
Jackson- on
ville. St. Johns
River.


( 1.PQ 14
K ic
^ P4 (^ 0


From
Florida
Transit
R.R
H .4

9 ^
,


Prom
Tampa
and
Manatee.


I ) N


From
F. C. & W.


Boston......... ......................... 55$1 10 65 1l301 70 $1 30 $195 $1 60 70 51 35
Providence....................... 55 1 10 6.15 1 30 70 1 30 1 95 1 60 70 135
Washington.. ..... .... 60 1 00 70 120 80 1 20 1 05 1 50 65 1 25


To make rates from Stations on Tropical IRailroad south of Ocala add 5 cents
per box and 10,9enqp per barrel to rates from stations on Transit Railroad.
Steamship conkeation from Savannah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
For Boston every Thursday. For Philadelphia eyery Saturday. For Baltimore
Tuesday and Friday. .. ..
To make through rates from points tributary. to'the above, add the rates for
transportation lines connecting to above rates,
The dimensions of the Standard Box for Oranges are 12xIx3ST inches, and the
weight is estimated at 80 pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capaolty over the abqve will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds, or 250 Standard.Boxes, Excess of this
amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destina-
tion and to one consignee.
Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of
shipments will be an absolute requirement. It is clearly understood between the
shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to
which Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be Issued only by the
Agents of this Company at Jacksonville and Callahan and the Agents of the DeBary
Merchants Line andBaya's Mail Line from St. John's River Landings guaranteeing
rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points
will net be subject to correction by this Line.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion
in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be charged in addition the single package
rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of
the agents of the Line.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further informa-
tion, if needed, apply to .
H. YONexE, Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga. Office New Pier 35 N River, N. Y.
Gen. W. L.'4AMXIS, Agent, 25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS
Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line Baltimore. WM. H. RING, Agent Boston and
Savannah Steamship Line, 18 T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. &
W. Railway, 211 Washington St. Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 315 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway,
43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Pier 41
South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
GEO. W, HAINES, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Jacksonville, Fla.
D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.


'I


*1


- L I I-- ~H I. I-- __ _-__ -- ii


----


- -----------


_ --------cl.


THROUGH TARIFjF 'O ORANGES ONLY.
VIA THE FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, AND ITS CONNECTIONS.
IN" E. .ECT ",TO T"E'I.: E BE. 24:tH., 1.882.


FROM 0
JACKSONVILLE AND CQ
CALLAHAN JUNCTION -I e
TO P49 94ra
Macon ........................ ....... .. 35 $ 70 $61,
Augusta................................... 40 80 70
Atlanta ................................... 40 80 70
Columbus, Ga ...... ............. 40 80 70
Montgomery, Ala.. ................. 40 80 70
Mobile..................................... 50 1 009 87
Chattanooga, Tenn........... 50 1 00 87
New Orleans........ ....6...... 00 1 20 105 '
Nashville, Tenn........ .... 60 1 20 105
Memphis, Tenn................. 601 20 105
Louitville, Ky................... 70 1 40 115 I
Cincninnat, Ohio..................... 701 40115 (
Henderson, Ky......................... 70 1 40 115 (
Columbus, Ky......................... 70 1 40 115 (
Hickman, Ky.......................... 701 40115 (

FROM I
Jacksonville... ..................................
Landings on St. Johns River................!
Stations on Florida Transit R. R..........
Tampa and Manatee.............................
Stations on the Fla. Cen. &IWest'n R'yl


I


Ir,






THE F LOR ID A DI 1 SPAT. CHi.


o0,000 O ASI .
C(n be invested to gnott adva0tage in the' .

of 15 acres P.0 bearitngtriqai the1. eajt4ul #bdeW1 e d
ROO.CK, Il.:i)( ;iIAMiMOUK rm theg at I ndian Tlve'r-*
with Its tisl, oysters, green turtle and ducks. I will sell
the grove for .,. , r
TWO-THIRDlS ITS ACTUAL VALCE.
NuutIiubers of visitorssay it is the most beauiliftl and de-
si'able'pir)perty'ii the-State.
h1aving'purchased Jupiter Island, 100 miles south, I
propose to make a specialty of
COCOANJJTS, PINE-APPLES,
and the more tender tropical fruits.
C. B. MAGRUDER.
Rock Ledge, Florida.

LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

In los to suit, In the town of Satsuma, Putnam County,
'Florida, Seid for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,
JACKSONVILLE,
june 26(-tf FI1OI1I 1A.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


!,W H. PILLOW'S" -

STRAWBH RR AYO-CY

FRUIT V TABLE REPACK-
SING A;-D (eOMMVBSIQN HQUSE,
ASTOS BULOOCK
;Packing House at Waycrops Wharf, Jacksonville,
Florida. n'y1 2 '88..

J M. 1.. A IRIS 00C ONY,
GLEOX A ARE OTY GA.
40 Hours fi ". Ne.ow. k' Oity;'108 Mile from

Here we ea iantgathe crops every month.
in the year; ,od .watpr.1elenty otgrais1l1 the woods for
sheep, cattle uiad hogs atlthe yearroud'I; very profit
ble to the owtler, Farms of40 acres ach at $1 to d3 p.r
acre; lumber, Sf per 10.'feet," delivered at the depot;
shingles, -tper 1.0); .will bt1ld a housewith 4 rooms,
lmmnel doors, I w in.or(Ws; cement f iue for chimney, well
Sdug and eurberL, for $150, o"t.fmyiterms. Labor of all
kinds needed.at. fair. wages; b-rd at. Mr^.Balnbridge'$
Sfrom 15 to 8 per.month. ": c '.
We need lrnj.', lrckeps tock In.
One bushel cate o veoetabl dei ed t e York
City for 50 cents per barrel, $1#*nd-wl6hq uiekdidpatch-
A number of NorOieri and Western families now here
are doing wl.. 110- stones ;rounc dbrush, no winter,cli-
-nate delIghtfulI'nd perfectly healthy all the year round.
Land is not cleared, but near -ie depot: some. cleared
land from M to $10 per acre. Allklindrof grain, vegeta-
bles, berries, fruit, and stock, do well. Our farmers are
out of debt, some lending money.
Any number of acres, for colonizing or grazing, at $l-0o
83 per acre; 40 aor+ wltl h ouse complete, (r $250;
EASY TERMS. 7
Come and see W turArelf, oadvdree """
J. M. STIGER,
to Jan 9,'83. Glenmore, Ware County, Ga.
COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,
,Real sta A ents,
.JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
l ave lands in every county in the Orange Belt, at from
$' to')'te0 per acre. Orange groves from n 1000 to $10, Government lands in every part. of the Orange Belt.
Can guarantee all of-our property.
Strawberry Plants.
We have 200,000 best varieties for sale low.
O" Origoas Trees.
We. liave :-M,000 trees, all ages, for sale, tt from 10 cents
to '2 per tree, as to age.
COLONY, TALBOTT & CO.
te'Opl. 1, If.
StEstablished 1040.
TRil CELEMBRTED
"BRADFORD"
PORTABLE MILL.
C'95, WHEAT& FEED
FLOUR MILL MACHINERY.
Send for 4eriptlve Crcu- .
lar. Address plinl
ff#0S.HOSB0ADFOD CO. |I
; CININXATLO, o - ,
,eow-t. tojan .. '83,,


0 : oo,F.1. 3T ST
fOhflsofl'j Prep aed Katsomine. Wads-
worth, Jfiartinez and Longman*'
Prepared Paint8s.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
F6 ORANGE TIMA.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel;
Sto niar25,'838 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
D.0G. AXALER. T. MARVI, ,R X. C. ST04PToN.
AMBLER, MARVIN & QTpCKTON,

Ea-st .Floida.
Qrgnia i in ,1870 y D. abJter,..ai d
Generally Known as
AMBLER'S .BAN K.
T RANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sol4. on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections 'made arid Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders N-ational Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah,. Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brdwn Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze. Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers Issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tif


.MI Y,
MILLINERY,


L. KEENE,
FANCY, .DRESS GOODS,


NOTIONS,

Laces,- Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, -' - FLORIDA.
to feb 20, "8.
Ef o

Commission Merchant,
A.ND) pSALEIt IN
Florjida Oranges and Lemons,
74 WEST BRAY STRElBT.
N. Y., Depot, MAXFIEL. & Co., 67 and 69 Park Place; Mag-
aa.ie and Packing House, Waycross R.W harf.
MAXUVAcT'U IER'S AGENT FOR
THE BANGOR BOX MATERIAL, HOOPS,, Etc.
Have a -iirge qusintity of Manil t Wrapping, ,
Papers, at Lowest Market rates.
Send in your orders for BOX MATERIAL. Can
ship promptly while freights are light. Have great
difficulty in getting it transported during the busy
season. [to March 25 '83
RICH'D H. MARKS'


