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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00036
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 27, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00036
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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_______ A to


Vol. 1.--No. 36.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Foirida and the Sauth.

Price 5 cents.


Monday, November 27, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


Preparation of Jute Fibre. stalks were entirely green and untrimmed.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., October 24, 1882. They were put into the machine with all their
Editors of The Florida Dispatch: branches and leaves on, just as they came from
GENTLEMEN : Your journal has contributed the plantation. The Jute stalks weighed eigh-,
much to awaken an interest in Jute culture in ty-seven pounds. They were run through the
our State, by numerous publications in its col- machine in thirty minutes. The available pul-
umns from time to time. I stated through the leys of the machine-shop were so.adjusted as to
press, some time since, that I had received cop- afford insufficient power. It was deemed un-
ies of the machinery of Mr. T. Albee Smith for wise for the sake of a single experiment to in-
separating the Jute fibre, and that these draw- cur the expense of alterations. Not more than
ings could be seen by any person desiring to one-third of the feeding platform was at any
examine them. The description of the trial time filled. If the power had been adequate,
and result of the test of the machine given in the time consumed in passing the stalks through
the following letter from Professor Waterhouse, the machine would not have exceeded ten min-
may give a more intelligent idea of the process utes. After the operation, the blades of the
than any view of the drawing of the machine machine were found to be free from gum. An
could afford. As the subject of Jute culture in ingenious and effective application of water pits
Florida has been presented prominently for a obviates a difficulty that has heretofore been
long time through the press of the State, the very embarrassing. The separation of the fibre
letter will awaken still more interest in showing from the ligneous stem was complete. Hardly
that the States of the lower Mississippi are a sliver of wood remained among the ribbons
earnestly engaged, not only in its growth, but of fibre, and wherever a piece was found it was
the preparation of the Jute fibre for market, on wholly detached and easily shaken out. The
a large scale. From the seed disseminated machine delivered the fibre straight and untan-
through Dr. Kenworthy and other sources, the gled, while traveling belts carried away the
planting of Jute in Florida has been success- -woody fragments and left them in a heap by
fully tried by many parties. The information themselves. The eighty-seven pounds of stalks
as to the perfection of the fibre for the demands yielded twenty-seven pounds of green fibre. A
of commerce in the great Southwest will, no pound and one-half of green fibre were found
doubt, stimulate the interest here to greater in the refuse, but this waste consisted almost
progress. The letter of Professor Waterhouse entirely of the fibre of the branches. These were
was received by me a few days since, so short that the fibre was not long enough to
Respectfully, C. DREW, reach from the crushing to the separating roll-
State Agent of Immigration. ers, and, therefore, was carried through and
deposited with the refuse.
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, ) The machine, of course, only removes the
SAINT Louis, September 18, 1882. J wood from the fibre. The process of rotting is
,IA..'. James M. Putnam and C. Menelas: necessary before the fibre is ready for commer-
DEAR SIRS: The Jute machine of Mr. T. cial use. Three experiments of rotting were
Albee Smith was tested in this city on the 12th tried. Two of them were conducted in the lab-
of September. The mechanical conditions un- oratory of Washington University. Fourteen
der which the experiment was tried were im- and one-fourth pounds of green fibre, steeped
perfect. The machine was operated. by an en- in a boiling bath of chemicals, yielded two and
gine that was at the same time driving all the one-fourth pounds of dry fibre. Ten and one-
machinery of a large work-shop. Hence it was half pounds of green fibre, treated by the same
impossible to determine the amount of power method, produced one pound and a half of dry
required to actuate the Jute machine. The Jute fibre. The time spent in this process was ex-
was home-grown-on the plantation of C. actly six hours. A specimen of the fibre ,pre-
Menelas. As the Jute was cut before it was pared in this way is herewith enclosed. The
mature, the stalks were rather small and short. fibres are strong and thoroughly separated, but
This length ranged from five to seven feet. The somewhat darker than those rotted in water.
j ____ ___ _ _ _ ___* __


Two and one-fourth pounds of green fibre were
placed in water, but the process of rotting is
not yet finished. All of the steps described in
these various tests were taken under my per-
sonal supervision. These facts will enable you
to judge for yourselves of the commercial value
of Mr. Smith's machine.
It is very gratifying to me, after ten years of
urgent appeal to inventors, that one of my own
townsmen has devised a machine that is an im-
portant advance towards the solution of a great
industrial problem. Mr. Smith's invention sim-
plifies the process of preparation. Heretofore
water-rotting required ponds and rivers for the
submersion of the unwieldy mass of stalks. But
Mr. Smith's machine so greatly reduces the
bulk, that the fibre separated from the wood,
can easily be treated in vats. Water seems to
be the most economical solvent of the gum
which holds the Jute fibres together. But water
will do its work as cheaply in the United States
as in India. Though chemistry may yet invent
more effective methods, at present, the cheapest
way of separating the fibre is an immersion of
the Jute in vats of hot water. This*process,
impracticable when the whole stalks are han-
dled, is readily feasible when only the fibre is
treated. Ponds and rivers cannot be heated,
but vats can be, and an equable temperature
of any required degree can be maintained.
Mr. Smith's machine obviates a serious diffi-
culty. In India, the entire stalk is placed in
water. If the stem is thick, the fibre, at the
top is thin and delicate, while that at -the foot
is coarse and dense. As the water has access
onlyt o the outside of the stalk, the thicker bark
and more compact fibre at the bottom prevent a
uniformity of rotting. Before t he fibre at the butt
has been sufficiently dissolved, the fibre at the
top has become worthless from over-rotting.
But Mr. Smith's machine, by stripping away
the woody part of the stalk and' freely, admit-
ting the water to both sides of the fibre, insures
*a comparative equality of rotting and prevents
a material loss of fibre.
Hoping that the culture of Jute in the Gulf
States will soon develop into a national ihdus-
try, and cordially thanking you for your grati-
fying. acknowledgement of my own efforts to
promote the success of this great interest,
Very respectfully, S. WA TEHO.-E.






;O THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


"Intensive' Farming.
We have not been able to find room for a full
account of the "Intensive" system of farming,
as applied by FURMAN, of Georgia, but we
shall publish the whole matter at an early day.
In the meantime, we give the following sum-
ming up from a late number of the Atlanta
Constitution:
I have been overwhelmed with inquiries
since the publication of my first article on this
subject. It has been circu ated everywhere. A
shoe dealer in this city, Mr. Geo. W. Price, has
sent 10,000 copies of it, with his advertisement,
out to his country customers. Mr. Furman is
in a like manner embarrassed, and I am in-
formed that visitors to his farm have revived
the flush days with the hotels at Milledgeville.
That's all very good, The more people that in-
quire, the more people are interested. The
more people that go to Milledgeville, the more
people are convinced and converted. The inqui-
ries are mainly directed to the accuracy of the
article-"Is it true ?" is the tenor of the corre-
spondence.
It is proper to say that Mr. Furman, in a
letter of late date, sends most abundant proof of
the truth of his claims. The last Milledgeville
Recorder publishes the certificate of two leading
farmers who say that his 65 acres will make
over 75 bales. Mr. S. P. Myrick writes me
that he has been over the crop four times, and
his best judgment is that it is certain to make
75 or 80 bales. He says it sounds incredible
when the poor land on which it is planted is
considered, and adds: "Had I not seen it with
my own eyes, I, too, should have doubted." I
could publish a column of similar certificates.
But where is the incredible part of Mr. Fur-
man's work ? It is no miracle and no new in-
vention. What he has done is as old as math-
ematics and as inexorable.
He found a piece of land that was starved.
And he fed it.
That was all. Just as he would have fed a
starving mule or horse. A great many farmers
would have refused to feed the land, holding
that what they gave to the land would be
wasted. Many who were willing to feed it
would have fed it recklessly, tossing into its
dumb mouth whatever came handiest. Mr. Fur-
man fed it intelligently. He saw that it had
been depleted by successive crops of cotton be-
ing taken from it.
What was the proper thing to do ? Clearly,
to restore to it the savor and strength that had
been taken from it. But exactly what elements
had been taken from it by the wearing cotton
crops ? To ascertain this he analyzed a cotton
plant, and found what elements made it up.
Then see how carefully he proceeds:
"I found," he said, "that a perfect cotton
food-that is one that would restore to the soil
everything that cotton took out of it-must
have in it phosporic acid, ammonia, humus,


potash, lime, magnesia, soda and silica. Of
these eight elements only one (silica) is found
in sufficient quantity. The other seven must
be supplied. So I determined to make a com-
post that supplied them."
"Why didn't you buy a commercial fertil-
izer ?"
"Because the best commercial fertilizers fur-
nish only three of the elements, viz : Phos-
phoric acid, ammonia and potash. Analyze
them all and you will see that none of them do
better than to furnish three of the needed ele-
IiitCLlLtO. Ou I Li4.'.Jl'a A V, LjL"U%, kabv. W.0
(1) cotton seed, (2) stable manure, (3) acid
phosphate and (4) kainit. Now, see how this
compost gives every one of the eight elements
needful for the perfect cotton food:


1. Acid phosphate gives phosphoric acid and
lime.
2. Stall manure or organic matter gives am-
monia and humus.
3. Cotton seed gives potash, ammonia and
humus.
4. Kainit gives potash, lime, magnesia and
soda.
Silica is always present in the soil, in prac-
tically inexhaustib le quantities, so we have in
my compost everything essential supplied.
Kainit is one of the most important elements
of this formula. Containing, as it does, nearly
one bulk of salt, it is a great conservator of
moisture. I have found it, combined with hu-
mus, a specific against rust in cotton, and
owing to its contents of sulphate of magnesia,
it is invaluable in the power that it possesses in
the compost heap of fixing the ammonia as
a sulphate and thereby preventing its es-
cape."
"Now, by feeding the land with this perfect
food you bring it up ?"
"Certainly, and why should there be surprise
at the result ? You give your land more every
year than is taken from it. It fattens just asti
horse or mule would fatten. I felt that a bale
to the acre on this land that produced a bale
to eight acres was just as sure under my pro-
cess as I used to be at college that a mathemat-
ical problem would work out right. Indeed, I
said at the beginning that I would produce 100
bales to the sixty-five acres, and keep it at that
figure. I say now that I will make three bales
to the acre, and I feel sure that I will get 150
bales off the 65 acres within two years. Now
print this prediction."
"There are," Mr. Furman went on to say,
"certain incidental rules to be observed. For
example, it does no good in your land to give
it proper food if our tropical washing rains
sweep it out of the shallow soil and take it
away. We must put it there and keep it there.
To do this I ditch all hillsides, turning the
dirt on the upper side of the ditch, so that it
catches the washings, and in time terrace my
field. 2d, I break my land deeper each year,
as I am able to increase the humus, and this
increases the absorptive powers of the soil, and
renders it less liable to wash. 3rd, I have a
succession of crops, so that the earth will be
kept full of organic matter and rootlets all the
time, and is thereby held together and can't
wash. I plant oats in the fall and cotton or
corn when the oats are taken off. I therefore
not only give my land a surplus of good food,
but I hold it in the land until it is absorbed.
The result is inexorable. If 10,000 farms in
Georgia were treated just as mine has been,
the outcome would be just the same."

"Don't" Mulch in Winter.
To the Editor of the Union:
An article from that able and well edited ag-
ricultural journal, the Southern Cultivator and
Dixie Farmer, appears in your columns of the
11th inst., advising the mulching of trees now.


I've no idea the editors intended the advice for
Florida orange growers, and this is written to
deter any of the "primary class" from indulg-
ing in any such luxuries and costly experi-
ments. Admitting that the treatment is quite
the proper thing for latitudes further north, I
feel confident that a majority of our oldest
growers will join me in the assertion that it is
extremely hazardous in Florida. As the arti-
cle in question says mulching "produces
warmth and moisture," whilst retaining both
of these vital essentials of plant growth, and
tends very materially in keeping up a flow of
vious- -should produce the opposite condition.
To reach this condition in the fall, I know of
but one line of action, one which has been em-
inently successful with the writer and all


others brought under his observation. It is to
so cultivate the trees during the growing
months, fertilizing if needed-but not later
than July for the latter-that they may in
consequence make so vigorous and thrifty a
growth, in these eight or nine safe months, as
to readily accept the short rest now offered
and so richly deserved. If deprived of this
natural respite at this season of the year, "Mr.
Grower," they'll whisper in your y-ear, "We'll
see you later," and if you won't "give us a
rest," we will take it in "De fust dry drouth."
And then "my innocent novitiate," you'll pro-
ceed to recall those wonderful legends erst-
while listened to regarding the marvelous
drought-resisting power of the orange tree,
and with a three-ton voice and a wheel-bari-
tone--Mississippi style, you will softly exclaim,
"another Florida lie nailed." "A three-ply-
wooly-blanketed dengued lie. "Cho-wrecked !"
"Good, Mr. Compositor," that's it-L-i-e, Lee.
The lecture is over, "Go home" and mulch
one tree, and when a cold snap sends the son
of Jupiter. down into the twenties, you will be
convinced that I am either right or wrong. If
the latter, I promise to do penance by agree-
ing to sit on neighbor Kelley's stove the next
time he uses it for a powder magazine. T.
Cow Peas as Fertilizers, Etc.
RICE CREEK, NEAR PALATKA, )
November 6, 1882. f
In the issue of the Journal of the 2d inst.,
you republished an article from THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH, by "C. V. H.," of Lake Como, on
"Cow Peas as Fertilizers," and I was surprised
to find in it this sentence: "Several planters in
this vicinity have a similar experience to my
own, which is, that the crop as a fertilizer does
not pay for planting, or even repay for the
seed." There are some field peas called cow
peas, which I regard a misnomer, that have
not given, in my experience, highly favorable
results, but with the old clay-bank cow pea, which
is among the oldest field peas, and which I re-
gard as the best, either as food or for stock, or
for its manurial properties, I have seen the
most decided and largely beneficial results in
South Carolina and Georgia.
The fertilizing value of the cow pea has long
been known, but in recent years the attention
of planters has been especially directed to it as
the means to renovate exhausted soils and re-
store their fertility, and, as some claim, even a
greater degree of fertility than the land origi-
nally possessed may be obtained. Eminently
successful and highly practical agriculturists
in the two States named have carefully and in-
telligently concluded experiments with the cow
pea, and the published results of their experi-
ments and conclusions prove satisfactorily its
value as a fertilizer and renovator of soils. I
have not the writings of these gentlemen just
now at my command, but as well as I can re-
collect they all concur in the advice to leave
the crop to rot on the ground undisturbed be-
fore turning under. And why ? A pea crop
turned under in a green state furnishes to the


soil ammonia and organic and inorganic ele-
ments in large quantities by decomposition,
which is rapid. 'The ammonia is changed
into nitrates which volatilize quick, and as the
soil cannot hold or fix them they are soon lost.
But if a crop of some kind is sowed upon the
land when the pea is in a green state and turned
under, the soil is thus enabled to retain the
volatile fertilizing elements through the action
of the rootlets and radicals of plants which,
penetrating and ramifying in every direction
in the soil, thus appropriate these valuable ele-
ments which would otherwise escape into the
o+wri ^Wbcon + ton r'nD ; lO 1pftf fo cliP
and rot upon the surface and is then ploughed
under, decomposition being less rapid, the spec-
ial gases are generated less rapidly and a crop
planted after the lapse of a few months appro-


--- r --


s


i -I -- -- -






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. S


private these elements of plant food without ap-
preciable benefit. It strikes me that the diffi-
culty of turning under thoroughly a heavy
growth of green pea vines is also a point to be
practically considered.
The pea enriches land not only by. decompo-
sition; it sends down into the sub-soil a vig-
orous tap-root which brings up from thence or-
ganic and inorganic elements of plant food,
there pent up, and deposits them into the sur-
face soil. Again, it is a well-known fact that
shade exerts upon soils a most important in-
fluence; it protects the land from the evaporat-
ing heats of the summer sun, thereby assisting
in the decomposition and retention of moisture
in the soil. In more northern latitudes, clover
is esteemed of great value as a fertilizer and
restorer of worn out lands, and one important
function which clover performs is furnishing to
land a protecting cover from solar evaporation,
thereby assisting the accumulation of humus.
The warm function which clover performs in
northern climates the pea performs for the
South. Not only does its decomposition give
fertility to land by its shade, which is suffi-
ciently thick, but it attracts from the atmos-
phere to the surface soil and then preserves there
the moisture and those especial gases and salts
that give productiveness to land.-D. R. Jacm-
ison, in Palatka Journal.
The Southern World also gives us the follow-
ing on the same subject:
WEST PASCAGOULA, Miss.
"The Scientific American of August 26, says:
'Pea vines act better as a fertilizer, when
ploughed under after they have decayed than
when green.' Long exposure to the weather
makes them of little value as food, and as rich
food is considered the best for rich manure, can
you tell me what new elements of fertility are
added to them by being left to sun and rain to
decay ? F. GAUTIER.
ANSWER.-"We have not seen the article in
the Scientific Amncricu,' alluded to, but presume
the writer did not intend to convey the idea
that any element of value is added to the pea
vines by leaving them exposed to the sun and
rain to decay, but that the rapid fermenta-
tion of the large mass of succulent vegetable
matter exercised a deleterious effect on a closely
succeeding crop, or that the upturning and ex-
posure of the soil during hot weather is injuri-
ous. We think the latter objection is the seri-
ous one. Another consideration that is against
turning under the vines green is, that it leaves
the ground in bad mechanical condition for im-
mediate planting and subsequent germination
of seeds. We have no doubt that the hot sun
seriously injures the soil when exposed to its
full rays without protection of any sort.
"While it is true, as a general proposition, that
the richer the food value of the crop the greater
it will benefit the soil when turned under, yet
it must be borne in mind, that during the pro-
cess of decay of the vines the elements that gave
them value as food are leached out by the rains


and carried directly into the soil where they
will be found in a condition for the immediate
use of the succeeding crop. Very little of value
is lost by evaporation from the decaying vines.
The leaves and stems successively fall to the
ground and are soon converted into a dry hu-
mus easily ploughed under, and making it a
much lighter job to cover the woody parts of
the vine. We do not think the question of the
relative merits of the two plans-so far as re-
lates to the benefits conferred on the soil are
concerned-has yet been definitely settled, but
incline to the opinion that mere convenience
and expediency has governed those who advo-
cate the practice of permitting the vines to de-
cay on the surface. It is well settled, however,
that a very great benefit to the soil is the result
of this new practice. While it may be true
that the old idea of ploughing under vines


while in full luxuriance of growth may add
more virtue to the soil, yet it may be that this
virtue is overbalanced by the considerations al-
ready referred to, viz: Injury to the soil from
exposure to the sun, greater difficulty and cost
of the operation, and the immediate subsequent
condition of the soil.
"We wish we could publish some decisive
experiments concerning all those points. The
question is only one of a thousand that ought to
be investigated, and which call loudly for the
institution of experiment farms or stations.
"R."




HOUSEHOLD RECIPES,

From the Household Department of Detroit
Free Press.
CAKE OR FRUIT SANDWICHES.
Cake or fruit sandwiches are made thus:
Four eggs, their weight in flour, sugar and
butter; warm the butter and beat it to a cream,
then stir the flour and sugar into it gradually,
beat up the eggs and stir them in. Beat the
cake well for half an hour and bake in a
rather quick oven. If for sandwiches slice
the cake in half and put preserves between.
WHITE CAKE.
One cup of white sugar, one-third cup of
melted butter whipped to a cream; add one-
third cup of sweet milk and stir thoroughly;
sift one cup of flour, one-third cup of corn-
starch and one heaping teaspoonful of baking
powder together and add to the above mix-
ture. Take the whites of four eggs, beat them
to a very stiff froth and add, stirring it well
with the other; flavor with lemon; bake slow-
ly, either in jelly cake tins or in one cake.
Excellent.
SPONGE PUFFS.
Have ready some very hot lard, as for boil-
ing doughnuts, and drop into it from a spoon
some bread, sponge before any more flour is
added, and when it is perfectly light. Let
them get brown and well cooked through, and
pull open and eat with butter for breakfast.
LEMON PIE.
One large lemon, the yellow grated, and all
the pulp and juice used; one cup sugar, one-
half cup water and two large even spoonfuls
of flour. Beat the whites of eggs separately,
with sugar added, then the yolks well beaten
and the flour gradually. Bake the crust a lit-
tle before putting the rest in. Bake brown.
BAKED CABBAGE.
Cut the cabbage in small pieces and boil till
tender in salt and water. When cold chop it
finely, add two beaten eggs, a little butter,
pepper and salt, if it needs it, and two table-
spoonfuls of cream. Stir all vigorously, bake
in a buttered pudding dish till it is brown on
the top. Serve hot.


PUDDING SAUCE.
Common sour pudding sauce can be pleas-
antly flavored by adding half a cup of stoned
or chopped raisins. When the hot water is
poured over the butter, sugar and flour, put
the raisins in; let them come to a boil in it.
Well-washed English currants or dried cher-
ries can be substituted for raisins.
SOUTHERN FRUIT CAKE.
Six eggs, beaten separately, seven cups of
flour, three and one-half cups of sugar, two
cups of buttermilk, one and one-half cups of
butter, two teaspoonfuls of soda, one tea-
spoonful of cloves, two teaspoonfuls of cinna-
mon, two teaspoonfuls of allspice, one teaspoon-
ful of coriander seed, two nutmegs, grated, one
pound of raisins, one-half pound of currants,
one pound of figs, dried, one pound of dates,
one pound of prunes, one-half pound of citron,
one-third pound of candied orange peel, grated


rind of two lemons and juice of one, one tum-
bler of brandy.
This recipe married off all our family, and
these proportions will make enough slices "to
go round." With a score of good wishes for
"Betsey."
ICE CREAM CAKE.
Two cups of granulated sugar, one cup of
milk, two cups of flour, one cup of butter, one
cup of corn starch, three teaspoonfuls of bak-
ing powder, whites of eight eggs.
Icing.-White of four eggs and four cups of
pulverized sugar. Pour one-half pint of boil-
ing water over the sugar, boil until when
dropped in water it is very stiff, but not brit-
tle. Pour over the beaten whites of the eggs
and add, when hot, one-half teaspoonful of ci-
tric acid. Beat until nearly cold. Bake in
layers. For "Betsey."
SPONGE CAKE.
Two eggs, half cup of cream, one cup of
sugar, one cup of flour, one teaspoonful of
cream of tartar, half teaspoonful of soda;
flavor to taste. Extra nice.
OYSTER FRITTERS.
Drain them, chop fine, season with pepper
and salt. Make a batter of eggs, milk and
flour; stir the chopped oysters in this, fry in
hot butter or lard.
TO COOK CALVES' LIVER.
Slice thin some nice salt pork, such as has a
streak of fat and a streak of lean, and fry un-
til a light brown, then put in the liver ; cut
about half an inch thick and dust well with
flour and season with a little pepper ; while it
is frying lay the slices of pork on top of it, and
that makes it salt enough and gives it a fine
flavor; fry until done through and serve at
once with a slice of pork on each slice of liver ;
great care should be taken not to cook liver
too much, or let it stand before eating, as it
makes it hard and tough and spoils a most ap-
petizing breakfast dish.
STEAMED CABBAGE.
Put four slices of bacon in a saucepan and
one cup of boiling water; quarter the cabbage;
lay it on the meat and cover closely; if it gets
dry, add a little more boiling water. This
takes less meat and time than if boiled.
CREOLE WAY OF COOKING CABBAGE.
Fry slices of ham or bacon till right brown;
take meat out and add a tablespoonful of flour;
brown it; have cabbage cut once, laying in
water ; put it in the pot, cover closely, and stir
every now and then. It will take three hours
to smother down nicely. Eat with rice.
BAKED CABBAGE.
Boil a firm head for fifteen minutes, then
change the water for more boiling water; boil
till tender, drain and set aside to cool. Mince
some boiled ham; mix with bread crumbs;
add pepper, one tablespoonful of butter, and
two eggs well beaten, and three tablespoonfuls
of milk; chop cabbage very fine ; mix all to-
gether and bake in a pudding dish till brown.
Serve hot.
TRANSPARENT CUSTARDS.


This is an old-fashioned and rather expen-
sive custard, but so superior to any I've tasted
that I have long since dropped all others, pre-
ferring this:
Beat with one pound of sugar the yolks of
sixteen eggs; set over a slow fire and add grad-
ually three-quarters of a pound of nicely
creamed butter; stir constantly until the but-
ter melts; remove from the fire and add a tea-
cup of rich cream; thicken with a tablespoon-
ful of corn starch; flavor with lemon; citron
in small bits may be added; bake in puff
paste a nice brown; to be eaten cold. This
recipe should be used when making silver or
ice cream cake, which calls for the same num-
ber of whites.
. Subscribe for THE FLORIDA DISPATCH
$1 per year.


. L


I I


d






62 THE FLORIDA I SPATC H.


A Subscriber's Criticism.
The following is an extract from a letter
from one of our subscribers, whose former letter
to us was unfortunately mislaid:
CAMPVILLE, ALACHUA Co., FLA.,
November 16, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Gentlemen-At the beginning of this year I
sent you a letter for publication.
My letter, I suppose myself, was a little too
long drawn out, as it is hard for me as a foreign-
er, to make short expressions in the English
language; but I know this much, the letter
would have done some good in regard to indu-
cing hard-fisted men, such as Dr. C. J. Ken-
worthy calls for in his last article, "Experi-
mental Garden for Florida," to come to the
State.
I can claim that I had a hard run of it at
first myself, but think just as much' of Florida,
and take as much pride in the State now as the
day I was induced to come, though I must
acknowledge false, or, at least, misleading
statements, induced me to come.
I know that such and such things can be
done, but they require capital and labor to do
them.
If such statements be made as you have done
in your issue of 13th inst., viz., "that Mr. Lip-
sey, at Archer, has received 75 cents a piece fbr
peaches," it will undoubtedly mislead.
I do not doubt the truth of it, but you know
as well as I do, that we couldn't harvest one
crop of peaches after another one, and get
75 cents a piece.
Sometimes circumstances run up the price of
an article, but it would be ruinous to speculate
on it as a surety.
I feel sorry, therefore, for that man who is
induced to go to Archer, with such expecta-
tions.
If he should go there how terribly disappoint-
ed would he be when he found he couldn't
realize over 25 cents a piece.
Yours very respectfully,
FRANK VOI(T.
REPLY.-The FLORIDA DISPATCH has
strenuously endeavored to give facts, and
nothing but practical and reliable information
in regard to Florida, and her agricultural and
horticultural products.
In no case knowingly, would the Editors or
publishers permit any but sucT to be published,
nor would they allow in their columns any arti-
cle which is calculated to mislead.
Our aim is to make the paper an authority,
and the best agricultural journal in Florida
and the South. For, undoubtedly, within
twenty years, may be less, Florida will be the
greatest fruit growing State in the Union.
Not only is her soil and climate adapted to
growing many fruits grown in the North,
but she is specially adapted to growing an im-


mense variety of tropical and semi-tropical
fruits.
The publishers have been six years in Flori-
da; long enough to form some accurate esti-
mate of what her future will be, and they pre-
dict for her a glorious one.
Her future will be such as Bishop Berkely,
who was born towards'the latter part of the
16th century, very aptly describes in a single
verse :
In happy climes, where from the genial sun,
And virgin earth, such scenes ensue,
The force of art by nature seems outdone,
And fancied beauties by the true."


If she has had her Richard Lee's to traduce,
villify and slander her, she also has her cham-
piohs, and the latter will prevail. Mr. Lipsey,
undoubtedly, got 75 cents a piece for the first
shipment of his peaches as stated by us, and if
Mr. Voigt will refer to our issue of last spring
in which this fact was first published, he will
see we commented upon it at the time, and said
such prices could not be relied upon, but that
there was money in them at 10 cents a piece, or
even less,
Mr. Voigt thinks a man would be disappoint-
ed at receiving only 25 cents a piece. A man
who would be disappointed at receiving 25 cents
for his crop of peaches, is a-well-extremely
avaricious, and we don't want any such to
come to Florida. Nothing short of a "gold
mine" would satisfy them. Some time ago
we were offered $1.00 apiece for Japan
Persimmons, but we absolutely refused. Now,
on the cluster of this fine fruit, sent us by Mr.
Hill, there were seventeen specimens. We
therefore could have realized $17 for them.
If we remember correctly, Mr. Hill informed
us, one of his trees planted in 1877, had eighty-
five Persimmons on it.
We have no hesitancy in saying, therefore,
that those of our fruit growers who make the
first shipment of this promising fruit to
Northern markets, will realize very high figures
for them, and the demand for them will be
large. For as a new fruit and a novelty, they
will bring extraordinary high prices.
Our first shipment of strawberries, too, briug
from $3 to $5 per box, but there is money in
them at only 25 cents per box.
Facts are better than assertions; the above
are facts. Examples are better than precepts,
and examples of poor men succeeding in Flori-
da are numerous. Too many cases of success
are already on record to question it at this late
day. Mr. Voigt is an example himself, and we
should like to publish his experience. He says
he was brought to Florida, "by false or at least
misleading statementss" and even then suc-
ceeded.
Let us publish your experience, Mr. Voigt,
for the benefit of those coming-[EDs.

Notes on Esperance, Florida.
ESPERANCE, SUMTER COUNTY, FLA.,
November 13, 1882. j
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
To-day we send you a list of our lands which
we wish to put before the public through the


columns of your valuable paper. We are not
land agents, but wish to settle up our section of
country, which is as well located and as desir-
able as any lands in this great "Lake Region."
We have a steamer which touches our wharves
twice a day, giving us every mail facility. We
are only two and one-half miles from the. grow-
ing town of Taveres, and about same distance
from Yalaha; distance from Leesburg ten miles.
Those who settle among uKi'eed fear no trouble
in getting plenty of lumber, as the powerful
mills at Taveres supplies all demands.
We can and do raise everything that is grown
in this section of Florida. Pine-apples and
guavas grow to perfection here. The profits
have been' so far beyond the expectations of'
the most sanguine, that quantities of both these
fruits will be planted out this winter and spring.
Our section is yet in its infancy, but as we have
so many natural advantages given us, and a


"go-head" set among us, we are sure that we
will prosper. The lands offered will compare
favorably with any in Sumter County, and we
offer them at a great bargain to any who will
come and live among us.
We are not below the "frost line," but we
raise many tender plants and trees.
Respectfully,
W. P. COUPER,
D. E. LOWELL,
W. N. JACKSON.