ORANI cOO LAND AH1,
SA1NP1ORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y,
BUYS AND SELLS
Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission.
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
June 12-tf


\


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,.
Window, PietUre and rriage qGlass.
GOL AND METAL LE.AF,
01NZE, 0OPPRA, ALJM, PUXIQp STONEl KEROENE,
Sand aiXt Emery papers &o.
S agentLEN' FOR ":, :
PRATS MsINRAL COZA OIL,


Plans,. Spe
all kinds. V
Roofs, Etc. :
Bay Street.


An Orange G

.Elntir

where you h
FISHING
' ;


LIS & MReCLU,]aE,



cifications and ei tniAe for Buildings of
rater Supply, Drainage, Sewerage, Bridgest
P. O. Box 784. Room No. 12 Palmetto Block,
Sto Feb. 7, 83


irove or Qrange Lands, .i.a healthy beauti-

ely .iFcee fromi Frost,

ave theifinest


SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME


of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a new country. Address me with stamp,
at Anclote, Hillsborough County, Florida.
I can sell you five acres, or five thousand acres, -as you
desire.
to aug 20, '83 M. 1". MARIKS.
THE SUWANNEE


STEAM SAw & PLANIIG .MILLS,
EIjTLAVILILE, FLORIDA,

DREW & BUCKI, Proprietors.,

We respectfully announce to our friends and the pub-
lic generally, that, having secured the services of com-
petent Draughtsmen, AreTlitects and Mechanics we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of
'DWELLINGS,
COTTAGES,
FACTORIES,
HOTELS
PUBLIC EDIFICES,
etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill, and will continue, as heretofore, to nanufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc. .
July 17, '82-tf, Ellaville, Florida.

FORSALE.
AN IMPROVED PLACE on the south side of Lake
Harris, in Sumter County, Fla., about a mile from Ya-
laha. It contains 225 acres of the finest first-class high
hammock, about 50 acres cleared. There are two bold,
never-failing brooks running through the place, from
which an unlimited supply of water can be had, mak-
ing the raising of vegetables a certainty. The place has
Y mile lake Iront; the residence is a large, Southern
style house-six large rooms, store-room and kitchen at-
tached ; there are 500 old orange trees from 7 to 10 years
old, budded with choice varieties; also, 700 trees from 4
to 6 years old; lime and lemon trees in bearing. There
is on the place, probably, the finest guava grove in
South Florida. The estimated yield in 1881 was 500 bush-
els. This property is one of the most valuable and in-
viting tracts of land in this State. The quality of the
soil, besides growing orange trees, will make itLwith the
advantages of irrigation, and remarkable protection
from frost, peculiarly profitable for vegetable growing.
It can be divided Into 3 tracts sufficiently large for every
purpose. Daily communication at Yalaha by mail boat
connecting with St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railway.
Only the non-residence of the owner induces its sale.
Price, $15,000. Terms easy. Address
W. N. JACKSON
to feb20-83 Esperance, Fia.


i


.L r -


---% I


I I


ST. MARK'S HOTEL,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE ANP ALL: STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.

PEN T RO U G H OUTIT HE
.to : 'm Y. EA R.;
to Apl1 23, '83 "


EL
'A iininn'





TH^ FLOIDA :DISrATCH, eC


CAN MAKE MONEY BY USING




V e..ta.Ies OranTrees
S.~i rS O% 3 J Q DQ4 2 OT IT T II
B IB A T "I < -AE & J ?k fi .J l A' If -O

iGEO.,4~~ E8TER, 169 Front St., New York.
\ ; '. ,.-*/,1 '. -----0--- --0
D R EMB BT A& o .R;
Do notlt -v miiu-or r I i Soil.
They have been, i nln tffIA 11 8' if r T &r kI pk t 64A I f teli su lts.u

-j"V" ,: C..SJ1.. 0 1o nty, Florida.
WPSend for circular. __t_'_ _8_ ____ lo



I' FLOR.IDA.: TT AB LES
AND GENERAL CO 10,SI SN, MEROHA "N
R I .TRE .' -I., :. 9 -
REEE C : inercial Agencies, o any Wi4W1 CI 1fWANTt
STENCILS FURNISHED BY -,A. Lia,
to, t p 8l ,, ,8, .., ... "- ,. .. U, .Lo, FO ipB .