Citron and Limeg-How to Preserve.
DRAYTON ISLAND, FLA., Nov. 19, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Be kind enough to inform me, if you know or
can ascertain from old residents, the manner of
treatment of the citron to prepare it for the use
of making into .cakes, &c., and preserving in a
dried state-such as is usually known as grocers
citron. For which information I shall be greatly
obliged. Yours truly, D. W. C.
REPLY.-We give the following mode of pre-
serving citron and limes from a late number of
the New York World. Will our correspondent
kindly report results if he tries this recipe?-
EDS.
Pare, core and slice the citrons. To six
pounds of fruit allow six pounds of sugar, four
lemons and a quarter of a pound of ginger root.
Put the slices of lemon into the preserving ket-
tle and boil them for half an hour, or until
they look clear, in a little clear water, then
drain them. Save the water and put the slices
into another dish with a little cold. water,
cover them and let them stand over night. In
the morning wrap the root-ginger (bruised) in a
thin muslin cloth, boil it in three pints of clear
water until it is highly flavored. Then take out
the bag of ginger. Put the sugar into the ket-
tle with the ginger water. When the sugar is
dissolved set it over the fire, boil and skim un-
til no more scum arises. Then put in the pieces
of citron and the juice of the lemons. Boil them
in the syrup until the slices are quite transpa-
rent. Do not allow them to break. When done,
put them into the cans or jars, pouring the
syrup on them. The slices of lemon may be
added or not, as is desired.
When the limes have been kept during warm
weather in brine, they may first be freshened.
Cut them enough to get out all the seeds and
place in cold water for one day, changing the
water several times, so as to remove all the salt.
Next boil the limes in water to which soda has
been added in about the proportion of one-half
a tablespoonful of soda to three quarts of water.
Boil until tender enough to put a straw through
them, soak again in cold water one day, chang-
ing the water often. To one pound of fruit add
two and one-half pounds of white sugar and
three pints of water. Boil the syrup fifteen
minutes, drop the fruit in, boil five minutes, re-
move, put into jars. Now let the syrup cook
about fifteen minutes longer and then pour it
over the fruit.


"Egyptian Queen" Pine-Apple.
SOUTH LAKE WEIR, FLA., Nov. 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Can you inform me where I can obtain the
"Egyptian Queen" Pine-Apple that Mr. E. E.
Ropes mentions in an article in the Advance?
I would like a thousand plants. What can
they be secured for; and when would be the
best time to set them out ?
By answering the above you would confer a
favor on a subscriber. W. E. G.
REPLY.-Write A. I. Bidwell, Jacksonville,
Florida. Will some of our Indian River or
Orange County subscribers answer the above
inquiries ?-EDS.


----~~------~-~---~-------- ----- -- I--- --






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 6


Answers to Inquiries.
R. L.-Small boxes, holding say 50 or 100
selected oranges, carefully wrapped and packed
-wrappers having the grower's address printed
thereon-would, we think, sell well in all our
large cities. Several of these boxes nailed to-
gether could form a case of the size and weight
of the ordinary orange box. We do not know
of any basket manufactory on a large scale in
the South. Peach baskets are made at the
North and West, in large quantities. The es-
tablishment of great factories, required by the
growth of the peach trade, has reduced the
price to a moderate figure, varying from $6 to
$8 per 100. Along the Maryland railroads
there are eight or nine basket factories, each
making from 2,500 to 4,000 baskets a day
during the busy season. The bottoms and
hoops are made of Maryland pine, and the
staves from the Delaware gum tree.
Mrs. A. D. S.-See excellent recipe for
Orange Marmalade in present number.
H.-Address A. I. Bidwell, or A. Puetz,
both of this city.
B. S.-No ; the Osage Orange does not make
a "good hedge" in Florida, but we see the
leaves recommended as food for the silk worm.
It will be safe to take cuttings from the Ma-
cartney or Cherokee rose whenever the plant is
in a dormant condition-generally from the
middle of November to middle of January.
Well matured wood, about as large as an or-
dinary lead pencil, makes the best cuttings.
They should be a foot or more in length, and
planted so as to leave one or two good buds
above the surface.
J1 G. F.-Our publishl'rs, the Ahinca.1l
Bro's., can supply the Florida books and views
you desire. Back numbers of DISPATCH, pres-
ent volume, can still be furnished.
J. G. S.-One dollar, paid any time before
Jan. 1st, 1883, secures the enlarged and greatly
improved DISPATCH for next year. See club-
bing rates. The speci'AIn copies were duly
mailed. Thanks for your friendly suggestions.
R. H.-The Peen- To and Honey Peaches are
undoubtedly better adapted to East Florida,
and the lower South, than thle old Persian va-
rieties. We do not know anything of the "na-
tive" or "cracker" peaches you speak of;.but
presume, of course, that they do not "come
true" from the seed, and can only be propaga-
ted with certainty by budding. We are plant-
ing largely of the Peen-To and Honey, on high
pine land on the St. John's River, near this city.
Mr. J. E. Ingraham advertises valuable land


at Sanford, Orange County. These lands are
situated near General Sanford's "Belair grove
and farm," and are a part of the original San-
ford Grant. They are in the midst of some of
the finest groves in the State, and are es-
pecially adapted to orange and pine-apple cul-
ture, and early vegetable growing. Those who
contemplate settling in Florida, would do well
to write to him for descriptive circulars, etc.
COTTON AND COTTON SEED.-It is believed
that from an annual cotton crop of 6,600,000
bales, seed can be obtained to yield $100,000,-
000 worth of oil. It is estimated that every
400-pound bale gives 1,200 pounds of seed.


New Publications.
We have scarcely more than room for the
titles of the unusual number of new papers,
pamphlets, etc., now on our table :
"The Plymouth Rocks." How to Mate, Rear,
and Judge Them. By H. H. STODDARD, Edi-
tor of the "Poultry World," "American Poultry
Yard," etc., etc. An excellent little treatise,
full of valuable information for all who are in-
terested in that "coming" fowl, (which has
already come!) the Plymouth Rock. Price,
25 cents. Address: H. H. Stoddard, Hart-
ford, Conn.
"American Poultry Journal," monthly ; illus-
trated-$1.25 per year. Address: C. J. WARD,
Chicago, Ill.
"St. Louis Magazine"-illustrated-month-
ly--$1 per year; furnished with our DISPATCH
at $1.50 for both.
"Florida Intelligencer," a very neat monthly
of 24 pages, "devoted to the interests of Flori-
da ;" $1 per year. WHITFIELD BRO'S., Live
Oak, Fla., proprietors.
"Transactions of the Massachusetts Horti-
cultural Society, for the year 1882." Part 1st.
Full of the practical and valuable discussions
of one of the most advanced Horticultural So-
cieties in the world. We find in it much of
interest; and return thanks to the accom-
plished Secretary, Hon. ROBERT MANNING,
for a copy.
"Catalogue of Seeds, Trees, &c.," from W.
R. STRONG & Co., Sacramento, California. An
excellent list of trees, plants and seeds, some
of which might profitably be introduced into
Florida.
"Silk." Second Annual Report of the
Women's Silk Culture Association of the Uni-
ted States, for the year ending April 18, 1882.
This report is full of interesting and valuable
information on Silk Culture, and we are grati-
fled to be assured that the new industry is
rapidly growing in impnirtahce, and destined to
be a great success. Address: Mrs. JOHN
LUCAs, 1028 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pa.,
for all information needed.
"Rural Californian,"-a very handsome,
lively and progressive monthly of 20 pages;
neatly printed and illustrated; just started at
Los Angeles, California, at 81.50 per year. Ad-
dress: GEO. RICE, Editor.
"The Art Interchange." A Household
Journal of 16 pages, elegantly printed and
illustrated, is published in INew York, at $2
per year.
"The alcarthstone," (not "Household," as
misprinted in our last,) sends out with No. 2,
just issued, a very "taking" little palette-pic-
ture, entitled "Curiosity;" and the publishers
promise to continue the issue of these pleasant
little souvenirs, the paper and picture costing
only six cents (Ashmead Bro's.)
"Copp's Settler's Guide," third edition; a pop-
ular exposition of our public land system, is on
our table. It is edited by HENRY N. COPP, of
Washington, D. C.-the well-known author.


Its price is only 25 cents in paper and 75 cents
in cloth; 8vo,*114 pp. The chapter on sur-
veys is illustrated, and shows how to tell town-
ship and section corners, etc. The chapters on
Homesteads, Pre-emption, and Timber Cul-
ture contain the latest rulings and instructions.
Every settler and land man should have a copy
of this valuable little book. Address the
author as above.
THE SOUR ORANGE makes one of our most
beautiful ornamental shade trees, and we have
often wondered that it is not more frequently
employed for road-borders, avenues, &c. It is
said that Dr. Moragne set out the first orange
shade tree ever planted on the streets of Palat-
ka. It still stands opposite his drug store, on
Lemon street, and is known as the father of
Palatka's greatest ornament-the orange shade
trees, for which that charming city is noted.


Fruits and Vegetables.
With the opening, (in January,) of our NEW
VOLUME,"enlarged and improved,"we shall com-
mence a series of illustrated articles embracing
in brief, practical style, the history, varieties,
quality, modes of culture, etc., of all the Fruits
which now are, or can be cultivated successfully
and profitably in Florida or the Southern At-
lantic States.
We shall, also, give a series of short articles
on the raising, packing and shipping of mar-
ket Vegetables-all which, we trust, will be of
interest to our readers generally, and of es-
pecial value to new settlers and beginners.
The December Magazines,
Full of beautiful engravings, tales, essays,
poems, criticisms, etc., etc., are on our table,
but we have not room for extended notices this
week. Harper's, the Century, Atlantic, Lip-
pincott's, North American Review, the Eclec-
tic, and many others, may be had from Ash-
mead Bro's., at publisher's prices, or will be
clubbed with our DISPATCH at reduced rates.
[See clubbing terms, under Editorial head.]
GAPES IN CHICKENS.-A correspondent of
the Country Grentle(ayn sa.-s: "Take the chicken
in the hand and insert a small-sized wing
feather, dipped in kerosene oil down the throat;
turn it round two or three times, and you will
find a small red worm attached to it. We find
it is a sure cure, and always apply it when we
find a chicken with gapes. We feed wheat
screenings and cracked corn or dry feed."
GARDENERS AND TRUCK-RAISERS ?--Test
your Seeds We strongly advise taking a few
seeds of each kind to be planted, 'counting
them, and planting in a box of good earth, kept
in a warm room and watered as needed. In a
few days the plants will appear, and if all, or
nearly all, the seeds have germinated vigor-
ously, the quality of the seed may be considered
positively settled. This work should be done
promptly, so as to get another assortment if
that on hand be defective.
WE are glad to receive such good reports
from the fruit and "truck" raisers of the inte-
rior. The people of Tallahassee and its neigh-
borhood seem fully alive to the great advanta-
ges of their fine region, and the Madison Re-
corder of the 18th, says: "The Madison County
Vegetable and Fruit-Growers' Association
means business. It has already ordered one
car-load of fertilizers, and orders are in from
various members for two hundred and one bar-
rels of seed Irish potatoes.


a- In.
METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION,
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Weather for week ending November 24, 1882.
Therm. rt Wind.
DATE. 0-
-l-0


Saturday 18...... 30.08 7157 61.377.0 0.03 W 6 Fair.
Sunday 19....... 30.07 65 50 54.0 80.7 0.00 N 5!Fair.
Monday 20..... 29.79 65 4 61.3 88.0 1.65 NE 6 Cloudy.
Tuesday 21...... 29.95,6045 48.7 75.3 0.00 NW 6!Fair.
Wednesday 22 30.14!60 43 52.0 74. 3 0.00 NW 8 Fair.
Thursday 23... 30.19,66 47 55.7 73.7 0.00 W 2 Clear.
Friday 24........ 30.26,7150 58.7 74.3 0.00 W 2 Clear.
Highest barometer 30.30, lowest 29.71.
Highest temperature 71, lowest 43.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.


--


i






6-a THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


money until he knows no other joy. It is as if
the man who is running a race should become
so infatuated with running that he should con-
tinue it long past the goal, and care nothing
for the prize he started out to win; or, as if
the man who proposed to become a carpenter
should become so interested in procuring tools
that he should devote his life to the accumula-
tion of them without putting them to any use.
Originally there were hopes and longings in
his mind, pictures of happiness which he was
to enjoy himself and to create for others, and
for which he would gladly toil to procure the
means. But they have faded from his mind,
because he would not pause to gratify them
when it was in his power to do so; they have
died of inanition, and no desire is left to himr
but to continue to accumulate the means tc
ends for which he has ceased to care.


Cultivating the Desires.
Among the many ruts that people get into,
and out of which it is so hard for them to
emerge, is the habit of having very narrow and
limited, though intense desires. There is a
strong impulse at the present time in favor of
breadth. Large and comprehensive views of
things in general are found to afford the best
basis for excellence in specialties. Opinions
that are handed down by tradition and care-
fully kept from the wholesome fresh air of in-
vestigation and opposition are less trusted now
than formerly. The faculties of man are found
to be manifold, and all deserving of develop-
ment. Knowledge aims to be broad, at least
in its foundations, and the particular structure
to be raised upon it is expected to be propor-
tionately solid and valuable.
This widening process has had full employ-
ment, so far, in enlarging thought and action.
It has not yet penetrated to the desires. They
are generally supposed to be strong enough and
varied enough in themselves to do without any
special cultivation, and the most that is urged
in reference to them is the necessity of re-
straining them when they pass their proper
bounds. It is true that they are usually very
strong, that they form our characters, influence
our actions, determine our lives. Yet it is just
because they are such powerful factors that
they need the most careful and judicious edu-
cation. To restrain them is but a small part of
the work; they need far oftener to be fostered
and nourished than to be repressed, and the
chief reason why some one desire so frequently
takes possession of a man and makes a wreck
of him is that so many others are lying dor-
mant and feeble within him.
There is no more striking example of this
than the desire for wealth. At first it is but
the natural and wholesome wish for the neces-
sities and comforts of life, and the power of
creating happiness in a thousand forms for
self and others. It is often pursued, however,
with such devotion and eagerness that at
length it crowds out the other desires of life,
and even swallows up the very ends for which
it was first maintained. The desire -for spend-
ing the money which costs so large a part of
life, diminishes in force, and perhaps becomes
extinct, for want of intelligent cultivation and
exercise, and the man, wealthy in gold but
poor in life, either delegates the whole task of
disposing of it to his family, or piles it up in
unmeaning heaps, simply to be rescattered after
his death. To add to its absorbs all his time,
thought and energy, but how to use it has be-
come to him a lost art, and one that fails to
call forth within him a single pleasurable emo-
tion.
Now this condition is arrived at, not so much
by the indulgence of a single desire as by the
neglect and failure of all the rest. It has be-
come a habit with him to crave and pursue


the changes which have taken place ? Seem-
ingly the soil is rich enough, for these old trees
are found buried in peat, and so well preserved
that even now, probably 500 years after their
fall, they are used for fuel. The very atmos-
phere seems to be poison to tree growth. The
why of it is mysterious.
At the Boston Fair the State of Georgia ex-
hibited the following list of native woods,
which is supposed to cover nearly all the varie-
ties: Georgia pine, which is used largely for
car building ; poplar cherry, which is well
adapted for cabinet; white-wood, laurel, beech,
red cedar, yellow poplar, maple, sycamore, red
hickory, cypress, black walnut, China wood
(not very well known, but it should be, as it is
of excellent quality for the use of the cabinet
i maker.-EDs.), white pine, sassafras, dogwood
post oak, black gum, white ash, white oak
tight-eye, [ti-ti] (not unlike boxwood), sparklh


Nothing can more forcibly show the need of
nourishing and fostering the good and whole-
some desires of our nature. Where the grand
purposes that money can subserve are kept in
view, and realized and enjoyed from time to
time, when a happy and well-ordered home is
secured, when children are trained, educated
and developed, when advantages and opportu-
nities are offered to those who need them, when
wholesome reforms are aided, worthy enter-
prises assisted, the city or town improved and
enriched, and society made better and happier
by the growing prosperity of the individual,
then his wealth is a tenfold blessing. But that
this may be so, his desire for all these things
must be continually cherished by actively min-
istering to them. He must devote at least as
much care and thought upon the way to use
his money as upon the way to get it.
Desires can only be kept alive by being
gratified from time to time, and as they are all
right.and reasonable, if kept in due proportion
to each other, it is far more essential that we
should wisely cultivate all, than that we should
strenuously deny any one. Indeed, the only
true way of preventing a single desire for ab-
sorbing our nature, and ruining our usefulness,
is to bring others into constant play. Nature
sets us a good example in this respect. The
child's desire for play is periodically checked
by his desire for food and sleep; his craving
for knowledge is kept within bounds by his
craving for physical exercise. But presently
some one strong desire being continually in-
dulged, other weaker ones are crowded out,
and it is the work of the wise parent to guard
against this injustice and to see to it that the
natural desires of the child are respected
and balanced one against another, so that none
shall fall into decay, and none obtain a monop-
oly. Some, indeed, are imperative, and seem
full grown; others are in the germ, and need
the tenderest nurture ; but none must be neg-
lected, and then none will be tyrannical. M.
Littre, a French philosopher, says: "The
chief use of education is to multiply motives
for action-for to have many faculties is to
have many impulses; to have many impulses
is to be accessible to many motives; and to be
accessible to many motives is to be in commu-
nication with many influences, instead of being
bound in unreasoning constancy to one."-Phil-
adelphia Ledger.

Subterranean Forests and Georgia Woods.
In the north of Scotland, on the coast, are
found buried in the soil the trunks of firs from
two to three feet in diameter. The territory-
which is a large one-in which they are found,
is devoid of trees except such as are planted,
and none will grow unless there is a wall of
some sort built to protect them from the winds
that come sweeping in from sea. That this
country was once thickly and heavily timbered
is absolutely certain, but who can account for


To Prospective Settlers in Florida.
The South Florida Journal preaches the fol-
lowing fairly sound and sensible sermon to
prospective settlers :
The country is being flooded with books,
pamphlets and letters about Florida, issued by
counties, agricultural societies, immigration
agents, agents of land grants, real estate agents,
correspondents and book makers, each adver-
tising some locality and appealing either in a
general or special way to the unemployed and
dissatisfied population of the manufacturing
towns and cities to seek new fields of labor or
investment, extolling the salubrious and equi-
table climate described to be such a preserver
and renovator of impaired constitutions.
Nearly every article written about the State
represents that a certain competency can be de-
rived from a few years' labor, on a merely nom-
inal amount invested in an orange grove. In
a. certain way this is true 'cumi grano salis,' for
there has been a something omitted. Not
every one who has come here for health has
found themselves becoming robust, not every
dollar that has been invested- has paid, not
every piece of land cleared and planted has
the promise of a paying grove, and not every
young grove bought has yet a paying crop, it is
not every person who has come here who de-
sires to stay.
There have been mistakes made in locating,
mistakes made in investment, mistakes made
everywhere, and the new comer who can and
will profit by the mistakes of the pioneers, has
a much easier road to travel, with the saving
of time and money which it costs to repair mis-


berry, crab-apple, apple-haw, willow, scaly-
bark hickory, tupello gum, white elm, May
cherry, black locust, osage orange, chincapin,
cottonwood, red bark, magnolia, black jack
(resembling bird's-eye maple), catawba maple,
red oak, white holly, red bay, white bay, red
elm, mulberry, ironwood, black-haw, persim-
mon, and parslay haw-["'possum haw."]
Newspapers at Yale College.
The Hartford Courant says that the Yale
College Library embraces nearly 1,000 bound
files of newspapers. It includes a complete
file of the Connecticut Gazette, the first paper
published in this State, from 1755 to 1757.
There is also the Connecticut Courant (week-
ly) from 1780 to 1824, with the exception of
two years, and also the daily from 1837 to
1859; the Columbian Register, weekly and
daily, from the time of its establishment, in
1812, to 1875; and the files of the Connecti-
cut Courier ( now the Journal and Courier of
New Haven), almost complete from the date of
its origin. The files of papers during the
period of the civil war are notably complete
and interesting, including, as they do, entire
files of the New York Times, Tribune, Herald,
Post, and one or two other New York papers;
the Boston Advertiser, the Missouri Republican
and the Charleston Mercury. The file of the
New York Times is complete, with the excep-
tion of about three months from its birth, in
1851, down to the present time. The library
has also the file of the New York Spectator
from 1794 to 1878. In the list of English
newspapers, John Bull, from about 1820 to
1874; the Economist from 1833 down to the
present time; the Land Chronicle from 1757
to 1790, and the semi-weekly edition of the
London Times for a long period of years.
-1vqdina


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I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


-I was always an early riser. Happy the
man who is! Every morning day comes to
him with a virgin's love, .full of bloom and
freshness. The youth of nature is contagious,
like the gladness of a happy child.-Bulwer-
Lytton.

-Hope nothing from luck, and the proba-
bility is that you will be so prepared, fore-
warned and forearmed, that all shallow ob-
servers will call you lucky.-Bulwer-Lytton.

-Mankind are more indebted to industry
than ingenuity; the gods set up their favors
at a price and industry is the purchaser.-Ad-
dison.


565


Fl


applied labor and capital. Man is gregarious,
women preeminently so, and many a time of
ennui, of homesickness and of heartache can
be saved by a more comprehensive inquiry into
the needs and wants of a country and climate
differing much from any other known land.
Though lacking the romantic scenery of moun-
tains, Florida is exempt from the sirocco of
Italy, or the blizzards of Texas; there are no
wild animals to fight and very few venomous
reptiles to encounter; many places are exempt
from insect pests, and by a wise choice of build-
ing spots, malaria is avoided. By locating
near a thriving town with ready transporta-
tion, all the facilities and privileges of an old
settled community are obtained, and while the
advantages derived are great, the objection is
limited to the one fact that the price of land is
more. .
Because land is a merely nominal price, it is
not necessarily cheap, much depends on its lo-
cation; because it is good it does not follow
that a living can be made upon it, consider
what there is to buy and sell. Because the
situation is romantic it will not prevent home-
sickness ; by its sameness in time it becomes
stale. Because there are neighbors it does not
follow that they will be friends. Because you
were a farmer's child at home will not
prevent your finding much to learn about ag-
riculture here, where there is no real dormant
season. Because you own a quarter section
does not prove that you will be richer than the
person with less than ten acres, it is more than
possible that the small area will, by being bet-
ter managed, yield the largest profit. Because
you have planted a large area it does not guar-
antee a large crop, which shall be saleable at
remunerative prices. Because you can get
along without fertilizer, it does not prove you
to be a good farmer or a wise man.
The proper policy for the new comer is to
"make haste slowly," and if there is among his
acquaintances some one on whom he can rely,
who has a reputation to lose, and who has been
here long enough to have learned something
about the locality, then we say if there is no
such person whose services and knowledge he
can use, wait at least before buying, and it will
be time profitably used. Florida is a large
State, and there is as much difference between
the climate of Duval County and Orange
County as between Massachusetts and Mary-
land. The formation of the State has as much
to do with this as the difference in latitude, the
difference in climate being most noted during
the winter months. To persons from the ex-
treme nor th the difference in soil and manner
of working is anything but pleasing, for here
during the summer is an excess of heat, in the
winter usually a lack of moisture.
It is usually the misfortune of new comers
to be bigoted, to sneer at the "crackers," as
they call the natives (a misapplied term, by
the way), for some are wealthy and well edu-
cated, and though they wear brogans and ride
in two-wheel carts, are, as a class, with very
few exceptions, reliable.


v 6-


- I --- I II I ILI~ CII-C--C-Pa ~~_ ~ I ---- a~ -- I C I


SoPRESERVATION OF HONEY.-Honey, ac-
S 'cording to A. Vogel, contains on an average
What Makes Silk. one per cent. of formic acid. Observing that
C. J. Carpenter, a practical Sericulturist crude honey keeps better than that which has
of Fairbury, Nebraska, writes the Southern been clarified, E. Mylius has tried the addition
Planter of formic acid, and found that it prevents fer-
At the present time, much is being said and mentation without impairing the flavor of the
Ah the present time, much is being said and hney.
written in regard to silk culture, and it is well honey.
indeed that the subject is agitated in the -The pleasure and delight of knowledge
United States, for if once developed, it will far surpasseth all other in nature. We see in
furnish lucrative employment at the homes of all other pleasures there is satiety; and after
thousands of women and children, and add they be used, their verdure departeth, which
largely to the material wealth of this land. sho'weth well that they be but deceits of pleas-
Perhaps a few practical ideas in regard to the ure, and not pleasures; and that it was the
relative value of the different kinds of mul- novelty which pleased, not the quality; and
berry, used for silk culture, from one who is therefore we see that voluptuous men turn fri-
engaged in the business will be of interest to ars, and ambitious princes turn melancholy.
some of your many readers. For the North- But of knowledge there is no satiety, but sat-
ern States I place at the head the Russian, isfaction and appetite are perpetually inter-
brought to this country about seven years ago changeable.--Bacon.
by Russian mennonites. 1st, Because it is per-
fectly hardy, and will thrive in any soil. 2d, iyg
It is a rapid grower. 3rd, It produces large
quantities of leaves which furnish silk of the Florida Dispatch Line.
finest quality. 4th, It produces the best fruit NEW YORK, November 20, 1882.
of all the mulberries and the most of it. It Receipts of oranges via Florida Dispatch
can be grown to the height of forty feet, and Line and Southern Express Co., at this port
from three to five feet in diameter, or can be for week ending 18th inst., 6,000 packages.
sheared to any size or shape you like. There Florida oranges in good demand, and selling
are eleven varieties of the Morus Alba, or from $3 to $5 per box; Jamaica oranges, from
white mulberry, among them the Morus Tar- $7 to $8 per barrel.
tarica, Morus Multicaulis, Morus Moretta, Mo- Respectfully, C. D. OWENS,
rus Japonica, English White, and others. The General Agent
only hardy mulberry among the above named G*h enera gent.
s hfrJacksonville Wholesale Prices.
sorts is the Morus Tartarica, from Russia, corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
where it has long been used for silk culture and FRUITS- Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
is one of the favorites. It produces a reddish SUGARS-Granulated............................ 10
white fruit of inferior quality. For the South White Ex. C:. ....::::::::....::::::::::
there is but little difference in the Morus Alba, Powdered ................... .... ..
varieties. The Morus Multicaulis produces the COFFEE, Rio-Fairu.......... ................ 9
largest leaves, but the common old English is oo......................................... 1
hard to beat, and is planted largely. Best ........................................ 12
The following *table will show the relative Java 0. G.............................................
value of the leaves for silk : Peaberry......... ............................. 1i
18 lbs. of Multicaulis leaves make 1 lb. of silk. Any of above grades roasted to order 18
16 English white make...... 1 FLOuR-Snow Drop, best, patent........................... 8 00
.i i LSnow Drop, best, no patent............... 7 50
14 M oretta make................ .. reoe,2d best......... ..7 25
13 Tartarica make... 1 .. ..Pearl, 3d best................................ 7 00
13 Alba Rosea ma ........... Orange Co., No. 1....... .................... 6 50
13 A lba R osea m ake........*... I M EATS-Bacon.................................................... 15 to 15%,
i Hams (Merwin & Sons) ........................ 18
12 Japonica m ake...........1 Shoulders............................................ 14
13 Russian make........ 1 HoMIIiNY-Pearl, per bbl........... ............. ...... 5 25
............... j M- EA L- per bbl.................................................... 5 25
Nearly all of the silk producing countries LARD-Refined in pails......... ............ 141
of the Old World have their favorites for BJTTER-Very best kegs (on icae)..................... 35 to 4
silk. Half cream ..................... 13
In China and Japan the Multicaulis is said TOBAC.o-Smokin-.the. Boss" Durham .s 32
to be the best, while France clings fondly to "The Boss Durham 1 lb pke......... 30
Morus Alba Rosea. In Italy the Morus Mo- sitting Bul" (genuine) s 75
retta leads all others, while the German thinks "Sitting Bull" (genuine) ib pkge.. 45
the Morus Nigra has no equal, even if it does Plug-"shell Road" 4 plugs tolb., 30
produce silk of a coarse quality. Soil and cli- "Florida Boys"' 5 plugs to lb., 30 lb
mate have much to do with the different varie- "Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 14 to6
ties, but if I were to plant two acres it matters lb., 17 l boxes..................... 0
not in what part of the United States, one Cigars-"Long Branch"avery pop- 2700
would be Russian, and then if you tire of silk "our x, choice cigar, easy smoker 24 00


_ ~L~_I~


lb


_T_~ I_ _X __ __


_____ L


I


culture, its fine fruit will more than pay for "Florida Boys," (weareState Agt,) 35 00
the labor and expense of growing. Never SOAP AND STARH-CColgate's 8 oz., per boc.. 3 50
S Peerless, 8 oz., per box ........................... 50
plant the common American or Morus Rubra, Starch, lump, per lb............................ 6c
nor the paper mulberry, and I would not ad- Hoi's, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lb ............................................... 15@ 22c
vise planting Morus Nigra for silk culture. In Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
Europe and Asia the mulberry is considered doz. 1 lb........................... Bower per 2.................. 2 25
the most valuable of all trees, for it produces Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lb 2 70
the most delicious fruit. Its timber is used in Royal Baking Powder, per doz. : lb....... 1 50
the arts and for fuel, the bark and fibre for Florida Sugar and syrups rulinghigh
paper, and its leaves produce the finest of fab- for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new.......................... 3@3 25
rics- silk. CHICxENS, each............................................ 20@40
-0EGGS-Per doz............... .............................. 28@32
is a progress from want to want, not HIDEs-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
-Life is a progress from want to want, not Country Dry Salted, per lb.................... 9@11
from enjoyment to enjoyment.-Johnson. Butcher Dry Salted, per lb................ 9@10
J __ J __Dam aged Hides........................................ 6
Kip and Calf, 8lbs. and under................ 10
-I believe I should have been swept away SKINs-Raw Deer Skins, per lb.................. 35
by the flood of French infidelityf it ad not F Deer Skins Salted, per lb................ 26@30
by the flood of rench infidelity,if it ad not FRS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
been for one thing, the remembrance of the ter............. 150@4 00
time when my sainted mother used to make me Wild Cat, each..... ......................... 20
kneel by her side, taking my little hands fold- Fox, each..... .......................... 5@15
ed in hers, and caused me to repeat the Lord's WOOL-Free from burs,sperlb.............................. 2022
BurryayerThomas R. .....................per..................115
Prayer,-- Thonwas hRa d?/lop. GOAT Burry, perlb........."...'i10
...S..Ns-ach per lb............... .10







eT THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Scientific Am erican..................................... 3.75
Saturday N ight.................. ...................... 3.35
Savannah W eekly News................................ 2.50
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.20
W averly M agazine...................................... 5.20
The above are among the very best publications'
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Qrder,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASHLIEAD BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

W. P. COUPER, D. E. LOWELL, and M. JACK-
SON also advertise valuable improved and un-
improved property.

Mr. W. N. JACKSON has a fine improved
place on south side of Lake Harris, in Sumter
County, for sale. See ad.


Eke glrida is lck.I

JACKSONVILLE, NOVEMBER 27, 1882.

D. Redmond, D. H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
RA.TBES OF ADVERTISING,
PAID IN AIDVANCEI.
SQUARES. 1 TIME.' 1 MO. 3 MO. 1] MO. 1 YEAR
One........................ $ 1 00o 2 50 $5 50 $10 00 $ 18 5C
Two..................... 2 00 500 10 00 18 00 34 0
Three...... .............. 3 70 00 14 00 2500 46
Four...................... 4 00 9 00 17 50 30 00 58
Five...................... 450 1100 19 00 35 00 65
Eight...................... 8 00 16 50 3000 50 00 100 00
Sixteen............... 16 00 30 00 50 00 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) 20 cents
per line.