. r.. -,- : MERMCHANTS
""'NOq ......4 .tOUTHr DEil :"W '...umi ,., ,,.,
INDIANAPOLIS, IN'DIAW"A'
-. REWERENCES 1 X 1
INGR4M l FLE E IO FL wc1 r & PE, Bankers anvd .M i al Bank,; .
e S tt,-' WIii St id-lils- .' lJlthed on A ppl.oiti ? i':::,:.


D DI SST ON P U RC HAS E---C E




!LA'ND, AN. IM0RQeMEN1


Offer ftin Oftoe1t, I ,. tiR M -.83,,




IN BLOCKS OF NOT I T)AN .0.OR THN CES.
i .F-.2^ L .AAL..^J J. '- .;.. z~^ J ': .": :.. '-


A ThesLapds include all variety do.f uplau4 a.d .lowad, and rs adapted to OrIeat, I ,, .
ApplesT, no P4*x nw.g Sy.W ae 4n. A... chie X i .the co ntir ^ ^T. IT
St.3ohrin, 'oliWid, Th'eVaM, C a, Smter, Ly, Mrnrado; fij'ibd .tktr ,
.... .. .n.. e a .......qrp, ... .;.
The following arprqpqryve ,nd for 'sle 4tgra4 rice?
Gulf Coast Reserve," 268,000 acres, M. R. MARK, Agent, Anclote Fla.
V T imbnse acres, paprising olce Uacts of Pne pAyp;s, cliefly St. o s a
ORI I P
S. mar...kI- :: ., .

a. A. / .BA. 'i A' Qi. ,
01 \44'4


oCOMMI tQfrANTS.

3O6 and 838 North DMOla ~4re'- A#e,)z~a0 i, ~ adelpIlit
- toJn ,.;sx ,' : i .,;. -, .. .. ... '


FINE POULTRY.
8 HIK FOLLOWING
S. .R .EDS:,
Two. yads., PLYIYOUT~T 1 4ks, two yards each of
WHITE a"d BROWN LEGHORN,
i, .: . ;. . .9
S ., ,,. W' e are booking
orders now-foo-EGGS, and
'; ~*l.!.l tee-ifity pea? chnt. better rsulto
[t eai 61 ifri^ thet Noiotfli. end for tr-
la t. WAt Eh Jacksonvile, Fla.
;tWit .QW-RA-Aot 1106: l^.; 4 tojAnLV83a


s..B. HUBAfB &CO.,




APA AM tt X. Deb '. i..",
ugpril ^ b and Leather Wting,

A In 414 ito afll Kinds
A , B D .fENCE WIE.
A iOR& L. AtiE .'GATDW Tool.
,*Seri for Price List and C talogue, "s
:to June.l l '83 a . .. .

t rko f. A 46 cres 18 acres H. clard t"r
free, growing onthhe place. ...Bold blue'es nr 6fo ver
a quarter of a mufe, and.' 1,"te .yne^ cy l 0m'e,
ile. f e mes o. waW ot to-n the o.t t v-
i .ave m Ao oe, t. Ii e Mfll below Jack-
sonille, and one mInle from New Berlin. Can come. to
city every morning on mail steamer and return In tUe
afternoon. A choice place gor orange growip and truck
farming. Prif 2#W1 t "r A4
t Also, two desirable city lots 52A9 feet, and one 70xl6
,feet covered with thrifty 'rtsg4A 'trees 6 years old half
mile froi r n.e n siS Tant..L qt na4,htx."ooa .all
white). Pri'e bffitrst, $i00 eachV.'(ie oseon6id, a corner,
very handsome, $N.'0 Apply to ',

I No. t a'y.S9treet, - JACISO VILL.
x~ 'tIatvnswti iTn^]~sA(


DR. R. BACHMANN 'Wni Hate; the oly, relia-
bWe antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every option
ow extant, viz: Li s d Fei, on D all
*her domestic ani MA J e~ As..II his
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, b MittiU 11604104 ve been a fallure.
It is pk u &I a esbf TYry C. rS and ONB Doi-
IAdbp 4t~ es and Seed stores, The best of
rp Irhe' teb'OiMipAlication to te proprietor.