CIR CULA TION.
This paper has the largest circulation of any
paper (daily or weekly) published in Florida,
with a very large circulation in Georgia and the
Southern States; also has subscribers in every
State in the Union, with many in foreign coun-
tries. After October 23d, we shall issue weekly
from 8,000 to 10,000 copies, about 40,000 per
month.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Persons are warned against paying subscrip-
tions to any one calling himself our Agent, as
we have no regular canvassing agent.

OFFICIAL OR GAN OF THE FLORIDA
FR UIT GROWERS' ASS0 CIA TION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."'
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR:
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
American Agriculturist................................. 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine......................... 4.20
Country Gentleman................. ................. 2.75
D etroit Free Press............ ........................... 2.50
Eclectic M agazine....................................... 4.20
Florida Agriculturist.............................. 2.25
Florida W eekly Union................................... 2.25
Florida Weekly Times ....... ..................... 1.50
Family Story Paper.................................... 3.50
Fireside Com panion.................................... 3.35
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly................ 4.20
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.20
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.................... 3.40
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine.................. 3.40
Harper's Illustrated Weekly........................... 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Bazar............................ 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Young People................ 2.20
Harper's Monthly Magazine......................... 4.20
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine................... 3.40
Nebraska Farmer................. ...................... 2.00
North American Review........................... 5.20
New York Weekly Sun................................ 175
New York Weekly Herald... ............... 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune......................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times......................... 1.75
New York Weekly World........................ 1.75
New York Ledger .................... ....... ....... 3.35
New York W eekly .................................... 3.35
Popular Science Monthly............................ 5.20
Philadelphia Weekly Times.......................... 2.50
Southern Cultivator............. ...................... 2.00


Transplant all deciduous trees, grape vines,
&c., &c. Also, all varieties of ornamental
shrubbery, roses, &c. It is better and safer to
transplant evergreens, such as the Japan Plum,
Cape Jessamine, Magnolia, &c., just as the
new growth is beginning to show in the spring.
And the same remark applies to the orange
and all its congeners-though these are so
hardy that they can be safely transplanted at
any time except in very dry or severe freezing
weather. "Jack Frost" is the great enemy of
the Orange tree, and should always be guarded
against, if possible.
Late, growing, tender buds must be carefully
looked after and protected from frost and chill-
ing winds.
Cattle, horses, sheep and poultry should re-
ceive "extra rations" during cold weather.
They.require more than the usual quantity of


Work for December.
At the close of the year, make a careful re
view of all your business operations during th(
past twelve months. Look into your*account,
and "balance up your books." Take careful
note of all your failures and successes with the
different-crops you have planted and harvested.
Lay oatt plans for the coming year, and go
forth to meet whatever of good or ill it may
hold in store for you, "without fear, and with
a manly heart."
December. in Florida, is generally our cold-
est month; and towards its close we may ex-
pect severe, and often freezing weather. Ven-
nor, and several other meteorologists, very con-
fidently predict a cold winter, and it will be
wise and prudent to prepare for it, by provid-
ing conveniences for the protection of tender
vegetables, gathering and disposing of the or-
ange crop, &c. A good deal has of late been
said in regard to preserving oranges in dry
sand, &c., and we hope the matter will be fully
and fairly tested this winter.
In the Garden much work must be done dur-
ing this month:
Cabbage should be set out at all favorable
seasons.
Irish Potatoes may be planted as before di-
rscted, though we prefer next month for the
main spring crop.
Continue, at regular intervals, to sow Pease,
Cabbage, Lettuce, Radishes, Carrots, Beets,
Turnips, Parsley, Spinach, Sweet Herbs, such
as Sage, Thyme, Marjoram, &c., &c.
Horse Radish and the "Burr," or "Globe
Artichoke" (Cynara Scolymus), should now be
planted. Roots of this ornamental and useful
plant may be obtained from the market-gar-
deners of Charleston and New Orleans. It is
not a common plant in Florida gardens. If
you are raising hogs, try, also, a patch (in rich,
deep soil) of the "Jerusaleri Artichoke," (He-
lianthus tuberosus); and later in the season,
the Chufa, described by Mr. Langdon in DIS-
PATCH of Nov. 13.
Hot beds-prepare for now. Provide, also,
a full supply of fertilizers for all your vegeta-
ble crops.
Protect seed-beds and young, tender plants
from cold.
Let no small weeds obtain a foothold among
your cultivated plants. There is not room for
both on the same ground.
If you are cultivating Strawberries for early
spring market, keep the ground clean, open and
mellow, and water from time to time, with a
very weak solution of potash. Do not water
at all in very cold or freezing weather. As
spring approaches, mulch your strawberry
patch all over with chopped straw-working it
close around the stems of the plants, but not
covering tops or leaves.
Sow seeds of Lettuce, Radishes, Cress, &c.,
in cold frames where they can readily be pro-
tected from cold.


Our full line of fine goods are now ready for shipment
'embracing the following:
Orange Marmalade, Preserved Scuppernong Grapes,
Scuppernong Grape Jelly, Guava Jelly, Guava
Marmalade, Preserved Figs, Quince Jelly,
Quince Marmalade, Sweet Pickled Peaches.
Our goods are first-class in every respect, put up in
neat, attractive and merchantable packages and ready
for shipmentto all parts of the United States and the
Canadas. Our object is to give to the best trade a per-
fectly pure article, and every package bearing our trade-
mark can be relied upon as strictly pure goods. To those
who are selling our goods it is unnecessary to commend
them, but to those- who are not we beg to say, we are
packing the best goods manufactured. A trial order is
solicited. Price list sent on application.
We offer every variety of Fine Candies known
to the trade, and if a first-class strictly pure article is de-
sired at reasonable prices, send for price list.
WALROCK fLCO.,
nox27 tf JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


one


food, to keep up their normal heat; and in
freezing or very stormy weather they should be
housed or sheltered, even in "sunny Florida."

Fruit via Atlantic Coast Line.
Notice has been received,but too late to give de-
tails and publish tariff in this issue,ofthe arrange-
ment of fast and close connecting schedules via
the "Atlantic Coast Line," making daily trains
from Jacksonville in connection with this line
to Baltimore, Philadelphia, Washington and
other Eastern cities. The rates to above points
from Jacksonville will be about 60 cents per
box on fruit.
Rates are also made, and daily connections
to all principal points in the Carolinas and
Virginia. Full particulars will be. given in
the next issue of THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
Shippers, in order to avail themselves of these
perfected fast and daily trains, should ship via
F. D. L. and A. C. L. Stensils furnished on
application to Agents Florida Dispatch Line,
Jacksonville.
Use -the Florida Dispatch Line Stencil.
Shippers of Oranges should understand that
the stencil of the Florida Dispatch Line alone
is sufficient to give the matter direction, or have
it delivered to the agents at Jacksonville or Cal-
lahan.
De Land, Fla., (see advertisement.) This is
a rising little town, situated on a high rolling
ridge, in Volusia County, and is rapidly being
settled by thrifty enterprising northern fami-
lies.
The p)c.ial attention of shippers is called to
advertisement of Mr. W. N. JUSTICE, Commis-
sion Merchant, 313 North Water Street, Phila-
delphia. It is a house already well and favor-
ably known to many of our shippers.
Do NOT water your pot-plants in very cold
weather.



Somi-Troic ial Frill Prsfvin g Go.
AND
MANUFACTURING CONFECTIONERS,
Post-Office Box 45,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


,, __ ,,__





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 7



DELAND, FRLORIDA.

DESCRIPTION OF DeLAND, FLORIDA!
The climate is semi-tropical. Range of theirmnooeter last four years-lowest, 26 degrees; highest, in the shade, 101 degrees WFather-Fall, Winter and spring dry
and pleasant, with occasional rain; Summer, sunshine and rain alternate. Soil-sandy, underlaid with clay in many places, covered with a growth of wild grass. Watr
in wells 20 to 40 feet deep, usually soft and good. Surface-gently undulating. Timber-Yellow Pine, 80 to 100 feet high. A-eraUe product of Orange Trees in full bearing,
1,000. Average price of fruit in grove, $1.50 per 100. Number of trees per acre, 50 to 75. Extra good care and culture of course pr:)du<(- better results. Best months for
planting Orange trees, January and February, June and July. Other products-Sweet Potatoes, Cotton, Sugar Cane, Rice, Corn, Pine-Apples, Bananas, Melons, Pears, etc.
Good Board $7 to $10 per week ; $1.50 to $2.00 per day. In gardening excellent results have been obtained in a small way, and this business will be ,I -Iop1d with added
experience and better transportation facilities. No cases of yellow fever, cholera, sunstroke or other epidemic or prevailing fatal diseases have been known here, and all
climatic conditions are most favorable to health and longevity. Many settlers from the north and northwest are coming in, and there is an indication that our orange bolt
will soon be thickly settled.
The village of DeLand is located five miles east of our landing on St. John's River, where all-the river steamboats pass; very near the geographical center, nor.h and
south, of Volusia County, in the center of the
GREAT ORANGE BELT
This place is twenty-five miles from the Atlantic Ocean, And is almost constantly favored with a tempered
SEA BREEZE
and from its elevation above the river, its location among the pines, and its isolation from all standing water, it is peculiarly alialptc.l to the nis.--. iti-s of invalids. This
belt of land is about twenty miles long, and averages about five miles wide. Our lands are
UNSURPASSED IN FERTILITY
by any pine lands in the State. In our village, which is only five years old, we have a
FINE SCHOOL BUILDING
used also for union Suindfy School and Church Services. A Baptist Church is now built, costing $4,000 furnished, and paid for. MIrthln;i.tis and pi.sn-opuli a:. are also
building. The Presbyterians hold services every other Sunday in the school house. We have daily mails, four General Merchandise Stores, one o(f th largest in South
Florida; a Drug Store, Millinery and Notion Store, Furniture Store, Livery Stable, three Steam Saw Mills and a Blacksmith Shop. A IT:,lu \vuit- Store is soon to he started
with a full supply of Doors, Sash, Blinds, etc. Also, a Jewelry Store is soon to be started, and in the fall a Bank and High School.
THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURIST
a large eight-page weekly, is published here, and is a valuable paper for those desiring information about Florida. We have a Bell Tlh-j ho), line in successful operation
between our village and our landing on the St. John's River, and a railroad from our landing via DeLand to the Atlantic coast is chartered with a land grant of 8,840 acres
per mile. The Palatka and Indian River Railroad which is now being built, will pass through DeLand, and will be completed, as far as DeLand, by next winter. Our ho-
tels and boarding houses afford good fare at reasonable prices. Passengers will find a conveyance at DeLand landing on the arrival of the up mail boat daily, Sundays ex-
cepted, and a carriage will be sent upon order, by telephone, at other times. For the information of invalids we will add, that several good physicians are settled in our
midst, cultivating oranges as a business, but affording excellent medical aid when required. They report the following
REMARKABLE HEALTH RECORD
"During the years 1878, 1879 and 1880, within a circuit of six miles diameter, DeLand being the center, with a population avtra-Iuing over 250, many of whom came here
invalids, there have been but four deaths. Two were infants under six months, and two were men who came here sick." l.Sl and l5s: have been so far equally healthful.
Population now in and near DeLand city, that trade there, 809 to 1,200.
A CHAIN OF LAKES
northwest of us affords protection from frost so perfectly that the extreme cold of December 29, 1880, did not injure our orange trees or fruit.
We are offering these choice lands to actual settlers at fro-m i51 to $50 per acre. Village lots and improved property for sale also. For further particulars, call on or ad-
dress J. Y. PARGEC, .DeLand, Volusia Co., Florida, or IT. A. D)eLAND, Pairport, Monroe Co., N. Y. to mch27'83


ENLAR GEMENT.
On and after January 1st, 1883, this paper
will be enlarged to 20 pages, printed on extra
superfine calendered book paper, and the yearly
subscription price raised from $1 to $2 per an-
num.
This will enable the publishers to make im-
portant changes, increase the number of illustra-
tions, insure a higher degree of typographical ex-
cellency, and make it second to no paper of like
character in the United States.
We shall still continue to take yearly subscrip-
tions until January at one dollar. Save money
and subscribe before that time.
All present subscribers will receive paper until
the expiration of their subscription.



Merchants' IAne,
DOUBLE DAILY,
CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.

ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.
REGULAR MAIL,

GEO. M. BIRD, Capt. G. J. Merciers.
H. B. PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at 3
p. m., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
all intermediate landings.
ROSA, Capt. J. L. Amazeen.
.FREDERICK DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel.
WELAKA, Capt. J S. Mattheson.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Saturday, at
4:30 p. m., and from S., F. and W. Railway wharf at 5 p.
m., for Palatka, Sanford, Enterprise and all intermedi-
ate landings.
Connects at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad
for Gainesville and Ocala.
Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
on the Upper Ocklawahlia.
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Daytona.
Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
New Smyrna and Titusville.
Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
morning at 7 a. m., and Sanford at 7:30 a. m. and 9:00 a.
m., making close connections with S., F. and W. Rail-
way for all points North, East and West.
T-Through bills of lading given to all points.
The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
respect.
For further information, apply at General Ticket
Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets.
W. B. WATSON, Manager.
C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.


W. N. JUSTICE,

WVholesale Commission Merchant,


Wo. 313 Norith Water Street, Iriladelphiia.

SPECIALTIES: FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.

Ig- Large shipments remitted on day of sale, small shipments weekly.


tonov27 83p


iEOutBIET E OW N -INSERIES.
0
ORANCE AND LEMON TREES Budded from tried andapproved varieties, and
RANGE AND LEON TR on good healthy stocks.
Also, JAPAN PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
Florida. Address,
AlA 03T WA Ireorgetown-, Florida.
to Feb '0 '83

JAMES S. TAYLOR,
'To. 7 Clarl= Street, Ch.icago ,


Commission Me Ichant S Florida Oranges


REFERENCE.-Hibernian Banking Association, Chicago.
Correspondence solicited. No. 1 packing onl' solicited.


The Savannah Guano Go.,


to dec 5g2


of savannahi, Ga.,


mp0l porters /eaz I ar uafaiot'u3rers of :E 7-1 C-ra er-
tiliZers, Offer for Sale Tlieir

Golden Frnit Fertilizer,
A strictly first-cass Manure prepared specially for Florida Oranges.

-"0' O.^TW-T,'" for Florida Market Gardeners and Farmers, is highly am-
moniated.
Also ENGLISH ACID PHOSPHATE for composting. Pure dissolved Bone. KAINIT,
COTTON SEED MEAL, pure BIRD GUANO,
MURIATE OF POTASH, &c.
Each sack bears the Inspection Tag of the State of Georgia, which shows that it has passed
under the rigid inspection laws of that State, and is a guarantee that the Guano is what the
Analysis on the sack represents. No other brands in this State furnish such a reliable guar-
antee of their merits to the purchaser.
Send for Circular. 0. D. IDT.T0.N .T,
to may20-83 Jacksonville, Fla., General Agent for Florida.


F






58 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


]i_,LORIDA DISCOVEIVY.
NiCV } n EV"l,'I 'tl'-TT IN THE STA.\TE
I W'VILL 1BE SUPPLIED.
It kills Ants, -.:.. i! Mice and Rats. Not;,,i; 1 ver
before oe it',:ll hlis half the merit. ANv I r'u ist in
f:!,- -. I inviill.A w ill 1,-p 101y you.
CF'-AE WILLIAMS,
M_ n '.'ni^ !.':"' ; !ii il P ro) r i t">io ,
oct 30-tf [P. t Box 126.1 JACKSONVIfLLE, FLA.


Ai-s 0 .
0 N P-4,I ,S



". ^ JD r O"--


-5 ci






Gn, gLUlcksm!Ms an bStonIl ullltulb,
24 LAURA STREET,
J A CI ClON VII-LiE - VF'-LOII)T>A,
tij:.]ithinul done in all its branches.
IRON SAFE WORK.
Sptci;al rates on Stencil (Clting,. by mail. Address,
to june :, (PT O. ox 833.)


Al


It


to sept 10 '83


SedgwickSkeelWireFence








Is the only general purpose Wire Fence in use, being a
Strong Net-Work Without Barbse. It will turn dogs, pigs,
sheep, aud poultry as well as the most vicious stock,
without injury to either fenoe or stock. It is just the fence
for farms, gardens, stock ranges and railroads, and very
neat for lawns, parks, school lots and cemeteries. Covered
with rust-proof paint (or galvanized) it will last a lifetime.
It is Superior to Boards or Barbed Wire in every respect.
We ask for it a fair trial, knowing it will wear itself
into favor. The SedgwilSk Gate., made of wrought-
iron pipe and steel wire, defy all competition in neatness,
strength and durability. We also mak e best and
cheapest All Iron Automatic or Self-Opening Gate, also
Cheapest and Neatest All Iron Fence. For Prices and
Particulars ask Hardware Dealers or address the Manu-
facturers,
SEDGWICK BROS.,
Mention tits paper. Richmond, Ind.
to dec 30, 82.











Kieffer :-.: Jap. P-r- twin-i.. LeConte Pear.
S o'utii's and Trees FOR SALE. More
[, )yC1''" ''' trees in orchard than any five growers
of the LEO NTFE PEAR. Apply to head quarters.
I. TIOM S.ON, P.o*.TrI.,
LeConte Xnri. ly, i itilvileP, Ga.r
,s In P ^C., (!A.T.-V r", i *. oct 23-tf


BRADLEY'S ORANGE TREEIIFERTILIZER.
'We have prepared this Fertilizer throughout the season.
especially for the culture of the or- I- The nitrogen and potash also are
ange tree, and from the results al- furnished in the most nutritious
ready obtained from its use on the forms and approved proportions
orange groves of Florida, we feel for this crop.
justified in claiming that it cannot After giving this Fertilizer a
be surpassed, if equalled, by any thorough trial of three years on or-
other fertilizer ange trees in Florida, we intro-
It is composed of the purest and duced it last season quite exten-
highest grade materials, combined sively throughout the State, and
in such proportions as to furnish all the results have even exceeded our
the elements of plant-food in prop- most sanguine expectations. We
er quantities and in the best form have yet to hear of a single instance
to promote a rapid and strong where the most satisfactory returns
growth of the wood and insure an have not been derived.
abundant yield of fine fruit. s We have nothing to say about the
A sufficient proportion of its fertilizers manufactured or sold by
phosphoric acid, being readily sol- other parties, as we believe, with an
uble in cold water, is immediately established reputation of twenty-
available as food for the young two years in the -manufacture of
rootlets of the tree, while a consid- .. high grade fertilizers, we can stand
erable portion, being present in the ------...upon our own footing, without call-
form of pure ground bone, undis- 2-F__ --:-__ -- uing the attention of the public to
solved by acid, becomes entirely -- the record of any of our competi-
soluble in the soil only by the ac- _-_ tors, or to the value of their manu-
tion of the elements of nature in g factures as compared with that of
due course of time. Thus this all our own. Our fertilizers are all an-
important food is not soon ex- alyzed, when manufactured, by
hausted by the tree, or washed into competent chemists, and none are
the ground by heavy rains, but is shipped to market until they are
supplied in abundant quantities known to be up to the standard.



Maanufaetiurers of the Celebrated



the Standard Frtilizl.r for all Field and Garden Crops, and especially adapted to the wants of the
Cotton Crop.
MfAIN OFFICE, 27 KIL-BY STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
For further particulars and pamphlets giving t'stimnials from some of the best orange growers in the
State, address,


O. MV. Brom-well & Co., Agents for State of Florida,
49 W. BAX-ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


to oct 9, '83.


Wholesale Dete-a.-s il



Foreign and Domestic Fruits.


COMMISSIONN ?, ERlCHANTS FOR THE SALE OF


PF.iS ranges anid ensonss,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


-0

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED-
-REERERENCES.-First National Bank, Jacksonville, Florida. Union National Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
sept 4, tf.____________________


FRANK W. MUMBY.


JNO. N. C. STOCKTON.


RAYMOND D. KNIGHT-


MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


1879.
F. WV. MUMBY & CO.


SU('CE.s~ORS TO -

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Sauccer.s, etc. Decorated Tea, Dii i anid Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica, Faience, Kite, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The A n-'-ienn, Crown and Pee-rl-.s Ice Cronam Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR T -' CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Litt1e Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No A4he1-;! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on a pl ic-itn,
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. sp:,ciii icnteinents to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and .'ar wvill find it gre's to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WEST B3AY. STrIEETr. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to J1ly 5, '83 (l ,'fi,,it O .'t.t U p rr


n


"' I~~i~n7~-z~s~-se~m*1Lb~ ~LO~/~e~ir. C*PMi~Fl~a


L.







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


DRY HOP


YEAST CAKES,


60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


S tOWt-DROP PA TENT F LOUR.



Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 3x Cents per Pound,

A-K=EM:L=rPT 0 IT IcE -",a


No. 3S West Bay Street,
tf


- - Jacksonville, Florida.


Ljaxid .A-genxts, L axild Bulyers aind _lsja dcl Ow-vrers,
And Everyone Interested in Florida Lands
Can be supplied with
TOWNSHIP MAPS
Made from United States Surveys-scale two inches to the mile-with topography complete, for every
township in EAST and SOUTH FLORIDA, delivered, or sent by mail, for 50 cents each.
(Postage Stamps Taken.)
DI1scounit to Dealers.
EX.PILA.NA TIO N CARD sent with every Map, showing vacant lands and where to apply for
them to purchase.
Special VIps of Counties, Cities and towns made to order.
-A.rclitect'a.ral Designs a specialty.
My long connection with the Florida Land and Improvement Company (DISSTON PUR-
CHASE) is a guarantee of satisfactory work. Correspondence solicited.
Address T. T. T". E'VE" ES, Civil Engineer and Draughtsman,
Office with Florida Land and Improvement Co., cor. Pine and Forsyth-Sts.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. oct23tf

ESTABLISHED 1866.

H.GEORGE & 0O.,

General Commission Merchants,
95 SOUTH WATER STREET, CHICAGO.

FLORIDA ORANGES AND VEGETABLES A SPECIALTY
REFER.ENCES:-National Bank of Illinois, First National Bank, Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale
Grocer in CHICAGO.
Stencils furnished by J. C. LANIER,


to apl 8, '83.


Go L. LAWRENCE & CO.,


LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


FOR THE SALE OF


Oranges and all Florida Produce,


234 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK.


QUICK SALES, IIONIEST RETURNS and
3JR1OM.PT TREIIMTTA'IYANCES.


REFER BY PERMISSION TO

Hon. S. B. CONOVER, Tallahassse; D. GREENLEAF, ESQ., Jacksonville;
to jan. 30, '83 p. MESSRS. GOULD & Co., Jacksonville.

F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. HILL,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer,

ANVTVILLE NITIISERIES,
Lake G-eorge, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted tothi climate.

ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3,just out, free on appl ication to apr 17, '83


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


AMIfERICAN PO ULTRY YARD
-AND THE-
POULTitY WORLD,
and on receipt of stamp I will send sample copy to any
address. No one should undertake to RAISE POULTRY
without some good POULTRY PAPER.
R. W. PARREAlMORE,
to feb 12, '83 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


QuE THE outh

FARM MILLS
For Stock Feed or Meal for
Family use.
: Write for Pamphlet.
ISimpson Gault M'fg Co.
Successors to STRAUB MILL Co.
CINCINNATI. 0.


Ilto jan 30, '83.


FOR SALE.
LANDS on the east side of Lake Harris, Sumter
county. We the undersigned offer the property de-
scribed below, situated at and around Esperance, at
great bargains. For further information apply or ad-
dress
W. P. COUPER, )
D. E. LOWELL, Esperance, Fla.
W. N. JACKSON.)
(1.) 90 acres land at Esperance, V mile lake front; first-
class willow-oak pine land; several fine building sites;
good elevation. Price $35 per acre. The above tract can
be bought in lots.
(2.) 80 acres, same location, 30 acres hammock; fine
building site, 80 feet above the lake, with 4 mile lake
front; 10 acres cleared; 500 trees in grove, part bearing.
Price $6,000.
(3.) 40 acres, about 20 acres hammock, full view of the
lake; good land. Price $700.
(4.) 40 acres fine, high land; view of the lake; one
mile from Esperance. Price $600.
(5.) -75 acres, 20 acres cleared and fenced; 600 trees in
grove: pine-apples, etc. Splendid location; 4 mile
lake front; 2 miles from Esperance. There is on the
Slace a comfortable dwelling. with a sufficiency of out-
louses. Price $6,000. Terms easy.
(6.) 40 acres good pine land, mile from Lake Harris;
25 acres fenced; 17 acres set to orange, lemon and lime
trees. Lemons, limes, guavas, pine-apples, bananas,
grapes, &c., in bearing; comfortable house and out build-
ing. Terms to suit an actual settler. Price $3,000.
(7.) 120 acres good pine land, V1 to Y mile from Lake
Harris, in lots to suit purchasers, $20 per acre.
20 acres first-rate pine land, overlooking Lake Harris,
$25 per acre.
(8.) 15 acres on Lake Harris, with lake front, good
view of the lake; nice building site; 3 acres of ham-
mock and two of pine; cleared. Price $500.
(9.) 160 acres, Y to %< mile from Lake Harris, good
pine land, in lots to suit purchasers. Price $10 per acre.
(10.) 80 acres of land beautifully situated, with a'com-
manding view of the lake; 6 or 7 magnificent building
sites; 14 mile lake front; 10 acres splendid hammock,
balance No. 1 pine land, 4 mile from Esperance. Price
$20 per acre.
P. S.-Land will be divided if necessary.
(11.) 80 acres land Y mile from the lake, No. 1 pine
land; handsome location; view of the lake; Y mile
from Esperance. Price $10 to $15 per acre in 5 or 10 acre
lots.
Groves will be set and cared for on above lots at reas-
onable rates. The party making the offer has had sev-
eral years' experience in the management of groves
to feb20-83


ACER'S


Am


~~L~-rr____~ ~1--~-r~ :--I_~-.7.r.-m-- - -IN4-~r~-pCrre~-~._-- -~ ---154


REMOVED.
I have removed my seed store to No. 22 East Bay st.,
next door to post-office, where I have the largest and
most complete stock of pure and fresh Seeds in the State.
S. L. TIBBITTS,
to Dec. 3, '82 Jacksonville, Fla.

THE ARCHER NIUJRSERIES
Grow a general assortment of FRUIT TREES, with
some Ornamental Trees, Shrubbery,
Vines, &c. Our stock of
ORANGE TREES
is good; both Sweet Seedlings and Budded sorts on both
sour and sweet stocks. Some 8,000
LECONTE AND OTHER PEAR TREES,
one and two-year-old-fine.
A large number of JAPAN PLUM TREES, with:a few
hundred of the famous
JAPANESE PERSIMMON
on native stocks, &c.
ORANGE and PEAR GROVES made to order and
cultivated by the year for non-residents.
SEND FOR PRICE LIST to
4 0LIPSEY & CHRISTIE,
to feb 5, '83 Archer, Alachua Co., Florida.


PLYMOUTH ROCKS.
The great demand for these fowls have induced me to
secure the agency of Mr. A. C. HAWKINS for the sale
of his stock, which has no superior. I can sell
FPOWILS OR EGGS,
direct from his enormous establishment, at his prices.
I am also agent for the






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


spa


ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6th, 1882,
Trains will leave'and arrive at Jacksonville as fol-
lows ;
Fast Mail. Daily. Jack'lle Ex. Daily.
Leave- Leave-
Jacksonville at 9:30 a. m. Jacksonville at.. 5:45 p m
Arrive- Arrive-
Jacksonville at.. 5:00 p m Jacksonville at.. 7:30 a m
Callahan at......10:15 a m Jesup at..............11:25 p m
Waycross at........12:05 p m Brunswick at...... 5:34 a m
Live Oak at........ 6:45 p m Macon at...... 7:00 a m
New Branford.. 8:30 p m Thomasville at... 6:50 a m
Savannah at...... 3:40 p m Albany at............11:15 a m
Charleston at..... 9:00 p m Montgomery at.. 8:00 p m
Thomasville at... 6:55 p m New Orleans at... 9:20 a m
Albany at........... 10:30 p m Louisville at......
Montgomery at.. 6.45 a m Cincinnati at...... 7:00 a m
New Orleans at..10:00 p m Chicago at........... 7:00 p m
Nashville at....... 7:00 p m St. Louis at.........7:00 p in
Washington at... 9:40 p m New York at...... 3:50 p min
New York at...... 6:50 p min
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train from
Jacksonville to Cincinnati via Atlanta and Cincinnati
Southern Railroad; to Montgomery via Albany and
Eufaula, and to Chicago via Montgomery and Louis-
ville.
Passengers arriving by this train for Palatka and the
Florida SouthernRailroad, make close con nection with
steamer at the Railroad wharf.
Night Express-Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at..................... ................ ...11:20 p mn
A rrive Jacksonville at.........................................11:05 p m
Arrive Savannah at.......................... 7:00 a in
Arrive Charleston at................... .....................12:30 p min
Arrive W ashington at........................................... 1:00 p in
Arrive New York at............................................. 9:30 p min
A rrive A tlanta at.................................................. 12:10 p in
Arrive Cincinnati at............................. ............... 7:00 p im
Arrive Chicago at.................................................. -
A rrive St. Louis at.... ..........................
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train for Sav-
annah, Charleston and Washington.
Passengers taking the night express can get into the
sleeping cars at 9 o'clock p. m.
A new Restaurant has been opened at Way-,iross, and
abundant time will be allowed for meals by all passen-
ger trains.%
Coincectinig at Savannah vitl t iin for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to.all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 ,Bay-street, and at Depot
Ticket Office. GEO. W. HAINES, Agent.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l F. and P. Ag't. [*]

BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-o-
MERCHANTS AND MINERS TRANS-
PORTATION COMPANY.
SAVANNAH, GA., September 12, 1882.
The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail from BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY
AT 3 P. M.,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE,
EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY,
as follows:
Friday, November 3d, at 12:30 p. inm.
Tuesday, November 7th, at 3 p. m.
Friday, November 10th, at 7 a. m.
Tuesday, November 14th, at 9:30 a. m.
Friday, November 17th, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, November 21st, at 3 p. m.
Friday, November 24th, at 6:30 a. m.
Tuesday, November 28th, at 9 a. m.
Friday, December 1st, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, December 5th, at 2 p. m.
Friday, December 8th, at 3:30 p. m.
Tuesday, December 12th, at 8:30 a. m.
Friday, December 15th, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, December 19th, at 1:30 p. m.
Friday, December 22d, at 3:30 p. m.
Tuesday, December 26th, at 8:30 a: m.
Friday, December 29th, at 10 a. m.
Cabin Passage, $15.00; Second Cabin, fl2.5.; Round
Trip (Cabin), $25.00. The Company reserve the right of
changing the sailing days.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
altimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column n.