T:I


The agent of the '" Roal Mall Line to the Nether
lands,,"an4f "or'R ir "ti.:, i l Jackson-
.v .le reliable parties in seaoch oj
mp t a ..r' th r, .. . .


North rz*S ope

r ,
SIMIoa. :" l Fi ml and'Imp't Co.,
sept4, . JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


c~r r I" ----was


NF.M


I


i


^
r


. rr -*, ,l 'r. \>AM\W-, ,


=77"- 7 7, % ,"1--





liHiF1I tLO-RIDA I'IS TA'IC"O .


QUICK TRANSIT.-IMPORTANT TO ORANGE SHIP- !
and arrived in good order tjousvile and Nash-
( E ByW.l ... .
To Capt. W. e. lz"Y1410 ,iA clC ttlt of0) &N;R. A., Jack-" "
sonville, Fla.: r1 W To arri ve during NOVE and DECEMBER. Als ral stock of 1rs, and*
' You mnay agr6e that'_a. qWI ,. lqikshville cars
loaded with fruit or c teiHi !o through without AL TO
transfer if in good order- on arrival at Louisvllle or F 9 s
"Evansville. . J .M.CULP F 0
Itp Go. At.L. oe .
FOR SAlEltw.Milll ami Machlabry, t 10,000 bage. a I X i
fee ,,,,ille l.tat DBONE N[EAL, COTTON-S EED -MEAL, HTI'AEH, ETO.
to janI' .. Algenb ,,
aToo -.- t .XoY wSrI ..t tnoo'l o a tH3T 1 .030
insects with Remedies for their destruction, by Prof. H. to Jan 6, '.8 LLZ, FLORIDA.

Florida will soon be published by ASHMEAD BROS., o :yO (
and will k.Ya RrPIAfaB T '
FLORIDA I i l Wof which i.sl.i'0*Mt l q IT tdl .lli

ivsher I 00.f ahi-sl'4 4 s, o RINFE
Sr Im 11 TTUS bR y,....L.


Sandy address for cents by Blanks d tBooks manufact o"r rilroadsaboate Hote Banks


Write ftra catWl uet ',,' '.,.r _,',l ..t.t..... a :^' ) tf'' ?'l;l
TOne AtVERTISB R.La e circulation: H" r uMel~r'it~ r i g, i(rdening, etc. *
sue from 8,000 to- _nu & _i .e-ubout 40,000 T&blAlat any published in Florida. Specimen copies free. Write f6j a coSpy.
0 11 t1W1h 3t ..1
tI J4 "i) r JMKfVl^,^tiAN, SETL ly 1 -A* e ylo t....i.... . r ..1
OiZVNl^^llWiR^APl ^r^ou wra ^tis generally cone ii[ lIbing n he .We haveall the modern mahinery and all




FOR SALE A A' I GA914. LOIDA ITS ATflEfi Pr-%q D
Groves built a p pme t wm, me for U DE TO EAST rdePiie0 10 COItTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-."
to.nv,'83., OU TH FLORI A, E AM H- ." OA"ELORIDA (8vo sheoe, Oe extra)..Proe 6o00

i. r VICA...............N.. .. .l ..Price 2 INDEX TO THE eECISIOS OF HE SU............-......................... Price
FOB SALE 'tGA ..... AV GEU LORDA.....; ...PrcLORIDeA: ITS 3 00
LA .... . SOUTH FLORIA 1 O r.LRIDA(8vo sheep, postage extra)..e 6 00





i t fri
I Sg e ner l coe.. t (a e h e i )..........ee........ 6i


i- A" ; ,1 mailed on application. *: .


Works and all the advantages of an it
So .Co t :, 0 t o ',i .
re map suttlan ogaarodsen ourpatabimag In MI ..'l .P ,.'i 11 *n -,li l. .
-ii' &nidoiltrB h tEfif 'C church
I 1 l..iLKRT XAS.,,,AND-tW D IN J AT YA i .



Catrdo ,- 'ArintMiddeiui tibueAddd ref iWn nR o r t.fo.i ".' 'I >t "

toEi N8 D I A o a Ja T JACKSONVILLE
to regart d. "Ain JackHonMddle,221 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, F IBI.M ;
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r u 9 re m .W.... .. .. ..... c...a... .. ... . .. ... . ..,- .. .......... ...... .___L ... ...1..... ..A&.. ,. .
_LRMNran