JAS. R. WEST & CO. Agents,
114 Bny-m t., savannah, Ga.


A. L. HUGGINS, Agent,
Long Dock, Baltimore, Md.


A N $800 HOUSE, ,0 acres ham mock and pine
OO land, 300 orange trees in grove well
advanced, few bearing. Price $1,000. Rare chance for
new settler.
W. W. DEWHURST,
St. Augustine, Fla.
N. B.-Letters will not be answered unless stamp is
enclosed. to feb 20, '83


nov 13-tf


We ask a trial. STENCIL PLATES FREE.


NO. 49 W. H. PILLOW'S-

C. N. o. & T. P. V RAWBERRY SHIPPING ARGBWY. Y
(Cincinnati Stthrn.) -AND-
SFRUIT AND VEGETABLE REPACK-
ING AND COMMISSION HOUSE,
ASTOR'S BLOCK,
PASSENGERS AND SHIPPERS FOR Packing House at Waycross Wharf, Jacksonville,
THE NORTH AND WEST Florida. may12 '83.

will consult their interests, and secure all needed infor-
matiot, by calling at buy M N\\ .


S NWo. 49 Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


30-tt to nov 30, 83.


L. R. TUTTLE,
Resident Agent.


THE PIONEER NURSERY of FLORIDA.
ONE HUNDRED ACRES IN STOCK.
THE SWEET ORANGE A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue sent free on application. Address
L. A. HARDEE,
to feb 20, '83 Jacksonville, Fla.


DESIRABLE TREES. PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
I can supply, this fall and winter, a limited quantity VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
of the IPeexi-To, or "Flat Peach of China," and the
Chinese HIoney Peach. Also, Le Conte PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
Pear Trees, of medium size, on their own roots,
to dec11 Jacksonville, Fla. TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


$70O


I~I8~~IIPW*II~~


SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA
WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.

kt-M


I


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.
Savannah and Philadelphia.
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for November are appointed to sail as follows :
FROM PHILADELPHIA:
JUNIATA,................................................................................Thursday, November 9th.
JUN IATA ,.......................... ..................................................................................................Saturday, N ovem ber 18th
CITY OF M A CO N ......................................................................................................................Saturday, N ovem ber 25th.
FROM SAVANNAH:
RAPIDAN...................................................... ............. Saturday, November 11th, at 7:00 o'clock a. m .
JUN IA TA .................................................................................................Tuesday, N ovem ber 14th, at 8:00 o'clock p. m .
JU N IATA ................................................................................................ Saturday, N ovem ber 25th, at 7:00 o'clock a. m .
CITY OF M ACON ................................... .................... .........................Saturday, Decem ber 2d, at 11:30 o'clock a. m .
Subject to change without notice.
"*eThe "Rapidan takes no passengers.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.

Ocean Steamship Company.

SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.
SAVANNAH, November, 1882.
The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
TALLAHASSEE, Capt. Fisher, Friday, November 3d, 12:30 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANN AH, Capt. Catharine, Sunday, November 5th, 2:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Capt Kempton, Tuesday, November 7th, 3:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nicxerson, Friday, November 10th, 6:00 a. m.
TALLAHASSEE. Capt. Fisher, Sunday, November 12th, 7.00 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt Catharine, Tuesday, November 14th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Capt. Kempton, Friday, November 17th, 11:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson, Sunday, November 19th, 1:00 p. m.
TALLAHASSE, Capt. Fisher, Tuesday, November 21st, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH. Capt. Catharine, Friday,November 24th, 6:00 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Capt. Kempton, Sunday, November 26th, 7:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson, Tuesday, November 28th, 8:30 a. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Capt. Fisher, Friday, December 1st, 11:00 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
II. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.

Boston and Savannah Steamship Company,

ONLY DIRECT LINE.
Transhipment and extra handling avoided. Cars unloaded at wharf in Savannah. Unsurplased passenger
aKconuiIot t ion s.
The magnificent new Iron Steamships sail from Boston every Thursday at 3 o'clock, and from Central Rail-
roa t Wharf, Savannah, as follows :
Gate City, Capt. Hedge.................................Thursday, November 23d, at 5:00 p. m.
City of Columbus, Capt. Wright........... .....Thursday, November 30th, at 10:00 a. m.
Gate City, Capt. Hedge..... .............. ..... Thursday, December 7th, at 4:00 p. m.
City of Columblis, Capt. Wright .............. .............Thursday, December 14th, at 9:00 a. m.
Gate City, Capt. Hedge.... ....................... .............Thursday, December 21st, at 3:30 p. m.
City of Columbus, Capt. W right.....................................Thursday, December 28th, at 8:30 a. m.
THROUGH FIRST-CLASS CABIN PASSAGE SAME AS TO NEW YORK.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents, Savannah, Ga.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. and W. Ry., Agent, Jacksonville.
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., General Agents, Boston. 44-tf

[ESTABLISHED 1866.]

ROBERTS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

FLORIDA FRUIT AND PRODUCE A SPECIALTY.
226 AND 228 NORTH DELAWARE AVENUE, PIJILADELPHIA, PA.
OUR M3OTTO: Qui(/ck Sales and Prompt Retarns,


Am






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


571


____________ __________________ 5.5


TE IjPTCRIFF ON O ALTA NTGONIER
VIA THE FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY,
I12T E=I"-MEoT OCTOBE1o 1st, 1Q82.


FROM
JACKSONVILLE AND
CALLAHAN JUNCTION :- P
TO |


M acon................................. $61 25 M adison, Ind........ ................. 75'1 50125 0
Augusta.................................. 40 80 70 00 Jeffersonville, Ind................. 751 50 125 00
Atlanta .................................. 40 80 70 00 Evansville, Ind....................... 751 50 125 00
Columbus, Ga....................... 40 80 70 00 Cairo, Ill................................. 75:1 501125 00
Montgomery, Ala ................40 80 70 00 Indianapolis ........................ 80 1 60 130 00
M obile................................ 501 00 87 50 Terre Haute.......................... 80 1 60 130 00
Chattanooga, Tenn............ 1501 001 87 50 Columbus, Ohio............... 801 60 130 00
New Orleans.... ............!60 1 20 105 00 St. Louis........................... 85 1 70 140 00
Nashville, Tenn..................... 0 1 20 105 00 Chicago.................................... 85 1 70 140 00
M em phis, Tenn.......................60 20 105 00 Peoria, Ill................................ 85ll 70 140 00
Louisville, Ky...................... 701 40 11500 Cleveland ................................90 1 80 150 00
Cincinnati, Ohio.................. 70" 4011500 Toledo................................... 90 1 80 150 00
Henderson,Ky...................... 70l 40115 00 Detroit................................... 90 1 80! 150 00
Columbus, Ky............ .... 70 40i115 00 Milwaukee ....................... ...... 90 1 80 150 00
Hickman, Ky.......................... 70,1 401115 00
The dimensions of the Standard Box for Oranges are 12x12x27 inches, and the
weight is estimated at 80 pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds, or 250 Standard Boxes, Excess of this
amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destina-
tion and to one consignee.
Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of
shipments will be an absolute requirement. It is clearly understood between the
shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence Shay be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to
which Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be issued only by the
Agents,of this Company at Jacksonville and Callahan and the Agents of the DeBary
Merchants Line and Baya's Mail Line from St. John's River Landings guaranteeing
rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Linr in good faith to connections at those points
will net be subject to correction by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be
mailed the consigee at destination, and all claims for overcharge or loss and damage
must be presented at destination, accompanied by the original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion
in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill.
TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
FROM
________Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. Per Bbl.
Jacksonville................ ....................... 25 $ 50 35 60
Landings on St. Johns River............. 35 70 40 75
Stations on Florida Transit R. R ...... 45 75 50 80
Tampa and Manatee.......................... 70 1 05 75 1 10
Stations on the J. P. & M. R. R... ....... 40 75 56 85
In Connection with direct Steamers of the Boston and Savannah Steamship Co.
F] ,' Fronm From From i i
J1Fro Ld'!Is on Florida Tampa Froni
J-kson- S.J. ohinsi, Transit alnd F C V
T ville. i River. Hi. R. I11Mnatle.,
TO -



Boston.................................... 50 1 1 2 5 i 21 ) L ,. I

From From From
SFrom IL'd'gs on FloridaI Tampa From
j ackson- St. Johns Transit and IF. C.&W.
ville. River. R. R. Manatee.
TO __..

._.__ -: sA 1 o

Boston via New York.............1i 73 ,1 I o | 13 115 3 s i
N ew Y ork................................... 50 15i ,) 1 i i 1 l 1 i t -1 1 2
Philadelphia......... .......... ..... 5 1 II 1 1 i2 t 5 '1 1 1
Baltim ore ............................ ....... 5, 5 ';5
Providence via New York ......,,, ; :7 ', 7 T1)_, i 7' i 75 5


IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M. T. CO.
FROM SAVANNAH VIA BALTIMORE.
-- ---From-
From Landings From From From
Jackson- on Florida Tampa F. C. & V.
ville. St. Johns Transit and
River. R. R. Mannt TO



Boston......... ................... ...... .. 1 60 i 70 11 j5
Providence .......................... 55 1 : 1 ?) 7 t5 1 70 1 35
W ashington ............................... 60 1 70 i , 0 1 85 1 25
To make rates from Stations on Peninsular Railroad south of Ocala add 5 cents
per box and 10 cents per barrel to rates from stations on Transit Railroad.
Steamship connection from Savan nah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
For Boston every Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
Tuesday and Friday.
To make through rates from points tributary to the above, add the rates for
transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia an.
Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be charged in addition the single package
rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of
the agents of the Line.

AL3L BAIL

8ava uaa, F ria and WesterBn Eailway 0ompaJy,
FORMING WITH ITS CONNECTIONS THE. ONLY FAST MAIL PASSENGER
ROUTE AND THROUGH FREIGHT DISPATCH LINE TO AND FROM
FLORIDA AND SOUTHERN AND SOUTtIWESTERN GEORGIA.


FREIGHT DEPARTMENT.
Movement of Freight in Through Cars, thereby AVOIDING THE RISK OF
TRANSFER to and from all points on the Florida Central and Western Railroad,
Florida Transit Railroad, St. Augustine, and all landings on the St. Johns and
Ocklawaha Rivers, Chattahoochee, Flint and Apalachicola Rivers, and Havana,
Key West, Tampa and Manatee.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars
NO DELAYS. PROMPT ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS.
Between Jacksonville and ,avannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE
AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT BREAKING BULK.
Rates lwv;. : -as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via
Savannah, Floria and Western Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THE ALL-
SRAIL ROUTE.
Days of .nil in, subl.et to change without previous notice. For further informa-
tion, if n-<-.i-, iqpl to10
H. YONGE, Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N River, N. Y.
Gen. W. L. JAMES, Agent, 25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS,
A.t i, Mcrchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H. RING, Agent Boston and
savannah st.-iii.lp Line, 18T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. &
W. Railway, 211 Washington St., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 315 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway,
43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Pier 41
1 South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jo k.-,nville.
F. B. IAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAF. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
D. H. ELLIOTT, General-Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. NHIAINES, Agent S., F. & W. R .ilw:y, .lTk o',le, Fla.


FROM 0
JACKSONVILLE AND -4
CALLAHAN JUNCTION' P
TO Z- a-o


I


_--- -;J


J


-4 _j_


_ I I -- I


---~~arrrrpr.3p~s~~-~jl W~lli~C)RII~C~DD~LTII~IC-L---


F -I







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


I


TO PRINITERS AN I BIINDEIRS.

FOR SALE.
1 Half Medium Universal Printing
P ress.......... ...... .................$300.00
1 Ruling Machine......................... 125.00
Address ASHMEAD BROS.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
JOIN
J. M. STIGEER'S COLONY,
GLENMORE, WARE COUNTY, GA.
40 Hours from New York City; 108 Miles from
Savannah.
Hero we can plant and gather some crops every month
in the year; good water, plenty of grass in the woods for
sheep, cattle and hogs all the year round; very profita-
ble to the owner. Farms of 40 acres each at $1 to $3 per
acre; lumber, $1 per 100 feet, delivered at the depot;
shingles, $4per 1,000; will build a house with 4 rooms, 6
panel doors, 6 windows, cement flue for chimney, well
dug and curbed, for $150, on easy terms. Labor of all
kinds needed at fair wages; board at Mrs. Bainbridge's
from $15 to $20 per month.
We need farmers, truckers, stock and fruit-growers.
One bushel crate of vegetables delivered in New York
City for 50 cents; per barrel, $1, and with quick dispatch.
A number of Northern and Western families now here
are doing well; no stones, no underbrush, no winter,cli-
mate delightful and perfectly healthy all the year round.
Land is not cleared, but near the depot; some cleared
land from $3 to $10 per acre. All kinds of grain, vegeta-
bles, berries, fruit, and stock, do well. Our farmers are
out of debt, some lending money.
Any number of acres, for colonizing or grazing, at $1 to
$3 per acre; 40 acres, with house complete, for $250;
EASY TERMS.
Come and see for yourself, or address
J. M. STIGER,
to jan 9, '83. Glenmore, Ware County, Ga.
COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,

Real Estate Agents,

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Have lands in every county in the Orange Belt, at from
$3 to $100 per acre. Orange groves from $li).0 to $100,000.
Government lands in every part of the Orange Belt.
Can guarantee all of our property.
Strawberry Plants.
We have 200,000 best varieties for sale low.
Orange Trees.


We have 300,000 trees, all ages, fr sale, at from 10 cents L aces, orsteds, DREW & BUCKI, Proprietors.


COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.
Sep. 18, tf.



Commission Merchant,
AND DEALER IN
Florida Oranges and Lemons,
74 WEST BAY STREET.
N. Y. Depot, MAXFIELD & CO., 67 and 69 Park Place; Mag-
azine and Packing House, Waycross R. R. Wharf.
MANUFACTUTrER'S AGENT FOR

THE BANGOR BOX MATERIAL, HOOPS, Etc.
Have a large quantity of Manilla Wrapping
Papers, at Lowest Market rates.
Send in your orders for BOX MATERIAL. Can
ship promptly while freights are light. Have great
difficulty in getting it transported during the busy
sea-son. [to March 25 '83

$20,000 CASH-I
Can be invested to great advantage in the
ROC LEDGIE IhOME GROVE
of 15 acres, 700 bearing trees in the beautiful and noted
ROCK LEDGE HAMMOCK on the great Indian River
with its fish, oysters, green turtle and ducks. I will sell
the grove for
TWO-THIRDS ITS ACTUAL VALUE.
Numbers of visitors say it is the most beaulifutl and de-
sirable property in the State.
Having purchased Jupiter Island, 100 miles south, I
propose to make a specialty of
COCOANUTS, PINE-APPLES,
and the more tender tropical fruits.
C. B. MAGRUDER.
to feb 5' Rock Ledge, Florida.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, - FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '83



0001 00( Choice Cabbage Plants in fine condition for
, 3 shipment. CABBAGE SEED, ONION SEED
of all varieties. New Crop.
"-SEND FOR NEW CATALOGUE.
C. B. ROGERS, Seedsman,
to dec 12, '82 No. 133 Market-st., PHILADELPHIA.

LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR


In lots to suit, in the town of Satsuma, Putnam County,
Florida. Send for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,
JACKSONVILLE,
june 26-tf P]. F- LORI DEA.

R ICH'D H. MARKS'


ORANGE UNTY LAND AGENCY,
SANFORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for

FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y,
BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission.
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf


0-
We respectfully announce to our friends and tire pub-
lic generally, that, having secured the services of com-
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of
DWELLINGS,

COTTAGES,

FACTORIES,

HOTELS

PUBLIC EDIFICES,
etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill, and will continue, as heretofore, to manufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.
DIIEW & B1UCKI,
July 17, '82-tf. Ellaville, Florida.

FOR SALE.
AN IMPROVED PLACE on the south side of Lake
Harris, in Sumter County, Fla., about a mile from Ya-
laha. It contains 225 acres of the finest first-class high
hammock, about 50 acres cleared. There are two bold,
never-failing brooks running through the place, from
which an unlimited supply of water can be had, mak-
ing the raising of vegetables a certainty. The place has
Y mile lake front; the residence is a large, Southern
style house-six large rooms, store-room and kitchen at-
tached ; there are500 old orange trees from 7 to 10 years
old, budded with choice varieties; also, 700 trees from 4
to 6 years old; lime and lemon trees In bearing. There
is on the place, probably, the finest guava grove in
South Florida. The estimated yield in 1881 was 500 bush-
els. This property is one of the most valuable and in-
viting tracts of land in this State. The quality of the
soil, besides growing orange trees, will make it, with the
advantages of irrigation, and remarkable protection
from frost peculiarly profitable for vegetable growing.
It can be divie divided into 3 tracts sufficiently large for every
purpose. Daily communication at Yalaha by mail boat
connecting with St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railway.
Only the non-residence of the owner induces its sale.
Price, $15,000. Terms easy. Address
W. N. JACKSON,
to feb20-83 Esperance, Fla.


ICI ---I -~- --- -~ ~----- -I~- I


-- ---- C~- --- 119_ L--- -~ .Ir~-r-iSrLYr-r-n-; Wj


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,

Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.

GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR *
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson'8s Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Iifartinez and Longman'8
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel
to mar 25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
D. G. AMBLER. J.. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON,
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as
AMBLER'S BANK.
RANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
T Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf

0. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,


ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
to April 23, '83

ELLIS & McCLLURE,


Archltects iml C l ERnIROBfSr

Plans, Specifications and Estimates for Buildings of
all kinds. Water Supply, Drainage, Sewerage, Bridges'
Roofs, Etc. P. O. Box 784. Room No. 12 Palmetto Block,
Bay Street. to Feb. 7, 83

IF TOD W T

An Orange Grove or Orange Lands, in a healthy, beauti-
ful country,

Entirely Free froln Frost,

where you have the finest

FISHING,
OYSTERS,
SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME
of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a new country. Address me with stamp,
at Anclote, Hillsborough Couhty, Florida.
I can sell you five acres, or five thousand acres, as you
desire.
to aug 20, '83 IM. i. MARII S.
THE SUWANNEE


lITEAI SAW & bPLANIN MILL ,
ELLIAVILLE, FLORIDA,


-- c--- 4, ,146L-


I






THE F LO RIDA DISPATCH


CAN MAKE MONEY BY USING

FORRESTER'S CHEMICAL MANURES,
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR

Vegetables,. Orange Trees
AND ALL

BY --

GEO. B. FORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York.
-O--
THESE MANURES ARE PREPARED FROM CONCENTRATED CHEMICALS; ARE FREE FROM ODOR;
Do not Breed Vermin or Insects in the Soil.
They have been used on FLORIDA LANDS for Years, and produce Wonderful Results.
For sale by

Sanford, Orange County, Florida.
44-Send for circular. (to mar. 3, '83)p

JOHN O. 1OORE & CO.0

FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
,AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS

188 WEST SIXTH STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO.
REFERENCES: Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale Grocer in CINCINNATI.
STENCILS FURNISHED BY T. C. LiA.lTI3E 1,
to apl 8, '83. LEESBURG, FLORIDA.
FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
9 AND GEN'L COMMISSION MERCHANTS
WNO. 41 SOUTH DELAWARE STREET,
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANNA.
REFERENCES:
INGRAM FLETCHER, of FLETCHER & SHARPE, Bankers, and Meridian National Bank.
U Stencils Furnished on Application. <
oct-16,tf


DISSTON PURCHASE-4-4,000,000 ACRES!


THE FLORIDA


LAND AND IMPROVEMENT

COMPANY

Offer from October 1, 1882, till May 1, 1883,

ALL THEIR LANDS

At Government Price of $1.25 per Acre

IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES.
These lands include all varieties of upland and lowland, and are adapted to Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Pine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar-Cane, Early Vegetables, etc., and are chiefly in the counties of


St.Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Orange, Sumter, Levy, Hernando, Hillsborough,
Polk, Manatee and Monroe.
The following are reserved and for sale at graded prices:
"Gulf Coast Reserve," 268,000 acres, M. R. MARKS, Agent, Anclote, Fla.
"Timber Reserve," 100,000 acres, comprising choice tracts of Pine and Cypress, chiefly in St. Johns and
Volusia Counties. Address
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT CO.,
to mar 24 '83 Jacksonville, Fla.
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

J. A. SABNES d CnO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
SouthLer2 Ir'uit ancd. Vegetables a Specialty-.
3~O6 and 312 North .Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83


5'73


FINE POULTRY.

SEVEN BREEDING PENS OF THE FOLLOWING
BREEDS:
Two yards PLYMOUTH ROCKS, two yards each of
WHITE and BROWN LEGHORN,
and one yard of GEORGIA
WHIIITE GAME.
We are booking
orders now for EGGS, and
guarantee fifty per cent. better results
than from Eggs received from the North. Send for cir-
cular. R. W. PARRAMORE, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. C. BIRD, Monticello, Fla. tojan15-'83

S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACOKSON VILLE, F.LA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

Harlgwaro, 8toaes, Doors, 8asli, Blils
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIPE.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam G4 -.A-Fittiuy, Ph/nbi/gy 4- Tin'"lithing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & O0.S GARDEN TOOLS.
4@p- Send for Price List and Catalogue, -6
to june 11 '83
-
Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrit-f a ...i.'.if Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold luiriv..r ',t of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer chnanoeol coe in shore,
and over five miles of water 'orotectieon to /.,'i /',rh,'". gi'v-
ing perfect security against)frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, i.2,:-.
Also, two desirable city ]eos .>x'.g' feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600 each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to
.. H1. NO rON,,
No. I W-t Bay Street, JA.'KO(,NV ILLI,4.
State that you sw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf

ZAsttentio= so= altry 2vEe=.
DR. R. BACHMANN'S 1 mrin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin .on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs; all
other domestic animals are benefitted by its use. This
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
It is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONE DOL-
LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to the proprietor.
H. BACHMANN, M. D.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., 36 Bay Street.
aug. 21 to feb. 21. '83.


to Jan 9, 83


~Od aI9Y~FrI~ ~o2 C ~


The agent of the Royal Mail Line to the Nether-
lands," and of the "Florio Italian Line," in Jackson-
ville, offers his services to reliable parties in seaichi oj
competent labor for their
Groves or Gardens,
to try to induce people from
Northern and Stt southern Europe
to come to Florida.
45oCorrespondence solicited.
C. II. VANiDER LINDEN,
Care Florida Land and Imp't Co.,
sept 4, '82, if. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


- I - -I DIILIIL-- ~_ I I I--- Lsd(~P4~1~L~IICI~I~-~RLII~aP*I~C* ~ ~DYrlUL~W~YL-V-^--~-91 I~--.~-- ---


- -- --`-


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- ---~ -- - -- ---. - -- r*s~ I P. 11111 llll~l~s~e- --Y ---~LIL__~-~_ I L---I~I~L I I --- __ C~ l~sll


PPI


wish,


MEW







74- THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


MAX BLOOMFIELD,
to aprlo-'83 St.. Augustine, Fla.
C(110ICE ORANGE LAN'DS in Hernando County, ly-
ing near surveys of railroads, can be bought at five dol-
lars per acre from W. B. CLARKSON, Jacksonville, Fla.
Send for descriptions. oct9-tf
LAW BLANKS.-A full line for Justices of the Peace,
Circuit Courts, etc. Deeds, Mortgages, etc., are printed
and published by ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla.,
Write for a catalogue. tf
TO ADVERTISERS.-Large circulation: For the
next two months THE FLORIDA DISPATCH will is-
sue from 8,000 to 10,000 copies every week ; about 40,000
a month.
Merchants and others should take advantage of this
and advertise liberally.
For advertising rates see editorial oai ,. tf
ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange wraps from
ASIIMEAD BlO.., Jacksonville, Fla. For prices see
ani ilcr ti.e .O,.O Ii. _tf

Orange Trees
-AND-
LAND NEAR JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN.
(oir, lots for Residence, Gardens, etc.
Grove.s built (iol ort il for and improvements made for
non-residents, by J. S. BELL,
Real Estate Agent and Notary Public,
to nov 5, '83. Reed's Block, Bay-st., Jacksonville, Fla.

GjET RIH Cselling our Rubber Stamps and Music.
* u 'n-Isn i pes free. L. P. Bissell & Co., Cleveland, O.
to nua yi-', s
Established 1840."
THE CELEBRATED


"BRADFORD",
PORTABLE MILL.
CORN, WHEAT & FEED,
FLOUR MILL MACHINERY.
Send for descriptive Circu-
*lar. Address plainly
THOS.BRADFORD & CO.
1174,176,178 W. Second St,
CINOINNATI2O.


eow-6t. to jan. 8. '83.


Lands in Middle and South Florida,

-ON THIE--
TRANSIT,
FLORIDA SOUTHERN
and SOUTH FLORIDA
RAIL ROADS.
iLands tor Orange Groves,
1L-ands for Truel-o Goarcdening.
At fair Prices and on Reasonable Time.
We also offer
Fizie SBuilding Sites
IN THE FLOURISHING TOWN OF SANFORD.

Sanford is rapidly Growing, and we have some
VERY CHOICE LOTS on
the Market.

Sanford has Churches, Schools, Railroads,
Car-shops, Telegraph, Telephone, Water
Works and all the advantages of an
ENETE' G-ETIC CI'- -.
For full particulars, address
JAMES E. INGRAHAM, Gen. Agt.,
Sanford, Orange Co., Fla.
In rngardl Lands in Middle Florida, address
JOHN E. LA.\ BETH, Local Agent,
neov20-tf Gainesville, Fla.


3,000


4


PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATION ERS
PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN
3B0 0 n rA I2D 2WT13 1A XETIQL^OS.


We have the most complete Book Bindery in the State. Can Rule, Number or Page and Perforate any job sent us.
Blanks and Blank Books manufactured to order for Railroads, Steamboats, Hotels, Banks
and Corporations. The ruling of difficult jobs a speciality.
WE PUBLISH
"KD L DISMPATOMI
A 20-page Weekly Agricultural Journal, at only $1.00 per year,
Devoted to Southern Agriculture, Fruit Growing, Market Gardening, etc.
This paper has the largest circulation of any published in Florida. Specimen copies free. Write for a copy.


Itis generally conceded we do the Finest Job Printing in the State. We have all the modern machinery and all
new type. Can print the smallest Visiting Card to the largest size Poster.
Printing of Pamphlets a specialty. Prices on application.


FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by
AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely II- A. T. Garey, (cloth)..........................Price 1 25
lustrated) ......... ................................Price $1 50 A MANUAL of GARDENING in FLORIDA
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE (Whitner).... .................................. Price 50
AND HISTORY (Lanier).............................Price 1 50 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA......................Price 75
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper Price 10 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-
F \AIIBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA........Price 2 50 the best)... ..... .................................Price 1 25
GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE...........................Price 25 NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST.
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE JOHN'S RIVER..........................................Price 25
BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL...............Price 75 McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMER- OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra)..Price 6 00
ICA .......... .............................. Price 25 INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SU-
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition) PREME COURT OF FLORIDA................Price 3 00
enlarged and improved...............................Price 50 NOTES FROM SUNLAND ON THE MAN-
i ;" :>ES ORANGE CULTURE (new edi- ATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OF SOUTH
tion, enlarged and improved) ...................Price 1 00 FLORIDA. Its Climate, Soil, and Pro-
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead,..Price 1 00 ductions, (By Samuel C. Upham)...............Paper .25
HISTORY OF ST. AUGUSTINE-Dewhurstl............ 1.25 FLORIDA AS A PERMANENT HOME,.......Price .10
GUIDE TO ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA-Bloomfield..................................... ........................................ 50
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
T7"IE"W7=S 0OF1 0PLO I"=D-A.4
(Sent by mail, postage fred, on receipt of price.)
In Book Form, Containing 1 Views Eatch.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)............................. ... 25c Souvenir of Jacksonville, (large size)..... ... .... ..... 50c
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small Souvenir of St. Augustine, (large size)....... ..... 50c
size)............................................................................ 25c Stereoscopic V iew s, per doz..... ............................... 1 00

10,000 copies of which have just been issued by us, consisting of twenty imperial size colored views in a hand-.
some cloth case, illustrating the different sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever published in Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00. Every one
interested in Florida should have a copy.

WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen......................Price 50 1 MORTGAGES, per dozen................................... Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen...............Price 50 NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order.Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers, Justices of the Peace, Circuit Courts, etc. Price-list
mailed on application.
RUBBER STA M PS .
Are manufactured right in our establishment, in the best manner, and at short notice.


CHRISTMAS GOODS
A SPECIALTY,
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S CARDS IN GREAT VARIETY.
We carry the largest stock in our line south of Baltimore.
Orders by mail solicited and promptly attended to.
Anything we send out, if notsatisfactory, we will take back and refund the money.


Address


OOAMG W&APS.
[Full count-480 sheets to the ream.}

10x10l-11xll--12x12
14 c. pr rm. 17 c. pr rm. 19 c. pr rm.
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,-
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


BA R R E LS P.OTATO ES


NUN"-


,r


I


LOCAL AD VERTISEMENTS.

BABIES. BABIES. BABIES.
You can get them Photographed perfectly at BUR-
GERT'S New Gallery. JHe takes them as quick as light-
ning. 79}2 W. TBhy-st. to dec -1.
FLORIDA BREEZES, by Mrs. Ellen Call Long, of
Florida, will soon be published by ASHMEAD BROS.,
and will have a large sale. Advance orders solicited.
PLYMOUTHn ROCKS AND BRiOWN LEGHORNS.-A few
trios for sale. T. GRAHAM ASHMEAD,
to deo5-'82 Williamson, Wayne Co., N. Y.
FLORIDA ILLUSTRATED.-10,0C0 copies of which
have just been issued by us, consists of 20 imperial size
colored views in a handsome cloth case, illustrating the
ditfre.t sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever pub-
lished on Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00.
-very one interested in Florida should have a copy.
Address, ASHMEAD BROS..
tf Jacksonville, Fla.
,tLOIMFIELD'S ILLUSTRATED HISTORICAL
GUIDE OF ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA, with
eap, for tourists, invalids and immigrants. For sale
by all booksellers and newsdealers in the State, or sent
to any address for .50 cents by


I


CHOICgE MLIGIiAN HARLY ROSE, F03 SEED AND TABLE USER,
To arrive during NOVEMBER and DECEMBEIR. Also general stock of tSELECT SEEDS for Gardeners, and
SPECIAL FERI ILLZER.s for POTATO ES ANI) CABBAGES.
FIFTY TONS TOBACCO STEMS.
These stems are claimed by WESTERN (TGARDENERS to be a sure sp'-. 'ii for the INSECTS that destroy Cab-
bage. Full stock
BONE IDEAL, COT''ON-EEI)> MiE .I, -IHULL ASH, ETC.
J. E. HART,
tojan 6, 'S3 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS.,
21 WEST PAY STREET, JAC-SONI ( LLVE, FLA.,